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Contents

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By Karen Hollenbach

a O’Brien

m Like to Love: to reach your on Facebook

ne Day

5 Tips: How to ect with your ence on social a

Leveraging LinkedIn: How to build influence beyond your profile

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How to outsource your social media without losing your personality By Sam McFarlane

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Q&A Natalie Hughes on becoming Miss Independent What success really means with Steph Webster of Miss Collective. Interview by Fi Mims


EDITOR’S LETTER

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ove it or loathe it (and I still swing between the two, depending on the day), social media and the role it plays in building a business can’t be ignored. In

fact, it’s impossible.

Most of us spend at least some part of each day scrolling through our feeds, posting, or scheduling. And just when we think we have a handle on it, something new comes out that we’re told we need to become an expert in, overnight, in order to stay up with the competition. If you haven’t ever felt overwhelmed and dropped a few F-bombs at it yet then I’d like to know your secret (and kudos to you)! It’s for these reasons (and many more) that we’ve decided to bring you an issue based solely on social media, with the hope you can take away some extra tips and tools for your kit. I’ve had the pleasure of working with some super talented women who have each carved out their own niche in the social media world. In doing so they’ve become experts in their field, and in addition, wonderful teachers. The contributors for this issue have each taught me so much and now you’ll be able to learn from them too.

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Karen Hollenbach from Think Bespoke is going to share some of the ways you can leverage LinkedIn for your business. If you’ve never gotten beyond putting up a profile, or even if you’re still wondering whether this platform is right for you, her article is a must-read.

Webster from Miss Collective. They’re doing amazing things bringing women together to learn from each other in the journey toward success. And if success for you includes podcasting, then you won’t want to miss my Q&A with Nat Hughes from Miss Independent.

While it seems to have slipped behind Instagram in terms of popularity, Facebook is still one of the biggest marketing tools available and can’t be ignored. Facebook maven Jayne Day is here to tell you all about how you can still get results from marketing on Facebook, even in the face of all the algorithm changes (who knew we’d need to know so much about maths to excel at marketing)!

This issue also marks the start of our second year of Shine! I’m pretty excited to have reached this milestone and it’s been a collaborative effort to bring this magazine to you each quarter. I want to give a huge shout-out to all the contributors who have made Shine possible so far. Working with such amazing women has been an honour and I can’t wait to see what the future brings.

I just know it’s going to help you become a social media rockstar!

To round out your social media marketing skills, we’ve got Serena O’Brien from Sova Social showing us how to build engaged communities by creating the right content, and Sam McFarlane from Sam Says offering advice on how to outsource your social media management so you can free up more time in your business for other things (and perhaps start dropping a few less F-bombs)! If you’ve ever doubted your ability or not been able to ask for what you’re worth, you’ll love my interview with Steph

Thank you also to YOU, my readers, for sharing this journey with me. I’m looking forward to showcasing more incredible women over the next 12 months and sharing more of their stories and talents with you, so you can be inspired to be all that you can be in your business. I hope you enjoy Issue 5. I just know it’s going to help you become a social media rockstar!

Fi Mims | Photographer + Editor

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CONTRIBUTORS Serena O’Brien Serena is a social media marketing strategist and manager who’s on a mission to make social media for business less overwhelming, more fun and more effective. She uses her background in marketing, branding, customer service and psychology to work with women in business, mums in business and those who target mums. She’s a mum of 2 girls and a social butterfly who loves a good laugh and a glass of bubbles!

Jayne Day Jayne Day is the founder and managing director of Webonize, an online marketing agency based in New South Wales, Australia. Jayne is an online marketing strategist and consultant and is well known for her expertise with getting results with Facebook Advertising for her clients both nationally and internationally.

Karen Hollenbach Karen Hollenbach is the founder of Think Bespoke. She provides a range of LinkedIn services from Professional LinkedIn updates to Company Page updates and ongoing management of your LinkedIn Profile, as well as online, small group and 1:1 LinkedIn training. She works at her clients’ pace and tailors solutions to meet their preferred learning style and budget. You can learn more from and about Karen through the Think Bespoke Blog where she shares her weekly insights about LinkedIn and what it means to be a parent, daughter, wife and entrepreneur in the digital age.

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Sam McFarlane Sam McFarlane is a social media and email marketer, a content creator, an event planner, a virtual assistant, and a shopaholic food lover who can’t wink (for real). Starting Sam Says in 2012, Sam helps small to medium businesses build their online profile. Specialising in social media and content management, events, newsletters, to-do list conquering, and daily admin, Sam has your business needs covered.

Natalie Hughes Natalie Hughes founded Miss Independent in 2017 to educate and mentor women in making their best career and business decisions. Natalie is an experienced businesswoman and non-executive company director focused on organisational design, strategy, growth and innovation. Her goal is to help you think differently, work differently and feel in control of your own destiny. Natalie would love to support you and your career. Say hello and connect with Natalie on LinkedIn.

Steph Webster Steph Webster is an advertising marketing veteran with 12 years experience in digital agencies. She works in partnership with her clients to drive business results, and offers regular career and business coaching on the Mornington Peninsula. C ​ o-founded with Kara Jenkins, ​Miss Collective is all about helping high achieving women give back to the broader community, and helping them support each other as they go on their journey toward success. ​Miss Collective are best known for their fabulous workshops and networking events, as well as their full day conference Level Up. shineonlinemagazine

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e h t g n i Tam Beast HOW TO BEAT SOCIAL MEDIA OVERWHELM

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By Serena O’Brien from Sova Social

et’s not sugar-coat it – social media can be a real drag, a time sucker, a beast of a thing. Yet it’s necessary for just about every business. And it’s so much more than just administration. It’s marketing. And it’s so much more than just marketing. It’s networking and community building. It’s multi-faceted and takes an approach that encompasses each of these for it to be successful for your business. If I had a dollar for every time someone told me they felt overwhelmed by social media I’d be living it up in the Maldives right now, but alas I’m not. Instead I’ve

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vowed to make social media for small business less overwhelming, more fun and more effective. My Maldives dream can wait… for now. A quote I live by when it comes to social media marketing is “People buy from people they know, like and trust”. Social media gives you the opportunity to reach out to your customers (and potential customers) and give them the chance to get to know you, like you and trust you to do work for them or buy your products or services. So with this in mind if I had to use one word to encapsulate social media, it would have to be that C word. You know the one I’m talking about… Community!


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Get to know your community Your community will be your friends, fans, supporters, referrers and eventually your clients or customers. This is how you build your business on social media – with a community. It’s your community that will make social media more fun and effective. And when this happens, you’ll be winning at social media! Never before has it been so important to build and nurture a community on social media, especially given the algorithm changes recently to Facebook and Instagram. We all know our content is only being seen by a small number of our followers. But if your content is received well by those people (in the form of likes and comments) then it’s released to more of your followers, and if received well by them, it’s released to more, and so on.

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The next question is how do you keep this community of people happy, willing to engage, supporting you, relating to you and ultimately buying from you? You need to know them inside out. This doesn’t mean simply knowing that they need what you sell. You need to know their favourite music, movies, TV shows, whether they watch Netflix (I mean who doesn’t huh?!), their sense of humour, whether they have kids, whether they love the beach or snow – the list is endless and the fun part about building a community on social media is you get to know your audience, and give them the chance to know you too. Why? Because people buy from people they know, like and trust, remember? And it’s fun meeting new people isn’t it?

Social media gives you the opportunity to reach out to your customers (and potential customers) and give them the chance to get to know you, like you and trust you to do work for them or buy your products or services.

So now you can see why your community is important when it comes to getting your content out there. What this means, is that it’s important to make sure your community consists of your people. Because people who are your people will want to engage in your content, have conversations and support what it is you do and stand for. Your people will probably be a mix of friends, biz buddies, mentors, collaborators, even competitors (#collaborationovercompetition), but if you want people to ultimately buy from you then your community also needs to

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consist of your ideal client(s) or your target audience. You might also have heard of client avatars: but that just makes me think of those giant blue creatures from the movie and I don’t want to work with clients like that – do you?

Nail your content You can reach your audience on social media in various ways. These include content, networking (online engagement, community management and face-to-face), advertising and hashtags. You can also keep building your audience with added extras such as collaborations, competitions


and influencer marketing. Ok, ok we’ve hit that overwhelm again. Let’s focus for the moment on the other C word… Content! Nail that and you’re well on your way. When it comes to content you need to keep your community in mind. What is it they want to see? Sure, they need reminders of what it is you do, but if you really want them to engage, like, comment and share your content (which you need them to in order to break through that algorithm) then you need to reach them at a personal level. You need to post content they can relate to, laugh at, have a light bulb moment about and get value from. Posting content at a personal level requires you to understand your audience intimately, and it’s not always about your business, products or services (although this is important). Knowing your audience inside out will allow you to market to their needs, be relatable and likable to them and allow you to build your community of friends, fans, supporters, referrers and ultimately clients and customers. The best way to get to know your audience better and open up to them is by testing out various types of content, and quite simply seeing what works and what doesn’t. Of course, you then do more of what works, and less of what doesn’t. Now this is often where some fear sets in – the fear of actually putting your content out there and the fear of failure if the content you put out there doesn’t work; bombs out; doesn’t even get a like…. the horror! Well, that’s a bit dramatic, but you know what I mean. If you know your audience well enough, the likelihood

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of your content bombing out is slim, but if it does, don’t be afraid to learn from the content that doesn’t perform as well, and of course take note of the content that performs the very best. This is a very simple, winning formula for social media dominance! As you can see, while social media is a multi-faceted beast, it can also be a great

Never before has it been so important to build and nurture a community on social media.

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place to build a community, a place for support and ultimately business growth. Take it slow, get to know your community and serve them through great content. If you concentrate on these aspects, you’ll be taming that social media beast and having a bit of fun before you can even say T.A.K.E. M.E. T.O. T.H.E. M.A.L.D.I.V.E.S…. ahhhhh!


Knowing your audience inside out will allow you to market to their needs, be relatable and likable to them and allow you to build your community of friends, fans, supporters, referrers and ultimately clients and customers.

Serena O’Brien And of course, if you’d actually rather be living it up in the Maldives or concentrating on other parts of your business that you love, you can always get someone like Serena O’Brien to tame that beast for you. Serena runs SOVA Social, a boutique social media marketing agency specialising in social media strategy and management solutions for women in business, mums in business and those who target mums. She just loves making social media less overwhelming, more fun and more effective! shineonlinemagazine

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FROM LIKE TO LOVE: HOW TO REACH YOUR TRIBE ON By Jayne Day from Webonize

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k o o b Face

f you’re using Facebook as a business marketing tool, you’ll know that it’s become increasingly difficult to reach your tribe and get engagement from posts on your Facebook Business Page.

Even in the last month, Facebook has updated its algorithm (again!), making it even harder for your Page posts to be visible to your followers. Things might sound bad, but don’t give up on Facebook just yet. When used effectively, it’s still a very powerful marketing tool. If you want to increase your results, here are some strategies that will help you get more from your Facebook investment. 1. Be social. Focus on creating conversations. You can’t just post and leave. Relationship building needs to be top of mind. Engage your followers and respond to comments. If you’re a local business

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then interact with other businesses in your area. Get involved in the Facebook groups that are relevant to your industry.

I realise you’re a busy business owner with a never ending to-do-list. But if you take time to be social and interact on Facebook as part of your social media marketing strategy, you’re going to see positive results. 2. Be clear in your message. Make sure what you’re posting is relevant and of interest to your ideal target clients or customers. Don’t be afraid to tell your followers exactly what it is your business offers or sells. Try and explain it at a basic level so your message is clear and people understand exactly what it is you do. Where it’s relevant, put a call to action in your post that tells them what to do next. If there’s any confusion in what you’re offering or what you want them


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“

Make sure what you’re posting is relevant and of interest to your ideal target clients or customers.

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to do, your followers may not take the time to reach out to you, which could mean you lose a potential client. 3. Tell stories. Storytelling is the new wave of marketing. People like to read stories they can relate to, so have a go at weaving storytelling into your Facebook posts and your Facebook Ads. Your reader will become more emotionally attached to what you’re offering if you do it through storytelling. Longer Facebook posts that tell a great story can get fantastic results so don’t be afraid to go into detail. You can also use a series of images or video to tell a story.

5. Don’t rely on Facebook alone. As the saying goes, “Don’t put all your eggs in the one basket” and nothing is truer in business marketing. You don’t control or own your Facebook page, so don’t rely on it alone to drive your business growth. Make sure you have a strategy in place to drive your followers and viewers from your Facebook page to your website. Once they arrive on your website you want to have a strategy in place to collect email addresses and also capture them in segments so you can make use of Facebook Ad retargeting at some stage.

People like to read stories they can relate to, so have a go at weaving storytelling into your Facebook posts and your Facebook Ads.

If you’re stuck on how to weave storytelling into your Facebook posts, think about sharing your personal story and why you started the business; customer case studies, their history and results they have achieved; or even sharing some behind the scenes information about you and/or your business. 4. Use video.

80% of internet traffic is now video based. Not just Facebook. The entire internet. This is huge. Facebook has also been open in saying that video is favoured by the algorithm in the Facebook newsfeed. So if you want your posts and content to be seen by more people, then make sure video is part of your strategy.

6. Chatbots. Using Facebook Messenger to communicate with potential clients or customers is becoming very popular. Why? Because these messages are being seen and opened more when compared with email.

The average email open rate is between 5% and 18%. With Messenger Marketing, business owners are seeing open rates of around 80%. A chatbot is the software used to do the communicating in Messenger and a lot of it can be automated. However, you should be careful that you don’t take automation too far. People don’t want to feel like they’re talking to a bot. If you haven’t seen chatbots in action yet, here’s an example of how it works.

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Let’s say you run a local dance studio. You put a post on Facebook about your new class that’s starting soon. In that post you might ask people to comment if they’d like more information. When people comment, you could then have your chatbot send them more information about the class to their Facebook Messenger. 7. Track your results. You can’t improve on something if you aren’t measuring the results you’re currently getting. To do this, you need to have Google Analytics connected to your website. Google Analytics is a free tool and will tell you how much traffic is coming to your website and where that traffic is coming from. If you’re keen to be more advanced, you can also setup conversions and goals and create

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special tracking codes (called UTM links) so you don’t just see the traffic that’s coming to your website, but also what conversions are taking place. And conversions doesn’t just mean sales. A conversion could also be someone submitting an enquiry or joining your email database. Drill this right down so that you can see the specific posts that are sending traffic to your website and producing conversions. 8. Facebook Ads. If you want to increase your results even further, you need to be

If you want your posts and content to be seen by more people, then make sure video is part of your strategy.


advertising. In my opinion, Facebook Ads are the most cost-effective way to market your business. They allow you to narrow down your audience so your ads are specifically targeted and this means you can get results without spending a fortune.

Finally, don’t be disheartened if you see low reach or engagement rates on your Facebook posts. You never know who might be watching from the sidelines without interacting with you. It might just be your next customer.

But for Facebook Advertising to work you need a strategy. You need to know exactly what you’re trying to achieve with your ads and you need to be tracking your results. Track everything using the Facebook pixel, custom conversions and events so that you know precisely what actions people are taking after they click on your ads. 9. Stay active and up to date. Facebook has become a popular search tool for its users. If people want to look up contact details or more information on a business, they often use Facebook. Google isn’t always the first option anymore. So you need to think of your Facebook page as you would your website. Keep all your information up to date and relevant. Be active often. And have a way of capturing follower details so that you can communicate with them on a regular basis outside of the Facebook platform (ie. email marketing)

Jayne Day Jayne Day is the founder and managing director of Webonize, an online marketing agency based in New South Wales, Australia. Jayne is an online marketing strategist and consultant and is well known for her expertise with getting results with Facebook Advertising for her clients both nationally and internationally.

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s p i T 5 Top

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e used to live in a world where she who shouted loudest won. Those with the biggest advertising and marketing budgets were the only brands that reached customers. And you marketed to everyone in the hope that just the right person might hear the message and take action. But today we’re living in a world where technology has levelled the playing field. No matter how big or small you are, or what product or service you deliver, you can create a real connection with a specific audience – your tribe.

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by Fi Mims Photog raphy HOW TO CONNECT WITH YOUR AUDIENCE ON SOCIAL MEDIA

Creating connection shows your clients that you understand and care about them. When we create connection, we create opportunities for magic to happen. And it’s more important than ever to make sure you’re connecting with your audience on social media. With this in mind, here are five things you can do to create connection in the social space.

SHARE BEHIND THE SCENES People are interested in the person they’re buying from and the personality behind the brand. Share things from your life so your tribe can get to know you, like you and trust you. I speak from experience


when I say that images of yourself will almost always get the most likes!

USE YOUR OWN VOICE Using your own tone of voice will show that you’re authentic. Speak to your audience in the same way you speak to your friends and don’t use formal language. It helps to read it out loud to yourself – is this something you’d say? Does it feel comfortable to say it aloud?

CREATE ENGAGEMENT Don’t just post and go! Ask questions of your audience and encourage them to engage. And when they do, make sure you engage back. Building relationships with your followers in this way creates incredible connection because you’re sharing things with each other.

SHARE STORIES – FROM YOU OR YOUR CLIENTS Sharing your story – the parts of it that you’re comfortable with – is the best way you can connect with your audience. If you aren’t comfortable sharing your story, then use your clients to share stories. When you share a story, you’re also telling people why you do what you do, what you value, the problems you solve and why people choose to work with you.

BE RELATABLE

No one wants to be friends with someone who’s perfect. Make sure you balance the awesome with the not-so-perfect bits of your life. The things that will make people respond by saying “me too!”

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Join us at

Helping to empower women in business to Level Up™ misscollective.com

Join us at

Our facebook group to help you connect facebook.com/groups/misscommunity

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n I d e k n i L g n i g a r Leve HOW TO BUILD INFLUENCE BEYOND YOUR PROFILE

By Karen Hollenbach from Think Bespoke

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f you’ve got an up-to-date LinkedIn Profile, then it’s time to take the next step and unlock LinkedIn for your business. LinkedIn works in a similar way to other social platforms. In order to get the most out of this professional connection platform, it helps first to consider how LinkedIn is the same as other social media. Let’s take a look at how you can use it like you might use Facebook or Instagram. There are two key ways to brand you and your business on LinkedIn:

1. LinkedIn Profile (your personal brand) 2. LinkedIn Company Page (your organisational brand) Once you’ve got these setup, this table will give you an idea of how you can use LinkedIn in the same way as Facebook or Instagram for your business.

Focus

LinkedIn

Facebook

Instagram

Personal Branding

LinkedIn Profile

Individual Facebook page (or fan page with your name)

Individual account

Business page with regular updates and events, with the option to boost posts and advertise.

Business account with analytics and the option to run ads and link to Facebook Page.

LinkedIn Company Page with regular Organisational updates with the Branding & Content option to sponsor Marketing updates and advertise. Be active and start conversations

Actively participating on LinkedIn is the first step to creating more leverage. If you’re not sure how to be more active on LinkedIn, here are four key things you can do to start more conversations and unlock LinkedIn for your business:

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1. Download the LinkedIn App to your phone and actively connect with your network by ‘connecting your channels’ (e.g. invite all of your clients, friends, previous school mates, colleagues, suppliers, collaborators and relevant Instagram and Facebook followers to connect with you on LinkedIn).

To help you decide if your clients or potential referrers are on LinkedIn, you need to take a look at the numbers. This is an essential first step I use before spending any time online. As a strategic thinker, many of the decisions I make for Think Bespoke and my clients’ online presence starts with business strategy and a review of target clients and where they play.

2. Do your research and make sure the people you want to influence are spending time on LinkedIn. If they are, that’s great! Follow or connect with relevant industry leaders and companies on LinkedIn and make sure you like or comment on their content when it appears in your LinkedIn newsfeed.

In Australia, while 4 out of 5 professionals are on LinkedIn, they don’t spend as much time there as they do on other social channels like Facebook or Instagram. There’s a slight skew towards men (but only 56 / 44) and users tend to be in the 30-54 year old age bracket, with 61% falling into this category globally.

3. Share updates via your LinkedIn Profile and even consider posting a popular blog from your website as a LinkedIn Article (which you can do from your LinkedIn Profile).

Interestingly, these individuals typically have more established careers, and have the most buying power out of all the age groups as they’re at the peak of their earning potential.

If you’re interested in income 4. Create a Company Page and add it demographics, 75% of LinkedIn users to your content plan and weekly social have incomes over A$64,000. For those in media posting schedule. If you use a the B2B space (business to business) 50% scheduling tool (like Buffer, Hootsuite of B2B buyers use LinkedIn when making or IFTT), you should add your purchasing decisions, with 76% preferring LinkedIn Company Page or LinkedIn to use recommendations from their Profile to make it easy to manage posts. professional networks1. Do your research: LinkedIn User Demographics What’s important about how you use LinkedIn (or any social media platform) is that the people you wish to influence spend time there too! Too many business owners and entrepreneurs automatically create LinkedIn and social media accounts across multiple channels simply because they think they should and not because the people they’d like to connect with are there.

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Are your target market on LinkedIn? Are you going to reach them if you spend time there? Use data to drive your decisionmaking In addition to using LinkedIn User Demographics, one of the many features LinkedIn provides is data related specifically to both your LinkedIn Profile and LinkedIn Company Page. This data informs the type of content I share


and helps start many conversations on LinkedIn with potential clients and referrers. In fact, my decision to invest in a personal branding photo shoot with Fi Mims Photography in 2017 was strongly influenced by my analytics and the type of content people were engaging with on Think Bespoke’s social media channels.

LinkedIn Company Page Analytics

LinkedIn Profile Analytics

• Sponsor updates and promote your content with targeted native advertising, drive traffic from the desktop app with easy-to-create ads, send sponsored InMails and create lead generation forms from sponsored content. Something to note is that cost per click (CPC) is higher on Linkedin compared to Facebook and Instagram as it has the potential for much higher conversion.

For your LinkedIn Profile, LinkedIn provides a dashboard for measuring your profile views, how many times you’ve appeared in searches and the keywords used to find you on LinkedIn. You can also see who’s viewed your profile, with premium (paid) accounts providing much greater visibility of who’s viewed your profile over the last four weeks.

For your LinkedIn Company Page you can: • Post updates (just like a Facebook Business Page) and measure followers, engagement, clicks, unique impressions, likes, comments and shares.

1 Most of these statistics are from a 2017 Hootsuite article on LinkedIn demographics for social media marketers.

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Social Selling and Content Marketing to leverage this, and the free features on LinkedIn LinkedIn offers to help you get more comfortable with adding it to your If you understand how to use LinkedIn repertoire of online conversations. to have more online conversations, it can become an incredibly powerful sales tool All of this assumes what I mentioned for your business. Think about how you earlier – that the people you want to engage with people on your Instagram and influence actually spend time on LinkedIn! Facebook business pages via comments LinkedIn also has features that are only and messaging. LinkedIn is the same! accessible via paid membership, one of Social Selling and Content Marketing are the most valuable being advanced search the two pillars on which I’ve built a referral functionality. This means it’s important to base for Think Bespoke. When people understand how LinkedIn rewards good think of me, they tend to think of me as behaviour, especially if you want to use it the ‘LinkedIn Lady’. I encourage you to as a business tool. apply this example Using sophisticated to your business algorithms, and consider how LinkedIn entices you want to be users with positioned in the gamification to minds of the people reward certain in your community behaviours. who can refer you, Gamification is your services and exactly like point your products. scoring (for things Consider your like having an ‘All personal brand like Star Profile’), to this: encourage more engagement. • What do I want to be known for? LinkedIn’s Social Selling Index (SSI) is a key component of this. • Who am I trying to influence? Unpacking Social Selling and the When you’re clear about your answers Social Selling Index to these two questions and focus your LinkedIn Profile and LinkedIn activity (e.g. If you’re new to Social Selling, LinkedIn your likes, comments, posts and LinkedIn describes it as “leveraging your social articles) on this, you’ll find you start having network to find the right prospects, build more of the right conversations with trusted relationships, and ultimately, the right types of clients and industry achieve your sales goals”. influencers via comments and LinkedIn There are four pillars of Social messaging. Selling for LinkedIn: Things you should know about 1. Create a personal / professional LinkedIn brand My approach to LinkedIn training is all This starts with your LinkedIn Profile. about showing you how it works, how A strong professional brand shows

If you understand how to use LinkedIn to have more online conversations, it can become an incredibly powerful sales tool for your business.

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you’re an active participant in your industry. It leads to more enquiries from prospects and more responses to messages you send. 2. Focus on the right prospects Who are you trying to influence? The clearer you are about this, the easier it is to focus your efforts and maximise your time on LinkedIn. 3. Engage with insights If you spend just 5 minutes a day on LinkedIn engaging with your connections’ content and responding to invitations to connect, it’s good for your business. 4. Build trusted relationships The magic of LinkedIn really does happen with messaging and responding to key trigger events (e.g. work anniversaries, new jobs, etc). Make sure you’re connected with everyone you know and aim for 500+ connections. Measure your success with the Social Selling Index: The Social Selling Index (SSI) allows you to track how well you’re leveraging your LinkedIn Profile for Social Selling. SSI is scored on a scale of 0 – 100 based on your LinkedIn activities relating to the four pillars. To measure your SSI you’ll need to be logged into your LinkedIn Profile on your desktop or laptop, open a new tab and Google ‘LinkedIn Social Selling index’. The search results will give you the option to get your score for free. Why not measure your SSI on LinkedIn right now? Then review it again after you’ve implemented some of my suggestions to leverage LinkedIn? Now go and unlock LinkedIn for your business!

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Use the tips and tools from this article and take some action today. And remember – it’s okay to have an opinion and it’s okay to share your expertise on LinkedIn. In fact, it’s essential for you to demonstrate your superpowers and have genuine conversations. If you focus on the needs of your community first and selling second, you’ll get great results from leveraging LinkedIn.


What’s important about how you use LinkedIn (or any social media platform) is that the people you wish to influence spend time there too! Too many business owners and entrepreneurs automatically create LinkedIn and social media accounts across multiple channels simply because they think they should and not because the people they’d like to connect with are there.

Karen Hollenbach Karen Hollenbach is the founder of Think Bespoke. She provides a range of LinkedIn services from Professional LinkedIn updates to Company Page updates and ongoing management of your LinkedIn Profile, as well as online, small group and 1:1 LinkedIn training. She works at her clients’ pace and tailors solutions to meet their preferred learning style and budget. You can learn more from and about Karen through the Think Bespoke Blog where she shares her weekly insights about LinkedIn and what it means to be a parent, daughter, wife and entrepreneur in the digital age. shineonlinemagazine

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e c r u o s Out HOW TO

YOUR SOCIAL MEDIA without losing your personality By Sam McFarlane from Sam Says

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here’s no denying that social media is a HUGE part of our lives. Whether you use it for business or for hours of mindless scrolling to see what your friends are doing, it’s our latest addiction. And as a social media manager, you’ll never hear me saying it’s a bad addiction! The problem most of my clients are finding is that they don’t have the time, or the know-how, to keep up-to-date and social on all the platforms we have available. They question, ‘What works the best’, ‘What platforms should I be using’, ‘What

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sort of content should I share’, ‘Do people care less about what I post’, ‘What’s the best time to post’, ‘Who’s doing this well’, ‘How much time am I wasting’, ‘Am I being consistent enough’? But when it comes to outsourcing their social media, they hesitate. Why? Because social media is meant to be personal and no one knows your business better than you. Right? Now although this is a little bit true (you can’t dispute that), you’ve also got to ask yourself, do you have the time to create the content, manage every single notification, and be ready to post all year round? If you’re even remotely curious about outsourcing your social media, here’s the questions you should be asking before you dive in.


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S S What you should ask yourself before you outsource

1. What are your branded and nonbranded keywords? It’s important to know that there are two types of keywords – non-branded keywords and branded keywords. You should have a list of both and you’ll really only use non-branded keywords to help with your Search Engine Optimisation (SEO) efforts. Here’s the difference:

Branded keywords include your brand name and variations of it. For example, Sam Says, or Sam Says Social Media Manager. You can pretty much guarantee that your website will rank number one for all variations of your branded keywords (unless another business has a very, very similar name). People who use your brand keywords already know who you are and are typing in your business name to find your website. You don’t need any SEO efforts for these keywords.

Non-branded keywords are words you want to be known and rank for. For example, Social Media Manager or Content Creator. These are the words you’ll have to tell your social media manager as they will use them in your posts. By being consistent and using these keywords on your website, your blogs and all your social media platforms, you’ll get more love from Google.

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2. What’s your brand personality?

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No one knows the ‘person’ of your business better than you. You must be able to articulate the following: Who you are What you value How you want to be perceived Your voice (what language is acceptable) What look, feel and style of posts you like (especially for Instagram) Your message (what do you want people to remember about you?)

3. Who is your target audience? If you’re randomly talking to everyone you’ll struggle to convert sales. Who is your target market (those ideal people you want to work with, who need your product etc.)? What platforms are they using? Find this out and focus your efforts there. Clients who know who they’re talking to get the best results from their social media efforts. 4. Who do you admire? Let’s be honest. We all have our little business crushes – those people we see all over social media


who are killing it. Their branding is on point, and their posts are so good, you want to emulate them. You might also see brands that turn you off – they’re scattered, plain and boring. Make a list of the good and bad brands as you see them and give this list to your social media manager. 5. What has worked for you? Think about your current social media efforts. What type of posts do people respond to? For example, if interactive

questions are working well for you, keep asking them. But if no one responds, ditch that idea until your audience is ready to interact with you. 6. What do you want to achieve from social media? When I ask clients this, they’re often not sure. They’re simply ‘doing’ social media because everyone else is and they feel they have to. Here are some things you may want to get out of your social media efforts:

You’ve also got to ask yourself, do you have the time to create the content, manage every single notification, and be ready to post all year round?

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Clients who know who they’re talking to get the best results from their social media efforts.

· Grow a following of fans who love you and keep coming back from more – once you’re known, you’ll find yourself getting tagged when people ask for recommendations · Increase engagement, meet more people, find complimentary services, and stay in touch with your audience · Everyone wants to sell more products/ services but be careful how you do this. People hate constant hard sells on social media as it’s meant to be ‘social media’, not ‘sales media’. Only ‘sell’ when asked (i.e. recommendation posts) or by using Ads · If you’re only doing social media to ‘have a presence’, that’s fine, but please don’t expect huge amounts of online love or to convert many followers into customers 7. How are you different? With so many people on social media, it’s easy to blend into the background.

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So, find YOU. What makes you different from everyone else? And don’t tell me it’s ‘nothing’. We all have at least one thing that makes us unique.

What you should ask your social media manager 1. How long have you been doing this and have you got referrals from current clients? 2. What industries do you work with? 3. What’s your personal favourite social media platform? 4. What do you think of our current efforts and what do you think we should be doing? 5. How often will we review our efforts and end goals and how do we determine success?


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6. What scheduling tools do you use? 7. How does this all work?

If you ask these questions and choose the right social media manager for you, then outsourcing your social media management will help create time in your business for you to spend doing the things you’re best at.

With so many people on social media, it’s easy to blend into the background. So, find YOU.

Sam McFarlane Sam McFarlane is a social media and email marketer, a content creator, an event planner, a virtual assistant, and a shopaholic food lover who can’t wink (for real). Starting Sam Says in 2012, Sam helps small to medium businesses build their online profile. Specialising in social media and content management, events, newsletters, to-do list conquering, and daily admin, Sam has your business needs covered. shineonlinemagazine

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Q&A 38

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s e h g u H e i l a t a N

ON BECOMING MISS INDEPENDENT Tell us about your business; who are your clients and why do they choose you? Miss Independent is for future-focused female leaders and aspiring entrepreneurs to learn and evolve. It’s a non-judgemental online space where you can access guidance and support. We help you find the answers you need to become more intentional in work and in life as well as being a positive daily source of inspiration and digital education. It’s our aim to reconnect you to the ‘real you’ of today and give you the tools, strength and resilience to strive towards your full potential. We understand how your work style informs your lifestyle and this is why our clients love us. We help you feel happier in yourself and proud of the work you do. What inspired you to start your podcast series? I’m passionate about learning and personal development, and listening to podcasts has become my first choice instead of books these days. Podcasts are powerful because of their accessibility, freedom to listen on demand and the variety of amazing content available - for free!

When I first found the iTunes Podcast App I seriously went on a bender listening to podcasts all week long. I couldn’t get enough. What I quickly realised though, was that there was a lack of female-focused content. I wanted someone to talk directly to me about my next career steps and help me solidify my business ideas. And nothing like this existed. So I decided to create it! Everyone is unique and we become who we are from the interactions we have with a broad range of people. For this reason, the Miss Independent podcast offers a diverse mix of women speaking about their own career and business experiences. We essentially provide female role models and mentors straight to your ear buds. I love the conversations so much and I think that shows. I’m naturally curious and use my 25+ years of corporate and business experience to ask the right questions: the ones I know will help my listeners get the most from their listening time. Everyone’s time is precious and I respect that. It means so much to me that Miss Independent podcast listeners are inspired and motivated by other women’s stories and feel that irrefutable urge to get off their butt, believe in themselves, and create a successful story of their own. shineonlinemagazine

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What did you find was the biggest challenge in setting up a podcast? At the beginning I believed the tech part of setting up a podcast was going to send me crazy. I was wrong. This was actually the easiest part. I’ll give you a not so secret tip here: YouTube! We really shouldn’t believe the lies we tell ourselves. At least not until we spend some time on Google and YouTube. So the biggest challenge I’d say for me when setting up the podcast was time. I underestimated the time involved with coordinating guests, writing the supporting blogs and following up with social media.

What have you learnt about yourself through the process of building your business and also your podcast series? I’ve learned how to be a lot more patient and to trust in the process. Building a business is hard and takes time. There are no shortcuts. I always believed in the vision I have for Miss Independent, but when people are coming at you from all angles suggesting

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I can pinpoint a few instances where I gave a bit too much time to things and people that weren’t relevant for where I was at with my business and board career. Now, I trust in my assessment of a situation immediately and can confidently say, “no, not right now, thank you”. And I focus on what my immediate and short term needs are.

Podcasts are powerful because of their accessibility, freedom to listen on demand and the variety of amazing content available for free!

I’ve now fine-tuned this process, but I was frustrated at the beginning with the time involved in doing all of this. Truly though, that could be said for any aspect of a business when introducing something new. You don’t really know what’s involved until you do it.

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different ways to do things you must have an amazing filter. People hustle and you’ve got to not be distracted by this.

What do you love most about what you do?

I absolutely love every part of what I’m doing. Even on the hard days when things don’t go as smoothly as I want them to, I still go to bed at night feeling damn good about myself and the work I do. I’ve created a highly relevant modern online experience for ambitious women and I’m very proud of it. Miss Independent is what I wish I had when climbing up the ranks in my corporate career and it’s what I continue to seek out now as an entrepreneur. The one surprise for me has been the creative process and branding aspects of the business. This has been soooooo personally satisfying. I’ve led marketing and strategy teams throughout my executive career, but with this being my own business it took things into a different


stratosphere. I was in my element, and I’m originally a numbers girl having started my career as an accountant with Ernst and Young! I’d now comfortably call myself a creator. What I believe truly helped was working with an amazing team of people from brand agency, Human Brand Story. We just clicked. They brought out the best in me and brought my future vision for Miss Independent to life. TRUTHBOMB TIME: Online it can appear everyone’s smashing it in business, whilst in reality we’re all facing challenges behind the scenes. Can you share something YOU struggle with on a day-to-day basis when it comes to running your business?

Being a single mum whilst running a business is an absolute juggle of time. Plus I’m a non-executive director and have monthly board meetings and extra committee meetings. I have brain swirl some days. Honestly, I just do my best. Some days my business gets little attention. Emails don’t get looked at. Social media is skimmed over. But, everyone survives and I get on with it again full steam ahead the next day. This interruption to rhythm can be frustrating, however I accept it’s the reality of my life right now. It’s not worth losing sleep over or feeling stressed. Believe me I can be cranky when I lack sleep. These days I’m very in touch with what I need to function at my best. I give a lot

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more attention to self-care: meditation, exercise, good food and sleep. It truly makes a positive difference to every aspect of my life when I take good care of myself. What are you looking forward to right now? I’m really looking forward to launching the Miss Independent online leadership and business educational programs. This is my next extension of the online experience for the Miss Independent community. Watch this space! You can have a little taste of what’s to come by downloading our free learning guides at www.missindependent.com.au/ learn What do you think is one trait people must have to be a successful entrepreneur?

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Tenacity. Not much can beat strength of will, persistence and determination. I believe that tenacious people feel every emotion, but they don’t give in. They keep striving and they are usually very influential leaders. What are you excited about right now? Technology and how we work. How good is it that you can choose how you want to work and how you want to earn money? And you can do it on this little device that fits into your pocket or handbag. Believe me I’m excited about what that means for my future, the future of women who currently feel marginalised and disempowered and the future of my children.


Technology has pushed the boundaries of tradition and is forcing corporates and governments to embrace change, innovation and globalisation in a new way. I feel very excited to be living during this time and to be a part of this shift in lifestyle, community, education and work. I absolutely love doing things differently and celebrating people who do things differently. What’s your favourite business tool? Currently I’m very into Trello. As I’ve built up the Miss Independent team, Trello has been a great project management tool for me to manage people, tasks, workflow and communication. I like simple apps and this one ticks all the boxes for me. What’s one piece of advice that has never left you?

When people are coming at you from all angles suggesting different ways to do things you must have an amazing filter.

There are two questions, or you could also say pieces of advice, that have come up for me recently through listening to podcasts and they’ve resulted in me totally switching by business to a new level. The first question is from Tim Ferriss. He asks, “What would it look like if it was easy?”

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This is my go to now when I feel overwhelm. It’s totally stopped me from thinking anything is hard. I no longer dwell on complexities. I jump straight to solutions. The other may also be from listening to the Tim Ferriss podcast, but I can’t remember who said it. The question is, “How would you do things differently if you were wealthy?” Think about it… how would YOU do things differently? You’d most likely go for it, wouldn’t you? I’m confident that I wouldn’t be sitting back drinking cocktails on a yacht or private island, I’d be making sure I’m doing work I love and making a difference in the world. This mindset and way of thinking has absolutely put a rocket inside me. I’m no longer afraid to spend money on the things that I believe really matter or have the conversations that make a difference to my business, my customers and me. I think back to how I designed growth strategies and spent massive amounts of marketing dollars for big returns in my executive days, and I apply this to Miss Independent, albeit in relative terms. I think big. I think huge. I think global. I created Miss Independent to impact and

influence the future of work for women. That’s not going to happen unless I’m well informed, give it my all, and have brilliant people on my team.

Technology has pushed the boundaries of tradition and is forcing corporates and governments to embrace change, innovation and globalisation in a new way. I feel very excited to be living during this time and to be a part of this shift in lifestyle, community, education and work.

Natalie Hughes

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PODCAST

Natalie Hughes founded Miss Independent in 2017 to educate and mentor women in making their best career and business decisions. Natalie is an experienced businesswoman and non-executive company director focused on organisational design, strategy, growth and innovation. Her goal is to help you think differently, work differently and feel in control of your own destiny. Natalie would love to support you and your career. Say hello and connect with Natalie on LinkedIn.

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s s e c c u S What s n a e M Really

(and other stories) WITH STEPH WEBSTER OF MISS COLLECTIVE Interview by Fi Mims

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ave you ever had that moment of doubt? The one where you question whether or not you can do this or ask your boss (or client!) to be paid what you’re worth? I have. More than once. And I know I’m not alone.

privilege of photographing earlier this year.

Well, Miss Collective is on a mission. They want women everywhere to succeed in their chosen field and they do this by giving high achieving women a platform to share their knowledge and building a community where we can all support each other as we journey toward success.

Fi:

Talk to me about Miss Collective first; what is it and who is it for?

Steph:

Miss Collective is all about helping women level up in their careers or business. We started Miss Collective just over three years ago after running She Says Melbourne. We started the She Says Melbourne chapter I think seven years ago. Kara met the founder of She Says in

The brainchild of formidable, ex-advertising duo Steph Webster and Kara Jenkins, Miss Collective are best known for their fabulous workshops and networking events, including the Level Up conference which I had the

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Here I chat with Steph about how Miss Collective came to be, the key to a great business partnership, her secrets to running successful events, how to know when to outsource and how we can work towards a world where women are able to acknowledge their worth.


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Cannes. She was over there for the [advertising] awards and got chatting to her about what she was doing and Allie was like, “Oh, you should really start the She Says chapter in Melbourne.”

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I guess working in the advertising industry it’s quite a maledominated industry. There’s not a lot of senior women at the top. She Says is all about the creative industry and trying to see more senior executive creative directors: currently women only represent 3% in these roles. Kara is actually one of those women. Well, was. She’s left the industry now. I think there was quite an affinity to what we were doing in the agency world; you know, the troubles you come across in your own career and the things that you wish you had access to. We always talk a lot about “you can’t be what you can’t see.” There wasn’t a lot of senior women that were helping other women and other generations climb up that ladder. Really, we started Miss Collective because

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we wanted to do more for women in business. To give them the opportunity to see successful women, ask questions, network with other women who were in the same scenarios and who just wanted some support and to talk about things.

The issues that we talk about are so universal really. It doesn’t matter what industry you’re in, whether it’s negotiating a pay rise or how to prepare a presentation or just networking in general. They’re all universal problems that women face in any stage of their career.

I guess for us, we really started Miss Collective to try and help women who have achieved success give back to that next generation of tomorrow’s leaders.

Fi:

So it’s really for any woman in business, whether she’s running her own business or in a corporate role?

Steph:

Yeah. We’re really probably more career focused than women in biz. But I think what we


find is that a lot of successful women, and a lot of women with ambition, they’ve got their own side hustle that they have started to try and help themselves stay motivated and connected. We find that a lot of women do have something else that they’re focusing on as well as their career. Fi:

When was the She Says chapter? When did you start that?

Steph:

That was probably seven years ago.

Fi:

In that many years you must have seen a lot of changes around support for women in business?

Steph:

I think there definitely is. Ultimately, we want to get to a point where we’re not having to have really targeted discussions about “supporting women”. It should be about the fact that everything is equal. We shouldn’t have to have femalefocused conferences in the future. I don’t think it’s any time soon but what we’re all trying to do now is actually work towards that equality, and all those little things that we can all do in our generation is going to help the next generation.

You can’t be what you can’t see.

Steph: Absolutely. Fi:

just the circles I move in and if it’s a bubble or is there really just so much more support now out there for women?

I mean, business itself has changed. I know when I started 12 years ago there was no social media. You could only go to inperson events and workshops. It was such a different scenario. Obviously now everything and anything is out there on offer. A lot of it for free. I wonder if it’s

There’s a huge amount of female-focused support, whether it’s women in business or entrepreneurship. I think there’s a lot more focus in entrepreneurship because entrepreneurship is a really lonely journey.

There is definitely a lot out there for that, but I think that there isn’t

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as much targeted at women who are trying to build their careers. A lot of women we’re attracting to the Miss Collective fold these days, there are a lot of corporate women who actually are just so tired of their professional development programmes that are just the same old thing day in, day out, that they want access to fresh thinking and different experiences.

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You probably saw at Level Up they’re very varied in what they do and what their role is and what their career trajectory has been, but there’s something you can take out of all of their journeys and apply that to your own situation.

Fi:

Yeah, absolutely. You mentioned about how lonely entrepreneurship is. That’s a good segue into talking about your partnership with Kara. I’d love to know how you both met. Was it just through working together?

Steph:

Yeah. We worked at Visual Jazz back then, now Isobar. I guess that was maybe eight years ago. Kara and I work really well

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together. She’s a creative, I’m kind of the suits strategist. I guess we’ve always just bounced everything off each other. I don’t know that I’d be able to do what we do without having a partner like Kara. Fi:

Everyone talks about collaboration at the moment and this is obviously more of a business partnership, but it’s still collaborating and there must be huge benefits to having someone by your side through the whole journey.

Steph:

Absolutely. We’re really good mates. We really enjoy doing it together and we’ve got a similar vision. We’ve always been really aligned about why we’re doing it and what we want to achieve with it. I think when you’re on the same journey but you’ve then got that person to bounce ideas off and challenge or start to build on ideas as they come… Kara is so good at thinking on the fly and we’ll be somewhere and she’s like, “Oh my God. We should do this.” Sometimes we don’t capture that stuff enough but she’s full of ideas and then because I have more


of the organisational and project manager/account manager in me I help drive things. We’re really yin and yang but we’re really similar too.

I think it’s really important to find somebody that you really can feel 100% confidence and trust in, and that you can just know is going to be there regardless and just have an opportunity to have really safe conversations. You know, you might not be feeling like something might be the right thing and you talk something through. I think just having that voice of reason is really important.

Fi:

It’d be incredible. Are there any challenges in working in a partnership that you’ve found?

Steph:

I think running a business is not easy regardless of whether you’re in a partnership or company. I think probably the toughest is when neither of you really want to own something because it’s just not your area of expertise. I think we’re only really coming to the point where we’re learning that we need to outsource the things that we’re not that good at.

Fi:

What do you think are some of the most important skills to have to run a business successfully?

Steph:

You’ve got to have tenacity. I think running a business is so difficult. You’re going to get knocked down more times than you’re actually going to get to the next level. It’s just about having the tenacity to pick yourself up and be able to keep going.

Fi:

I’d love to talk a bit about Level Up. Level Up is your major conference you’ve held for the past two years, which I was lucky enough to get to photograph this year! What inspired you to start Level Up and how does it differ from other conferences, what you see as its point of difference?

Steph:

Good question. For us we have been really fortunate with the calibre of speakers in our network that over the last seven years they’ve just been like, “Yep, we’ll get involved.” Everyone that we have asked to get involved with any of our She Says and Miss Collective events have been so willing to just jump in and go, “yep, what do you need?” I think when you’ve got the support of

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such amazing people like that and you can see how well it resonates with the topics that they’re talking about and how the audience responds, we were just like, “We want to do more of that.” We felt like we had such a good network and there were so many incredible speakers that we could bring to our audience that it felt right to do a full day.

We didn’t see anything out there that was like Level Up for women in business and women in their careers. Actually some of the feedback we got around the conference from some of the attendees was, “It wasn’t quite clear who your audience was. Was it a conference for marketers? Was it a conference for women in tech?” We kind of liked the fact that there was a few different streams going throughout a whole day because I think today you really need to understand that with marcomms and tech we’re using technology to power all of our businesses these days. As a marketer you need to understand

some of that technology and you use digital to enable your marketing efforts.

I think that now those lines are becoming so blurred that it’s really important to actually show more breadth and keep your mind learning in that more broad set because that’s going to really impact the way that you evolve your career.

Fi:

Do you have any tips for people wanting to move into offering workshops or events?

Steph:

Consistency is one of them. I think your audience have to know that they can expect consistency from you, that you run them on a regular basis, and they know when things are happening. Relying on your marketing is really important. Like investing in really high quality photography and video - everything is moving to video now as well.

I think making sure to invest in the content when you do run those events so that you’ve got great things to market and talk about afterwards is really

We’re learning that we need to outsource the things that we’re not that good at.

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important. Getting testimonials from people that attend your events so that you can tell other people why it is so valuable and why they should attend.

Definitely don’t go into workshops thinking that you’re going to earn the big bucks. Workshops and events are all about helping build your audience and your network really. It’s about establishing trust and authority - trust that you know what you’re talking about. Align with people that share your values. Don’t do an event with somebody when you don’t align with their values. It’s got to be a representation of you, your brand, and your own personal values. You’re going to find a lot more success that way.

Fi:

They’re great tips. You’ve got a lot going on in your life - how do you juggle it all?

Steph:

I think the biggest thing is it not feeling like work. Miss Collective never feels like work for me or Kara. When we get together we have a glass of wine or we go to locations that we really enjoy and

we work from there. The world is our office. We can take Miss Collective wherever we want to be able to work on it.

When you’re doing something that so intrinsically doesn’t feel like work and you just love it and you’re passionate about it and there’s just a fire in your belly about why you do it, then you kind of just make room for it.

Fi:

Level Up and Miss Collective, it’s all about helping women level up in their career - what do you think is the biggest barrier that holds women back from doing that at the moment?

Steph:

There’s a couple of things. I think the confidence gap is probably a really big one. I feel like we really lack the confidence in ourselves that we can do it. You hear so many stories about a man and woman go for a promotion, the man thinks he’s overqualified and the woman thinks she’s underqualified. And that’s a consistent story. You look at the inequality in pay and the gender gap disparity and you can see that backed up.

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It’s not that the women are any less capable but they didn’t have the confidence to ask what their value actually was. I think there’s a long way to go in helping women find their voice and find the way to ask for what they’re worth, and then equally having employers really understand what unconscious bias is and how that impacts their decisions and how they recruit.

gets a little loud and you need to go to events like Level Up or get yourself a girl squad and remind yourself why you deserve it. Fi:

You do have to surround yourself with your tribe don’t you! Now it’s time for some quick fire questions to finish.

What’s your favourite business or tech tool?

Steph:

Oh my God. Slack and Zoom. Honestly, Zoom for us has been amazing. Kara and myself we live near each other but we’re not always accessible at the same times. You kind of just need to be able to jump on a call or jump in and figure things out at the drop of a hat. Being able to see people and have conversations makes such a difference. You can be anywhere in the world and talk to people, which I love.

There’s a lot of organisations like REA Group and Jetstar who are doing unconscious bias training for their senior leaders and senior managers but I do think that there’s quite a long way to go in helping drive a bit more of that diversity in the workplace.

Fi:

Absolutely. It does feel like it’s happening at grassroots level, doesn’t it? Which is a great feeling but there is still lots of work to do.

Steph:

Yeah. Absolutely.

Fi:

Favourite podcast?

Fi:

It makes me really sad that women are missing out or just wasting time due to a lack of confidence – things we shouldn’t be worrying about. It is changing and women are supporting each other a lot more … we’re all getting used to putting ourselves ‘out there’ more, but very slowly.

Steph:

Steph:

It’s women that are in really senior roles as well that still have that confidence gap. I’ve met so many incredibly accomplished women who don’t like to talk about the fact ... “Oh, you know, I don’t know if I could do this.” That’s just crazy to me.

I absolutely love all of Gimlet Media. I do love Startup. That was probably one of my favourite podcasts. I also really love Mixer G. Andrew Warner is the host. He has this knack of getting great insights out of his interviewee and the guest. You know when some people would just stop asking questions - he delves a little bit deeper. He gets to the nitty gritty of the reasons people have been successful and I love that.

Fi:

One book that’s changed your life?

Steph:

I love Simon Sinek’s Start With Why. I think there’s been a real resurgence of people trying to find their why and realising just how important understanding your why is to be able to achieve what you’re looking to achieve. If you don’t know why you’re doing something it’s really hard

Fi:

Yeah. Where did that come from? Why have we all got that inside us? It’s crazy.

Steph:

Absolutely. I’ve got a huge amount of it. I still do it. Sometimes the little voice just

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for you to find the energy to make it happen and talk about it and be able to tell other people why they should believe in you. I think that that’s probably one of my favourites of late. Fi:

What’s your definition of success?

Steph:

Ultimately, I’ve met so many incredibly accomplished women who what you’re doing. You know, success isn’t really a pay check. It’s being proud of what you’re doing and that you’re leaving a legacy behind. All we can hope for is being able to make our children proud and to feel good about what you’re doing and that what you’re doing has an impact.

Fi:

Last question. What are you excited about right now?

Steph:

We’re super excited about planning the next evolution of Level Up. I think we want to trial different formats of what we’re doing. Trying out new venues and trying to listen to some of the feedback we got from this year’s event and really make it bigger and better for next year. We’re already in planning mode for Level Up next year and we’re also working on releasing a product this year. I think between that and the conference it’s going to be pretty busy.

Steph Webster Steph Webster is an advertising marketing veteran with 12 years experience in digital agencies. She works in partnership with her clients to drive business results, and offers regular career and business coaching on the Mornington Peninsula. ​Co-founded with Kara Jenkins, ​Miss Collective is all about helping high achieving women give back to the broader community, and helping them support each other as they go on their journey toward success. ​Miss Collective are best known for their fabulous workshops and networking events, as well as their full day conference Level Up. shineonlinemagazine

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“THERE’S A LONG WAY TO GO IN HELPING WOMEN FIND THEIR VOICE AND FIND THE WAY TO ASK FOR WHAT THEY’RE WORTH.”

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Shine Magazine is edited by Amey Lee from Heart Content.

and designed by White Deer Graphic Design

Profile for Fi Mims Photography

SHINE - Issue 5  

SHINE - Issue 5  

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