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FINTAN SWITZER


Fintan Switzer Fintan Switzer hails from Killarney on the West coast of Ireland. Having gained a reputation in Killarney as a contemporary portraitist, the artist took inspiration from his growing interest in street art and started to paint outside in derelict sites near his hometown. Over the past 18 months Fintan’s street paintings have received widespread acclaim, resulted in a growing interest in his work and a reputation as one of the most promising street artists today. In the past year, the artist has produced a series of paintings which we are delighted to present to you today, titled ‘Guerrillas in the Mist’:

Guerrillas in the Mist Initially inspired by the Arab Spring and later drawing from the wider phenomenon of revolution throughout history, this series consists of twelve paintings: six large pieces and six studies. Three of the larger paintings focus on the exterior conflict, the aggression and the chaos. The remaining three dig a little deeper, exploring the interior conflicts within the uprising. What motivates revolutionaries, what binds them and what divides them? Can these revolutionaries keep their ideals when they find themselves at the helm of a dissatisfied nation? With what will they replace the statues they tore down? Will the outcome justify the bloodshed? Is a society able to absorb sudden radical change, and if not, will civil war be the result? What role does art play in times of political and social upheaval, and is art used as a platform for awareness or does it have a more sinister role? A lot of question marks there (and more to be expected), but don’t expect any answers!


Guerrillas in the Mist (2013)

Oil on canvas 90 x 122 cm

ÂŁ2,250

Sales enquiries: fintanjswitzer@gmail.com

April 2013


Revolution Eve/ King Understudy (2012-13)

Oil on canvas 107 x 122 cm

ÂŁ2,850

Sales enquiries: fintanjswitzer@gmail.com

April 2013


Water to Wine (2012)

Oil on canvas 122 x 153 cm

ÂŁ3,250

Sales enquiries: fintanjswitzer@gmail.com

April 2013


Waltz with the Philistine (2012-13)

Oil on canvas 107 x 122 cm

ÂŁ2,350

Sales enquiries: fintanjswitzer@gmail.com

April 2013


Hail and Fire (2012)

Oil on canvas 122 x 122 cm

ÂŁ2,450

Sales enquiries: fintanjswitzer@gmail.com

April 2013


Post Oppression Depression (2012)

Oil and aerosol on canvas 100 x 85cm

ÂŁ2,250

Sales enquiries: fintanjswitzer@gmail.com

April 2013


Water to Wine study (2013)

Oil and aerosol on canvas 46 x 61 cm

ÂŁ700

Sales enquiries: fintanjswitzer@gmail.com

April 2013


Tahrir and back again (2013)

Oil and aerosol on canvas 61 x 76 cm

ÂŁ800

Sales enquiries: fintanjswitzer@gmail.com

April 2013


Caravaggio ‘Entombment of Christ’ study (2013)

Oil and aerosol on canvas 46 x 61 cm

£700

Sales enquiries: fintanjswitzer@gmail.com

April 2013


Untitled (2013)

Oil and aerosol on canvas 61 x 76 cm

ÂŁ800

Sales enquiries: fintanjswitzer@gmail.com

April 2013


Revolution Eve study (2013)

Oil and aerosol on canvas 46 x 61 cm

ÂŁ700

Sales enquiries: fintanjswitzer@gmail.com

April 2013


Pall-Bearer (2013)

Oil and aerosol on canvas 61 x 46 cm

ÂŁ700

Sales enquiries: fintanjswitzer@gmail.com

April 2013


Additional information: Purchasing  All sales enquires should be directed to: fintanjswitzer@gmail.com

 Should more than one person express an interest in a particular painting, the painting will be sold on a first come, first serve basis. Payment Instructions  Payment is either by bank transfer (or international bank wire).  Buyers are required to pay a £150 non-refundable deposit by Paypal to secure the painting, which will be deducted off the balance due.  The balance is payable within 7 workings days. Payment details will be sent to the buyer following receipt of the deposit.  Buyers are responsible for any charges. The prices quoted in the document is the amount due, net of any fees. Shipping  Please note shipping is on top of the quoted prices in this PDF; given the size of the works and complexity of the framing, we anticipate this to be significant for the larger, framed paintings. Please contact us for a shipping quote.  The paintings will be shipped to the buyers as soon as possible. We ask you to be patient in receiving the painting, but will endeavour to keep in contact once you have been confirmed as the new owner of the painting.  Import duty/ tax is the responsibility of the buyer. Questions  Should you have any questions please do not hesitate to drop us an email and we will endeavour to respond as soon as possible.

For regular updates, please visit: www.fintanswitzer.com www.facebook.com/fintanswitzer


‘Revolution Eve/ King Understudy’

“The first half of the title is somewhat self-explanatory. It’s the night before the revolution, the news has been given that in the morning there will be a revolt. Each family member is reacting in his/ her own individual way. The grandfather character on the right represents the older generation, the philosopher or enlightened thinker who outlines what could/ will be done by the younger generation. Although his writing is meant to inspire the next generation, he is reluctant - grasping the table and glancing in dismay at his son in law - as if weary that his thoughts aren’t polished enough to be followed as doctrine.

The central father figure represents the spear head of the revolution who will successfully overthrow their oppressor and attempt to restructure society, built on the philosopher’s theories. The son character in the foreground represents the child of the revolution, driven more by ego and desire than any particular ideology. He will either inherit his father’s power or overthrow him and assume power. He is the most radical of these revolutionaries, springing to his feet, prepared to fight (or to console his mother). The cloth, wrapped around his legs, matches the sash worn by the king at the top of the painting, symbolising his future role as oppressor, hence the second half of the title. This structure seems to repeat itself in revolutions quite regularly, for example the French revolution, where the political ideas of Rousseau inspired Robespierre to revolt, leading to the rise of Napoleon. Likewise in Russia, where the writings of Marx influenced Lenin, ending in Stalin’s regime. Although not a revolution, the same could be said about Nietzsche and the impact his work had on Hitler. What separates these men are their ideologies and motivations, but what they share is their table/country and its contents. More importantly they share an interest in the female character: she is the philosopher’s daughter, the spear head’s wife and the dictator’s mother. She represents Liberty, the force who unites them all, if only briefly, but inevitably the family members will splinter in pursuit of their individual ideals.” Fintan Switzer


‘Water to Wine’

“In ‘Water to Wine’, there are two reference painting Jacques Louis David's ‘Death of Marat' (1793) and Caravaggio's ‘The Entombment Of Christ‘ (1602-1603). 'Death of Marat' depicts the freshly murdered Jean-Paul Marat, arguably the most blood thirsty of the key players in the French Revolution. David used the limp arm of Christ from Caravaggio's 'The Entombment of Christ' (who took his from Michelangelo's 'Pieta'). By doing so David likened a war mongering revolutionary to Jesus Christ. This might seem deluded and extreme, but at the time it made quite a bit of sense. See, at the time the Jacobins were in the process of abolishing Christianity, because they saw it as a tradition of the aristocracy. They even went so far as to change the Christian calendar, destroy many Christian sculptures and replace them with sculptures more fitting of the times - ditching The Virgin Mary for Lady Liberty for example. At Marat’s funeral they even placed the bath he was murdered in on the altar as a kind of crucifix. Of course in hindsight this seems pretty daft but had others at the time not felt unnerved by these unusual and sudden changes, there's a good chance that the Jacobins plans might have worked - if perhaps, they hadn't implemented these changes so abruptly and gave the public more time to adjust to their concept. It being a revolution though, things moved in fast forward and history was written and rewritten on a daily basis and within a matter of weeks, the Jacobins were overthrown, their plans abolished and soon forgotten. What I'm curious about is if developments had played out in their favour, how would history have air brushed their story? More to the point, did Christianity stem from similar roots? Maybe Christ's story is similar to that of Marat's, but has been altered over time, because if history is good at anything it's forgiving, embellishing and of course repeating itself.

Food for thought really, nothing conclusive, just questions - which is why I decided to leave the left side of the canvas quite bare and sketched to suggest it's an unfinished story. ”

Fintan Switzer


FINTAN SWITZER

Guerrillas in the Mist  

Sales PDF April 2013 with prices

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