Issuu on Google+

E

prextens sen ive of ttatio he n

Trip

inc

lud

ed

Movies and TV production in France

THE INCENTIVES GUIDE 2013

Conception and writing: Franck Priot, Caroline Julliard-Mourgues, MĂŠlanie Chebance, Patrick Lamassoure


xxx

Credits for cover photos: © Henri Garat – Mairie de Paris / Tour Eiffel – Pierre Bideau concepteur Lumière © Commission du film des Alpes Maritimes © Bayoo Media © F. Da Costa © Universal Pictures and Illumination Entertainment

Conception and writing: Franck Priot, Caroline Julliard-Mourgues, Melanie Chebance, Patrick Lamassoure Published by Film France 9 rue du Château d’Eau 75010 Paris Tel + 33 (0)1 53 83 98 98 Fax + 33 (0)1 53 83 98 99 film@filmfrance.net www.filmfrance.net President: Nicolas Traube Chief Executive Officer: Patrick Lamassoure Chief Operating Officer: Franck Priot

With the support of the CNC (National Center for Cinema). All reasonable measures have been taken to ensure the accuracy of information of this guide. The Publisher cannot accept any responsability for any errors or omissions or for any liability resulting from the use or misuse of any such information. This book can be downloaded as a PDF file from www.filmfrance.net Printed in France Dépôt légal à parution Designed By Scope: www.scope-editions.com Copyright: Commission Nationale du Film France, 2013 This booklet is free, it cannot be sold.

IG-2

The Incentives Guide


Content

Content INTRODUCTION

IG 9

PART 1 : FILM FRANCE Chapter 1 : Who we are

IG 12

I.Film France, the French Film Commission

IG 12

II. The network of film commissions in France

IG 13

Chapter 2 : A direct link to identify French Partners

IG 13

Chapter 3 : Contacts

IG 14

PART 2: FEATURE FILM INTRODUCTION

IG 21

Chapter 1: Get a “TRIP” to France

IG 22

I.Eligible companies

IG 23

II. Eligible productions and expenses 1.Live action 2. Animation 3.VFX & post-production works

IG 24 IG 24 IG 25 IG 26

III. Application Process 1. Provisional approval 2. Final approval 3. Collecting the international tax rebate 4. TRIP discount 5.Credits

IG 28 IG 28 IG 28 IG 28 IG 29 IG 29

IV. Trip Line Up

IG 30

Chapter 2: How to make an official co-production

IG 32

I. Qualifying for the French System 1. Why France supports movie production: the spirit of the system 2. Co-production agreements

IG 32 IG 32 IG 32

The Incentives Guide

IG-5


Content

3.The French Qualification process a. The European Scale b. The French Scale

II. Available funding for French-qualified co-productions 1. General overview 2. The weight of TV money

a. The free-o-air networks b. Pay TV c. What they look for

3. The automatic subsidies 4.The Soficas 5. Cash flow Production 6.Selective subsidies a. The national subsidy: advance upon receipts b. Special support for co-productions with Germany and Canada c: The local subsidies

IG 33 IG 34 IG 38

IG 43 IG 43 IG 44 IG 44 IG 44 IG 44

IG 45 IG 46 IG 47 IG 47 IG 47 IG 47 IG 48

Chapter 3: Cinémas du monde

IG 50

I. Application requirements and obligations

IG 50

II. Colleges and procedures

IG 51

III. Amounts

IG 51

PART 3 : TV dramas, series, animation

IG-6

Chapter 1: Get a “TRIP” to France

IG 54

I.Eligible companies

IG 54

II. Eligible productions and expenses 1.Live action 2. Animation

IG 55 IG 55 IG 56

III. Application Process 1. Provisional approval 2. Final approval 3. Collecting the international tax rebate 4. TRIP discount 5.Credits

IG 58 IG 58 IG 58 IG 58 IG 59 IG 59

IV. Trip Line Up

IG 60

The Incentives Guide


Content Chapter 2 : Co-producing with France

IG 61

I. Overall market Presentation 1.The State support system for TV production

IG 61 IG 61

a. Broadcasters’ obligations b. CNC support

2. Key figures

a.Yearly investment and volume b. Average costs and broadcasters contributions

3. Most of the productions are majority French a. Animation and documentaries b. Dramas & series c. French producers go for mainstream international series

II. Qualifying for the French system 1. The benefits of qualifying 2. Qualifying criteria 3. The French-Canadian Co-production Treaty 4. The local tax rebate 5. The local subsidies

IG 61 IG 61

IG 62

IG 62 IG 62

IG 63

IG 63 IG 63 IG 64

IG 64 IG 64 IG 64 IG 67 IG 67 IG 68

APPENDICES I. How to meet French producers 1.Cannes Producers Network 2. Cannes Producers Workshop 3. Cannes Doc Corner 4. Paris Project 5. ACE Events 6. CRC co-production meetings 7. Film France

a.Finding a production services company b. co-production services

IG 70 IG 71 IG 72 IG 73 IG 74 IG 75 IG 77 IG 78 IG 78 IG 79

II. Industry directories, institutions and organizations 1. The National Center for Cinema 2. Producers Union 3. French Local & Regional Supports

IG 80 IG 80 IG 81 IG 82

III. TRIP : The Cultural Test 1. Point rating scale applicable to live action productions 2. Point rating scale applicable to animation productions 3. Eligible countries and territories

IG 87 IG 87 IG 89 IG 92

IV. Minority French co-productions (2006-2012)

IG 93 The Incentives Guide

IG-7


Introduction You are currently working on an exciting project and there is something French in the script: a key location, a city, a region, a character (fictional or real). Maybe you know that your director or one of your stars has a large following in France and you want to benefit from this notoriety. Or maybe you’re developing an ambitious animated film, or a film that requires impressive special effects, so you’d like to work with some of France’s most creative studios. In any case, you feel that you should partner with someone in France and figure out how to raise money from the French market. You can access the brand new TRIP (Tax Rebate for International Production) and save 20 % on your French expenses. Or, you can explore the CNC’s traditional system and set up a co-production with a French partner, which will label your project a “French qualified film” and may allow it to benefit from the available grants or incentives, the sofica investments, regional supports, etc. This pretty much depends on each individual project. Since 2009, France has established a Tax Rebate for International Production that reimburses 20 % of the eligible costs of foreign movies and TV productions shot in France, providing that they comply with a set of requirements. This refundable incentive that can reach up to e4M is also open to animation and VFX projects made partly or completely by a French studio. Since its implementation, the TRIP has already been granted to 39 foreign productions, including films from famous directors such as Clint Eastwood, Chris Nolan, Woody Allen, Martin Scorsese and Jackie Chan. Or English language series from the US (Gossip Girl) and the UK (Merlin, Death in Paradise). Some projects may receive more French support through the co-production system because of their financial details and artistic content. Building a co-production with France makes sense – as long as you have enough European elements in the film. In 2010, 58 foreign movies were co-produced by French companies and in 2011, 65 foreign films were made. Plus, no other film community in the world can claim to be involved in one way or another in so many foreign-language titles. In this guide, we explain how the government’s support system works and what type of financing may be obtained in France for your project. Our aim is to help you better understand your prospective French partner’s point of view, a partner who is, in fact, in prime position to assess your case. For TV series and dramas, co-production doesn’t happen that often, but there are real opportunities for animation and documentaries. This guide dedicates a full chapter to co-productions for TV formats. In this guide, you will also find the titles of the international projects that have received TRIP funding since 2009, as well as films and TV content co-produced by Gallic companies in the last five years. In the latter, you will find the names of the production companies, the budgets and the different types of financing they received in France. Last but not least, since every real partnership starts with an interesting encounter, this booklet will also provide you with a short list of events where you can meet French production companies. Filmmaking is all about building the right team and your work in France will require you to find the right French partners. Do not hesitate to contact us if you have questions after reading this handy guide! You know where to find us.

The Incentives Guide

IG-9


«Be

inspired by Guadeloupe» avec Death in Paradise

l

a on

i at n r te e la n I é et d h c ar Film sion M u vi d élé T

Crédit photo - D.R. - Création Lejuez Monica -Death in Paradise - Red Planet Pictures - Région Guadeloupe

157 Techniciens (dont 50% trilingues) qualifiés au service de la production -15% du coût du travail grâce à la réduction des charges sociales patronales (LODEOM renforcée) 20% de Tax Rebate for International and National Production 1 BTS «Métiers de l’Audiovisuel»

1

5

7

1 fonds d’aide ambitieux 1 commission du film disponible 24/7 1 accueil hors-pair

ls Festiva a ém de Cin

mi tél llions é he spe de bd cta om te ad urs air e

Un réseau développé dans toute la Caraïbe Un équipement adapté et performant

CARAÏBES

Le CNC, Film France, le Comité du Tourisme des Iles de Guadeloupe, Concept X et Panavision-Alga accompagnent la Région Guadeloupe Contacts : www.guadeloupefilm.com et guadeloupefilm@cr-guadeloupe.fr


Film France

PART 1

TheTaxrebate for interna tional proPART 1 duction (trip) FILM FRANCE

The Incentives Guide

IG-11


Film France

Film France, The French Film Commission 1 - Who we are The National Film Commission France is a state-funded agency in charge of promoting France as a shooting location. We coordinate a network of 39 local film commissions throughout the country that offer free information and assistance to facilitate your shoot. a. Film France, the French Film Commission Film France is the first stop for foreign production companies and individuals preparing to film in France. Film France provides free assistance in contacting appropriate agencies regarding immigration/work permits and filming permits, as well as information regarding labor rates, studio facilities, post-production facilities and suppliers. Film France can also provide information about co-productions opportunities in France and assists foreign producers who wants to apply to the TRIP (Tax Rebate For International Production). Nowhere else in Europe will you find such a large diversity of locations combined with a highly skilled workforce. France is home to one of the strongest film communities in the world and is proud of its free spirit. Crews jump from short films to large-scale productions and are recognized for their versatility and adaptability. The Film France board is made up of key film and television producers, prominent people in technical services industries and representatives of the CNC and local governments. Film France is a member of the AFCI (the Association of Film Commissioners International www.afci.org), and of the EuFCN (the European Film Commissions Network - www.eufcn. org), and of the AFCnet (the Asian Film Commissiosn Network – www.afcnet.org)

Film France – 9 rue du Chateau d’Eau - 75010 Paris - FRANCE Tel + 33 1 53 83 98 98 • film@filmfrance.net • www.filmfrance.net Patrick Lamassoure - Chief Executive Officer Franck Priot - Chief Operating Officer Caroline Julliard-Mourgues - Legal Affairs Melanie Chebance - Foreign Producers Relation Fanny Fan - Foreign Producers Relation Calvin Walker - Information Systems Elsa Chevallier - Administration

IG-12

The Incentives Guide


Film France b. The network of film commissions in France The local film commissions promote and facilitate shoots in their area and assist crews with all types of productions (feature films, television programs, commercials and music videos). Each local film commission, also known as a film office, member of the network of the National Film Commission France, provides free assistance in the following areas: • information about locations and pre-scouting (constitution of a database, digital photographs, etc.) • search for crew, cast and extras (casting facilities are available in most film offices) • administrative procedures, assistance in obtaining filming permits • logistical and diverse information (vehicle rental, lodging, etc.) • production office facilities and documentation • relations with the press and local authorities. Contacts: see pages 15-17.

2 - A direct link to identify French Partners The firs tand third parts of this guide provide information about the TRIP, the French support system and the various financial sources available for foreign projects. The appendices tell you about how and where to find a French producer. Film France can provide you with lists of key professionals (such as a French production services companies or line producers) to either organize your shoot in France and/or to be eligible to the TRIP. Specific lists of French producers that may fit your criteria can also be compiled by Film France. Indeed we have an extensive database of French producers experienced in handling foreign films, as well as information about foreign movies co-produced by French companies since 2000: financing, budget, support rate, subsidies... Film France can also help you to identify the key elements that will increase your project’s attractiveness and raise the interest of a potential French partner. We can assist you to figure out how to obtain as many French elements as needed to have your film “qualified as French” (crew members, locations, post facilities, VFX houses, talents, etc), but also to understand how this will maximize the automatic subsidies your future partner will benefit from. Do not hesitate to contact us for more information or assistance with your project at film@filmfrance.net. We also have a French Production Guide available to you free of charge. You may also visit our website at: www.filmfrance.net

The Incentives Guide

IG-13


Film France The Network of Film Commissions in France

1 2

3 4

7

5

9

15

14

6 13 12

11

10

16

19

17 23

21

29 26 25

IG-14

The Incentives Guide

38

20

22 24

37

18

27

32

35 30

39

34

31

33 28

36


Film France

Contacts

The Network of Film Commissions in France

Film France The French Film Commission Tel + 33 1 53 83 98 98 Fax : + 33 1 53 83 98 99 film@filmfrance.net • www.filmfrance.net >1 Nord-Pas de Calais Film Commission PICTANOVO Tel + 33 3 20 28 26 53 jallard@pictanovo.com www.pictanovo.com Jérôme Allard >2 Picardy Film Commission ACAP Tel + 33 3 22 72 68 30 filmpicardie@acap-cinema.com www.filmpicardie.com Juliette Flament >3 Upper Normandy Film Commission Pôle Image Haute-Normandie Tel + 33 2 35 70 70 41 bat@poleimagehn.com www.poleimagehn.com Nùria Rodriguez • Carole Laumier >4 Lower Normandy Film Commission Maison de l’Image Basse-Normandie Tel + 33 2 31 06 23 23 j.prat@maisondelimage-bn.fr www.maisondelimage-bn.fr Johanne Prat >5 Ile de France Film Commission Tel + 33 1 56 88 12 88 stephane.martinet@idf-film.com constance.cardon@idf-film.com www.iledefrance-film.com Olivier-René Veillon • Stéphane Martinet Constance Cardon >6 Paris Film Mission Cinéma Tel + 33 1 44 54 19 60 tournages@paris.fr www.parisfilm.fr Sophie Boudon-Vanhille

>7 North East Paris Film Commission Pôle audiovisuel nord parisien Tel + 33 1 78 35 09 94 comfilm@lepole.org www.lepole.org Stephan Bender >8 Champagne Film Commission ORCCA Tel + 33 3 26 55 71 83 leo.pignaud@orcca.fr www.orcca.fr Léo Pignaud >9 Brittany Film Commission CRTB Tel + 33 2 99 28 44 60 tournages@tournagesbretagne.com www.filmsenbretagne.com Catherine Delalande • Emmanuelle Lohéac Fanny Sabatier > 10 Western Loire Film Commission Tel + 33 2 40 48 81 24 bat@agence-paysdelaloire.fr www.agence-paysdelaloire.fr/BAT Pauline Le Floch > 11 Loire Valley Film Commission Ciclic Tel + 33 2 47 56 08 08 fanny.barrot@ciclic.fr www.ciclic.fr Fanny Barrot > 12 Burgundy Film Commission Tel + 33 3 86 34 47 60 contact@filmbourgogne.com www.filmbourgogne.com Gaëlle Laurent > 13 Alsace Film Commission - Region Agence culturelle d’Alsace Tel + 33 3 88 58 87 57 films.alsace@culture-alsace.org michel.woch@ culture-alsace.org www.culture-alsace.org Glenn Handley • Michel Woch

The Incentives Guide

IG-15


Film France > 14 Strasbourg & Urban Community Film Commission Communauté Urbaine de Strasbourg Tel + 33 3 88 43 61 82 estelle.zimmermann@strasbourg.eu www.strasbourg-film.com Estelle Zimmermann

> 22 Dordorgne Film Commission Ciné Passion en Périgord Tel + 33 5 53 07 91 91 thierry.bordes@cine-passion24.com http://cinema.cg24.fr/ Thierry Bordes • Rafael Maestro • Fanny Stemart

> 15 Lorraine Film Commission Tel + 33 3 87 31 81 40 marie-alix.fourquenay@lorraine.eu www.tournages.lorraine.eu Marie-Alix Fourquenay

> 23 Gironde Film Commission Tel + 33 5 56 48 67 85 m.rateau@tourisme-gironde.fr www.tourisme-gironde.fr Frédérique Kohler • Marie Rateau

> 16 Poitou-Charentes Film Commission Tel + 33 5 45 94 37 81 m.perronnet@cr-poitou-charentes.fr www.cinema.poitou-charentes.fr Marie Perronnet

> 24 Lot-et-Garonne Film Commission Espaces Productions 47 Tel + 33 5 53 41 65 19 info@bat47.com www.bat47.com Hervé Bonnet • Sanne Brinkhoff

> 17 Limousin Film Commission Tel + 33 5 87 21 20 80 cinemaenlimousin@cr-limousin.fr www.cinemaenlimousin.fr Valérie Fumet • William Windrestin > 18 Auvergne Film Commission Sauve qui peut le court-métrage Tel + 33 4 73 14 73 14 cfa@clermont-filmfest.com www.filmauvergne.com Stéphane Souillat • Vincent Kaluza > 19 Rhône-Alpes Film Commission Tel + 33 4 72 98 07 98 sergetachon@comfilm-rhone-alpes.fr a.malfroy@comfilm-rhone-alpes.fr www.comfilm-rhone-alpes.fr Serge Tachon • Aurélie Malfroy-Camine > 20 Drôme Ardèche Film Commission Tel + 33 9 52 35 26 14 contact@cineda.com www.cineda.com Sébastien Cobos > 21 Aquitaine Film Commission ECLA Aquitaine Tel + 33 5 47 50 10 06 yane.lahaye@ecla.aquitaine.fr www.ecla.aquitaine.fr Yane Lahaye • Mia Baqué IG-16

The Incentives Guide

> 25 Southern Midi-Pyrenees Film Commission Ciné 32 Tel + 33 5 62 63 69 30 accueil.tournages@cine32.com www.cine32.com Josiane Bled > 26 Northern Midi-Pyrenees Film Commission Gindou Cinema Tel + 33 5 65 22 89 69 atmpn@gindoucinema.org www.gindoucinema.org Marie Virgo > 27 Languedoc-Roussillon Film Commission Tel + 33 4 67 64 92 58 marin@languedoc-roussillon-cinema.fr sandrine@languedoc-roussillon-cinema.fr www.languedoc-roussillon-cinema.fr Marin Rosenstiehl • Sandrine Courouble Delphine Jouan > 28 Provence-Alpes-Côte d’Azur Film Commission Tel + 33 4 91 57 59 73 crf@regionpaca.fr www.regionpaca.fr Vassili Meimaris • Fabienne Dabanian


Film France > 29 Southern Alps Film Commission CFAS Tel + 33 6 75 80 37 13 info@cinefas.com www.cinefas.com Nathalie Pons > 30 Marseilles Film Office Tel + 33 4 91 55 94 51 missioncinema@mairie-marseille.fr www.marseille.fr Robert Bayou • Samia Baila > 31 Aix en Provence Film Commission Tel + 33 4 42 91 97 68 albertinimc@mairie-aixenprovence.fr Christine Albertini > 32 Luberon Vaucluse Film Commission Tel + 33 6 88 55 32 68 filmvaucluse@gmail.com www.filmvaucluse.com Joan Azorin > 33 South of France Film Commission Var Tel + 33 4 94 54 81 88 michel.brussol@wanadoo.fr www.filmvar.com Michel Brussol > 34 French Riviera Film Commission Tel + 33 4 93 13 75 12 evelyne.colle@cote-azur.cci.fr www.cote-azur.cci.fr Evelyne Colle

> 35 West Provence Film Commission Tel + 33 4 42 11 24 47 nathalie.bremond@ouestprovence.fr Nathalie Bremond > 36 Corsica Film Office Corsica Pôle Tournages Tel + 33 4 20 03 37 11 corsicapoletournages@ct-corse.fr www.outil-culturel.corse.fr Yolaine Lacolonge • Sandrine Rossi > 37 New Caledonia - Southern Provinces Film Commission Tel + 687 24 45 06 aline.marteaud@province-sud.nc tournages@province-sud.nc www.province-sud.nc Aline Marteaud • Bénédicte Vernier > 38 Guadeloupe Film Commission Tel + 33 5 90 80 41 57 guadeloupefilm@cr-guadeloupe.fr Tony Coco-Viloin > 39 Reunion Film Commission Agence Film Réunion Tel + 33 2 62 92 29 18 alain.randresy@agencefilmreunion.com www.agencefilmreunion.org Alain Randresy

The Smurfs 2 (Colombia Picutres ) shot in France was supported by the TRIP (© Burno Calvo).

The Incentives Guide

IG-17


Film France

PART 1

TheTaxrebate for interna tional proPART 2 duction (trip) FEATURE FILM

The Incentives Guide

IG-19


FIRSTEP

production / co-production serVice company

PUB FILMFRANCE Midnight in Paris

Woody Allen Pontchartrain / Sony Pictures Classic

Les Misérables

Tom Hooper Working Title / Universal Pictures

The Smurfs 2

Raja Gosnell Columbia Pictures

RED 2

Dean Parisot Summit Entertainment Raphaël Benoliel raphael@firstep.fr Paris : +33 6 50 19 10 59 Los Angeles : +1 310 990 62 48

© Columbia Pictures


Feature film

When it comes to movies, no other film community in the world can claim to be involved in as many productions in as many languages than France. For thousands of filmmakers, France is THE hub for all things cinema, as they know their paths will always bring them back to Paris, Cannes or Marseille. There are many reasons that French cinema is such a pivotal player on the international scene. First of all, with 600 different features distributed in theaters every year, no other country demonstrates more of an interest in diversity and a stronger festival scene. What you may not know is that every year, one-third of all French-qualified movies (250 to 300) are actually foreign-initiated projects co-produced by French companies. And obviously, nearly all of these international ventures are not shot in French. In this guide, we explain how the movie incentives systems work in France and what type of financing may be obtained in France for your project. Our aim is to help you better understand your prospective French producing partner’s point of view, a partner who is, in fact, in the best position to assess your individual case. In this section, we will also present the French TRIP, which stands for “Tax Rebate for International Productions”. This incentive gives Foreign producers back 20 % of their expenses. These expenses can include money spent on live action shoots, animation, or VFX and/or mocap projects. Since the TRIP launched, it has supported 40 films and we have had a great time in the process. This section also features a presentation of the Cinema du Monde grants. Co-managed by the Ministry of Foreign Affairs and the National Cinema Center, the Cinema du Monde grants support filmmakers from all over the world making movies in their own countries. If you look closely at the lineups of festivals like Cannes, Berlin, Venice or Pusan, you’ll always find a film that has been awarded one of these grants. Obviously, taking advantage of the “best of” France means finding partners there, and since building the right team always begins with those chance – and often life-changing – encounters, this booklet will also provide you with a short list of events where you can meet French producers.

French VFX company BUF did an important part of the digital effects shots for The Grandmaster by Wong Kar Wai, and got the support of the TRIP to lower the bill for its Chinese client Jet Tone Films.

The Incentives Guide

IG-21


Feature film

CHAPTER 1

Get a TRIP to France The Tax Rebate for International production (TRIP) Approved by the French Parliament at the end of 2008, the French Tax Rebate for International Productions has been effective since January 1st, 2009. It was created because France and French characters appeared very frequently in many foreign films and TV series, but because of all of the neighboring fiscal incentives, these films were forced to shoot outside of the country. The TRIP helps filmmakers to shoot France in France, by decreasing the cost of the shoots. It applies to both animated and live action projects. The new incentive has been very well-received since it launched. Already 39 productions from eight different countries have qualified for the TRIP, from Japanese filmmakers adapting a Manga hit to a British prime time TV series. France has had the chance to award the TRIP to prestigious filmmakers such as Rowan Atkinson, Clint Eastwood, Woody Allen, Martin Scorsese, Wong Kar-wai, Guy Ritchie, Jackie Chan and Chris Nolan. This success is based on two factors: the excellence of French talents and crews and the worldwide appeal of France. The country is still the number one tourism spot on the planet, thanks to the beauty of its landscapes, cities and villages, but also because of its long history of kings and musketeers, palaces and revolutions, world wars and massacres as well as the numerous famous residents and visiting artists, novelists and creative minds, from Leonardo Da Vinci to Picasso. Every year, The French Film Commission Film Francehas the opportunity to read screenplays from across the globe that explore new facets of France’s past. Did you know, for example, that France was one of the birthplaces of the Communist Party that led the 1949 Chinese revolution? Thanks to all of the historical events that took place here, many stories set in France almost instantly gain some “romantic or historical added-value. (This is also thanks to all of our fond memories of all the movies set there!) Furthermore, it certainly comes in handy that France has many landmarks instantly identifiable by millions of people on Earth: in just one shot, your audience knows where their protagonists are! It’s no coincidence that when Inception’s filmmakers needed to pick one city to symbolize the power of dreams, they chose Paris… However, the appeal of France and screenwriters’ wonderful ideas aren’t enough. That’s where the film crews and talents come in. Foreign producers and directors know they can find hard workers, talented artists and the facilities they need here. French movies have clearly demonstrated the skills and talents of French crews. Did you know, for example, that the animation studio Mc Guff Ligne that created the magic in worldwide hit Despicable Me (and soon its sequel) is based in a former parking structure in a tiny Paris street behind the Eiffel tower ? And that the ice palace in Marvel’s Thor was designed by the computers of French VFX shop BUF ? In a nutshell, the TRIP helps you access this know-how and hire these talents. Here’s one last piece of good news: the rebate for foreign production may only be three years old, but it takes advantage of the long background of similar incentives for domestic productions. This means that it is a system that has already proven itself and doesn’t involve any unexpected complications. It works, and it works very quickly too. The French system boasts the shortest processing time in the world. Just ask how long the same things take elsewhere… On several occasions, it’s taken only four weeks from the first time a production team makes a phone call to shoot in France to delivering the official letter from the French government approving the project. IG-22

The Incentives Guide


Feature film

1 Eligible companies To file a TRIP application, a company must meet the following criteria:

• Be subject to corporate income tax in France. • Act as PRODUCTION SERVICES COMPANY for the sequences filmed or produced in France, and enter a production services agreement with the foreign producer.

The production services company is defined as “the company that has been contracted by the foreign production company to manage the physical production.” There is no restriction to the capital mix of the applicant or its main business. The company can thus specialize in production services, act an executive production company in film & TV or be an animation or VFX studio, a subsidiary of the foreign producer, an ad hoc created company, etc.

> For live action productions, a directory of French active production services companies may be obtained from Film France’s website: www.filmfrance.net go to the English language version, and then “Line producers database”.

> For animation productions, a list of French animation studios may be obtained from the French film commission, Film France: www.filmfrance.net A DVD with the demo reels of 10 of the major studios is available on request at film@filmfrance.net.

The Incentives Guide

IG-23


Feature film

2 Eligible productions & expenses 1 - Live action > Eligible productions To be eligible for the TRIP, a live action project must meet all of the following criteria: • The project must be a live action film1 • Live action documentaries as well as commercials and corporate films are not eligible • The project must not receive any other financial support for production from the CNC • The project may not be pornographic or promote violence • The project must spend a minimum of e1M  on eligible expenses in France; For TV series, it is possible to aggregate the costs of several episodes in order to reach the e1M threshold • Live action projects must shoot at least 5 days in France • Live action projects must obtain at least 18 points on the rating scale of the Cultural Test, including 7 points in the “dramatic content” block2 Live action projects may apply to the animation Cultural Test if they include a strong portion of VFX shots (see next page: 2 - Animation). > Eligible expenses In order to be eligible, expenses must be incurred by the French production services company who submits the application to the CNC3. These expenses must contribute directly to the production needs.

Jackie Chan’s movie Chinese Zodiac, shot in the Picardy and Paris region, was supported by the TRIP 1) See part 3 : TV series 2) See Appendice 3 Trip : the cultural test page 87 3) See page 29 and Appendices

IG-24

The Incentives Guide


Feature film

The maximum tax rebate is e10M . It comprises 20% of the following expenses, excluding tax: • Wages and compensation for French and European authors, actors & crew members • Fringes • French crew per diem partly if mentioned on pay slip • All technical expenses: - rentals & purchases of material, film stock & tapes -post-production: image lab, image editing, voice recording sound effects & sound design, mixing, sound editing, credits & trailers - digital visual effects - subtitling studios • Transportation, including international transport of materials and travel of the cast & crew to and from France • Accommodation for cast and crew • Catering expenses that are incurred for the needs of the production (catering, restaurants) • Expenses relating to a shorter shoot outside of France using the same crew and material • Depreciation amounts. For actors, the compensation amount considered for the tax rebate is limited to the minimum compensation amount outlined in the collective bargaining agreements of the movie industry. When the production services company employs production personnel on a permanent basis, eligible costs will only include the wages, payroll taxes and benefits that incur when the concerning personnel was really working on the physical production.

The Incentives Guide

IG-25


Feature film 2 - Animation > Eligible productions To be eligible for the TRIP, an animation project must meet all of the following criteria: The project must be an animated film or TV movie (that may function alone or as parts of a series). Animation documentaries as well as films used for advertising or corporate purposes are not eligible. • The project must not receive any other financial support for production from the CNC. • The project may not be pornographic or promote violence. • The project must spend a minimum of e1M  on eligible expenses in France. For TV series, it is possible to aggregate the costs of several episodes in order to reach the e1M  threshold. • Animated projects must obtain at least 36 points on the rating scale of the Cultural Test, including 9 points in the “dramatic content” block1. > Eligible expenses To count as eligible, expenses must be incurred by the French production services company who submits the application to the CNC. These expenses must directly contribute to the production needs. The maximum tax rebate is e10M. It comprises 20% of the following expenses, excluding tax: • Wages, fringes and compensation for French & European authors, actors & crew members, including teams in charge of: rigging & animation set up, storyboarding, character conception & modelling, set conception & modeling, exposure sheets, pre-visualization, rotoscopy, tracking, motion capture, lay out, animation, set construction, colorization, lighting & rendering, compositing, visual effects, image & sound editing, mixing… When production staff members are permanent employees of the production services company, the salaries and social contributions for the period during which they were actually working on the eligible production are taken into account. > Expenses incurred for hiring technical companies and other providers of services • equipment, supplies, computer hardware and software used directly for the animation process • The aforementioned computer software must be paid off during the production of the work for which it was designed or purchased 1) See Appendice 3 Trip : the cultural test page 87)

IG-26

The Incentives Guide


Feature film

• post-production: image lab, image editing, voice recording, sound effects and sound design, mixing, sound editing, credits & trailers • digital visual effects • negative image film, magnetic sound film, and in general, all digital or nondigital image and sound media; filming, finishing, video, and subtitling studios. > Transportation and catering expenses • transport of artistic and technical materials and supplies; • transport, accommodation and catering for the artistic and technical teams. This also concerns international transport of materials and crew. > Depreciation expenses • Tax-deductible depreciation accruals for fixed assets held by the French production/animation company and directly related to the production of the project for which the tax rebate may be claimed. Those depreciation expenses that correspond to the period in which the asset was actually used to produce the work eligible for the tax rebate go toward the rebate.

3 – VFX & post-production projects The TRIP also supports live-action projects with a significant proportion of VFX shots, providing VFX and post-production are executed mainly in France (minimum eligible spend of e1M ). “VFX-intensive” means that at least 25% of the shots or an average of two and a half shots per minute of the film are digitally processed. This means : addition of characters, visual elements or objects involved in the action, modification of the rendering of a scene or the camera’s point of view. If the projects fulfill this condition, their producer can apply as an animated project. Indeed, films with a strong proportion of digitally-enhanced shots go through the same production process as animated features, shorts and series. They also include all kinds of non-human characters and undefined locations, for which the live-action cultural test isn’t relevant. For example, where is Thor’s planet Aaasgard? What is the citizenship of an earth-attacking alien? The animation cultural test rewards the involvement of French talents more than the live-action one. But this is still a cultural test, which checks the proportion of European and French elements. Each project is unique, but as a rule of thumb, a non-European film or series will more easily qualify when allocating VFX shots to a French vendor if at least one third of the shots are done in France. Already two major Hollywood movies received the support of the TRIP for VFX: Marvel’s Thor, and Fox’s Darkest Hour. The Incentives Guide

IG-27


Feature film

3 Application process 1 - Provisional approval The production services company of the film must submit a file requesting provisional approval from the CNC that includes the necessary supporting documents. The application is available on the websites of the CNC and Film France: www.cnc.fr & www.filmfrance.net. Applications cannot be submitted until a production services agreement has been made between the foreign producer and the French company. This contract (or letter of intent) is one of the supporting documents required for the assessment. The starting date for considering eligible expenses is the reception date of the application at the CNC TRIP office. No expense incurred before this date will be considered as eligible, with the exception of authors fee under the condition that this fee was paid the same fiscal year as that of the application. The CNC, following Film France’s assessment, will come to a decision on the application, based only on the eligibility criteria (including the rating scales) defined in here. Should these criteria be fulfilled, the CNC will issue a provisional TRIP approval to the applicant.

2 - Final approval Once the film has been completed, the production services company must submit a final approval application to the CNC, along with the necessary documents including a video copy of the film. The CNC, with the support of Film France, will then verify that the finished film complies with the eligibility criteria and will issue a final approval.

3 - Collecting the international tax rebate At the end of each fiscal year, the French company must have the production accounts certified by a statutory auditor (CPA). This certification must be sent with the provisional TRIP approval to the tax authorities along with the company’s income tax return. Most of the French companies end their fiscal year on December 31st, and submit their corporate tax after March 31st. If the amount of the tax rebate exceeds the corporate income tax during the fiscal year, the difference will be paid by the French State. IG-28

The Incentives Guide


Feature film

The tax authorities may pay the tax rebate before the final approval application is submitted. However, the final approval officially confirms the right to keep this tax rebate. In the event that final approval is refused, the tax authorities will demand the reimbursement of the tax rebate granted. For the French company, the amount of the tax rebate paid constitutes revenue that is tax and VAT exempt.

4 - TRIP discount Even though the TRIP is a non-assignable and inalienable debt of the French State to the French Company, as soon as provisional approval has been obtained, it is possible to discount it at a bank, under certain conditions fixed by the law. French banks used to discount tax rebates tend to only advance max 80% of the prospective Rebate amount.

5 - Credits During either the beginning or end credits and in either French or the original language, productions that receive the TRIP must mention the following: “Cette œuvre a bénéficié du crédit d’impôt en faveur de la production de films étrangers en France.” Proposed English translation: “This film benefited from the French Tax Rebate for International Production.”

Do not hesitate to contact Film France or the CNC for any questions relating to the approval procedure, as well as information on production, notably for questions concerning shooting in France.

Contacts CNC Magali Jammet Tel: + 33 1 44 34 34 17 magali.jammet@cnc.fr Baptiste Heynemann Tel: +33 1 44 34 35 34 baptiste.heynemann@cnc.fr

Film France French national film commission Franck Priot Mélanie Chebance Fanny Fan Tel: + 33 1 53 83 98 90 / 91 rebate@filmfrance.net

The Incentives Guide

IG-29


Feature film

4 The trip line-up YEAR

GENRE

TITLE

DIRECTOR

COUNTRY OF ORIGIN

PRODUCTION COMPANY

FRENCH LINE PRODUCER

2009

Feature (Animation)

DESPICABLE ME

Chris Renaud, Pierre Coffin

USA

Illumination Ent. / Universal Animation

Mac Guff Ligne, Peninsula 

2009

Feature

KILLERS

Robert Luketic

USA

SS2 Productions – Lionsgate

DMWT Productions

Japan

Ciné Bazar- Fuji

Comme des cinémas 

2010

Feature

NODAME CANTABILE 1&2

Hideki Takeuchi, Taisuke Kawamura

2010

Feature

PARIS CONNECTIONS

Harley Cokeliss

UK

Amber Ent.

Alienor Productions

2009

Feature

INCEPTION

Chris Nolan

USA

Warner Bros

Peninsula

2009

Feature

HEREAFTER

Clint Eastwood

USA

Warner Bros

Peninsula

2010

Feature (Animation)

THE LORAX

Chris Renaud

USA

Illumination Ent. / Universal Animation

Mac Guff Ligne, Peninsula 

2010

Feature

THOR

Kenneth Brannagh

USA

Marvel

Angele & Fine (Buf Compagnie)

2010

Feature

MIDNIGHT IN PARIS

Woody Allen

USA

Gravier Productions

Firstep 

USA

Tourist Productions / GK Films

Peninsula 

2010

Feature

THE TOURIST

Florian Henckel von Donnersmarck 

2010

Feature

LE LION DE POUBARA

Henri Joseph Kouma Bididi 

Gabon

Films de l'Équateur

Adélaïde Productions

2010

Short (Animation)

MINIONS

Samuel Tourneux

USA

Illumination Ent. / Universal Animation

Mac Guff Ligne

2010

Feature

THE INVENTION OF HUGO CABRET

Martin Scorsese 

USA

Hugo Cabret LTD – GK Films

Peninsula

2010

Feature

THE MONTE CARLO STORY

Tom Bezucha

USA

20th Century Fox

Peninsula Elzévir Films

2010

Feature

GIRL ON A BICYCLE

Jeremy Leven 

GERMANY

Wiedemann & Berg Filmproduktion

2010

Feature

ONE DAY

Lone Scherfig

UK

Hadrian Productions

Firstep

2010

Feature

THE DARKEST HOUR

Chris Gorak 

USA

Four Times Prod. & 20th century Fox

Angele & Fine (Buf Compagnie)

2010

Feature

THE GRANDMASTER

Wong Kar Wai

CHINA

Jet Tone Films

Angele & Fine (Buf Compagnie)

2010

Feature

SHERLOCK HOLMES

Guy Ritchie 

UK

Elementary Prod. & Warner

Peninsula

2011

Feature

JOHNNY ENGLISH REBORN

Oliver Parker 

UK

Intelligence Films Ltd

Firstep

2011

VFX - LM

Odd Thomas

Stephen Sommers

USA

Two Out of Ten Prod.

Angele & Fine (Buf)

2011

Feature

Chinese Zodiac

Jackie Chan

CHINA

China Hero LTD

Bayoo

Feature

Mr Morgan's Last Love

GERMANY

Kaminski.Stiehm.Film Gmbh

Elzévir Films

Australia

Essential Media & Entertainment

Firstep

2011 2011

IG-30

Feature

Almost French

The Incentives Guide

Sandra Nettelbeck Kate Dennis


Feature film

2011

Feature

Planet B-Boy

Lee Benson

USA

Screen Gems

Firstep

2011

Feature (Animation)

Despicable Me 2

Chris Renaud, Pierre Coffin

USA

Universal Animation Studios LLC

Illumination / Mac Guff

2011

Feature

A Giant

Gil Kenan

USA

Lava Bear

Angele & Fine (Buf)

2012

Feature

The Smurfs 2

Raja Gosnell

USA

Columbia Pictures

Firstep

2012

Feature

Pierre Piere

Larry Charles

GERMANY

Lago Film

Firstep

2012

Feature

The Love Punch

Joel Hopkins

UK / USA

Love Punch LTD

Radar Films

Danemark

Blenkov Schonnemann

Kanzaman France Chrysalis Films

2012

Feature

Player

Tomas Villum Jensen

2012

Feature

Dolphin 3D

Andy Byatt

UK

Amberjack Films

2012

Feature

Overdrive

Antonio Negret

Belgium / USA

Overdrive Production

Kinology

2012

Feature (Animation)

Mins (Les)

Pierre Coffin

USA

Universal Animation Studios LLC

Illumination Mac Guff

2012

Feature

RED2

Dean Parisot

USA

Di Bonaventura Pictures / Lionsgate

Firstep

USA

DM2 Productions LLC / Universal

Illumination Mac Guff

2012

Feature (Animation)

DM2 shorts

F. Joubert, R. Schuller, B. Dequier, M. O'Hare, Y. Cheney, E. Favela

2012

Feature

Three Days to Kill

McG

USA

3DTK Inc.

Europacorp

2012

Feature

Weekend (Le)

Roger Michell

UK

Weekend Production Ltd

Le Bureau Films

2012

Feature

Madame Bovary

Sophie Barthes

GERMANY

Occupant Entertainment Gmbh

Everybody On Deck

Despicable Me 2 was supported by the TRIP (Š Universal Pictures and Illumination Entertainment)

The Incentives Guide

IG-31


Feature film

CHAPTER 2

FEATURE FILM: How to make an official co-production 1 Qualifying to the French system 1 - Why France supports movie production: the spirit of the system Under French law, a film is not considered a product, but an artistic good. The French movie industry has strong support from the State because the country feels that it is in its cultural interest to have a dynamic film industry. An artistic work doesn’t directly possess any other nationality than that of its creator and accordingly the French State mainly grants French nationality (and thus French support) according to the citizenship of its filmmakers. Two questions determine whether a movie can receive support: Are the creators European? Are they French? The movie must also be produced or co-produced by a French movie company incorporated in France. This company cannot be owned or controlled by non-European stockholders. The language spoken in the movie, or more precisely, the language in which it has been shot will be one factor among others fixing the level of State support it will enjoy, but it is not a compulsory condition to be eligible for support. Please note that French regional languages count as French.

2 - Co-production agreements The goal of supporting film production for cultural reasons isn’t to prevent foreign and French talents to work together. On the contrary, there is a long tradition in France of artistic co-operation with foreign countries. France has signed bilateral co-production agreements, aiming at giving access to support systems on both sides, with more than 40 countries that also have created State support systems for their own film industries. Part 2 defines what mandatory conditions a movie co-produced by a French producer and a producer from a given country have to meet in order to be considered “national” in IG-32

The Incentives Guide


Feature film

both countries, therefore enjoying double-citizenship. They generally require a minimum investment (20 % or 30 %), and artistic and/or technical elements, from each side, as well as a balance between the investment and spending from each side. This balance is frequently the most tricky co-production-related issue producers have to deal with. Each bilateral agreement is different. For instance, some agreements restrain French and foreign production companies partnering on a movie to have common stockholders, while some do not. France has bilateral co-production agreements with: Germany, Algeria, Argentina, Austria, Australia, Belgium, Bosnia-Herzegovina, Brazil, Bulgaria, Burkina Faso, Cameroon, Canada, Chile, China, Colombia, India, Ivory Coast, Denmark, Egypt, Spain, Finland, Georgia, Great Britain, Greece, Guinea, Hungary, India, Israel, Italy, Iceland, Lebanon, Luxemburg, Macedonia, Morocco, Mexico, New Zealand, Netherlands, Poland, Portugal, Czech Republic, Romania, Russia, Senegal, Serbia, Slovenia, South Africa, South Korea, Sweden, Switzerland, Tunisia, Turkey, Ukraine, Venezuela. It does not include the USA or Japan. The texts in French are available through Film France or on the CNC’s website. The key issue in the case of a project co-produced within the framework of an international agreement is that the citizens and technical facilities of the foreign partner allot points in the European scales printed on the next pages. Proportion contributed by the respective producers from France and the other countries Country

Minority Contribution

Belgium, Germany, Lebanon, Luxemburg, Switzerland

10%

Italy

10%

Algeria, Austria, Burkina Faso, Cameroun, Canada, China, Georgia, Great Britain, Guinea, Iceland, Ivory Coast, Mexico, Netherlands, New Zealand, Senegal, South Africa, South Korea, Spain, Tunisia, Turkey

20%

Argentina, Brazil, Israel, Romania, Slovenia, Ukraine

20%

Denmark

25%

Boznia and Herzegovina, Chile, Egypt, Greece, India, Macedonia, Portugal, Serbia, Venezuela

30%

Bulgaria, Colombia, Czech Republic, Finland, Hungary, Poland, Russia, Sweden

30%

Morocco

30%

Australia

20%(FRA) 40% (AUS)

Derogation

Majority Contribution 90%

5%

90%

80%

10%

80% 75%

20%

70%

70% 10%

70% 60%(FRA) 80% (AUS)

The Incentives Guide

IG-33


Feature film

3 –The French Qualification process The qualification of a film, be it a project about to be shot or a completed one, is determined by the CNC, the national center of cinema and the moving image overseeing all movie affairs and policies on behalf of the Minister of Culture. The French qualification (i.e. the French nationality of the film) is given after the decision made by a committee of representatives of diverse part of the movie industry (every two weeks). In order to decide whether a movie qualifies, the CNC1 and its committees use two scales that basically decide if the movie is European-enough and then whether it is French enough.

The Nun (by Guillaume Nicloux) shot in Rhone-Alpes is produced by Belle Epoque in Germany and by Les Films du Worso in France.

1) See Appendices.

IG-34

The Incentives Guide


Feature film

a. The European scale According to French law, a movie must score a minimum of 14 points out of 18 points to be eligible to the State support system (documentary: 9 points out of 14 points; animation: 14 points out of 21 points) on a scale that is fairly straightforward but that requires a few comments. To gain points, authors, actors and crew members must either be of French nationality, come from a European Union state, or -as seen previously- from a country with which France has a co-production treaty in the case of movies produced within that framework. Foreigners qualifying as resident in France are treated as French citizens. If there are two directors/ screenwriters, half of the points are gained if one is European. The last point in the actors’ group will be awarded if European actors get more than 50% of all the working days (excluding the two leading roles). Please note that what defines the lead and supporting role in this scale is the number of working days, not screen time or salary! Technical facilities must be established in France or on the territory of a European state. Movies: European Scale 18 points (required: 14) 6 points 3 points 2 points 1 point 6 points 3 points 2 points 1 point 4 points 1 point 1 point 1 point 1 point 2 points

Simulation

Authors and director(s) Direction Script- and screenwriters Other authors (music‌) Actors 1st role 2nd role 50% of other fees Creative collaboration Photography Sound Editing Set design Technical Industries

The Incentives Guide

IG-35


Feature film

Documentary: European Scales 14 points (required: 9) 3 points

Authors and director(s)

2 points 1 point 7 points 1 point 1 point 1 point 4 points

Direction Script and screenwriters Creative collaborations Photography Sound Editing 50% of others salary Technical Industries: 50% of shooting and post production technical costs

4 points

2D and 3D Animation: European Scale 21 points (required: 14) 6 points 1 point 2 points 2 points 1 point 7 points 2 points 2 points 1 point  2 points 6 points 1 point 1 point 2 points 2 points 2 points

Simulation

Simulation

Authors and director(s) Conception or author(s) Script Director(s) Music Pre-production Drawing of the characters Stortyboard Art director Animation Positionning Production of the animation Caption stand Scene painting 50% of labour costs of animator 50% of labour cost of tracers colorists Post production 

Co-productions are now a very popular sport in Europe; there are more and more films involving producers from more than two countries. This is why members of the European Council2 and a few other European countries agreed on a general framework – the European Convention for Co-productions – for co-productions between producers of 3 or more signatory countries, as well as for co-productions between 2) A transnational organization distinct from the European Union.

IG-36

The Incentives Guide


Feature film

producers of 3 or more signatory countries AND a non-signatory country (the part of this last co-producer being no more than 30 % of the budget). Co-productions created using the Convention must also follow some rules and a minimum level of European talents and elements, according to another scale. A movie is considered European if it scores 15 points out of 19. The European Convention on Cinematographic Co-production countries are: Germany, Albania, Armenia, Austria, Azerbaijan, Belgium, Bulgaria, Bosnia-Herzegovina, Cyprus, Croatia, Denmark, Spain, Estonia, Finland, France, Georgia, Greece, Hungary, Ireland, Iceland, Italy, Latvia, The Former Republic of Macedonia, Lithuania, Luxembourg, Malta, Moldova, Netherlands, Norway, Poland, Portugal, Czech Republic, Romania, United Kingdom, Russia, Serbia and Montenegro, Slovakia, Slovenia, Sweden, Switzerland, Turkey, Ukraine. European Convention for co-production Scale 19 points (required: 15) 7 points 3 points 3 points 1 point 6 points 3 points 2 points 1 point 6 points 1 point 1 point 1 point 1 point 1 point 1 point

Simulation

Authors and director(s) Direction Script- and screenwriters Other authors (music‌) Actors 1st role 2nd role 3rd role Creative collaboration, technical industries, shooting Photography Sound Editing Set design Studio and locations Post-production

Please note that what defines the first, second and third characters in this scale is the number of working days, not screen-time or salary!

The Incentives Guide

IG-37


Feature film

b. The French scale The law requires a minimum part of French elements and talents in the artistic as well as technical aspects of a movie before qualifying it (i.e. declaring it eligible to obtain the support of the State). Hence this second scale, on which, in order to be qualified, a movie must score at least 25 out of 100 points. Documentaries and animated movies use different scales as their processes involve different forms of craftsmanship, but the movie still has to score 25 points out of 100 points. In order to accumulate points, lead and supporting actors as well as crew members must be of French nationality, come from a European Union state or a European Council signatory state. Foreigners qualifying as residents in France are treated as French citizens. Leading actors are those featured in the frame in more than 50 % of screen-time, secondary actors those with more than 4 working days. For everyone, points are gained if work contracts or author contracts stipulate the French law as being applicable. Once the movie passes this level, its number of points will fix its BSF (Barême du Soutien Financier/Financial Support Scale), which is a sort of “Frenchness factor” of the movie. This ratio has a long-term effect on the automatic support the French co-producer and distributor will get at each stage of the movie’s lifespan. The higher this number, the bigger the automatic grants to the movie will be, and accordingly the higher the value of the French rights of the movie, which means the French co-producer is more likely to invest time and money into the venture!

Belle and Sebastien by Nicolas Vannier (Radar Film – Epithete) shot in French Alps ( © Eric Travers Gaumont)

IG-38

The Incentives Guide


Feature film

Movies: Financial Support Scale 100 points (required: 25) 10 points

Production Company

20 points

Shooting Language

10 points

Authors

5 points

Director(s)

4 points

Script and screenwriters, dialogues

1 point

Composer

20 points

Actors

10 points

Leading roles

10 points

Secondary roles

14 points

Technicians and creative collaboration

2 points

Direction other than the director(s)

2 points

Administration and production departments

3 points

Photography

2 points

Set design

2 points

Sound

2 points

Editing

1 point

Make-up

6 points

Workers

4 points

Film Crew

2 points

Construction Team

20 points

Shooting and post-production

5 points

Localization of shooting places:

3 points

Locations

2 points

Laboratory

5 points

Shooting equipment:

2 points

Camera equipment

2 points

Lighting equipment

1 point

Machinery

5 points

Sound post-production

5 points

Image post-production

Simulation

The Incentives Guide

IG-39


Feature film

Documentary: Financial Support Scale 100 points (required: 25)

IG-40

10 points

Production Company

20 points

Shooting Language

25 points

Authors

15 points

Director(s)

5 points

Script and screenwriters, dialogues

5 points

Composer

5 points

Narrator

20 points

Technicians and creative collaboration

1 point

First assistant director

2 points

Administration and production departments

6 points

Photography

5 points

Sound

6 points

Editing

20 points

Shooting and post-production

2 points

Camera equipment

2 points

Lighting equipment

8 points

Sound post-production

8 points

Image post-production

The Incentives Guide

Simulation


Feature film

2D Animation: Financial Support Scale 100 points (required: 25) 10 points

Production Company

26 points

Authors

8 points

Director(s)

8 points

Script, screenplay, dialogues

6 points

Graphic Artist

4 points

Composer

5 points

Technicians and creative collaboration

3 points

First assistant director

2 points

Production manager

19 points

Pre-production

6 points

Storyboard

6 points

Drawing of the main characters

6 points

Set design

1 points

Animation positionning

30 points

Production of the animation

2 points

Setting up of set design

3 points

Setting up of animation

10 points

Animation

4 point

Set painting/drawing

4 points

Tracing, painting in gouache or colorization

7 points

Digital assembly, special effects

10 points

Post-production

5 points

Sound post-production

5 points

Image port-production

Simulation

The Incentives Guide

IG-41


Feature film

3D Animation: Financial Support Scale 100 points (required: 25)

IG-42

10 points

Production Company

26 points

Authors

8 points

Director(s)

8 points

Script, screenplay, dialogues

6 points

Graphic Artist

4 points

Composer

5 points

Technicians and creative collaboration

3 points

First assistant director

2 points

Production manager

22 points

Pre-production

6 points

Storyboard

8 points

Modeling of the main characters

8 points

Modeling of sets

27 points

Production of the animation

3 points

Setting up of 3D scenes

12 points

Animation

7 points

Rendering, lighting

5 points

Digital assembly, visual effects

10 points

Post-production

2 points

Editing

3 points

Laboratory

2 points

Voices recording

1 points

Sound creation

2 points

Mixing

The Incentives Guide

Simulation


Feature film

2 Funding available to qualified co-productions 1- General overview There are several financial sources tapped into by French producers to produce their movies. Some of them are not specifically French, such as MG from distributors (theater, DVD, international sales), or broadcasting rights sales. With nearly 200 million tickets sold every year, including more than 70 million for French-qualified films, France is obviously one of the world’s top film markets, both for foreign and domestic titles. Therefore, there is money to be found for good projects in France as there is anywhere. That said, there are some extra funding sources specific to French laws and regulations. You will find a description of these in this chapter with explanations about their degree of involvement in foreign productions. Here is a general overview of how films are financed in the global amount of money gathered for 209 majority French productions in 2012: TV (Pay and free-to-air) investments (equity and prebuys) Selective subsidies (CNC and the regional governments) Automatic subsidies (CNC) Distributors MG (Th., Vid., Internat.Sales) Investments of French producers Investments of foreign producers Soficas

31,9% 3,8% 2,7% 19,5% 28,9% 9,3% 4%

Out of the 279 movies qualified by the CNC in 2012, 70 were foreign productions with a minority French co-producer. 2010

2011

2012

Fully or mostly French movies

2000 145

172

163

183

167

187

164

185

196

182

203

207

209

Including co-productions

34

46

57

78

37

61

37

52

51

45

60

55

59

Majority foreign movies

26

32

37

29

36

53

39

43

44

48

58

65

70

171

204

200

212

203

240

203

228

240

230

261

272

279

All QualifiedFrench movie

2001

2002

2003

2004

2005

2006

2007 2008

2009

The Incentives Guide

IG-43


Feature film

2 - The weight of TV funding As it appears, a huge proportion of the money invested in movie production in France comes from TV channels. This is due to several regulations described below.

a. The free-to-air networks First, the 3 free-to-air networks (TF1, France 2 & France 3, M6, TMC & W9) have to invest 3,2 % of their turnover in pre-buys and co-productions of French-qualified movies, with at least 2,5 % of the turn-over (75 % of the available money) devoted to French-speaking ones. The fourth terrestrial network, French-German channel Arte, does not have to obey by the same rules, but it nevertheless devotes more or less the same percentage of its turnover to movies (technically, TV investment is divided between pre-buys and co-productions, in proportions reflecting the balance of power between the French producer and the channel). The law states that the networks have to choose the movies they will invest in before first day of principal photography. Other TV channels that invest in film productions without having to comply to the obligations are: Direct8, France 4, Gulli & NT1. In 2012, the terrestrial network invested in 15 French-qualified foreign movies coproduced by minority French producers.

b. The Pay TV channels French law also fixes investment obligations for the pay-TV movie channels. They have to invest 9% of their turnover in pre-buys of French-speaking movies and 12% in European movies. TPS Star and Orange Cinéma Series have to invest 26% of their total yearly resources in European film productions of which no less than 22% have to go to French-speaking movies. For Ciné+, these percentages are respectively 27 and 25%. In 2012, the French pay-TVs, Canal+, Canal J, Ciné+, Orange Cinema Series, TPS Star (owned by Canal+), TV5, pre-bought 21 French-qualified foreign movies co-produced by (minority) French producers for a total of E12,28M.

c. What they look for Although they have to spend a lot of money, the channels are all free to choose what films they will buy. Consequently, domestic commercial French-language projects IG-44

The Incentives Guide


Feature film

intended to draw good ratings in prime-time slots are very sought-after as early as the script stage, with prices going over E1 M per run on terrestrial networks, and over E4 M on the biggest pay-TV. Both Free-to-air networks and pay-TV channels also invest in a few French-qualified foreign-speaking movies, generally by top European filmmakers. Their interest there is to use the money devoted to French productions for either Hollywood-like movies that can be aired in prime-time slots after wide releases (for example Pierre Morel‘s Taken with Liam Neeson or From Paris with Love with John Travolta, Oliver Stone‘s Alexander, Tom Tykwer’s The Perfume, The Three Musketeers by Paul Anderson or Largo Winch 1&2 by Jérôme Salle) or for high-level “auteur” films able to get the support of the press and the festivals, such as new films from Christian Mungiu, Paolo Sorrentino, Ken Loach, Nanni Moretti, Michael Haneke or Alex de la Iglesia.

3 - The Automatic subsidies The automatic subsidies, referred to in French as “Le Compte de Soutien” or “Le Soutien Automatique” are a key component of the French producing landscape: Each qualified movie producer or distributor receives automatic subsidies in proportion to the film’s success at the French box office, and also in video-stores (a percentage of VHS and DVD sales turnover) and in TV sales (a percentage of broadcasting rights sales). The amount awarded for each ticket sold, or each Euro of DVD sales, varies according to its BSF figure, the “Frenchness factor“ of the movie, exposed in the previous chapter. This means that the more French elements it has, the higher its BSF figure will be, and the higher the automatic support will be given to its French co-producer. At the same time, the theatrical distributor of a French-qualified movie will also receive automatic support, again in proportion to the number of tickets sold. The money goes directly into the CNC account of the French producer (as well as the distributor), and they have to reinvest it in French-qualified movies; therefore, this money will be available for the producer’s next French-qualified movie. Thus, the value of the French rights of any foreign movie increases dramatically if it can be qualified as French, because each step of its exploitation will generate automatic support, available for subsequent films. Therefore, the question arises: ‘‘How can a film project be more attractive to a French producer?” The answer is: “Obtain as many French elements as you can to get the film to qualify as French”, thus increasing the automatic subsidies it will generate for its co-producer and distributor in France: talents, crew members, locations, post facilities, VFX houses, etc. The Incentives Guide

IG-45


Feature film

How can you find “French elements”? Ask for help from Film France (contact see page 12) and its network of 40 local film commissions all over France!

> Case study Let’s consider a foreign-speaking French-qualified movie released in France that sells 100,000 tickets, so it’s box-office revenue around E 611,000. Since the theaters usually keep 50 % of box office revenue in France, the distributor’s gross will be E 305,500. It is a minority-French co-production, shot in a foreign language and let’s say that it scored 50 out 100 on the French scale (BSF, see chapter 1) this triggers automatic support (compte automatique de soutien). Solely thanks to theater admissions, the film should generate around E 40,000 for the French producer’s account at the CNC to invest on a future project. Then, for each DVD sold, legal downloads and official TV-run, the movie will also generate some extra revenue in that same producer’s account. The amount of money generated depends on the number of tickets/DVDs/downloads sold, and for TV, on how much the film broadcasting rights were sold. The admissions will also generate some money on the distributor’s account depending also on the number of tickets sold. It can easily represent about half of the distributor’s box-office share! As the distributor has to recoup its P&A before being able to give some money to the rights owner, in some cases, producers don’t get any money back from the release, and the automatic support will stay as the only or the biggest return they get. The automatic support therefore has a huge impact in the risk-assessing equation of the producer.

In this way, foreign movies that can qualify as French become much more interesting to French producers and distributors. Many French distributors therefore act as co-producers of the foreign movies they are releasing to get them to qualify as French.

4 - The Soficas The Soficas are equity funds financed with tax-related money. They are allowed to invest in both film and tv productions, on a project by project basis, but most of them only focus on feature films. Their money comes from banks, from private investors who want to pay less income taxes. Sometimes, there is a guarantor (often media companies) who will repay the investors if needed. Soficas want their money back, so they tend to do mostly gap funding, providing producers with the last (and most expensive) money. Soficas generally stand behind the distributor(s) in the recoupment order. Only part of the Soficas money is invested in independent productions. Each sofica can invest 20% of its money in foreign-speaking (qualified) co-productions, as long as the film’s language matches the foreign co-producer’s country’s language. In 2012, the soficas invested 44,66 ME in 118 movies. 16 of them were majority foreign co-productions, mostly from English or Belgian producers.

IG-46

The Incentives Guide


Feature film

5 - Cash Flow Production In order to encourage French credit houses to cash flow production contracts, France has created the IFCIC (www.ifcic.eu). This State-owned bank can counter-guarantee some loans on collateral and bridge loans to movie producers. It first targets loans against production contracts, but in some cases can also counter-guarantee contracts involving Foreign partners.

6 - Selective subsidies a. National subsidy: advance upon receipts The most important French grant, widely known as the “Avance sur Recettes”, is a refundable grant awarded to around 55 projects every year chosen at the script stage for their cultural values by a committee of members of the creative community (producers, directors, distributors, writers, publishers, critics). But only French-speaking (or France regional languages) projects are eligible, which narrows the field, outside France, to French speaking territories, such as Belgium, Switzerland, Québec… Last year, the total budget for this selective mechanism was E21,24 M, and only 1 out of the 51 supported projects were minority French co-productions.

b. Special support for co-productions with Germany and Canada 1) Germany’s Federal Film Fund, Filmförderungsanstalt (FFA) and its French counterpart the CNC have created a selective French-German fund, which gives refundable grants to co-productions between producers of the two countries. Each country contributes to the fund (E1,48 M from France in 2012). Selected projects are given grants on both sides, in proportion to each country’s input. 11 projects received aid in 2012. 2) Canada’s federal cultural agency Téléfilm Canada and its French counterpart the CNC created a selective fund in 1983, which gives refundable grants to 4-5 co-productions between producers of the two countries every year. Each country contributes to the fund (E300,000 from France in 2011 for 5 projects). Selected projects are given grants from both sides, in proportion to each country’s input.

The Incentives Guide

IG-47


Feature film

c. The local subsidies In addition to the State’s Minister of Culture, some local governments (Regions, Départements and Cities: see contacts pages) have created funds to support movie & TV production. So far, 23 Regions (please refer to the map page 82), 9 Départements and one City (Strasbourg) have set up a feature film and tv drama fund, each one defining its own support policy. The cultural value of the project is generally the biggest concern of the funds. Some of them develop partnerships with the bordering regions of nearby countries. Most of their investment goes to French-speaking movies or tv dramas. For more information on these local support, please refer to the guide published by Ciclic (with the support of Film France) available on the website: http://www.ciclic.fr/ressources/le-guide-2013 (in French only)

Dégage ! (2012) / Nouri Bouzid / Siecle Productions (FRA) – CTV Services (TUN) Supported by Ile-de-France

Bonsaï (2011) / Christian Jimenez / Las Niñas Pictures (FRA) – Pulsacion Creadora Films (MEX) Supported by Ile-de-France

The strange colour of your body’s tears (2012) / Hélène Cattet and Bruno Forzani/ Tobina Film (FRA) – ANONYMES FILMS (BEL) Supported by Lorraine

La Clinique de l’amour (2011) / Artus de Penguern / 24 25 Films (FRA) – Iris Productions (LUX) Supported by Lorraine

Historia de la meva mort (2012) / Albert Serra/ Capricci Films (FRA) – Andergraun Films ( ESP) Supported by Provence-Alpes-Côte d’Azur – Pays de la Loire - Limousin Monsieur Delacour (2012) / Cornel Gheorghita / Milonga Productions (FRA) – Ro De Film Prod Impex (ROM) Supported by Midi-Pyrénées Future lasts forever (2012) / Ozcan Alper / Arizona Films (FRA) – Nar Film Yapim Dagitim Ltd (TUR) Supported by Ile-de-France La Tendresse (2012) / Marion Hansel / ASAP Films (FRA) – Man’s Films Productions (BEL) Supported by Rhônes-Alpes Looking for Simon (2011) / Jan Krüger / Neon Productions (FRA) – Schramm Film Koerner & Weber (DEU) Supported by Provence-AlpesCôte d’Azur IG-48

The Incentives Guide

She is not crying, she is singing (2011) / Philippe de Pierpont / Perspective Films (FRA) – Iota Production (BEL) Supported by Picardy Dream and Silence (2011) / Jaime Rosales / Les Productions Balthazar (FRA) – Fresdeval Films (ESP) Supported by Ile-de-France Pinocchio (2011) / Enzo D’Alo / 2D3D Animations (FRA) – Cometafilm (ITA) Supported by Poitou-Charentes & Charente Bambini in Affitto (2011) / Carlo Alberto Pinelli / Takami Productions (FRA) – Paneikon (ITA) Supported by Provence-Alpes-Côte d’Azur & Alpes-Maritimes Sister (2011) / Ursula Meier / Archipel 35 (FRA) – Vega Film (CHE) Supported by Centre


Feature film Gebo and the Shadow (2011) / Manuel de Oliveira / Mact Productions (FRA) – O Som E A Furai (PRT) Supported by Ile-de-France

Opération Casablanca (2009) / Laurent Negre / Ex Nihilo (FRA) – Bord Cadre Films (CHE) Supported by Rhône Alpes Cinéma

La Lapidacio de San Esteve (2011) / Pere Vila Barcelo / L’Age d’Or (FRA) – Eddie Saeta (ESP) Supported by Provence-Alpes-Côte d’Azur

The Day will come (2009) / Susanne Schneider / Unlimited (FRA) – Wüste Film Ost (DEU) Supported by Alsace and Strasbourg

Kill me (2010) / Emily Atef / CineSud Promotion (FRA) – NiKo Film (DEU) Supported by Provence-Alpes-Côte d’Azur

Cheri (2008) / Stephen Frears/ Pathé Production (FRA) – Cheri Productions (GBR) Supported by Ile-de-France

Le Havre (2010) / Aki Kaurismaki / Orsans Productions (FRA) – Sputnik Oy (FIN) Supported by Upper-Normandy

La Chanteuse de Tango (2008) / Diego Martinez Vignatti / Mobilis Productions (FRA) – Tarantula (BEL) / Supported by CRRAV Nord-Pas de Calais

Sauvage (2010) / Jean-François Amiguet / Perspective Films (FRA) – PCT Cinema & Television (CHE) Supported by ProvenceAlpes-Côte d’Azur & Alpes Maritimes Last Winter (2010) / John Shank / Silex Films (FRA) – Tarantula (BEL) Supported by MidiPyrénées & Centre The House of Lucchese (2010) / Pierre Duculot / Perspective Films (FRA) – Need Production (BEL) Supported by Corsica Rock the Kasbah (2010) / Yariv Horowitz / 13 Production (FRA) – Topia Communication (ISR) Supported by Ile-de-France The Passions of Michelangelo (2010) / Esteban Larrain / Tchin Tchin Production (FRA) – Piranha Films (ESP) Supported by Ile-deFrance Vintner’s Luck (2010) / Niki Caro / Acajou Films-Kortex (FRA) – Acension Films (NZL) Supported by Burgundy All Good Children (2009) / Alicia Duffy / Cinema Defacto (FRA) – Element Pictures (IRL) Supported by CRRAV Nord Pas de Calais Quartier Lointain (2009) / Sam Garbarski / Archipel 35 (FRA) – Entre Chien Et Loup (BEL) Supported by Rhône Alpes Cinéma Noir Océan (2009) / Marion Hänsel / ASAP Films (FRA) – Man’s Films Productions (BEL) Supported by Corse, Guadeloupe, Rhône Alpes Cinéma

Disengagement(2007) / Amos Gitaï / Agat Films (FRA) - Agave /Hafakat (ISR) / Supported by Provence-Alpes-Côte d’Azur California wash (2007) / Bouli Lanners / Lazennec & Associés (FRA) - Versus Producton (BEL) / Supported by CRRAV Nord-Pas de Calais Yuki et Nina (2007) / Nobuhiro Suwa et Hippolyte Girardot - Comme des Cinémas (FRA) Supported by Ile-de-France Rumba (2007) / Dominique Abel / MK2 (FRA) Courage Mon Amour (BEL) Supported by Upper-Normandy A B’A MEY (2007) / Sarah Bouyain / Athenaïse (FRA) / Supported by Ile-de-France Phantasmagoria, The Visions of Lewis Carroll (2007) / Marilyn Manson / L Films (FRA)  / Supported by Ile de France Alexander Ivul (2007) / Andrew Kotting / Sciapode(FRA) / Supported by Midi-Pyrénées and Aquitaine Lourdes (2007) / Jessica Hausner / Société Parisienne de Production (FRA) / Supported by Midi-Pyrénées 9MM (2007) / Taylan Barman / Dolce Vita Films (FRA) - Saga Films (BEL) / Supported by CRRAV Nord-Pas de Calais

The Incentives Guide

IG-49


Feature film

CHAPTER 3

Cinémas du Monde for foreign feature films The World Cinema Support is a new fund that emerged from the merging of Fonds Sud and the Support to Foreign Language Films in 2012 (see the list p.54). It is targeted at international co-productions by foreign authors that are produced by a French and foreign company based preferably in a country who signed the UNESCO 2005 Convention on the Protection and Promotion of the Diversity of Cultural Expressions, likely to contribute to the promotion of cultural diversity and present different insights as well as new sensitivities to a French and global audience. This aid is managed both by the CNC and the Institut Français (ministry of foreign affairs). Priority will be given to films co-produced in the official frame of a bilateral co-production treaty.

1 Application requirements and obligations Application has to be completed by the France-based production (exceptions will be given to projects from certain countries). • Director is foreign (can exceptionally be French if film is shot in a foreign language), • The main language of the film is one of the official languages of the territory where most of the film is shot or in the language of the director (but not French if the director is French), • Part of the production and post-production costs are to be spent in France, between 50 and 75% of the amount of the support granted, • For projects from certain countries (list available from the CNC / Institut français), a minimum of 25% of the support granted has to be spent for the shoot in the other country/ies.

IG-50

The Incentives Guide


Feature film

2 Colleges and procedures Support is granted as a joined decision by the two entities (Institut français and CNC) after consultation of the Cinemas du Monde committees1. Applicants either apply to the first college for first and second features or to the second college for directors who already have made a minimum of two feature films. Applicants have to register online via the CNC website as well as physically submit the full application at the Institut français for projects of the first college and at the CNC for projects of the second college. Applications must include, amongst other, the following documents: a copy of the script in French, an estimate, the coproduction contract, financing plan, a proof of rights ownership. The committee will assess the application and express an opinion according to the feasibility and the artistic quality of the project: • If positive: assessment of the amount by the CNC and the Institut français and signature of a contract between the production company and the CNC. • If negative: possibility to ask for support again after production.

3 Amounts A total of around e5M  will be given every year. The amount allocated to each film will depend on the nature of each project, and will be comprised between e 100,000 and a maximum of e 250,000.

CONTACTS CNC Department of European and International Affairs Production and cooperation Jacqueline Ada Tel + 33 1 44 34 38 17 jacqueline.ada@cnc.fr / www.cnc.fr

INSTITUT FRANCAIS Head of the Cinema Department Nathalie Streiff Tel: +33 1 53 69 39 79 nathalie.streiff@institutfrancais.com

The Incentives Guide

IG-51


Feature film Ciao Ciao Yuan Chan Song (China) The Midfielder (El 5 De Talleres) Adrian Biniez (Argentina) Eyes Of A Thief Najwa Najar (Palestinian Territories) In Your Name Marco Van Geffen (Netherlands) Lunchbox (The) Batra Ritesh (India) The South Is Nothing Fabio Mollo (Italy) Aga Hiner Saleem (Iraq) Palestine Stereo Rashid Masharawi (Palestine) If Baraq Could See Mohammad Malas (Syria) A Nine-Minute Interval Corneliu Porumboiu (Romania) Wakolda Lucia Puenzo (Argentina) Xenia Panos Koutras (Greece) Above The Clouds Pepe Diokno (The Philippines) The Last Land Pablo Lamar (Paraguay) Fataria, Arab Summit Walid Tayaa (Tunisia) Zero Motivation Talya Lavie (Israel) Zion Music Rama Thiaw (France - Senegal)

IG-52

The Incentives Guide

3000 Nights Mai Masri (Lebanon) Above The Hill Raphael Nadjari (France -Israel) Je M’en Sortirai Petr Vaclav (Czech Republic) Ciel Du Centaure (Le) Hugo Santiago (Argentina) Red Rose Sepideh Farsi (Iran) The Ardor Pablo Fendrik (Argentina) Flapping In The Middle Of Nowhere Hoang Diep Nguyen (Vietnam) Brides Tinatin Kajrishvili (Georgia) The Kindergarten Teacher Nadav Lapid (Israel) Lamb Yared Zeleke (Ethiopia) Nn Hector Galvez Campos (Peru) Les Ombres De Norviliskies Dmitri Makhomet (Bielorussia) 1001 Grams Bent Hamer (Norway) Aventure (Une) Nariman Turebayev (Kazakhstan) Cry/Fly Claudia Llosa Bueno (Peru) (Coproduction With Spain) Quiet People Ognjen Svilicic (Croatia) Terrasses (Les) Merzal Allouache (Algeria) The Valley Ghassan Salhab (Lebanon) Harmony Lessons Emir Baigaizin (Kazakhstan)


Feature film

PART 3 TV dramas, series, animation

The Incentives Guide

IG-53


TV dramas, series, animation

CHAPTER 1

Get a TRIP to France Most of the information presented in this chapter is almost similar to the same chapter in the feature film section. For TV productions, the TRIP is applicable to dramas, TV series (both live action or animation). Documentaries are excluded.

1 Eligible companies To file a TRIP application, a company must meet the following criteria: • Be subject to corporate income tax in France. • Act as PRODUCTION SERVICES COMPANY for the sequences filmed or produced in France, and enter a production services agreement with the foreign producer. The production services company is defined as “the company that has been contracted by the foreign production company to manage the physical production.” There is no restriction to the capital mix of the applicant or its main business. The company can thus specialize in production services, act an executive production company in film & TV or be an animation or VFX studio, a subsidiary of the foreign producer, an ad hoc created company, etc. > For live action dramas and series, a directory of French active production services companies may be obtained from Film France’s website: www.filmfrance.net go to the English language version, and then “Line producers database”. > For animation productions, a list of French animation studios may be obtained from the French film commission, Film France: www.filmfrance.net A DVD with the demo reels of 10 of the major studios is available on request at film@filmfrance.net.

IG-54

The Incentives Guide


TV dramas, series, animation

2 Eligible productions & expenses 1 - Live action > Eligible productions To be eligible for the TRIP, a live action production must meet all of the following criteria: • The project must be a live action TV drama or TV series (series can apply for one episode or for one group of episodes, seasons, etc.); • Live action documentaries as well as commercials and corporate films are not eligible. • The project must not receive any other financial support for production from the CNC; • The project may not be pornographic or promote violence; • The project must spend a minimum of e1M  on eligible expenses in France; For TV series, it is possible to aggregate the costs of several episodes in order to reach the e1M threshold. • Live action projects must shoot at least 5 days in France; • Live action projects must obtain at least 18 points on the rating scale of the Cultural Test, including 7 points in the “dramatic content” block1 Live action projects may apply to the animation Cultural Test if they include a strong portion of VFX shots (see next page: b - Animation). Live action projects may apply to the animation Cultural Test if they include a strong portion of VFX shots (see next page: 2 - Animation). 1) See Appendice 3 Trip : the cultural test page 87.

Merlin (seasons 1 to 5) shot in Picardy was supported by the TRIP.

The Incentives Guide

IG-55


TV dramas, series, animation

> Eligible expenses In order to be eligible, expenses must be incurred by the French production services company who submits the application to the CNC1. These expenses must contribute directly to the production needs. The maximum tax rebate is e10M . It comprises 20% of the following expenses, excluding tax: • Wages and compensation for French and European authors, actors, and crew members • Fringes • All technical expenses (rentals and purchases) • Accommodation for the cast & crew • Transportation, including international transport of materials and crew (provided that the transportation “is not of a extravagant nature”) • Catering expenses that are incurred for the needs of the production • Expenses relating to a shorter shoot outside of France using the same crew and material (and paid through the production services company) • Depreciation amounts. For actors, the compensation amount considered for the tax rebate is limited to the minimum compensation amount outlined in the collective bargaining agreements of the movie industry. For hotel expenses, the compensation amount considered for the tax rebate is limited to e270 per night in Paris and immediate vicinity, and to e200 for the rest of the French territory. When the production services company employs production personnel on a permanent basis, eligible costs will only include the wages, payroll taxes and benefits that incur when the concerning personnel was really working on the physical production.

2 - Animation > Eligible productions To be eligible for the TRIP, an animation project must meet all of the following criteria: • The project must be an animated TV movie or TV series (series can apply for one episode or for one group of episodes, seasons, etc.) • Animation documentaries as well as films used for advertising or corporate purposes are not eligible 1) See page 59.

IG-56

The Incentives Guide


TV dramas, series, animation

• The project must not receive any other financial support for production from the CNC • The project may not be pornographic or promote violence • The project must spend a minimum of e1M  on eligible expenses in France. For animated TV series, it is possible to aggregate the costs of several episodes in order to reach the e1M  threshold • Animated projects must obtain at least 36 points on the rating scale of the Cultural Test, including 9 points in the “dramatic content” block2 > Eligible expenses In order to be eligible, expenses must be incurred by the French production services company who submits the application to the CNC1. The maximum tax rebate is e10M. It comprises 20% of the following expenses, excluding tax: • Wages and compensation for French and European authors, actors, and crew members • Fringes • All technical expenses (rentals and purchases) • Accommodation for the cast & crew • Transportation, including international transport of materials and crew • Catering expenses • Expenses relating to a shorter shoot outside of France using the same crew and material • Depreciation amounts. When the production services company employs production personnel on a permanent basis, eligible costs will include the wages, payroll taxes and benefits that incur when the concerning personnel was really working on the physical production. > Depreciation expenses • Tax-deductible depreciation accruals for fixed assets held by the French production/animation company and directly related to the production of the project for which the tax rebate may be claimed. Only those depreciation expenses that correspond to the period in which the asset was actually used to produce the work eligible for the tax rebate go toward the rebate.

2) See Appendice 3 Trip : the cultural test page 87.

The Incentives Guide

IG-57


TV dramas, series, animation

3 Application process 1 - Provisional approval The production services company of the film must submit a file requesting provisional approval from the CNC that includes the necessary supporting documents. The application is available on the websites of the CNC and Film France: www.cnc.fr & www.filmfrance.net. Applications cannot be submitted until a production services agreement has been made between the foreign producer and the French company. This contract (or letter of intent) is one of the supporting documents required for the assessment. The starting date for considering eligible expenses is the reception date of the application at the CNC TRIP office. No expense incurred before this date will be considered as eligible, with the exception of authors fee under the condition that this fee was paid the same fiscal year as that of the application. The CNC, following Film France’s assessment, will come to a decision on the application, based only on the eligibility criteria (including the rating scales) defined in here. Should these criteria be fulfilled, the CNC will issue a provisional TRIP approval to the applicant.

2 - Final approval Once the film has been completed, the production services company must submit a final approval application to the CNC, along with the necessary documents including a video copy of the film. The CNC, with the support of Film France, will then verify that the finished film complies with the eligibility criteria and will issue a final approval.

3 - Collecting the international tax rebate At the end of each fiscal year, the French company must have the production accounts certified by a statutory auditor (CPA). This certification must be sent with the provisional TRIP approval to the tax authorities along with the company’s income tax return. Most of the French companies end their fiscal year on December 31st, and submit their corporate tax after March 31st. If the amount of the tax rebate exceeds the corporate income tax during the fiscal year, the difference will be paid by the French State. IG-58

The Incentives Guide


TV dramas, series, animation

The tax authorities may pay the tax rebate before the final approval application is submitted. However, the final approval officially confirms the right to keep this tax rebate. In the event that final approval is refused, the tax authorities will demand the reimbursement of the tax rebate granted. For the French company, the amount of the tax rebate paid constitutes revenue that is tax and VAT exempt.

4 - TRIP discount Even though the TRIP is a non-assignable and inalienable debt of the French State to the French Company, as soon as provisional approval has been obtained, it is possible to discount it at a bank, under certain conditions fixed by the law. French banks used to discount tax rebates tend to only advance max 80% of the prospective Rebate amount.

5 - Credits During either the beginning or end credits and in either French or the original language, productions that receive the TRIP must mention the following: “Cette œuvre a bénéficié du crédit d’impôt en faveur de la production de films étrangers en France.” Proposed English translation: “This film benefited from the French Tax Rebate for International Production.” Do not hesitate to contact Film France or the CNC for any questions relating to the approval procedure, as well as information on production, notably for questions concerning shooting in France.

Contacts CNC Magali Jammet Tel: + 33 1 44 34 34 17 magali.jammet@cnc.fr Baptiste Heynemann Tel: +33 1 44 34 35 34 baptiste.heynemann@cnc.fr

Film France French national film commission Franck Priot Mélanie Chebance Fanny Fan Tel: + 33 1 53 83 98 90 / 91 rebate@filmfrance.net

The Incentives Guide

IG-59


TV dramas, series, animation

The trip line-up

IG-60

YEAR

GENRE

TITLE

DIRECTOR

COUNTRY OF ORIGIN

PRODUCTION COMPANY

FRENCH LINE PRODUCER

2009

TV series

MERLIN (Season 2)

(various)

UK

Shine Ltd / BBC

Firstep 

2010

TV series

MERLIN (Season 3)

(various)

UK

Shine Ltd / BBC

Firstep 

2010

TV series (Animation)

CITY OF FRIENDS

Jean Duval 

NORWAY

Creacon Entertainment

Action Synthese

2010

TV series

GOSSIP GIRLS

Mark Piznarski 

USA

Warner Bros. Television

Peninsula

2010

TV series (Animation)

RUSSEL & FRANKIE

Stephen Cooper 

UK

Parthenon Animation Prod

Action Synthese

2010

TV series (Animation)

EUREKA

Kaouther Benhania 

QATAR

Al Jazeera Children Channel

XD Productions

2011

TV series

DEATH IN PARADISE

-

UK

Red Planet Pictures Ltd / BBC

Atlantique Productions

2011

TV series (Animation)

A'mak-i Hayal

Mustafa Emre

Turquey

Autoplato Film Production

XD productions

2011

TV series

Merlin (Season 4)

Alice Throughton, Jeremy Webb

UK

Shine LTD

Firstep

2012

TV series

Death in Paradise 2

- Collectif -

UK

Red Planet Pictures LTD

Skyprod

UK

Shine LTD

Firstep

2012

TV series

Merlin (Season 5)

J. Webb, A. Pillai, A. Throughton, J. Molotnikov

2012

TV series

Pacman

Moto Sakakibara

USA

Sprite Entertainment

TeamTO

2012

TV series

Signs

R. Bradshaw, M. Zgarka

Canada

XII Tribes Entertainment

Endemol Fiction

2012

TV series (Animation)

DM2 shorts

F. Joubert, R. Schuller, B. Dequier, M. O'Hare, Y. Cheney, E. Favela

USA

DM2 Productions LLC / Universal

Illumination Mac Guff

2012

TV series

Tunnel (The)

Dominik Moll & autres

UK

Kudos Ltd

Shine Films

The Incentives Guide


TV dramas, series, animation

CHAPTER 2

CO-PRODUCTION WITH FRANCE 1 Market overall presentation 1 – The spirit of the State support system for TV production When France supports film & TV production, the main motive is culture, and the laws were originally designed for feature films (see PART 2). When assessing how this cultural policy should be applied to TV formats, lawmakers first had to sort out which formats would be considered as “culture” (dramas & series, animation…), and which ones would be regarded as TV entertainment not eligible for state support (commercials, game shows, talk shows…). This chapter focuses on the TV projects that can benefit from CNC subsidies, specifically dramas and series, animation projects and documentaries.

a. Broadcasters’ obligations In an attempt to promote and support French and European culture, the authorities designed two sets of obligations for the broadcasters: Production quotas: broadcasters have to invest a strong portion of their yearly turnover (at least 12.5% for free-to-air channels) into European production, and most of that money (90%) has to go to French speaking projects produced by “independent” producers. Broadcasting quotas: broadcasters have to show at least 60% of European programs, including 40% French language programs (European directive “Television Without Frontiers”).

b. CNC support Like its support for feature films, the CNC offers two kinds of subsidies for TV production: automatic support for production, and selective support (production, development, innovation, international promotion…). The automatic support amount per project is based on various criteria like: duration, format, French expenditure… As for feature films, it is generated after the broadcasting of the project, and will be available to the producer for his next projects. Those supports are now open to productions for new media.

The Incentives Guide

IG-61


TV dramas, series, animation

2 – Key figures a. Yearly investment and volume In 2011, the French industry has produced a total of 3,777 hours of programming, for a global investment of e1,35 billion in dramas & series, animation and documentaries, French production in 2011 Nb hours

Total amount invested (Me)

Producers investment

Broacasters’ contribution

CNC support

Foreign investment

Other 3,5%

Dramas & series

773

752,3

10,3%

71,4%

9,9%

4,9%

Animation

355

210,6

20,7%

27,5%

14,6%

28,9%

8,4%

Documentaries

2 649

387,3

16,1%

48,8%

20,5%

4,4%

10,3%

TOTAL

3 777

1 350,2

In that chart, 3 figures deserve some attention: • For dramas and series (live action), about 71% of the financing come from the broadcasters themselves, and only 4,9% from foreign partners. The broadcasters have a strong input in the content of these productions and don’t rely on international co-productions. • Foreign partners contribute up to 29% of the global financing of animation, which shows that this format is often based on international co-productions.

b. Average costs and broadcasters’ contributions (eligible productions) The average cost per hour varies depending on the type of broadcaster (public, private, free, pay). Production cost per hour in 2011   Cost / hour (Ke) Dramas & series

Animation

973,5

911,2

Private free-to-air channels

Private pay-TV channels

Regional channels

1 131,0

981,7

192,7

Broadcasters’ contribution (e)

689,1

657,5

788,6

670,8

42,3

Broacasters’ contribution (%)

70,8%

72,2%

69,7%

68,3%

22,0%

Cost / hour (Ke)

593,0

565,7

653,4

539,5

193,7

Broadcasters’contribution (e)

137,1

166,5

128,6

64,9

33,6

Broadcasters’ contribution (%)

23,1%

29,4%

19,7%

12,0%

17,3%

Cost / hour (Ke)

146,2

203

105,5

104,6

103,6

68,4

100,5

64,2

39,5

25

46,8%

49,5%

60,9%

37,8%

24,1%

Documentaries Broadcasters contribution (e) Broacasters contribution (%)

IG-62

Public Average free-to-air for all broadcasters channels

The Incentives Guide


TV dramas, series, animation

The better-financed format is “dramas & series”, with an average cost of e973,500 per hour. The ones with the higher budgets are carried out by the main free-to-air private channel TF1 (e1,5 M per hour), the giant pay-TV channel Canal+ (e1,5 M), the main free-to-air public channel France 2 (e1,2 M) and finally the French-German cultural channel Arte (e1,1 M). Only three channels have a yearly budget for dramas & series above e100 M: France 2 (e144,1 M), TF1 (e142,7 M) and France 3 (e117 M). Animation programs have an average cost per hour of e593,000, although in 2011 some broadcasters got involved in more expensive animation series: TF1 (e735,800), France 4 (e704,900), and the cable channel Canal J (e664,000). However, only three channels have a yearly budget for animation above e4 M: France 3 (e16,7 M), TF1 (e13,2 M) and France 5 (e8,4 M). Documentaries are produced for an average cost per hour of e146,200, but five channels back projects that have a much higher budget: Arte (e248,000 per hour), France 2 (e245,800), France 3 (e214,900), France 5 (e212,500) and Canal+ (e210,600). On a yearly basis, the biggest contributors to documentary production are Arte (e30,1 M), France 3 (e24,6 M), France 5 (e24,6 M), France 2 (e21,9 M).

3 – Most of the productions are majority French A complete list of foreign TV productions co-produced by French producers and eligible for the CNC support is available in the Appendices section.

a. Animation and documentaries The desire for foreign cooperation is much greater for animation and documentaries, both because these formats are much more suitable to co-productions and because language is less of an issue. 36 foreign animation series have officially been co-produced by France in the past 5 years, coming from countries like Belgium, Canada, Italy, the United Kingdom and even South Korea. The number is even more impressive for documentaries: about 100 foreign projects co-produced by France since 2007, coming from very diverse countries. The main partners were Belgium, Canada, Germany, Spain and Switzerland. b. Dramas & series Whereas many foreign feature films are officially co-produced by France (see Part 2), when it comes to dramas & series, there are few examples of foreign programs coproduced by French producers. Three basic reasons for this: • The dramas & series market is driven by broadcasters, and they tend to offer two kinds of stories to the French viewers: national stories with a French cast or American series. In both cases, there is no strong appeal for co-production with The Incentives Guide

IG-63


TV dramas, series, animation

foreign partners. This is true in many other countries. • Broadcasters have obligations to finance French language content, and tend to focus on what’s left of their purchasing budget on international mainstream programs (mostly US). • France has signed about 50 bilateral co-production treaties with other countries for feature films, but only one for TV dramas, series and animation (with Canada).

c. French producers go for mainstream international series In the past 2 years, some key French producers have participated into a new trend: the production of international mainstream series, predominantly in a foreign language (in English in most cases), co-financed with several foreign partners. Doing so, they have initiated a stronger presence of the French industry on the international market place, and triggered a slight shift in the CNC support, which will now lend more support to such international programs. The most recent examples are series like XIII (EuropaCorp / Canal+ / M6), The Borgias (Atlantique Prod. / Canal+), The Heretics (Breakout Films / Arte), Cop in Paris (Atlantique Prod. / TF1)…

2 Qualifying for the French system 1 – The benefits of qualifying • French co-producers can use CNC subsidies for qualifying productions only. • French broadcasters will pay more attention to any program qualifying as “French”. • Sofica funds (private equity) can only invest into qualifying productions. • Regional funds tend to invest only in qualifying productions (see Part 4). > In a nutshell: It makes it easier for the French partner to raise money.

2 – Qualifying criteria • The lead producer must be European; • French contribution to the financing must be at least 30 % of the total budget. • French contribution to the financing must include one or several French broadcasters investments for at least 25 % of the French investment and at least e 9 000 per hour in cash; French Video-On-Demand services are considered as broadcasters. IG-64

The Incentives Guide


TV dramas, series, animation

• A minimum of 30 % of the budget has to be spent on French soil. • The production must qualify as “European” according to the CNC point system (see next page). >Example TV Drama – Budget: 1 000 000 e Minimum French contribution: 300 000 e (30 % total budget); Including: French broadcaster investment for at least 75 000 e (25 % French share); Minimum expenses on French soil: 300 000 e (30 % total budget).

The CNC point system for TV dramas and series Audiovisual: European Scale 18 points (required: 13) 6 points 3 points 2 points 1 point 6 points 3 points 2 points 1 point 4 points 1 point 1 point 1 point 1 point 2 points

Simulation

Authors and directors Direction Script- and screenwriters Other authors (music…) Actors Lead role Supporting role 50% of other fees Creative collaboration Photography Sound Editing Set design Technical Industries

The BBC’s serie Death In Paradise (season 2) shot in the French Carribbean (Guadeloupe) was supported by the TRIP (© Red Planet Pictures)

The Incentives Guide

IG-65


TV dramas, series, animation The CNC point system for animation 2D and 3D Animation: European Scale 21 points (required: 14) 6 points 1 point 2 points 2 points 1 point 7 points 2 points 2 points 1 point 2 points 6 points 1 point 1 point 2 points 2 points 2 points

Simulation

Authors and directors Conception or author(s) Script Directors Music Pre-production Drawing of the characters Storyboard Art director Animation Positioning Production of the animation Caption stand Scene painting 50% of labour costs of animator 50% of labour cost of tracers colorists Post production

The CNC point system for documentaries Documentary: European Scale 14 points (required: 9) 3 points 2 points 1 point 7 points 1 point 1 point 1 point 4 points 4 points

IG-66

Authors and directors Direction Script and screenwriters Creative collaborations Photography Sound Editing 50% of others salary Technical Industries: 50% of shooting and post production technical costs

The Incentives Guide

Simulation


TV dramas, series, animation

3 – The French-Canadian Co-production Treaty This treaty allows a couple of changes in the rules for TV co-productions between Canada and France. The main changes are: • the minority co-producer has to invest at least 20 % of the total budget, instead of 30 %; so, for majority Canadian productions, the French contribution to the financing must be at least 20 % of the total budget; • same change for local spending: a minimum of 20 % of the budget has to be spent on French soil (instead of 30 %); • in order to qualify as “European” on the CNC point system (next page), Canadian elements score as European. One of the series using this possibility was Transporter, adapted from the feature film franchise. It was an English language show, with majority producer QVF Inc (Canada) co-produced by Atlantique Production in France, and supported by M6 (second biggest private free-to-air channel).

4 – The tax rebate for French audiovisual works It is important to bare in mind that this tax rebate is different from the TRIP mentioned above in this booklet. Any production qualifying to the French system is hence regarded as French, which enables it to apply to the local tax credit for French audiovisual works. Until 2012 included, the local tax credit was reserved for French language works, which made it improper for foreign language co-productions. However, when improving the local tax credit in December 2012, the French parliament brought interesting changes in order to make France more attractive for foreign language TV dramas and series. From 2013 on, a non-French language TV drama or series can apply to the tax rebate for French audiovisual works, and be refunded of 20 % of its French spending up to e5,000 per minute, provided it fulfils the following criteria: • a minimum production budget of e35,000 per minute; • at least 30% of the budget financed by non-French partners; • the completed version is available with French subtitles or dubbed in French; • spend most of the budget on French soil (precise criteria depending on the CNC ad hoc committee).

The Incentives Guide

IG-67


TV dramas, series, animation

In any case, this tax rebate will be requested by and awarded to the French co-producer of the drama (or series), thus – very likely – being regarded as part of the French producer’s contribution to the budget.

5 – The local subsidies In addition to the State’s Minister of Culture, some local governments (Regions, Départements and Cities: see contacts pages) have created funds to support movie & TV production. So far, 23 Regions (please refer to the map page 82), 9 Départements and one city (Strasbourg) have set up a tv drama & series or animation fund, each one defining its own support policy. The cultural value of the project is generally the biggest concern of the funds. Some of them develop partnerships with the bordering regions of nearby countries. Most of their investment goes to French-speaking works. For more information on these local support, please refer to the guide published by Ciclic (with the support of Film France) available on the website: http://www.ciclic.fr/ressources/le-guide-2013

Death in Paradise (2011&2012) / Atlantique Prod & BBC (GBR) Supported by Guadeloupe

Death In Paradise (season 1 & 2) was supported by the TRIP and by Guadeloupe (© Red Planet Pictures)

IG-68

The Incentives Guide


APPENDICES


How to meet French producers

1 How to meet French producers The purpose of this chapter is simply to present you with a selection of networking events in France and co-production meetings blending French and foreign producers. The five platforms for feature films presented below organize around 15 different gatherings along the year, often in connection with film festivals. The Cannes film festival offers by far the biggest number of meeting opportunities in France. Our advice: prepare well in advance for such events. The deadlines to apply for accreditations as well as booking accommodations are often done many months ahead of time. Even though a lot of the French producers interested in discovering exciting foreign projects will speak English or another foreign language, being able to hand out some documents in French, a synopsis or a director’s statement, may give you an extra chance. When swamped by projects, any producer may be tempted to choose the easy way out and pick the one written in his/her language in the stockpile! (By the way, Film France can provide you with translators’ contacts). > For TV dramas and series specifically, here is a shortlist of relevant events you may want to attend: • MipCom (beginning of October) and its pre-market MipJunior (for children’s & youth programmes) in Cannes : www.mipworld.com/mipcom/ • MipTV (beginning of April) and its pre-markets: MipDoc, MipFormats and MipCube (innovation lab for the future of tv) also in Cannes Nathalie Gastone - nathalie.gastone@reedmidem.com - www.mipworld.com > For animation features and series specifically, you may want to consider attending: • Mifa is a 3-4-day must-attend event (market and conferences) for the animation industry that takes place every year early June in Annecy. Deadline accreditation in February www.annecy.org/annecy-2012/mifa/mifa-presentation • Cartoon Movie (features, 5-7 March 2014) in Lyon & Cartoon Forum (TV series, 17-20 September 2013) in Toulouse Annick Maes - Forum & Movie Director www.cartoon-media.be • movie@cartoon-media.eu / forum@cartoon-media.eu Please check out the websites of all these co-production events before planning your trip as some tend to disclose their dates quite late and cannot be included in this edition.

IG-70

The Incentives Guide


How to meet French producers

1 - Cannes Producers Network In brief: The networking platform of the world’s biggest film festival and market. Description: The Producers Network was launched in 2004 by the Marché du Film/ Festival de Cannes. It takes advantage of the increasing number of international film professionals at the Cannes Film Festival to maximize networking opportunities. Gathering 550 producers from around the world, the Producers Network stimulates production and promotes international co-production opportunities through a series of events specially designed for the producers. Every morning for seven days, a series of Breakfast Meetings take place, gathering some 200-industry professionals and producers for roundtable discussions. Every day, each of the 16 breakfast tables will feature a different VIP international special guest who will share their own unique experiences in production, festivals and international financing, with the help of an industry expert acting as moderator. Also Producers Network offers one Speed-Dating Worldwide Session between producers to help them connect and network. And, in true Cannes’ tradition, the daily Happy Hour is the place to be to carry on conversation over a drink! Selection criteria: Limited to producers whose main activity is production and who have already made at least one feature film theatrically released within the last 3 years. Participants must show a credit as producer or co-producer. Line producer’s, executive producer’s or associate producer’s credit are not accepted. Costs and benefits: The Producers Network fee includes: • Access to screenings at both the Market

and

the

Festival

• The Marché du Film information package: pocket guide, festival official catalogue, the producers guide & the daily screening programme • A copy of this year’s Market Guide • Listing in this year’s edition of the Market Guide (if registered before April 13, 2012) • Free access to the cinando.com database for a year • The 2012 Focus study

Cannes Producers Network 2012 may

The Incentives Guide

IG-71


How to meet French producers

For Cannes 2012: e 369,50 per person VAT included (deadline: April 30th, 2012 or once maximum capacity has been reached, whichever comes first – limited to 550 producers) Information & Registration Marché du Film Julie Bergeron Tel + 33 1 43 58 29 55 / Fax + 33 1 43 58 29 77 jbergeron@festival-cannes.fr / www.marchedufilm.com Film France’s comment: Plenty of meetings, lots of different professionals.

2- Cannes Producers Workshop In brief: The networking platform for newcomers producers on the international scene or at the Festival de Cannes Description: The Producers Workshop was launched in 2011 by the Marché du FilmFestival de Cannes. It is a program designed for producers who have little or no prior experience with the Marché du Film and the Festival de Cannes or on the international scene. The specific aim of the program is to support producers in achieving their goals within the International market and get the most out of their participation at the Marché du Film-Festival de Cannes. During the first three days of the Festival, the Workshop provides a series of seminars conducted by esteemed specialists on various subjects, including co-production and international financing, marketing, international sales and pitching skills. Producers can also participate to guided tours of the Market and to coaching sessions in which they can exchange views and experiences with top-notch consultants. Also, the Closing Cocktail of the Producer Workshop is a great place to carry on conversation and connect with other producers in a lively atmosphere that make the renown of the Festival de Cannes. Selection criteria: Registration with the Producers Workshop is open to all professionals whose main activity is production or distribution. Costs and benefits: The Producers Workshop fee includes: • Access to the Producers Workshop program (workshops, guided tours, coaching sessions) • Access to screenings at both the Market and the Festival • The Marché du Film information package: pocket guide, festival offiIG-72

The Incentives Guide


How to meet French producers

cial catalogue, the producers guide and the daily screening programme • A copy of this year’s Market Guide • Listing in this year’s edition of the Market Guide (if registered before April 10, 2013) • Free access to the cinando.com database for a year • The 2013 Focus study For Cannes 2013: 309 e per person VAT not included (deadline: April 10th, 2013 or before once maximum capacity has been reached, whichever comes first – limited to 300 producers) The 3th edition of Producers Workshop is taking place on May 15-17, 2013. Information & Registration Marché du Film Julie Bergeron Tel + 33 1 43 58 29 55 jbergeron@festival-cannes.fr / www.marchedufilm.com

3 - Cannes Doc Corner In brief: A space dedicated to documentary cinema in the heart of the Marché du Film Description: The Doc Corner was launched in 2012 as a continuation of the Doc Corner Brunch. It welcomes directors, sales companies, buyers, festival programmers and commissioning editors into a world of documentary cinema. In a dedicated space, festivals and sales companies specialized in documentary can reserve a work space with different facilities (a table for meetings and for promotional materials). Every morning for six days, a series of round-tables discussions takes place with professionals of the documentary industry. Also, the video library of the Doc Corner showcases feature film documentaries registered with Cinando and finalized this year (more than 200 films were shown last year) that are accessible for screening at the viewing stations of the Doc Corner and on Cinando. Access to the video library and round tables of the Doc Corner: reserved for professionals registered with the Marché du Film. The 2nd edition of the Doc Corner is from May 15-22, 2013 Information & how to register your films with the video library Marché du Film Tel + 33 1 43 58 29 55 doccorner@festival-cannes.fr / www.marchedufilm.com

The Incentives Guide

IG-73


How to meet French producers

4 - Paris Project When: June 30 - July 3 2013, within the framework of the International Film Festival Paris Cinema (June 28 - July 9). In brief: Designed to encourage co-productions, film financing and development, Paris Project annually presents an international selection of projects in development and films in postproduction to the French and European film industry professionals. Description: Organized within the framework of Paris Cinema International Film Festival, Paris Project is a development and financing platform for carefully selected worldwide feature projects destined for French and European co-production. Furthermore, Paris Project organizes screenings of feature films in late stages of post-production seeking financial completion and looking for presales partners and international sales representatives. During this intense three-day meeting and networking event, participating filmmakers, producers, sales agents, and financiers not only benefit from one-to-one pre-scheduled meetings, but they also have the opportunity to attend seminars and workshops organized by European leading film industry professionals. In 2011, more than 350 professionals from 140 companies attended Paris Project, while more than 450 meetings were scheduled. Selection criteria: Fiction feature projects are eligible only. All applications must be submitted by a production company. All projects in development should not have French partners attached when submitted to Paris Project. What else: Paris Project is organized in partnership with the Hong Kong International Film Festival and HAF - Asian Film Financing Forum, bringing in 2012 a selection of five Hong Kong projects in development. Enhancing the co-production possibilities between Taiwan and France, Paris Project will once again host a workshop centering around two Taiwanese and two European projects in development, continuing the fruitful collaboration with the Taipei Film Commission. Additional projects presentation, as well as seminars, workshops and case studies will be organized with Paris Project long lasting partners - ACE, EAVE, Europa Distribution, Producers - Network | Festival de Cannes, CinĂŠfondation and CineMart.

IG-74

The Incentives Guide


How to meet French producers

Costs and benefits: Submission is free. Producers and directors, whose projects in development are selected for participation, are invited and all expenses (travel and accommodation costs) are covered by the festival. Deadline for applications: April 20, 2012: Application deadline for projects in development (Paris Project Meetings) May 11, 2012: Application deadline for films in post-production (Paris Project Screenings)

© Mathilde Mar 10

Information & Registration Festival Paris Cinéma / Paris Project Vanja Kaludjercic / Head of Paris Project Tel + 33 1 55 25 55 26 / Fax + 33 1 43 67 09 50 parisproject@pariscinema.org www.pariscinema.org Paris Projet

Film France’s comment: Paris Project is to co-production platforms what haute-couture is to the fashion industry!

5 - ACE events In brief: Created in 1993, ACE is an international film producers association based in Paris. ACE is also a well-known provider of professional training and consulting for experienced producers, a coproduction matchmaker and a powerful international network of 180 producers from more than 40 countries from Europe, Canada, Latin America, Asia, New Zealand, Australia and Middle East. The ACE members meet several times every year in Film Festivals and in other events organised by ACE itself, in order to find the best possible financial and artistic partners. In 2012 63% of ACE members had coproduced at least one film with another ACE Network member over the last three years. To become an ACE member you must have been through the ACE training session. Description: The ACE annual session for EU producers, 4 steps to help your feature film project: • October / script development workshop, • Late November / financing strategy workshop, • Late March / networking workshop: The ACE ANNUAL REUNION, • One year of script and financial advice at a distance.

The Incentives Guide

IG-75


How to meet French producers

The ACE annual session for non EU producers: ACE has developed a dedicated training session concentrated in 1 workshop late March, before joining the other members at the ACE ANNUAL REUNION (it also includes one year of script and financial advice at a distance). ACE also organizes short sessions dedicated to a specific target. Producers trying to develop a project in coproduction with a specific region can apply to the ACE Coproduction Labs in Hong Kong, Tokyo, Latin America: 4-day project-based workshops to help find the relevant strategy and to identify the right potential partners in order to develop a consistent business with these markets. Selection criteria: For all sessions, eligibility conditions are to have produced, as the majority producer, at least one feature film theatrically released, to have a relevant project and to be selected by our selection committee.  When: Application Deadline for the EU Training Session: 21st June / 16 seats available Application Deadline for the Non-EU Training Session: 8th November / 8 seats available Information Ronan Girre/ Chief Executive & Head of Studies Alice Ormières / Head of Communication & Events Sabrina Camus / Financial Controller Al Williams / Assistant Tel + 33 1 53 25 00 01 / Fax + 33 1 53 32 76 94 info@ace-producers.com / alwilliams@ace-producers.com www.ace-producers.com Film France’s comment: Networking is great, but learning is also a valuable tool.

ACE events

IG-76

The Incentives Guide


How to meet French producers

6 - CRC Co-production meetings In brief: For 20 selected projects from producers from key European regions Description: The Capital Regions for Cinema (CRC) co-production events bring together a large contingent of movie producers for several hours, including meals shared together or informal meetings. All participants get the Co-production meetings list of producers and projects one week before CRC CRC mettings at Cannes 2011 each event, so that they can contact the teams associated with the projects they are interested in. The co-organizing teams (see list in contacts) help with connections by bringing producers from their areas. Selection criteria: Each CRC partner (Ile de France Film Commission, Madrid Film Commission, Medienboard Berlin-Brandenburg and Roma-Lazio Film Commission) selects 5 projects from producers based in its region and invites around 20 film professionals : financiers, distributors, producers with a significant experience of co-producing with European countries. Each meeting welcomes also 5 projects and a delegation of producers from a “guest country”: Egypt, Taipei, Hong Kong, New York, India, Argentina, Brazil… The projects must already have financing in place and/or a valuable partner in the project’s original country (distributor, co-producer, national or regional funding, TV, etc...) Cost and benefits: No application or participation fee required. What else: The CRC network was established in 2005, resulting from partnership agreements signed by the Ile-de-France Film Commission with three European regional counter parts (Roma-Lazio, Madrid and Berlin-Brandenburg), with the goal of bringing together the enormous creative potential of these European film capitals in developing co-productions. The CRC is a platform to expand cooperation among partners. Its aim, alongside with enabling co-productions, is the exchange of services and support of all levels and to further the distribution and circulation of projects. When: Each year, CRC co-production meetings take place during the main film festivals and markets: Berlinale (February), Cannes (May), Donostia San Sebastian International Film Festival (September), Roma Film Festival (October).

The Incentives Guide

IG-77


How to meet French producers

Information & Registration • Ile de France Film Commission: Cécile Petit - Tel + 33 1 56 88 12 84 – cecile.petit@idf-film.com • Madrid Film Commission: Samuel Castro - Tel + 34 91 518 65 22 – samuel.castro@madridfilmcommission.com • Medienboard Berlin-Brandenburg: Teresa Hoefert de Turegano - Tel + 49 331 743 87 25 - t.hoefert-de-turegano@medienboard.de • Roma-Lazio Film Commission: Tina Bianchi - Tel + 39 06 6841 1712 - bianchi@romalaziofilmcommission.it Film France’s comment: A very open platform run by regional public organizations.

7 - Film France services to producers a. Finding a production services company Over the years, Film France has always provided information about all line producers/ production service companies based in France, thus helping foreign producers who need to shoot in France to find the most suitable partner for their project. In order to ease the access to this information, Film France and the network of French film commissions launched an online directory in 2010 featuring production service companies based in France:

Franck Priot (Film France COO) with French and Chinese producers on the Film France booth at Cannes Film Market.

www.filmfrance.net/v2/fr/home.cfm?choixmenu=baseprodexe From mainstream Hollywood films to low budget projects, from Japanese commercials to Indian Tamil song sequences, from a UK TV series in town for a 6 month shoot in one castle to a 2 day shoot spanning multiple landmarks, France offers a wide range of highly trained production service professionals who can adapt to all kinds of clients, languages and projects. Find the best-suited production services for your project on our website by checking the company’s previous experiences and the foreign languages spoken.

IG-78

The Incentives Guide


How to meet French producers

b. Co-production services In brief: Case-by-case advice Description: Film France does not organize co-production events but can help foreign producers look for French partners: provided that part of the project is to be shot (or posted) in France. This condition is absolutely mandatory. • At the development stage: We can provide producers with explanations of what to hope from the French market. Also, through Film France’s network of 40 local film commissions all over France, we can help with background info about the area in which the story is supposed to happen and also help coordinate scouting trips. • When projects have gathered at least three out of four key elements (a completed screenplay, a director, two leading actors and domestic financing – from the country of origin of the project), Film France can provide information about French national and regional financing, co-production structures, cultural differences between French filmmakers and other countries, regulations and about the TRIP (Tax Rebate for International Production, see part 1). Film France can also draw tailored lists of French producers whose background and profile indicate they could be game for sitting down a moment to discover your project. For a (very) few projects that have special appeal to the French market, Film France may organize one-to-one meetings between foreign producers and potential French co-producers. What else: Film France’s staff regularly gives lectures at markets and festivals about France’s film production landscape and co-production processes – the live version of the guide you are currently holding! When: All year round in the Film France offices in Paris, on our booth at the Cannes Film Festival, at the Berlinale in February, in Los Angeles during the AFCI Locations as well as at various other events throughout the year. Information Film France Franck Priot - Mélanie Chebance - Fanny Fan Tel: + 33 1 53 83 98 90 / 91 melanie@filmfrance.net / fanny@filmfrance.net / www.filmfrance.net

The Incentives Guide

IG-79


Industry directories, Institutions & Organisations

2 Industry directories, Institutions & Organisations CNC - The National Center for Cinema Established by the law of October 25th 1946, the French National Center for Cinema (CNC – Centre National du Cinéma et de l’Image Animée) is a public institution of an administrative nature, financially independent though under the authority of the French Ministry of culture and communication. Eric Garandeau is its president.

The CNC’s main briefs are: > Regulations > Support financing the cinema, audiovisual, technology and multimedia > Promotion of the motion-picture and the audiovisual industry – and of the circulation of films among all types of public > Protection and promotion of the cinematographic heritage.

CNC - Centre National du Cinéma et de l’Image Animée 12, rue de Lübeck - 75016 Paris Tel + 33 1 44 34 34 40 www.cnc.fr

IG-80

The Incentives Guide


Industry directories, Institutions & Organisations

Producers Unions APC (feature film) Association des Producteurs de cinéma Tel + 33 1 53 89 01 30 apc@producteurscinema.fr www.producteurscinema.fr President: Marc Missonnier

SPI (feature film & TV drama) Syndicat des Producteurs Indépendants Tel + 33 1 44 70 70 44 info@lespi.org www.lespi.org Presidente: Bénédicte Lesage

UPF (feature film) Union des Producteurs de Films Tel + 33 1 44 90 07 10 contact@upfilms.fr www.upfilms.fr President: Alain Terzian

SPFA (animation) Syndicat des Producteurs de film d’Animation Tel + 33 1 55 28 83 05 spfa@wanadoo.fr www.animation-france.fr/ President: Marc du Pontavice

L’ARP (feature film) Société civile des AuteursRéalisateurs-Producteurs Tel + 33 1 53 42 40 00 larp@larp.fr www.larp.fr President: Michel Hazanavicius

AFPF (feature film) Association Française des Producteurs de Films Tel + 33 9 54 71 74 55 afpf@afpf.net www.afpf.net President: Stépgane Guenin

USPA (Tv drama) Union Syndicale de la Production Audiovisuelle Tel + 33 1 40 53 23 00 contact@uspa.fr www.uspa.fr President: Jean-Pierre Guerin

Industry Directories On line Industry Directories Bellefaye www.bellefaye.com The European Audiovisual Observatory www.obs.coe.int Business Guide de l’Audiovisuel www.mass-media.fr Unifrance www.unifrance.org TV France International www.tvfrance-intl.com/ The Incentives Guide

IG-81


Industry directories, Institutions & Organisations

French Local & Regional Supports

15

19

17 16

10

13

7

1

5 18

6

4

20 12

3 23

2 14

11

21

8 22 9

IG-82

The Incentives Guide


Industry directories, Institutions & Organisations

1.............ALSACE - Region STRASBOURG - Communauté Urbaine 2.............AQUITAINE - ECLA DORDOGNE – Département PYRENEES ATLANTIQUES - Département LOT ET GARONNE - Département 3.............AUVERGNE - Region 4.............BURGUNDY - Region 5.............BRITTANY - Region FINISTERE - Département 6.............CENTRE / LOIRE VALLEY - Ciclic 7.............CHAMPAGNE-ARDENNE - ORCCA 8.............CORSICA - Collectivité Territoriale 9.............GUADELOUPE - Region 10...........ILE DE FRANCE - Region 11...........LANGUEDOC-ROUSSILLON - Region 12...........LIMOUSIN - Region 13...........LORRAINE - Region 14...........MIDI-PYRENNEES - Region 15...........NORD-PAS DE CALAIS - Pictanovo 16...........LOWER NORMANDY - Maison de l’Image Basse-Normandie 17...........UPPER NORMANDY - Pôle Image Haute-Normandie 18...........PAYS DE LA LOIRE - Region 19...........PICARDY - Region 20...........POITOU-CHARENTES - Region CHARENTE - Charente Développement CHARENTE-MARITIME - Département VIENNE - Département 21...........PROVENCE ALPES COTE D’AZUR - Region ALPES-MARITIMES - Département 22...........REUNION - Region 23...........RHONE-ALPES - Rhône-Alpes Cinéma (for feature) RHONE-ALPES- Region (for tv drama) The Incentives Guide

IG-83


Industry directories, Institutions & Organisations

Contacts of French Local & Regional Supports > 11 ALSACE Communauté Urbaine Département Audiovisuel et Cinéma Murielle Famy Tel + 33 3 88 15 69 47 murielle.famy@region-alsace.eu www.region-alsace.eu

LOT ET GARONNE Conseil Général Direction de la Culture Sébastien Durupt Tel + 33 5 53 69 44 44 sedurupt@cg47.fr www.cg47.fr

STRASBOURG Communauté Urbaine Département Audiovisuel et Cinéma Georges Heck Tel + 33 3 88 60 92 97 Audiovisuel_et_cinema@strasbourg.eu www.strasbourg-film.com

2) In this territory, both the Region Aquitaine, the Dordogne, Pyrenees Atlantiques and Lot-et-Garonne Départements support film production.

1) In this territory, both the Region Alsace and the City of Strasbourg support film production.

> 22 AQUITAINE Ecla Jean-Raymond Garcia Tel + 33 5 47 50 10 01 Jean-raymond.garcia@ecla.aquitaine.fr www.ecla.aquitaine.fr DORDOGNE Conseil Général Direction de la Communication Nicolas Platon Tel + 33 5 53 02 21 02 / 20 27 n.platon@dordogne.fr www.cg24.fr PYRENEES ATLANTIQUES Conseil Général Direction de la Jeunesse, de l’education, de la culture et des sports Laurent Ferriere Tel + 33 5 59 11 44 54 laurent.ferriere@cg64.fr www.cg64.fr

> 3 AUVERGNE Conseil Régional Service Culture Stéphanie Thomas Tel + 33 4 73 31 96 62 s.thomas@cr-auvergne.fr www.auvergne.org > 4 BURGUNDY Conseil Régional Direction de la Culture Marie Chapelet Tel + 33 3 80 44 37 09 mchapelet@cr-bourgogne.fr www.cr-bourgogne.fr > 53 BRITTANY Conseil Régional Direction de la Culture Mission Cinéma et Audiovisuel Guillaume Esterlingot Tel + 33 2 99 93 98 55 g.esterlingot@region-bretagne.fr www.region-bretagne.fr FINISTERE Conseil Général Direction de la Culture Rodolphe Rohart Tel + 33 2 98 76 26 16 rodolphe.rohart@cg29.fr www.cg29.fr 3) In this territory, the Finistère Département may add to the subsidy granted by the Brittany Region.

IG-84

The Incentives Guide


Industry directories, Institutions & Organisations > 6 CENTRE / LOIRE VALLEY Ciclic Jérome Parlange Tel + 33 2 47 56 09 20 jerome.parlange@ciclic.fr www.ciclic.fr > 7 CHAMPAGNE-ARDENNE ORCCA Sophie Bousseau Tel + 33 3 26 55 78 17 sophie.bousseau@orcca.fr > 8 CORSICA Collectivité Territoriale Service Culture Jean-François Vincenti Tel + 33 4 95 10 98 65 jean-francois.vincenti@ct-corse.fr www.corse.fr > 9 GUADELOUPE Conseil Régional Service Arts Plastiques, Cinéma, Audiovisuel et Édition Kelly Palmin Tel + 33 5 90 80 40 72 cinema.audio@cr-guadeloupe.fr www.cr-guadeloupe.fr > 104 ILE DE FRANCE Conseil Régional Service Cinéma et Audiovisuel Sophie Haguet • Mélaine Thomann-Fox Tel + 33 1 53 85 58 81 sophie.haguet@iledefrance.fr melaine.thomann-fox@iledefrance.fr www.iledefrance.fr/cinema VAL DE MARNE Conseil Général Direction de la culture Marie Aubayle Tel + 33 1 49 56 27 04 marie.aubayle@cg94.fr www.cg94.fr 4) In this territory, both the Ile de France Region and the Val de Marne Département support film production.

> 11 LANGUEDOC-ROUSSILLON Conseil Régional Service cinéma, audiovisuel et multimédia Emmanuel Feulié Tel + 33 4 67 22 93 68 cinema@cr-languedocroussillon.fr www.cr-languedocroussillon.fr > 12 LIMOUSIN Conseil Régional Pôle Cinéma Catherine Rolland Tel + 33 5 55 45 18 55 c-rolland@cr-limousin.fr www.cinemaenlimousin.fr > 13 LORRAINE Conseil Régional Direction des Affaires Culturelles Marie-Alix Fourquenay Tel + 33 3 87 31 81 40 marie-alix.fourquenay@lorraine.eu www.lorraine.eu > 14 MIDI-PYRENNEES Conseil Régional Service des Industries Culturelles - International Benoît Caron Tel + 33 5 61 39 62 19 / 18 benoit.caron@cr-mip.fr www.midipyrenees.fr > 15 NORD - PAS DE CALAIS PICTANOVO Emmanuelle Demolder Tel + 33 3 20 28 26 52 edemolder@pictanovo.com www.pictanovo.com > 16 LOWER NORMANDY Maison de l’Image Basse-Normandie Guillaume Deslandes• Fanny Chereau Tel + 33 2 31 06 23 23 www.maisondelimage-bn.fr The Incentives Guide

IG-85


Industry directories, Institutions & Organisations >17 UPPER-NORMANDY Pôle Image Haute-Normandie Denis Darroy • Nuria Rodriguez Tel + 33 2 35 70 70 41 cine.av@poleimagehn.com www.poleimagehn.com

VIENNE Conseil Général Direction de l’Action Culturelle Stéphanie Champalou Tel + 33 5 49 55 66 52 schampalou@cg86.fr

> 18 PAYS DE LA LOIRE / WESTERN LOIRE Conseil Régional Service cinéma et audiovisuel Guylaine Hass Tel + 33 2 28 20 51 28 guylaine.hass@paysdelaloire.fr www.paysdelaloire.fr

5) In this territory, the Charentes, the Charentes-Maritime and the Vienne Départements may add to the subsidy granted by the Region Poitou-Charentes

> 19 PICARDY Conseil Régional Direction de la culture et du patrimoine Pascale Legrand Tel + 33 3 22 97 26 38 plegrand@cr-picardie.fr www.cr-picardie.fr > 205 POITOU-CHARENTES Conseil Régional Poitou-Charentes Cinéma Pascal Pérénnès Tel + 33 5 45 94 37 89 p.perennes@cr-poitou-charentes.fr www.poitou-charentes.fr/vivre-ensemble/cinema CHARENTE Magelis Frédéric Cros Tel + 33 5 45 38 00 00 fcros@magelis.org / www.magelis.org CHARENTE-MARITIME Conseil Général Direction de l’emploi, de l’économie et du tourisme Sophie Lepage Tel + 33 5 46 31 71 00 Sophie.lepage@cg17.fr www.charente-maritime.fr

IG-86

The Incentives Guide

> 216 PROVENCE-ALPES-COTE D’AZUR Conseil Régional Service Cinéma et Audiovisuel Chantal Fischer Tel + 33 4 91 57 50 57 cfischer@regionpaca.fr www.regionpaca.fr ALPES-MARTIMES Conseil Général Sous-direction de la Culture Mission Cinéma Pascal Gaymard Tel + 33 4 97 18 65 90 pgaymard@cg06.fr / www.cg06.fr 6) In this territory, both the PACA Region and the Alpes -Maritimes Departement support film production.

> 22 REUNION Agence Film Reunion Alain Randresy Tel + 33 2 62 92 29 29 Alain.randresy@agencefilmreunion.com www.agencefilmreunion.com > 23 RHONE-ALPES Rhône-Alpes Cinéma (feature film) Nathalie Huchard Tel + 33 4 72 98 08 94 n.huchard@rhone-alpes-cinema.fr www.rhone-alpes-cinema.fr Conseil Regional (TV drama) Direction de la Culture Catherine Puthod Tel + 33 4 72 59 52 70 puthod@rhonealpes.fr www.rhonealpes.fr


TRIP : the cultural test

3 TRIP : the cultural test 1- Point rating scale applicable to live action productions Eligibility requirements: To be eligible, the project must score a minimum total of 18 points, including at least 7 points for “dramatic content�.

1. DRAMATIC CONTENT (18 points)

Number of points Simulation received

1.1 - Location (7 points) Criterion no. 1 - Maximum number of points : 4 A relative majority of the scenes take place in France

4

Or A relative majority of the scenes take place in France and in a French-speaking1 country

3

Or A relative majority of the scenes take place in France and in a European country

3

Or At least five scenes take place in France Criterion no. 2 - Maximum number of points : 3 At least two sets must be symbolic of France: two locations representative of France must serve as the main setting of one scene

2

3

1.2 - Characters (4 points) Criterion no. 3 - Maximum number of points : 1 At least one main character is French, from a French-speaking or European country CRITERION NO. 4 - MAXIMUM NUMBER OF POINTS : 3 At least three secondary characters are French, from a French-speaking or European country Or At least two secondary characters are French, from a French-speaking or European country Or One secondary character is French, from a French-speaking or European country

1

3

2

1

1) A member of International Organisation of la Francophonie (www.francophonie.org)

The Incentives Guide

IG-87


TRIP : the cultural test

1.3 – Plot and story (5 points) Criterion no. 5 - Maximum number of points : 2 The plot and story highlight French artistic heritage or a period of French history CRITERION NO. 6 - MAXIMUM NUMBER OF POINTS : 2 The plot and story deal with political, social or cultural problems concerning French society or European societies

2

2

CRITERION NO. 7 - MAXIMUM NUMBER OF POINTS : 1 The plot and story are inspired or adapted from an existing work, such as a cinematographic or audiovisual work (except sequels), a novel, comic, opera, play, or video game.

1

1.4 – Languages Criterion no. 8 - Maximum number of points : 2 A final version of the film must be dubbed or subtitled in French

2. NATIONALITY OF CREATORS AND CREATIVE COLLABORATORS (12 points)

2

Number of points received

CRITERION NO. 9 - MAXIMUM NUMBER OF POINTS : 2 At least one of the creators: director or screenwriter

2

CRITERION NO. 10 - MAXIMUM NUMBER OF POINTS : 1 At least one of the film composers

1

CRITERION NO. 11 - MAXIMUM NUMBER OF POINTS : 2 At least one of the producers (individual)

2

CRITERION NO. 12 - MAXIMUM NUMBER OF POINTS : 2 At least one actor playing a main character

2

Or At least one of the actors playing a secondary character

1

Criterion no. 13 - Maximum number of points : 1 At least 50% of the actors (for scenes shot in France, excluding ancillary performers)

1

Criterion no. 14 - Maximum number of points : 3 At least three heads of department (first cameraman, art director, sound engineer, wardrobe director, film editor, first assistant director, production director, stage manager)

3

Or Two heads of department

2

Or One head of department

1

Criterion no. 15 - Maximum number of points : 1 At least 50% of the film crew members (for scenes shot in France)

IG-88

The Incentives Guide

1

Simulation


TRIP : the cultural test

Number of points received

3. PRODUCTION INFRASTRUCTURE (8 points)

Simulation

Criterion no. 16 - Maximum number of points : 3 At least 50% of shooting days are in France

3 Or

Between 30% and 50% of shooting days are in France

2 Or

Between 15% and 30% of shooting days are in France

1

Criterion no. 17 - Maximum number of points : 1 More than 50% of expenses related to special effects are paid to service providers established in France (for scenes shot in France).

1

Criterion no. 18 - Maximum number of points : 1 More than 50% of expenses related to shooting equipment (filming, machinery, lighting, sound recording) are paid to service providers established in France (for scenes shot in France)

1

Criterion no. 19 - Maximum number of points : 1 More than 50% of expenses related to shooting lab work are paid to service providers established in France (for scenes shot in France)

1

Criterion no. 20 - Maximum number of points : 2 More than 50% of expenses related to timing, sound mixing, or creating digital visual effects of more than 10 shots are paid to service providers established in France

2

TOTAL : 38

2- Point rating scale applicable to animation productions Eligibility requirements: To be eligible, the work concerned must receive a minimum total of 36 points, including at least 9 points for “dramatic content�.

1. DRAMATIC CONTENT (20 points)

Number of points received

Simulation

1.1 - Location (3 points) Criterion no. 1 - Maximum number of points : 3 At least one of the main locations of the action is in France, in a French-speaking country or in a European-looking location

3

Or At least 50% of the action takes place in a location that cannot be determined

2

1.2 - Characters (3 points) Criterion no. 2 - Maximum number of points : 3 At least one of the main characters is French, from a French-speaking or European country, or of a nationality that cannot be determined

3

The Incentives Guide

IG-89


TRIP : the cultural test

1.3 - Plot and story (10 points) Criterion no. 3 - Maximum number of points : 3 The plot is meant or adapted for a young audience

3

Criterion no. 4 - Maximum number of points : 4 The plot and story are inspired by or adapted from an existing work (notably a movie or a series (except sequels), a book or a comic, an opera, a play, a video game) or traditional tales.

4

Criterion no. 5 - Maximum number of points : 3 The plot and story refer to an event or a period in history, or deal with political, social or cultural problems specific to French or European societies

3

1.4 – Languages (4 points) Criterion no. 6 - Maximum number of points : 4 A dubbed or subtitled French version of the work will be available

4

2. NATIONALITY OF CREATORS AND CREATIVE COLLABORATORS (23 points)

Number of points received

CRITERION NO. 7 - MAXIMUM NUMBER OF POINTS : 2 At least one of the creators: director, screenwriter

2

CRITERION NO. 8 - MAXIMUM NUMBER OF POINTS : 1 At least one of the film composers

1

CRITERION NO. 9 - MAXIMUM NUMBER OF POINTS : 2 At least one of the character and/or set designers

2

CRITERION NO. 10 - MAXIMUM NUMBER OF POINTS : 2 At least one of the producers (individual)

2

CRITERION NO. 11 - MAXIMUM NUMBER OF POINTS : 2 At least one of the production directors and/or visual effects producers

2

CRITERION NO. 12 - MAXIMUM NUMBER OF POINTS : 2 At least one of the artistic directors (animation or visual effects) and/or first cameramen

2

CRITERION NO. 13 - MAXIMUM NUMBER OF POINTS : 2 At least one of the lead supervisors and/or first assistant and/ or visual effects supervisor

2

CRITERION NO. 14 - MAXIMUM NUMBER OF POINTS : 8 At least 50% of the animation supervisors and/or animation directors and/or technical supervisors and/or heads of modeling department and/or texture supervisors and/ or lighting supervisors

8

Or Between 25% and 50% of the animation supervisors and/or animation directors and/or technical supervisors and/or heads of modeling department and/or texture supervisors and/or lighting supervisors

4

Criterion no. 15 - Maximum number of points : 2 At least one of the sound creators

IG-90

The Incentives Guide

2

Simulation


TRIP : the cultural test

3. PRODUCTION INFRASTRUCTURE (31 points)

Number of points received

Simulation

Criterion no. 16 - Maximum number of points : 1 More than 50% of expenses related to storyboards and/or building sets and animation and/or (3D) pre-vis are paid to service providers established in France

1

Criterion no. 17 - Maximum number of points : 1 More than 50% of expenses related to characters design are paid to service providers established in France

1

Criterion no. 18 - Maximum number of points : 1 More than 50% of expenses related to set design are paid to service providers established in France

1

Criterion no. 19 - Maximum number of points : 5 At least 10% of expenses related to modeling (including digital sets) and/or rotoscoping and/or motion tracking are paid to service providers established in France: 0.5 point per 10% bracket

0.5 to 5

CRITERION NO. 20 - MAXIMUM NUMBER OF POINTS : 10 At least 10% of expenses related to animation (characters and cameras) and/or motion capture are paid to service providers established in France: 1 point per 10% bracket

1 to 10

Criterion no. 21 - Maximum number of points : 5 At least 10% of expenses related to rendering and/or lighting or tracing and/or colorization are paid to service providers established in France: 0.5 point per 10% bracket

0.5 to 5

Criterion no. 22 - Maximum number of points : 5 At least 10% of expenses related to digital compositing are paid to service providers established in France: 0.5 points per 10% bracket

0.5 to 5

Criterion no. 23 - Maximum number of points : 1 More than 50% of expenses related to sound artistry and sound editing are paid to service providers established in France

1

Criterion no. 24 - Maximum number of points : 1 More than 50% of expenses related to music recording are paid to service providers established in France

1

Criterion no. 25 - Maximum number of points : 1 More than 50% of expenses related to voice recording and dialog editing are paid to service providers established in France

1 TOTAL: 74

The Incentives Guide

IG-91


TRIP : the cultural test 3- Eligible countries and territories > French territory France consists of the metropolitan territory and the following locations: Corsica, French Guyana, French Polynesia, Guadeloupe, Martinique, Mayotte, New Caledonia, Reunion, St. Barthelemy, Saint Martin, Saint Pierre and Miquelon, Wallis and Futuna. > European States List of applicable countries: Albania, Armenia, Austria, Azerbaijan, Belgium, Bosnia and Herzegovina, Bulgaria, Croatia, Cyprus, Czech Republic, Denmark, Estonia, Finland, France, Georgia, Germany, Greece, Hungary, Ireland, Italia, Latvia, Liechtenstein, Lithuania, Luxembourg, Macedonia, Malta, Montenegro, Netherlands, Norway, Poland, Portugal, Romania, San Marino, Serbia, Slovakia, Slovenia, Spain, Sweden, Switzerland, Turkey, Ukraine, United-Kingdom. > French speaking country French-speaking countries include all members of the International Organization of La Francophonie and Algeria. List of applicable countries: Albania, Algeria, Andorra, Benin, Burkina Faso, Burundi, Cambodia, Cameroon, Canada, Canada New Brunswick, Canada Quebec, Cape Verde, Central African Republic, Chad, Comoros, Congo, Djibouti, Dominica, Egypt, Equatorial Guinea, Gabon, Ghana, Guinea, Guinea Bissau, Haiti, Ivory Coast (Côte d’Ivoire), Laos, Lebanon, Mali, Maurice, Moldavia, Monaco, Morocco, Niger, Rwanda, Saint Lucia, Sao Tome et Principe, Senegal, Seychelles, Togo, Tunisia, Vanuatu, Vietnam.

IG-92

The Incentives Guide


Minority French co-productions (2006-2012)

4 Minority French co-productions (2006-2012) More than 200 foreign movies on www.filmfrance.net (section Incentives) Discover which films from your country were co-produced by France in the past: budgets, French producers involved, funds raised from France‌ Many people don’t know about it: in the French support system, most of the production contracts are on public record, registered at the CNC. Therefore, there is a lot of information available about movies produced, and we have gathered a great deal of useful data about more than 150 Minority French co-productions who have qualified for state aid in the last five years. For each project, you will find the name of the French and the leading foreign coproducers, the budget, as well as all the French grants and financings used for the production: investments from free-to-air and pay TV channels (with their names), selective grants, soficas, transnational mechanisms (Eurimages, Franco-German Mini-Treaty, Franco-Canadian Mini-Treaty). The goal of this section of our website is to let foreign producers know about the roads that have been tried and tested, and to spot the French companies who have a special track-record of working with one country or another.

The Incentives Guide

IG-93



Film France Incentives Guide 2013