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AUTUMN/WINTER 2020

FINTONA FILE THE BI-ANNUAL MAGAZINE OF FINTONA GIRLS’ SCHOOL


Important Dates for 2020

Contents

Events in Semester 2 will be subject to change based on the latest health advice.

PAGE 1 From the Principal

PAGES 14-15 Our Community

PAGES 2-3 VCE Results

PAGES 16-17 Meet our Teachers Amy Miers Jacqui Pugh

PAGES 4-5 Fintona from Home PAGE 6 Early Learning Centre PAGE 7 Junior School PAGE 8 Middle School PAGE 9 Senior School

PAGES 18-19 Beyond the Classroom PAGES 20-27 OFA Deaths, Obituaries, News of Old Fintonians Reunions PAGE 28 Beyond Science Centre Update

PAGE 10-11 Meet our Consuls

JULY

OCTOBER

Tuesday 14 Term 3 commences for students

Monday 5 Term 4 Commences

Thursday 16 Year 11 (2021) VCE Information Evening

Tuesday 6 VCE Music Concert

Tuesday 21 Year 9 and 10 (2021) Information Evening Friday 24 Dads’ Beef and Burgundy Night Monday 27 Friday 31 - ELC Student Learning Conferences Monday 27 Year 8 Rowing Information Evening Wednesday 29 VTAC Information Night AUGUST Wednesday 6 Year 9-12 Student Learning Conferences

PAGE 12 Young Achievers

Monday 17 Friday 21 ELC Exhibition Week Thursday 20 Year 10, 11 and 12 Careers Evening

PAGE 13 Year 9 Connections

Friday 21 Friends of Rowing Trivia Night Tuesday 25 Annual Music Concert SEPTEMBER Tuesday 1 - Friday 4 ELC/VCE Art and Design Show Tuesday 1 - Friday 4 ELC Father’s Day Breakfast Tuesday 1 Middle School Father’s Day Breakfast

Fintona File Autumn/Winter 2020 Number 77 Published by Fintona Girls’ School 79 Balwyn Road, Balwyn Victoria, Australia 3103 CRICOS 00139C

Editor Cameron Arnold OFA Editor Kate McPhee Cover Front Cover: Maggie (Year 5) with her remote learning companion

Contributors Thank you to Fintona staff, students, parents and OFA members for their articles, news stories and photos. Photography James Byron and contributors

P: +613 9830 1388 F: +613 9888 5682 Design Back Cover: E: fgs@fintona.vic.edu.au Self portrait oil on canvas JWB&CO www.fintona.vic.edu.au This document has been to Year international environmental byproduced Yoria Shi, 11 Print

management standard ISO14001 by a certified green printing company.

Ellikon

This document has been produced to international environmental management standard ISO14001 by a certified green printing company.

Thursday 3 Junior School Father’s Day Breakfast Friday 11 Term 3 Concludes

Thursday 8 VCE Art and Design Show Sunday 18 Friends of Rowing Season Launch Thursday 22 Valedictory Evening NOVEMBER Monday 2 - Tuesday 3 Mid Term/Melbourne Cup Holiday Monday 9 Year 7 (2021) Information Evening Friday 13 Middle School Orientation Day Friday 20 ELC 2021 Orientation Day Wednesday 25 Year 4 Exhibition Night Friday 27 Junior School Orientation Day DECEMBER Thursday 3 Year 12 Dinner Thursday 3 Junior School Presentation Evening Tuesday 8 Final Day for Students TOUR DATES 9.30am to 11.00am Thursday 20 August Wednesday 21 October For more information on our upcoming tours, visit our website or contact the Registrar on 9830 1388.


From the Principal

Who knew what 2020 had in store for us? As we prepared to return to School following the Christmas / New Year holiday period, following fires that raged through the eastern states of Australia, news of COVID-19 was starting to fill the airwaves. Before day one of the new school year, restrictions were in place for staff and students returning if they, or anyone in their family, had been in Hubei Province in China. These restrictions were soon expanded to incorporate many other countries, and so we began to support those who were self-isolating at home. While working to maintain the familiar routines of school – regular program of classes, sport, performance, excursions, camps, co-curricular and extra-curricular activities, beyond the gates it was clear that things would be far from that very soon. Behind the scenes, teachers were exploring new platforms and tools that would facilitate teaching and support the learning, resourcing and communication needs of our students in a remote learning environment. We began re-imagining our programs and activities in preparation for a GREAT THINGS COME FROM A SMALL PACKAGE

move to a remote setting, and by Week 7, we were communicating with our parents that it was not “if” but “when” we would be in a remote learning environment. On Monday 23 March, for the last week of Term 1, our programs were transformed as we moved to remote learning and never looked back! The girls learnt that they could navigate a new online platform with ease and use it to positive effect as they continued to actively engage in their learning. They relished the opportunity to participate in the changed programs including PE@ Home for our Junior School students and the Passion Projects for our Middle School students. Girls found ways to continue a number of lunchtime clubs online, and learnt to find different ways to be active and mindful each day. Teachers found many new successful tools to add to their teaching and delivery repertoire; including new ways to share, interact, assess and report with students, and students with each other, such as in breakout rooms. As a School we reinvented the Senior Campus House Cross Country to ensure it was not an event missed despite everyone being at home; our General Staff and members of the Leadership Team became ‘posties’, as we delivered learning packs and resources to families, as well as wellbeing packs to all our teachers working from home; weekly family challenges and

our Friday community assembly meant we could stay connected in different ways each week; a range of co-curricular events including public speaking, debating and our Leadership Seminar series continued, with everyone ‘Zooming’ in from home; and we hosted our first Student Learning Conferences remotely through MS Teams. Parents were suddenly on the front line of learning and perhaps for the first time, were privy to the rich learning, instruction and conversation that takes place every day in every class and activity at Fintona. For the youngest members of our community, parents also became significant facilitators in the learning process, working closely with the resources available on inFintona and their child’s teachers each day. Despite the many challenges, our girls and ELC boys, our staff, our parents, in fact our whole community rose to the occasion, continuing to do what they do well. We are living history and should look back with enormous pride on the agility with which we responded to the changes, the resilience shown in the face of uncertain and challenging times, and the achievements as individuals and a collective as we navigated our new working and learning environments. Age Quod Agis Rachael Falloon

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SCORE

99+

99.4

2019 VCE Results

FINTONA /

STATE

CLASS OF 201 COURSE DES

Fintona 2019 Dux, Erin Kontaxis who achieved an ATAR of 99.4

We congratulate the Class of 2019 for their excellent academic achievements. A Median ATAR of 91.3 and a ten year Median ATAR of 94 reflects Fintona Girls’ School’s continuing academic excellence and confirms its place as one of Australia’s leading girls’ schools. We especially congratulate the Fintona 2019 Dux, Erin Kontaxis who achieved an ATAR of 99.4. The Class of 2019 is commended for doing what they do well and making so many contributions to the School community and beyond. Principal, Rachael Falloon said, “Our girls have

once again led with distinction, balancing their full engagement in sport, music, performance and a myriad of other co-curricular pursuits with their academic studies to great success.” Our VCE success would not be possible without the dedication and guidance of our expert staff who have supported our students throughout their time at Fintona. We wish all our girls the very best as they embark on their tertiary studies and explore their career paths, continuing to do what they do well. Age Quod Agis.

OUR GIRLS HAVE ONCE AGAIN LED WITH DISTINCTION, BALANCING THEIR FULL ENGAGEMENT IN SPORT, MUSIC, PERFORMANCE AND A MYRIAD OF OTHER CO-CURRICULAR PURSUITS WITH THEIR ACADEMIC STUDIES TO GREAT SUCCESS.

2019 VCE HIGHLIGHTS AT A GLANCE Median ATAR

99+ 95+

90+ 2

91.3

Median ATAR over 10 years

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94

9% of students achieved an ATAR of 99+ placing them in the top 1% of the State

30% of students

achieved an ATAR of 95+ placing them in the top 5% of the State

51% of students

achieved an ATAR of 90+ placing them in the top 10% of the State

There were

2 perfect study scores of

50 achieved FINTONA FILE | AUTUMN/WINTER 2020


+

4

97+

FINTONA /

STATE

95+

90+

7%

2019 ATAR COMPARISON CHART

2019 ATAR COMPARISON CHART The following table is a comparison between CLASS

50

40

20

20

10

10

9%

ATAR SCORE

0 ATAR SCORE

Health sciences

9%

FINTONA /

STATE

Architecture/ Design

21%

7%

%8%

5% 95+

397+

Engineering

6%

97+

10%

10%

95+

90+11%

90+2%

2

11%

7%

INTERSTATE

7%

Communications

2%

2%

INTERSTATE

Fine Arts

2%

Science

9%

A SMALL PACKAGE

CLASS OF 2019 TERTIARY COURSE DESTINATIONS

3%

%

Education

2%

3%

Commerce/ Business

Communications

Fine Arts

% 7 9% Arts

2%

Commerce/ Business

6%

2% 9%

CLASS OF 2019 TERTIARY COURSE DESTINATIONS

7%

2%

Engineering

Education Health sciences

STATE

21%

2%

9%

5%

Law

29

7

Arts

3%

Architecture/ Design

29% %

%

30

1%

99+

FINTONA /

%

%

9% 1%99+

43

51%

30%

X%

Law

8% 0

X

%

TERTIARY INSTITUTION

43%%

51

21%

30

30

9%

Medicine/ Biomedicine

Medicine/ Biomedicine

21%40

Science

CLASS OF 2019 BY INTERSTATE CLASS OF 2019 BY TERTIARY INSTITUTION

INTERSTATE

FINTONA’S ATARs and those of VICTORIA The following table 2019 is a comparison between as a 2019 whole.ATARs and those of VICTORIA FINTONA’S OF TERTIARY as 2019 a whole.

19 TERTIARY COURSE DESTINATIONS STINATIONS Science 50 9%

7%

23

OUTSTANDING RESULTS

Architecture/ Design

21%

23

OUTSTANDING RESULTS

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Medicine/ Biomedicine

Science

9%

21%

Architecture/ Design

21%

Arts

9%

Medicine/ Biomedicine

21%

Arts

Law

8%

Commerce/ Business

11%

Engineering Health sciences

Law

6%

9%

Education

Communications

2%

8%

2% Fine Arts

2%

Engineering Health sciences GREAT THINGS COME FROM A SMALL PACKAGE

9%

9%

6%

Education

Commerce/ Business

11%

Communications OUTSTANDING RESULTS

2%

2% Fine Arts

2%

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OUTSTANDING 3 RESULTS

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Fintona From Home 2020

will be remembered as a unique time in the history of our world and in the archives of Fintona. This has been a school term unlike any other in our lifetime. Despite the many challenges of learning and teaching remotely, our community has remained connected. We have seen students and staff rise above obstacles to continue doing what they do well in a new environment. As a community, we have been active with Mr Bourke, practiced wellbeing habits with Ms Laville, baked cupcakes,

had crazy hair days, brightened footpaths with chalk, participated in a virtual cross country and so much more, all while maintaining the highest possible standards of education in virtual classrooms. We may not look back on everything fondly, but we are confident that the resilience and new skills developed through this time will be valuable additions to the lives of students and teachers at Fintona for years to come.

1. Belle (Year 3) celebrated her birthday online with her classmates 2. Isla (Year 1) continued her music lessons online

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2 3. Lexi, Bella, Nati, and Button the Cat ready for Virtual Cross Country 4. Remote learning packs being prepared for delivery 5. Ms Hyde and Mrs Crozier connecting with their students in remote learning

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FINTONA FILE | AUTUMN/WINTER 2020


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6

6. Ms Heath continues her flute lessons online 7. Ms Harris’ cat enjoying remote learning 8. Emily (Year 1) practised her literacy skills every day

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9. Julia (Year 6) during remote learning 10. Freya (Year 12) showed her Clarke House spirit during Virtual Cross Country

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ELC

Reimagining Community

Throughout Term 2, the ELC was a hub of excitement with children very busy learning in both onsite and remote environments. A key component of the national Early Years Learning Framework is that children need to feel a sense of Belonging in all aspects of their life. Belonging acknowledges children’s interdependence with others and the foundation of relationships in defining identities. Children need to feel welcome, connected and included. During these unprecedented times, it was a priority for us maintain this sense of belonging, and continuity of learning for all ELC children.

Our program this term has been flexible and evolving, to ensure that all children continue to maintain important relationships, grow in their understandings, and are supported in all areas of interest and development. The Primary Years Program (PYP) curriculum this term has seen the children learning all about animals, their important role in our environment, as well as our responsibility to all living things. Investigations into worms, insects, whales, Australian animals and domestic pets have been vehicles for this PYP Unit of Inquiry to be explored. This 6

unit has crossed from the classrooms into the playgrounds, into children’s homes, and virtually over Zoom as the unit has progressed and children’s ideas and thinking have been developed. The children also contributed to our community project, where our provocation this year was the ‘Rainbow’. The rainbow is sign of positivity, hope and togetherness and the teachers saw this as a project that would include and connect all children. The children all created their own rainbow which became part of a larger piece which sits on the ELC fence facing Balwyn Road. This collaboration is a tangible connection between the children learning inside the ELC and those learning from home. It is also a symbol of how the children are connected to Fintona and to each other, and a representation of the importance in cultivating and maintaining each child’s sense of Belonging. Cara Mearns Head of Early Learning Centre

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3 1. Alice closely studying a spider 2. Teddy visiting the Rainbow Project whilst in remote learning 3. Pre-Preps enjoying the autumn leaves in the Junior School Playground 4. Shae completing a rainbow inspired artwork

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FINTONA FILE | AUTUMN/WINTER 2020


Junior School

Open-minded, Courageous, Reflective & Balanced

The

International Baccalaureate promotes the attributes of the learner as being open-minded, courageous, reflective and balanced, among many other characteristics. The girls in the Junior School certainly demonstrated this in their approach to their remote learning experiences. As a Primary Years Program (PYP) School, we encourage the girls to be inquirers, to reflect on their understandings and to be principled in their conduct. The success of the girls’ remote learning experience was due to their resilience,

determination, hard work, and support from their parents and teachers. Life was different. They did not have their friends to play with; but they could connect through Zoom. They did not have a library to visit and immerse themselves in reading; but they had new reading materials, learning packs and online programs. They did not have their usual lessons, in some cases, such as Physical Education on the

oval or basketball court; but they had PE@Home. The girls embraced these new and varied opportunities with positivity and participated with gusto. They worked hard in PE@Home to get House Points, they uploaded their work onto Teams, they sent in photos of their learning, and shared special occasions such as Crazy Hair Day, Mother’s Day and items related to their Units of Inquiry. Well done to our Junior School community for your resilience, hard work, care for each other and positive attitude throughout remote learning. Eleni Goulas Head of Junior School

2 1. Teachers brighten remote learning with Crazy Hair Day 2. Maya (Year 1) loves taking part in yoga 3. Madeleine (Year 3) remote learning on campus

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4. Lillian (Year 4) raised the bar on Crazy Hair Day

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Middle School

New Passion Projects for Lifelong Learning

As

Term 2 resumed, it was clear that we were going to be in this new mode of learning for some time, so we initiated important changes to the Remote Learning program, including more time off screens. One change for the Middle School was the implementation of Passion Projects. Passion Projects was developed to support and encourage lifelong learning, engagement and skill development while the girls were in remote learning. It was a Middle School program run through Microsoft Teams for one or two afternoons a week. The girls chose from a list of projects and with a mentor teacher had time to plan, research and produce a product or develop a new skill. The girls also selected a minor project such as cooking, craft, knitting or sustainability. The groups contained students from different classes and year levels.

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2 1. Angelina (Year 8) Passion Project board game 2. Aahana (Year 5) Passion Project cooking

The first iteration of the projects went for five weeks. Projects included debating, novel writing, public speaking, writing or illustrating a children’s book, making a board game and making a documentary video, app or podcast. Year 7 and 8 students had the additional option of pitching their own project or being part of the Middle School newspaper editorial or design team. The feedback from the parents and students in the fortnightly survey was very positive. Girls reported that this was a highlight of their Remote Learning experience.

3. Evelyn (Year 5) Passion Project Cooking 4. Illustration by Emma (Year 5)

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Jacqui Pugh Head of Middle School 8

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FINTONA FILE | AUTUMN/WINTER 2020


Senior School

Dynamic Leadership: Leading in a Pandemic

“I learnt the importance of taking up offers and to try something new. I also learnt that three elements depict a strong leader: being adaptive to change, resilience and setting goals to remain on the ‘cutting edge‘.” Alice Whitbourn, Year 9

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Remote

Learning and the COVID-19 Pandemic didn’t hold back the Senior School Leadership Development Series this term. Building on the workshop with Old Fintonian and former MP, Andrea Coote, approximately 50 students and staff were treated to a leadership masterclass led by another Old Fintonian, Georgina Williams and current Fintona parent, Dr Maryza Graham. The topic for this workshop, set months ago, was Dynamic Leadership and the two workshop presenters were able to speak on this topic in the context of their leadership journey and their current coronavirus leadership life. The leadership development workshops aim to expose students to the leadership journeys – trials, tribulations and victories – in a ‘warts and all manner’. The girls were treated to advice around: • • • • • •

As a timely and amazing addition, Dr Graham was able to discuss COVID-19 testing and speak about her new role as part of the team at The Doherty Institute working on the response to the pandemic at a State and Federal level.

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Should any female leaders in our community wish to be a part of the Leadership Development Series, please be in contact with Sarah Carter, Deputy Principal / Head of Senior School at scarter@fintona.vic.edu.au. Sarah Carter Deputy Principal / Head of Senior School

3 1. Georgina Williams (Barnard ’88) 2. Dr Maryza Graham 3. L - R: Rachael Falloon, Principal, Yasmin, Year 9, Andrea Coote (Scroble ‘69)

Gaining confidence to face new challenges; Team work to find and succeed with passion; Dynamic personality traits; Resilience and the ability to adapt; Setting goals; and Striving for challenges.

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Q&A Meet our Consuls 2020

HANNAH, YOU’VE ALREADY BEGUN YOUR SCHOOL CONSUL DUTIES, WHAT DO YOU THINK IS THE BEST PART ABOUT YOUR ROLE?

Something that I have loved thus far about being School Consul are the opportunities you have to connect with different people associated with the School, who you otherwise might not get to know. Whether it be teachers and Heads of School we work alongside, younger students who would be too shy to approach a Year 12 under other circumstances, or those in the wider Fintona community, it’s incredibly valuable. Connecting in this way allows us to shape our actions to inspire and lead different demographics, rather than just our peers. WHAT NEW OPPORTUNITIES HAVE YOU FOUND TO BE A LEADER DURING THE CURRENT PANDEMIC?

Recently, our focus has been on encouraging students to stay connected and positive. During the weekly live streams, we have read out the Fintona birthdays from home as we usually would do in assembly. We have also used social media as a tool during this time, and took over the Fintona Instagram for a day to touch base with everyone while sharing 10

some tips for surviving isolation. Additionally, we felt it was important to acknowledge our teachers, who have been such great role models for us in adjusting to online school, and have gone above and beyond to ensure our learning wasn’t too effected. To thank them, we wrote an open letter on behalf of the girls expressing our gratitude. WHAT HAS A FINTONA EDUCATION GIVEN YOU?

Something that Fintona has instilled in me over the years is the importance of giving back in your community and to charities. Since Year 7, we have had many opportunities to do so, and are constantly reminded of how lucky we are to receive a great education and live in a country as safe as Australia. I remember my Year 9 Connections placement, at Bulleen Heights School for children with autism, which resonated with me. Each year we have also chosen charities that we feel are deserving, and the school has held many fundraisers to support these causes. WHO DO YOU CONSIDER TO BE A GREAT LEADER AND WHY?

and businesswoman, has been an instrumental ambassador for the AFLW. She is a trailblazer in calling for equal respect and a pathway for women in football, and campaigns widely for gender equality. Alberti’s ability to turn personal tragedy to something positive is an incredible quality in a leader, which was seen when she used her daughter’s tragic death, as motivation to donate profusely to medical research. WHAT ARE YOUR FUTURE ASPIRATIONS?

After school, I hope to pursue a career as a solicitor. Justice and the law has always been something incredibly interesting to me, and completing 3/4 Legal Studies last year confirmed this. I hope to make a difference, perhaps working for the Office of Public Prosecutions. Alongside this, I have a desire to complete pro bono work in order to increase access to the legal system for those unable to afford it. Throughout Uni and my career, I hope to also travel with my friends and family. At the moment, Greece and Africa are at the top of my list!

Susan Alberti, an Australian philanthropist FINTONA FILE | AUTUMN/WINTER 2019


The School Consuls for 2020 are Hannah Jacobs and Nicole Phanivong. Hannah has been at Fintona since Year 7 and Nicole since 3 Year Old Kindergarten. Through their responses, you will learn a little about Hannah and Nicole’s aspirations and what motivates them.

NICOLE, YOU’VE ALREADY BEGUN YOUR SCHOOL CONSUL DUTIES, WHAT DO YOU THINK IS THE BEST PART ABOUT YOUR ROLE?

The best part of being a School Consul is being able to represent the student body and act as a bridge joining the students and staff together. As Consuls, we’re able to communicate with the teachers and student body, listen to their opinions and perspectives on certain issues and convey them to the Heads of School in order to enact positive change. Knowing that all parties at Fintona are content makes our jobs as Consuls so rewarding and it makes us so happy knowing that we’re ensuring the best possible learning environment for our fellow students WHAT NEW OPPORTUNITIES HAVE YOU FOUND TO BE A LEADER DURING THE CURRENT PANDEMIC?

Hannah and I have been filming a small video each week for the Fintona livestream where we wish any student who has had a birthday that week a happy birthday as well as providing updates on weekly events. We feel it helps to maintain a level of normality in not so ‘normal’ times. We’ve also been working on short, light-hearted videos of us and our fellow leadership team at home GREAT THINGS COME FROM A SMALL PACKAGE

which show how we’ve all been coping during isolation in order to boost the spirits of students. WHAT HAS A FINTONA EDUCATION GIVEN YOU?

Fintona has given me a supportive and open-minded group of girls that I’m lucky to call my peers. Fintona’s size has allowed me to become extremely close to not only all the students in my year level but in other forms as well. The judgement-free learning environment has enabled me to become more confident in sharing my ideas and has created a sense of trust and understanding between us all. I am so grateful to have such hardworking and motivated people alongside me in my final year of high school that I know I can always rely on. WHO DO YOU CONSIDER TO BE A GREAT LEADER AND WHY?

I consider Michelle Obama to be one of the greatest leaders to ever exist. Even before becoming First Lady of the United States, she was already an accomplished lawyer, writer and community activist. Michelle Obama serves as a role model for millions of women around the world,

fighting against racism and discrimination and advocating for public health, children’s education and women’s rights. She’s confident and a risk taker who is unafraid to use her voice to stand up for what she believes in. WHAT ARE YOUR FUTURE ASPIRATIONS?

After Year 12, I’d like to study either commerce or science and pursue a career in the finance sector or in optometry. I would also love to travel and discover new places and cultures. As a student learning two languages this year (French and Japanese), I would love to further my language studies and become conversationally fluent in at least 5 languages (I only need to learn one more!) as well as fulfil my goal of working overseas. Not only will I be able to experience and learn about new cultures, but I’ll also be able to communicate with a wider range of people and communities around the world.

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Our Young Achievers

Chee-Rae and Zara

Laura with Ms Yifan Guo

Kooyong Prizes for Chee-Rae and Zara

Gold medal for Laura Nan

Grace’s artwork exhibited at Top Arts 2020

Premier’s VCE Award for Jacqueline

In recognition of the outstanding contributions they have made to their School Community, 2019 School Consul, Chee-Rae Loi (’19) and Zara Burk, Year 11 were awarded 2019 Kooyong Student Prizes by The Hon Josh Frydenberg MP. The annual awards recognise both excellence in academic and extra-curricular pursuits, leadership amongst peers, strong commitment to upholding the School’s values, and strengthening the community at large. Congratulations Chee-Rae and Zara, the Kooyong Prize is certainly well deserved by both of you.

Laura Nan’s impressive skills in maths and science are already being publicly recognised. Late last year, in an official ceremony at the Melbourne Exhibition Centre, Laura who is now in Year 7, was awarded a Gold medal for her top score in the UNSW Global ICAS Science Competition. Laura was also awarded a number of prizes and trophies, after topping the State with a perfect score in the 2019 Australian Mathematics Competition. Ms Yifan Guo from Australian Maths Trust presented Laura with her awards at a Middle School assembly where she was honoured for her remarkable efforts. Laura also received a perfect score in the Australasian Problem Solving Maths Olympiads and received a medal for this too.

Congratulations to Grace Stevenson (’19) whose artwork was exhibited at Top Arts 2020 at the National Gallery of Victoria in March. Grace’s exhibited painting Fast Forward explored the concept of youth and growth, and how as children we aspire to grow up and this idea evolves as we age. Fintona staff, Grace and her family gathered at the Gallery for the official opening of the Exhibition. The Top Arts selection was well deserved recognition of Grace’s artistic talent and long-standing commitment to her art, in particular oil painting, throughout her schooling at Fintona.

Congratulations to Jacqueline Motet (’19) who received a Premier’s VCE Award for Accounting. This is an outstanding achievement for Jacqueline and her teacher, Chris Williams as the Awards recognise students who have received top results in VCE subjects. Whilst the ceremony was postponed, we hope there will be an opportunity in the not too distant future for the achievements of Jacqueline and all award winners to be acknowledged appropriately.

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FINTONA FILE | AUTUMN/WINTER 2020


Greater Perspective The

Connections Program is a unique and valuable part of the Year 9 curriculum. Each fortnight, students spend a day outside the traditional classroom learning about social, cultural and community challenges. So far this year, the students have immersed themselves in the culture and community of Melbourne. Activities experiencing Australia’s culture have included visiting the National Gallery of Victoria’s Australian Identity and Culture Exhibition, the Immigration Museum’s Identify and Belonging Exhibition and the Chinese Museum. Students also enjoyed a tour through the CBD’s back streets and laneways to see Melbourne’s street art and

GREAT THINGS COME FROM A SMALL PACKAGE

graffiti and observe the contrast between the structured environment of galleries and museums and the unofficial art gallery that is the streets of our city. All activities provided valuable experience for students to learn about what it means to be an Australian and how people from different backgrounds have shaped our city and who we are as a nation. Whilst learning from home, and as part of building their understanding of the community, students in their virtual classrooms visited The Big Issue to gain an understanding of how homelessness impacts people’s lives within Melbourne and hear first-hand from people that this has affected. According to Year 9 student Katy, “It really hit hard when you realised

Year 9 Connections how privileged and how lucky we are and it shows a duality of our society and how now more than ever, we really need to come together as a community”. With remote visits from the Royal Botanical Gardens, students have gained an understanding of the impact of climate change on our environment and how this impacts the community in which we live, both now and in the future. The greater perspective that students have gained from the program have led them to develop independent thought, cultural awareness and a changed view of the city and its inhabitants by seeing life through different eyes.

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Our Community FOOD & WINE FESTIVAL SUNDAY 24 NOVEMBER

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PARENTS’ WELCOME DRINKS THURSDAY 6 FEBRUARY

FINTONA FILE | AUTUMN/WINTER 2020


FAMILY CHALLENGES DURING REMOTE LEARNING

1. Alex, Year 8 – Capturing Autumn Challenge 2. Sofia, Year 1 – Cupcake Challenge 3. Hegarty Family – Step Challenge 4. Zoe, Year 2 – Capturing Autumn Challenge 5. Gilligan family – Footpath Art Challenge

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Q&A Meet our Teachers Amy Miers Amy Miers began her association with Fintona in 1988 as a student in the Junior School. After completing her teaching degree and working in a variety of educational settings, including two years in an International School in Shanghai, Amy returned to Fintona in 2012. She spent a few years teaching Year 5 in the Middle School and is now teaching Year 4 on the Junior Campus. Amy is also a parent at the School with her son starting in the ELC this year. Who inspired you to teach? The value and importance of education has been part of our family story for generations. My mum has recently retired from over 40 years as an educator, 17 of those as a school principal. Her dedication to her vocation and the care she genuinely felt for each student, each family and each staff member was awe-inspiring. She has the rare ability to balance strength in her convictions with compassion for others, and high intellect and professionalism with a sense of fun and humour. This is absolutely the model to which I aspire.

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What do you enjoy about working at Fintona? There are many qualities of the Fintona Community that make working here enjoyable. My colleagues are a passionate group of educators who inspire, encourage and support. The non-teaching staff members are equally passionate about their areas of expertise. I am deeply grateful for all the ways in which they support me personally and create such a warm and collegial workplace. The families throughout my time at Fintona have all worked in partnership with me to create a vibrant learning environment for their daughter. Of course, the best part of working at Fintona is the young women I have the privilege to teach. The joy they find in exploring, testing, discovering and learning, and the fun we have while engaging in this together makes this a wonderful place in which to work. What is it about working in girls only education that attracts you? We know that there are distinct differences in the way that girls learn. We also know that in spite of improvements in recent times, issues of pay parity and equal opportunity

are still relevant today. Perhaps it is the Old Fintonian in me, but I believe that working in girls only education is my way of contributing to the development of strong young women. My aspiration is that an education at Fintona results in our students finding their voice, finding their place in the world and finding ‘success’ in whichever way is authentic for them. In your experience, what do you believe has the greatest impact on successful learning outcomes for girls? There is a saying along the lines of, “People don’t care how much you know, until they know how much you care”. I believe it may have been paraphrased from Theodore Roosevelt. This has always been the central tenet of how I teach and how I believe optimum learning occurs. Creating a trusting working relationship with students allows one to push them outside their comfort zone, celebrate with them in their successes and encourage them to persevere even when they experience failure. I believe that knowing ‘who we are’ when things go wrong and ‘what to do’ when we hit hurdles and challenges facilitates a strong pathway for ongoing success.

What is the best advice you can give students? Say ‘Yes’ to as many of the opportunities provided here at Fintona as possible. Even if you are only half interested, have a go and see where the opportunity may take you. This should hold you in good stead when you are considering whether to submit that application to start a career in business or one of the health professions, whether to audition for that role in Theatre or the Arts, or whether to apply for positions in government. The possibilities are endless. What do you like to do in your spare time? When I do have a moment to myself, I enjoy taking a Pilates class, exploring the local nature reserve near my home, gardening, baking and reading. I also enjoy excursions to the Zoo and museums with my little one and I regularly frequent the Melbourne Symphony Orchestra with family and friends.

FINTONA FILE | AUTUMN/WINTER 2020


Am

Jacqui Pugh Education is Jacqui Pugh’s second career. After starting university, she took a 5-year gap sojourn and worked in five-star hotels and restaurants in Whistler, Canada and England. After running her own hospitality and catering business from the age of 25, she returned to her original dream of being an Art teacher. Married to Michael, also a teacher, they have three adult children. Who inspired you to teach? My Year 5 teacher, Ms Cambridge, was pivotal as she instilled a sense of creativity, ownership and responsibility in our learning journey. You could tell that she believed in us. We were given many opportunities such as public speaking, chess challenges, writing plays and having a voice with the Local Council. She also had a team of us redesign unused spaces of the library and transformed them into different themed reading caves. We built a space age room with special effect lighting and large fibreglass animals for the African safari room. It was so innovative for the time that it was filmed for Simon Townsend’s television show, Wonder World.

GREAT THINGS COME FROM A SMALL PACKAGE

My high school Art teacher, Mr Wetherby, also played a role in me becoming a teacher. The art rooms at lunchtimes were always a place of solace. Under his tutelage, I found a passion for Art History. He challenged his students to know the art timeline from Ancient Greece through to the 19th Century and not just the Western perspective. I often draw on this knowledge when I teach Conceptual or Political Art across time. What do you enjoy about working at Fintona? The teachers are so invested in their students and are masters of their subjects. They have a great relationship and understanding of the girls and how they learn. The girls are also my inspiration; they are such a pleasure to teach. I will always remember the first lessons I taught at Fintona and the eagerness of the girls to learn. To watch them take in every word and ask questions without prompting is any teachers delight. At Fintona, there is so much more time to teach the deeper concepts that you don’t always get to do in other schools.

In your experience what do you believe has the greatest impact on successful learning outcomes for girls? The aspect that has a significant impact on girls’ education is teacher efficacy, understanding and believing in each girl and the way they learn. I have seen this in action at Fintona. The teaching profession is an exciting field that is forever changing with new research coming out all the time compelling teachers to be flexible and open. Experienced teachers have a teacher tool kit that they can bring to any situation. They can read what tools are needed for a specific lesson and are willing to change tools if it is not working. I like John Hattie’s quote “Know thy impact” and at Fintona this is evident. What is your best advice for students? I always encourage the Middle School girls to involve themselves in new opportunities. Try new things now when you are young. You don’t have to be an expert straight away as it may be something that needs practice or research. I know when I was at school I put my hand up for all different sports. I was not a swimmer and when they were

short on the Water polo team I somehow agreed to have a go. I knew I wouldn’t be very good. This proved to be accurate as I almost drowned but now I can say I have tried Water polo. I also encourage girls not to pigeonhole themselves by saying “I am not sporty or I am only good at maths”. The brain is a fantastic muscle that can change with practice.

What do you do in your spare time? I love exploring new places and I am a passionate lifelong learner. I have always been drawn to the outdoors. Depending on the time of the year, it could be a summer beach camping, hiking, touring or skiing in winter. Since moving to Melbourne last year, I have been amazed by the cultural opportunities with the galleries, restaurants and performance spaces. I thought the current coronavirus situation and the forced isolation was going to be hard for me as I rarely spend time sitting still, but I have discovered the beautiful Melbourne walking trails, and I have an app to ensure I don’t get lost. Having time to be creative is also a priority. Lately, this has been painting and post isolation I want to take up ceramics again. 17


Beyond the Classroom HANGING ROCK

WORLD CHALLENGE

PREPARING FOR VCE

Sixteen Year 9 and 10 students experienced an adventure of a lifetime in November and December when they spent three and a half weeks in South Africa, Lesotho and Mozambique for a World Challenge expedition. Our Year 9 students enjoyed a day at Hanging Rock, having studied ‘Picnic at Hanging Rock’ in Semester 2 last year.

LIFE AFTER SCHOOL

DAY OF HOPE

In November, Year 10 students took part in a Day of Hope, a wellbeing seminar for teenagers. Presented by former Young Australian of the Year, Glen Gerreyn from the HopeFull Institute, Day of Hope empowers students to navigate their life journeys with courage, clarity and conviction.

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Year 11 students spent three days at Anglesea participating in beach activities, canoeing and the great crate stacking challenge to help further develop strong team bonds in preparation for their VCE years.

Year 12 students were given a taste of life after school by spending time with their teachers at Newman College at The University of Melbourne. The girls experienced an amazing race around the city, visited RMIT and The University of Melbourne to learn about what each tertiary institution offers, and tried different relaxation techniques through a yoga and meditation session. A number of Old Fintonians joined the girls on the final day for a panel discussion about their VCE experiences.

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Camps, Excursions & Incursions

NIGHT AT THE ZOO

YEAR 6 VISIT CANBERRA

ART INSPIRATION

Parliament House, a meeting with The Hon Josh Frydenberg MP, Mt Stromlo, the Australian War Memorial, Questacon and the Australian Institute of Sport, were just some of the activities our Year 6 students undertook when they visited Canberra.

To provide inspiration for developing their art projects, Year 10 Studio Art students visited the city to collect primary source material such as drawings and photos. They also visited the National Gallery of Victoria to investigate artworks dealing with the theme of gender and the role of women throughout art history.

VISIT FROM WILDLIFE

A night at the Zoo as part of their Ecology and Classification studies was a great introduction to Science at Fintona for our Year 7 students.

It’s not every day that lizards, an owl and a snake visit the girls in Year 1. The Wild Action incursion was part of their Unit of Inquiry into ‘How the world works’.

GREAT THINGS COME FROM A SMALL PACKAGE

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OFA

Old Fintonians’ Alumni AUTUMN/WINTER 2020

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OFA Births Congratulations to Katrina Hamer (Russell ’04) and Rohan on the birth of their twins Miriam and Bethany on 21/8/19, sisters to Joash.

The Fintona community is saddened to learn of the deaths of: Jocelyn Loosli (Paton ’43) 10/5/19 Jeanne Mabin (’57) 26/5/19 Isabel Robinson (Skewes ’45) 12/9/19 Thelma Milne (Lee ’49) 16/9/19 Margaret Hoban (Macgill ’51) 25/11/19 Diana Waller (Field ’45) 26/2/20 Margaret Macdonald (Chancellor ’40) 5/3/20

Congratulations to Georgie Page (Clark ’99) and Chris on the birth of Oscar Clark Page on 9/9/19, a brother for 2 year old Henry.

Joan Claringbould (Alder ’43) 8/3/20 Deidre Kirby (Neylon ’46) 17/3/20 Jill Bastow (Phillips-Smith ’63) 18/3/20 Helen Craig (Coltman ‘50) 8/4/20 Diana Parker (Matthews ’36) 15/4/20 Kirri Radcliffe (Hicks ’56) 26/4/20 Elspeth Pyper (’46) 13/5/20 Catherine Ramsden (Day ‘77) 30/5/20

Margaret with her grandaugher, Georgia

GREAT THINGS COME FROM A SMALL PACKAGE

Obituaries Margaret Macdonald (Chancellor ’40) 14/6/24 - 5/3/20 My grandmother Margaret Macdonald was a proud second-generation Fintonian, her mother Daisy Chancellor (Spence ’16) having graduated in one of the first classes under Annie Hughston. Gran was an archetypal example of the qualities the School imbues in its students - strong willed, intelligent and endlessly resilient. She often spoke about her time in the “extended class” taught in an apparently somewhat eclectic and radical fashion by the formidable Margaret Cunningham, and about classes in the Meeting Room, of being taught philosophy, economics and feminism. She made close friends who would remain in touch for their entire lives, including Dame Beryl Beaurepaire AC DBE (Bedggood ’40) whom she missed dearly. Gran graduated in an exciting post-war era where women were entering the workforce in professions which had previously been closed to them. Having studied a wide and varied curriculum under Miss Cunningham, Gran graduated from Fintona confident she could succeed in anything she put her mind to.

sum, so decided to put them to use and enrol into one of the first physiotherapy degrees ever offered. She worked predominantly with children affected by polio during the years when summer brought a new wave of illness unabated until the widespread use of the Salk vaccine. She was vivid in her recall of rooms full of small people in hulking iron lungs, but she loved helping them recover with seemingly many successes. Her mother, Daisy was very involved in volunteering with the Red Cross and inculcated in Gran a love of service which continued her whole life, including offering financial support for Fintonians whose families could no longer afford tuition. She loved the School dearly, and was regularly teased by my grandfather whose favourite thing was to call the School “Fint’nuh” so she would without fail correct him. I love that her love of the School has been passed to me through my thirteen years at Fintona and that we walked the same ground and shared so many of the same experiences. She will be dearly missed. Georgia Macdonald (’12)

The story goes that Gran was offered a box of (human) bones by a family friend for a nominal 21


OFA 1 Joan Claringbould (Alder ’43) 23/9/26 - 8/3/20 Joan was the second child born into a Melbourne suburban family in 1926. Her parents were strict Presbyterians who, perhaps by coincidence, lived right next door to the Balwyn Methodist Church. Joan and her brother Keith thus became compulsory church attendees. Joan’s parents made great sacrifices to educate both their children. Joan thus attended Fintona Girls’ School, an institution from which she retained only fond memories, and one with which she associated to the end of her life. She loved attending the annual Old Fintonians’ reunion in QLD. When Joan left school she progressed to teacher’s college where she played a lot of hockey. She also retained close association with Christian youth groups. It was at one of these that she told her mother that evening she had met someone interesting. She described him as “the most arrogant man I have ever met”. That turned out to be Roy Claringbould, her future husband. In fact, Roy was anything but arrogant and they were married in January 1953 and went on to have three children, Michael, Sue and Jenny. The happy marriage lasted 44 years until Roy passed away in 1997.

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Joan and Roy took a honeymoon on the Isle of Wight and stayed on in United Kingdom for a year. When they returned to Australia, they retained the travel bug so Roy applied for a Colonial service position in Nigeria. They flew there in 1954 where they lived for nearly seven years. This was an intrepid move for an Australian suburban couple. It is not difficult to imagine that Joan’s parents were not happy with the concept, although Roy’s were more relaxed. Roy worked for the British Development Corporation while Joan taught at a primary school where one of her students was her recalcitrant son.

2 regularly played tennis and participated in walking groups. From these years, she developed a close and strong network of friends. Even in her later years, Joan retained her sense of adventure and loved to travel. She undertook many overseas trips after Roy passed. She instilled in her family that respect was to be earned, and that self-discipline was an essential quality. Throughout her life, she retained a sense of humour and self-worth.

Diana Parker (Matthews ’36) In 1961, Joan and Roy returned 27/12/19 -15/4/20 to Melbourne on cruise liner SS Born in Sydney in December Himalaya and bought a house in 1919, Di was the second of five Balwyn. Both were restless after children. The family moved to the overseas years and Roy Melbourne when she was 6 successfully applied for a years old. At Fintona, Di loved position in pre-independence sport more than formal classes Papua New Guinea. They and was a keen tennis and arrived in Port Moresby in 1962 netball player. As an Old where they lived for the next Fintonian, she remained active eleven years. Joan divided her until a few years ago and was time between raising the three an enthusiastic member of the children and teaching at OFA Red Cross Unit. Waigani Pre-school. After leaving School, Di worked Joan’s time in these at the Commercial Banking environments shaped many of Company of Sydney (now NAB). her views and helped explain her independence, selfA goodbye letter from her sufficiency and resourcefulness. colleagues when leaving to join the army shows she was very The pair returned to Australia in well respected and had a good 1974 and took up residence in sense of humour. Di Brisbane. Both retired at relative volunteered for the Australian young age, upon which Joan Women’s Army Service (AWAS) took up her passion of weaving and served on Continuous Full almost full-time. She also Time War Service in the AWAS

in the Central Bureau, an allied signals intelligence unit from September 1943 to February 1946. She moved up the ranks to be promoted to a Sergeant. Di made many friends in the army and she loved the CB Anzac reunions. In 1949 Di married, Gerald Edmund Parker (Gerry) and they had three children, Geoffrey, Alison (Curry ’67) and Katherine (Akarsu ’69). They lived in Mt Eliza where a shopping centre now stands, then Kew and then Mont Albert before retiring to Tathra on the South Coast of NSW. It was only a few years ago that Di moved to Lynden Aged Care in Camberwell where she was well cared for. In December, Di celebrated her 100th birthday with a party of around 50 family, friends including Old Fintonians, Legacy and RSL committee members attending. It was a wonderful occasion. Elspeth Pyper (’46) 18/12/28 - 13/5/20 Elspeth was born in Dorset, England and arrived in Australia during the Second World War in 1943 after spending a number of years living in Persia where her father was a Senior Medical Doctor. Elspeth attended Fintona as a boarder from 1943 to 1946. She was a serious student

FINTONA FILE | AUTUMN/WINTER 2020


1. Joan Claringbould 2. Diana Parker 3. Elspeth Pyper

3 who excelled in all her studies and as a member of Murdoch House she was their Service Representative. She played hockey in the School team and gained her School colours in 1946. After leaving school, Elspeth studied at Kindergarten Training College graduating in 1949. She taught as a Kindergarten teacher at a number of locations, before being appointed Director of the Malvern Memorial Kindergarten in 1953, a position she held until her retirement in 1993; a period of 40 years. Long before it became fashionable, Elspeth would ride her beautiful black 1950s bicycle to work each day, choosing to remain fit and active rather than drive through the crowded streets of Armadale. Elspeth loved teaching and taught many children over the years, but she was most proud when teaching the second and third generations of the same families. Children and parents alike loved Elspeth and parents who had been to Malvern Memorial as a child would often drive their own children from the outer suburbs to be taught by ‘Elspeth, my kinder teacher’. Today, Elspeth still holds the title of ‘longest continuously serving Kindergarten Director’ in Victoria. Apart from kindergarten teaching, Elspeth led an extremely full and busy life being very much involved in Scottish country dancing, music and as a member of the St John’s Anglican Church Toorak; where apart from teaching the Sunday school kindergarten she also took up bell ringing. Each week for over 30 years, Elspeth rang the St John’s bells. In 1967, Elspeth started the ‘St John’s Scottish Dance Group’ at the Church. She was one of the first registered instructors in Victoria and for a period of over 46 years Elspeth taught Scottish Dancing, often travelling to the country and throughout GREAT THINGS COME FROM A SMALL PACKAGE

rural Victoria. She became one of Victoria’s most esteemed Scottish Dancing teachers and was honoured for her contributions to Scottish Dancing. It was not until her mid 80s, and after two knee operations, that Elspeth finally stopped teaching. Elspeth was also an active member of the Melbourne Recorder Orchestra and played regularly in concerts. After Elspeth retired in in 1993 she became even more active. She travelled extensively, visiting many countries. Travelling with her very close friends, she had adventures in places as far apart as the Baltics, the Middle East, Canada, New Zealand and of course her beloved Dorset. After each journey, she would come home, organize her photos and prepare for her next trip overseas. These travels only stopped a couple of years ago due to ill health. Born from her observations of poverty and need during her extensive travels and her strong Christian faith compelling her to be a force for good in the world, Elspeth donated generously to many causes. Each year before Christmas and Easter, she would sit down to write to organisations that were to receive donations and sponsorships. Charities working for the benefit of children were always at the forefront of her kindness. Elspeth moved to Mount Barker in Western Australia six years ago to be closer to family members. She again joined in the community life, with church central to all she did, until she became too frail over the past year. She died peacefully after a short illness in the Mt Barker hospice with family around her and surrounded by love. A Christian life very well lived. Vale Elspeth.

News of Old Fintonians

GEORGIE PAGE (CLARK ’99) TOP RADIO AWARD Old Fintonian, Georgie Page has been recognised for her outstanding producing skills by being awarded the Best Program Director at the 2019 Australian Commercial Radio Awards for the smoothfm network. To work in the broadcast industry is no easy feat and whilst studying a Bachelor of Arts (Media and Communications) at the University of Melbourne, Georgie volunteered in the phone room at 101.9 FOX FM. She then worked as a Black Thunder promotional driver whilst learning how to be a show producer. Her first radio show as a Producer was for Hamish and Andy’s Saturday morning show and according to Georgie, none of us knew what we were doing back then! Georgie then worked her way up through shows in Adelaide and then Sydney, including shows such as The Kyle & Jackie O Show and Fitzy & Wippa on NOVA. In 2015, Georgie moved to smoothfm and produced Melissa Doyle, Richard Wilkins and David Campbell’s weekend shows. Georgie also looked after the celebrity guest shows so worked one-on-one scripting and producing names such as 23


Barry Gibb, Dolly Parton, Rod Stewart, Michael Bublé, Olivia Newton-John, Kylie Minogue and Neil Diamond. Two years later she took over as Program Director for smooth 91.5 Melbourne and 95.3 Sydney. “It is an honour to work on a brand so embraced by both markets – we recently celebrated over one million listeners in each city who love the smooth music as much as I do,” said Georgie. Georgie has many happy memories of her time at Fintona and flew down from Sydney for her 20 year reunion last year to catch up with many good friends. At School she was a proud ‘Maxwell-ite’ and participated in debating, swimming and tennis. Her favourite Fintona tradition was Drama Day which was an absolute highlight of the year for her. Georgie considers herself lucky to have attended a school that was so keen to nurture and stretch its students. For example, her favourite subject was Politics and she was encouraged to take a University Politics course at RMIT as part of her VCE which she adored! “I consider myself very lucky to have enjoyed an education at Fintona. I have fabulous memories of my time at School and feel lucky to have been challenged and encouraged in my learning by the great staff,” said Georgie.

“I consider myself very lucky to have enjoyed an education at Fintona. I have fabulous memories of my time at School and feel lucky to have been challenged and encouraged in my learning by the great staff”

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“I was inspired and supported by the wonderful Mrs Danne, our Biology teacher, who made the classroom come alive with relevance to life”

DR GAEL JENNINGS (’69) AWARDED AM Congratulations to Old Fintonian, Dr Gael Jennings AM who received a Member (AM) of the Order of Australia in this year’s Australia Day Honours for significant service to science and broadcast media. Gael was a student in both the Junior and Senior schools of Fintona. She loved both English and Biology, possibly because, as she recalls, “I was inspired and supported by the wonderful Mrs Danne, our Biology teacher, who made the classroom come alive with relevance to life”, and “Miss Dick, the English teacher, who related literature to our inner lives and the world”. Gael interrupted her Year 12 in 1968 to be an AFS student in Indiana, USA, for a year, coming back to complete ’matric’ Year 12 in late 1969. She went on to complete a Bachelor of Science at the University of Melbourne, graduating with First Class Honours and a PhD in Immunology from The Walter and Eliza Hall Institute. She decided half way through her PhD that she wanted to be a science and medical reporter with the ABC, and after she’d submitted her thesis, she burnt her research notes and started a 5 year plan which culminated in a 30 year career with the ABC - as the ABC’s first national science and medial reporter for TV News and the 7.30 Report, a reporter for Quantum and Catalyst, and later as presenter of ABC radio 774 mid-morning and afternoon shows. She later developed factual content for ABC TV Documentary, presented Insight on SBS TV and was a regular part of “The Brains Trust” on ABC TV’s Einstein Factor quiz show. Still involved in the media, Gael is now a

regular commentator on ABC TV News Breakfast and a co-host on ABC Radio 774. In addition to her media work, Gael has a parallel career as presenter, MC and faciltator in science, education, gender equity, violence against women, and media, has authored two books, and has served on 14 boards including the Melbourne Writers Festival, Cancer Council Australia, Museums Victoria, YMCA and the City of Melbourne Prevention of Violence against Women Committee. She is currently a member of the Victorian Assisted Reproductive Treatment Authority Board and an Honorary Fellow of the Centre for Advancing Journalism at the University of Melbourne. Her extensive awards include winning the NSW Premier’s History Award for her book ‘Sick As!...Bloody Moments in the History of Medicine’, Walkley Award National Finalist, Austcare Media Award, winner MBF Wellbeing Journalism Award, Kelloggs Nutrition Journalism, numerous Michael Daley Journalism Awards, and UN Media Award Finalist. Gael deeply appreciates the ‘women can do anything’ credo of her Fintona school years, and has certainly achieved a great deal throughout her career and the AM is well deserved recognition of this. .

FINTONA FILE | AUTUMN/WINTER 2020


ASSOCIATE PROFESSOR JILL SEWELL AM (SHAW ’65) TAKES PART IN LARGEST ALL FEMALE EXPEDITION TO ANTARCTICA Last November, Jill Sewell, a Consultant Paediatrician at The Royal Children’s Hospital, spent three weeks in Antarctica as part of the Homeward Bound Women in STEMM (Science, Technology, Engineering, Maths and Medicine) Leadership Program. Homeward Bound supports women in developing their leadership skills to enable a sustainable future. The voyage was the culmination of the 12 month leadership journey with 100 inspiring STEMM women from across the Globe and was the largest ever all women expedition to Antarctica. Jill’s journey to Antarctica took several days and involved flying to Ushuaia in southern Argentina, boarding a ship and sailing down the Beagle Channel and across the Drake Passage to the Antarctic Peninsula. “We cruised around (on zodiacs) and visited islands, beaches and research stations to learn about and observe Antarctic geology, glaciers, sea ice, whales, seals, penguins and birds. Evenings were spent in intense discussions, learning to be stand-up comedians, walking the decks, and watching the long and late, intensely beautiful sunsets. A polar bear plunging off an icy rocky beach made sure we appreciated the environment we want to save,” said Jill. Jill is now a member of the international Homeward Bound alumnae, fostering a leadership style of collaboration, inclusion and a legacy mindset to manage the planet as our home.

GREAT THINGS COME FROM A SMALL PACKAGE

DR VIVIEN GASTON (’68) SUBLIME SEA, A SPECTACULAR AND DIVERSE EXHIBITION

MARGARET ROSS AM (REID ’51) CELEBRATING AN 80 YEAR ASSOCIATION WITH FINTONA

Old Fintonian, Dr Vivien Gaston recently curated a spectacular and diverse exhibition at the Mornington Peninsula Regional Gallery titled Sublime Sea: Rapture and Reality.

A morning tea to honour the 80 year relationship Old Fintonian, Margaret Ross AM has had with Fintona was held late last year. Family, friends and staff attended the celebration.

The exhibition was an outstanding collection of visual interpretations which provided heightened awareness of the need for stewardship of the natural world. Grand paintings from the nineteenth and twentieth centuries were combined with contemporary art works. Selected decorative arts were also included, all of which stimulated an awareness of the realities of human interaction with the sea. Interestingly, one of the exhibits was Coral Vanitas 2008 by Kate Rhode, a staff member in Fintona’s Art Faculty. The Gallery Director, Jane Alexander praised Vivien’s work stating, “she audaciously established new relationships by placing traditional museum pieces alongside fine art painting, photography and decorative arts, resulting in new and reimagined stories that reflect the rapture and the reality of the sea in the twenty first century.” Dr Vivien Gaston is Honorary Research Fellow at the University of Melbourne. From 2014 to 2017, she was Australia Research Council Senior Research Associate working on British and Australian portraits (1700 - 1900) at the National Gallery of Victoria. Prior to Sublime Sea, she curated the major exhibitions The Naked Face: self-portraits at the National Gallery of Victoria, and Controversy: the Power of Art at the Mornington Peninsula Regional Gallery. Vivien spent two years preparing Sublime Sea and is well known as a tireless worker who has a long list of achievements all of which are richly deserved.

First as a 4 year old student, Old Fintonian, parent, Board member, Chair, Grandmother and generous donor, Margaret’s connection to the School is highly valued by the Fintona Community. Congratulations Margaret on this extraordinary milestone. L – R: Merran Schoeffel (Higgs ’71), Claire Levi (Buckner ‘83), Renata Jenkins (De Bortoli ’90), Gillian Johnson (Hickman ’52), Pat McVean, Barbara Hall (’51), Margaret Ross (Reid ’51), Jennifer Grindrod (’01), Annie Grindrod (Ross ’74), Ann Hawker, Archivist, Belinda Lawson (Ross ’76), Adele McIntosh, Development & Community Engagement Manager, Rachael Falloon, Principal

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Reunions L – R: Rachael Falloon, Principal, Katrine Pilcher (Keuneman) Julie Fink (Kretschmer), Elizabeth Rawling (Pitman), Julia Griffith (La Nauze), Pam Badham (Clark)

Class of 1959 60 Year Reunion

THURSDAY 24 OCTOBER L – R (Back): Jessica O’Bryan, Jacquie Fullard (Robson ’84), Jenny Batten, Priscilla Everson (Rose ’91), Adele Outteridge (Samuel ’63), Michelle Harris (Lucovich ’62), Angela Goldman (’77), Diana Deane (’73), Annette Ford (Haywood ’76) L – R (Front): Joan Claringbould (Alder ’43), Rachael Falloon, Principal, Helen Jane (’78), Barbara Gunn (’64)

QLD Reunion

SATURDAY 26 OCTOBER

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1. Class of 2018 with Suzanne Hannebery, staff 2. L – R: Willow Belyea, Anushri Kumar, Grace Schroeder, Miranda Croci, Matisse Montague

Class of 2018 1 Year Reunion

THURSDAY 14 NOVEMBER

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2

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3. L – R: Rachel Lang, Cherry Zeng, Judy Wang, Yoko Kirkman, staff

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L– R: Liz Vines OAM (’70), Louisa Rose (’87), Kirri Radcliffe (Hicks ’56), Diana Pinkney (Goodson ’65), Sue Vandeleur (Leaver ’57)

SA Reunion

SUNDAY 24 NOVEMBER

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Class of 2019

THURSDAY 20 FEBRUARY

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GREAT THINGS COME FROM A SMALL PACKAGE

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Class of 2019 and staff

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L – R: Nicci Dempsey, staff, Ayiana Alcouffe, Chelsea Fisher, Amy Chilcott

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L – R: Zoe Seale, Grace Stevenson, Rachael Falloon, Principal, Ellen Stevenson

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UPCOMING OFA EVENTS REUNIONS 2020 Dates to be confirmed for the rescheduling of the following reunions: Classes of 1970, 1980, 1990, 2000, 2010 , 2015.

Classes of 1960 & 1965 55/60 Years Reunion Thursday 22 October, 10am - TBC INTERSTATE/COUNTRY REUNIONS NSW/ACT Thursday 10 September North East Victoria (Benalla) October QLD Saturday 24 October SA Sunday 13 December SPECIAL EVENTS OFA ART SHOW TOUR & AFTERNOON TEA Thursday 3 September OFA GOLF DAY Friday 6 November Woodlands Golf Club, Mordialloc

JOIN THE OFA FACEBOOK GROUP

Please join the Old Fintonians’ Alumni Facebook Group at facebook.com/groups/ofafintona to keep up to date with Alumni news including reunion dates and photos.

SHARE YOUR NEWS

Fintona’s exciting new Beyond Science Centre is on track to be completed in early 2021, and as the current pandemic is so clearly illustrating, there will always be a need for scientific research, engineering and design skills. Fintona has long been a school where education in the areas of STEAM have been an essential part of all girls’ learning. The Beyond Science Centre will further enhance the opportunities for our girls in these areas. There has been incredible progress throughout Term 2. The last of the steel frame was delivered, the window reveals were completed, the lift shaft was installed, and the roof will be finished by the time you are reading this. In the coming months, the brick façade will be completed, the external windows installed, and the internal joinery will commence.

If you are in a position to give a gift in 2020, we would be delighted if you would consider our Beyond Science Capital Campaign, supporting the education of current and future Fintonians. You can make your donation on our website - bsc.fintona.vic. edu.au/. If you would like to donate over $1,000 for the Beyond Science Campaign, your name will be a permanent feature on our Donor Wall in the new building. For any donation made to the Beyond Science Campaign, your name will be added to our temporary Donor Boards on both the Junior and Senior Campus. Please contact Adele McIntosh, amcintosh@fintona.vic.edu.au or 9880 4412 if you would like any additional information about other opportunities to become involved in the Campaign. You can follow the progress of the Beyond Science Centre on Instagram and Facebook.

Our $2 million target for the Capital Campaign is well within reach, with donors continuing to make new pledges.

We love to share special and significant achievements of Old Fintonians. Please send your news to Kate McPhee, Alumni Co-ordinator at kmcphee@fintona.vic.edu.au. 28

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SENIOR CAMPUS 79 Balwyn Road Balwyn VIC 3103 Australia JUNIOR CAMPUS 80 Balwyn Road Balwyn VIC 3103 Australia

P. (03) 9830 1388 F. (03) 9888 5682 E. fgs@fintona.vic.edu.au www.fintona.vic.edu.au

Profile for Fintona Girls' School

Fintona File - Autumn/Winter 2020  

77th edition of the Fintona File, the Biannual Magazine of Fintona Girls' School. In this edition: - Outstanding VCE results from 2019. - F...

Fintona File - Autumn/Winter 2020  

77th edition of the Fintona File, the Biannual Magazine of Fintona Girls' School. In this edition: - Outstanding VCE results from 2019. - F...

Profile for fintona

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