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THE BUILDERS·Of PHILIPPINE COMMERCE A biographical record of the lives, lineage and labors of the men who worked to build the foundation and structure of Philippine Commerce

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DONA;"'-O ' BY AYALA. CORPORATION TO FILIPINAS FOUNDATION, INC.

VOLUME I

l2()VU~

J. ()IZ

MANILA

ROJADI PUBLISHING CO. 1933-1934

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527

. I. Copyright, 1933 8p

ROQ UE J. DIZON


DEDICATION To Ex-S,ecretary of the Interior Honoriq. Ventura, Slenator SotÂŁro Baluy'ut of the Thi1'd Senatorial District, Gov'ernnr Pablo

Angew~

David of Pampanga, Consul

Gene'ral K. L. K'u;ong fO'1 the Republic of China, and Consul General AtBushi Kimura forr Japan, whose generosity of heart and greatness of spirit hatl3 inspired me: to greater accomplishments,

.this

volume is respectfully dedicated.


PREFACE Commerce in a nation's existence is a vital factor. Its dev.elopment insures the advent. of prosperity, while its neglect would spell the The

~!tagnation,

if not the collapse, of its economic system.

past few

years witnessed

-. depression.

a

world- -wide

business

In the Philippines, thanks to the business men and

the country's rich natural resources, this depression was not so acutely felt. When he realized that during the last thre,e decades the economic progress of this country was due in a large measure to its

comm~'rce,

the auth,or of this volume felt the urgie to compile

"THE BUILDERS OF RHILIPPINE COMMERCE"

which pre-

sents in its pages the pictures, short biographies and a.ccomplishments of

mo~t

of the men that made that progress possible.

That our accomplishments will be but the beginning of much greater development that is yet to come; and that the message of these pagies may inspire and thereby contribute' somehow to Philippine progress is the hope of the author. Gra,t.eful acknowledgment is hereby made to some friends of the author who prefer to be unknown without whose valuable help and suggestions, the publication of this volume would not have been possible. ROQUE J . DIZON.

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Pages THE BUILDERS OF THE PHILIPPINE COMMERCE..

1

COPYRIGHT PAGE .......................... ...... . DEDICATION . . ..... . ........ . ... . .. . .. . .. ......... PREFACE. .. ........ . ... . .... .. .... . .. . .......... .. .

2 3 5

PRINCIPLES OF BUSINESS CONDUCT..... ... .....

7-8

MESSAGE OF THE COVEHNOR GENERAL . . .. '" . . ..

11

BASIC FACTORS OF ECONOl\1IC DEVELOPMENTV. Sing-son Enca.rnacion .... .... .... . '" . . . . . . . . . ..

1G 20

THE PARTIClPATION OF THE FILIPINOS IN THE MATERIAL DEVELOPMENT OF OUR COUNTRY -Ars1enio N. Luz .. . . .. . .. ......... . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

21-24

NEW INDtISTRIL'S AWAITING GREATER DEVELOPM lDNT-Tomas Confesor . .... ... . ...... . .. .. .....

2G 29

DEVELOPING NEW INDUSTRIES AND NEW MARKETS FOR THE PHILIPPINES-Ex-Governor Th.eodore Roosev.elt ................... ..... .. ... 30-43 FILIPIl 0 HANDICAPS IN BUSINESS.-Cornelio Balmaceda ...... .. .. ... ... . .... . . ....... ..... ...... 44-50 CHINA AS MARKET FOR P. 1. PRODUCTS -K. L. Kwong ..................... . ........... ,

51-54

JAPAN AS A MARKET FOR PHILIPPINE PRODUCTS -Atsushi Kimura ............................... ,

55 63

THE DUTY AND RESPONSIBILITY OF THE MANUF ACTU.RER- Elpidio Quirino .......... .. ...... . .. 64-66 THE IMPORTANCE 0 F CHINESE - PHILIPPINE TRADE-Tan Sam To ........ .. . ..... ... . . ... . ..

67-6!J

THE NEED FOR INDUSTRIAL DIVERSIFICATION --Florencio Tamesis ....... .. . ......... ... . .. . . ..

70-72

ADVERTISING IN nUSINESS--Florentino Garl"iz . . . . ..

73-78

TAXES AND THE BUSINESS MAN- Jose M. Hilario..

79-81


Pages POINTERS TO FILIPINO RETAILERS-Miguel Cuaderno ... .. .. ........... ............. . .............

86-89

BUSINESS ETHICS-Rev. Fr. Serapio Tamayo. . . . . . ..

90-91

THE METHODS OF EXPORTING PHILIPPINE TOBACCO-Victorio Estuar ....................... "

92-95

MERCHA 1 JDTSING Rl LES FOR RETAJLS~L. R. Aguinaldo .. . .. .. .. . .. ........... . .............. 96-100 FOHEIGN TRADE FOn THF. FITIST FIVE MONTHS INDICATES HOPEFUL SIGNS-Pedecto Rivera .,. 101-104 BIOGRAPHIES ... .... .. ..... . ......... . ............

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107


Principles of Business Conduct I

THE FOUNDATION of business is confidence, which springs from integrity, fair dealing, effident service, and mutual benefit.

Ii. THE REWARD of business for service rendered is a fair profit plus a safe reserve, commensurate with risks involved 'a nd -.foresight exercised. -

III. EQUITABLE CONSIDERATION is due in business alike to capital, mana.g.ement, employees, and the public.

IV KNOWLEDGE~Thorough and specific-and unceasing -study of the facts and forc~s affecting a business enterprise are essenti'al to a lasting individual success a1nd to effi6ent service to the public. V PERMANENCY and continuity of service are basic aims of business, that knowledge gained may be fully utilized, confidence .established and efficiency incI'eased.

VI OBLIGATIONS to itself and society prompt business unceasingly to strive toward continuity of operation, bettering conditions of employment, and increa.sIng the efficiency and opportunities of individual employees.

VII CONTRACTS and undertakings., written or oral, are, to be performed in letter and in spirit. Changled conditions do not justify their cancellation without mutua.l consent. VIII REPRESENTATION of goods and servic路es should be truthfully mad.e and scrupulously fulfilled.


THE BUILDERS OF PHILIPPINE COMMERCE

IX WASTE in any form,-of capital, labor, services, material, or natural resources,-is intolerable and con tant -effort will be made toward its elimination. X EXCESSES of every nature,--inflation of credit, ovel'-e'{pansion, over-buying, over-stimulation of sale , - which create altificial conditions and produce crises and depression are condemned. . XI UNFAIR COMPETITION, embracing all acts characterized by bad faith, deception, fraud, or opprEssion, including comm 1'cial bribery, is wa teful, daspicable, and a public wrong. Bu iness will rely for its suc ss on the eXCEllence of its own service . XII CONTROVERSIE will, wh re possible, be adjusted by voluntary agreemmt 01' imp~rtial arbitI ation. XIII CORPORA TE FORMS do not absolve from or alter the moral obligations of individuals. Respon ibilities will be as courageously and conscientiously di charg~d by thos~ acting in representative capacities as when acting for themselves. XIV LAWFUL COOPERATION among business melL a!"!d in ugeful businEss organiza.tions in support oC these principles of bu iness conduct is commended. XV BUSIl ESS should render re trictive legislation unnecessary through so ccnducting it '21f a to dEserve and inspire public confidence. Courte811 01 "Commerce"


Builders of ) . Philippine Commerce


Message of the Governor-General

Dr

' ~f!iu ~f

flr.e

~.att.H'~-Q).~~

~H?:~ '4i~ 1!ld~

I~ 111 a prhilege to respond to your request for a tew Word. tram me. Jon4 quite in keeping with the purpose of this book be08l1se the goVe1'J:ben t is not only , v 1tally ( interested in the d&val~nt Qt PhIl1ppine c01'.Ill1erce but ' 1a in itselt the lQr~.t einlf18 btusilla.as 1n then islands.

May I oall attention to DIY 'tim beliet that government should condUot its busUesa 'lid th the 4~ rega'1"Cl tor ett1c .nt operation and inte~l ty 01' standards tha,t obtatna , in the moat carefUlly managed private b~ine88, and at the .ame time never 10ee sight ot'the taot t~t pr1.lna.rlly and tundamentmy government 18 not a l>uBineae. but a pUb~10 truatee8h1PJ which Dteane that the public . good must come be'tore money proUts in every instenccf where the two are in actual or seeming eoufl.1ot? ~ eongratuhttons to the sturdy and resouroeM men and WCl1Dal1 to Gall nle book is ded1eated. -ltd to whall the

paae.nt nou:rlshb'lg .tate ot Philippine c01'.Ill1eroe Ie larsely dUe.

'~


f?ll(J7U~ / - W~:Z(Jn Editor & Publisher


)


Basic Factors of Economic Development By

1 V. SINGSON ENCARNACION SeC1'e ta1'Y of Agn:ruUure and Comm,eTCl3

The basic factors of economic life being looked into with more cardul attention and study today than ever before. In many count.ries, the demand for a better-regulated and more orderly syst,em of national economy has developed, ahd economic planning under governmental direction and leadership is the or路 del' of the day. This healthy change in the world's outlook on thing economic had its beginnings shortly afte'r the World War when the problem of reconstruction in t.he war-torn countries of Europe had to meet. Plans for international ,economic recovery '15


THE BUfLDERS OF PHfLIPPlNE COMMERCE

were proposed, and some of the~e were actually put in op ration_ Individual nations, like Russia, adopted tlleir o\<vn national plan _ More recently, the' United States, under the lead ership of President Roosevelt, has put in force a national plan of economic recovery based on an orderly and systematic cour e of action to be undertaken under <' part.nership betws'€n private business enterprise and the government. This departure from the shifting, disorganized, and lead 1'less system of national:::conomy of the past, which ha been one of the principal caus s of the economic debacle in which the world is sUI engulfed, is one of the greatest Ie ons from the trials and difficulties of recent years. If the proogT ss of trade and industry is to follow a more stable and even course, ystem and organization is necessary. Each country has to layout its basic plans of future economic development in a way tha.t will meet the ex;gencie of the' situation not only within itself but also in the outside worl . The Philippines has had her share of the difficulties in the world of bu!::iness dUl 'ng the last few y.ear , and th ese trying times hav,e also s'el'ved to make as realize and feel the need of a more definit.e, intelligel1t, and well-rralanced national plan of cconomic ~ development. The demands of our e~ nomic life are now being considered by us with the degree of interest that they are due. Because, in the past, the economic foundation of our naticnal life has not been given enough attention, and c'ecause much greater emphasis was placed on other lines of national growth, €specially in the educational field, we find ourselves today confronted with the s·erious problem of providing adequately for the higher tastes and increa ed wants engendered by our educational advance. The degree of economic advancement which we have attRined dces not afford enough ·work not only for our increasing number of manual workers but also for our educated cleas.:~s . Our tastes and wants have increa ed fa ter than our capacity to upply them. The public treasury is becoming confronted each coming ~-ear with the problem of providing for more public needs and public improvements without a corresponding increase in revenues. \Ve cannot keep on in this manner. "e cannol keep on sending thousands of graduates from our schools and universities

16


BASIC F Ac'rOll..; OF E CONOM IC DEVELOPMENT

every year only to sw.ell the tide of local un employment. We cannot keep onf m Eeting the increasing needs of the public service without creating additional a.nd legitimate sources of revenue from the government. Something must be d on~ to strengtr_en the fcundation of our economic structure. There is need for a greater dev Elopment of our resourc.es, our trades, and our industries. This development must take place und,er a well-formuhted plan. The future course of our economic progress should be carefully mapped out so that it may mOV E along the right chalmels con. lSistent with our best nation2J interests. The formulation of a national plan of economic development requires a careful anal ysis of the present situation and a thorough and accurate knowledge of all the facts involved. Ther,e is need for a n ew orientation of the true economic status of tr.e country.

One important feature of a national economic plan for this country would be the stimulation of local production, espe:::ially in agriculture. Most of our present productive enterprises are agricultural, and with the existence of wide ar'Eas of agricult.ural land still uncultivated, there is to be expected a much bigger volume of national output of the products of the farm. B ut the problEm in this regard lies not only in extending the ples ent acreage but also in determining what particular products should be raised. Much of the difficulties from which the world i.s suffering today and which have also been keenly f elt by this country has been due to the lack of proper regulation in production. The wOl'ld m~.rkets had become glutted with surplus stocks of agricultural products which the weakened arteries of trade and the paralyzed industries could not absorb.' Ther'e has been a lack of proper adjustment between the quantity and kinds of commodities produced and the available demand for them. . So in our effort to bring about a gl'Eater development in agriculture, therel should be a careful adjustment to the actual needs of the market. New lines of production which find adequate markrEts within the Islands and outside should be encouraged, and the tendency to crowd in the old basic crops of which there is already an oversupply should be properly checked. The first objective in this increase of agriculrtural production should be to supply the needs of the home mark,et. There is no reason why

17


THE BUILDCRS OF PHILIPPINE COMMER E

we s!1ould continue importing so many valuable articles deriv'ed from the farm which new figure so prominently in our import tr2.de. Millions of p.esos are new being paid for huge importations of agricultural products such as cotton, silk, meat and dairy products, vEgetables, fruit and nuts, eggs, coffee, cacao, and others, all of which could. be produced in the Islands. While it may not be possible to wipe out these unnecessary imports at once through the greater development of our own agricultural enterprises, such development could be so planned that there will be a gradual elimination of most or all of these importations. Another important feature of our economic plan would be for the industrialization of the country. We have here the natural f2.cilities for a successful nation-wide industrial development program. Greater wealth production should come not only from agriculture but also from new, mQrle numerous bigger, and more prcsperous manufahturing establishments in the Islands. Our country is well supplia.d with the new materials of industry. With our exports we are n w upplyin the big industrial plants in America and Europe. y developing our manufacturing industries, we shall be in a position to ShIP ou finished good instead of law materials as at present, thus obtaining a greater national income from our goods, and also affording more employment to our workers. Again if we examine our import trade we shall be impressed with the undeveloped condition of our dome tic industries. In spite of the local abundance of cheap materials and the relative case of converting many of these inb articles of gn:at domestic utility, we 2.re allowing these raw products to go to waste or exporting them to other countries. At the same time we are buying enormous quantities of article made from these same materials or which could be upplied from local production. We can rai~e textiles and wearing apparel from locally-grown cotton and from other Philippine fibers, and yet we buy P33,OOO,OOO worth of these goods from other countries every year. Mention may be made aloof imported cigarettes worth nearly P4,OOO,OOO a year; s::Jap, paper, fish and fruit preserves, pottery, glassware, chemical product, toys, sacks, door mats, and even brooms of which V,re are now importing yearly more than P40,OOO. \Vhat little i being

18


BASIC FACTORS OF :8CONOMIC

DEVELOPMENT

produced locally of these articles are insufficient to supply our local needs because the industri es in the Islands are few, small, and undev,eloped, and also because there has prevailed in the past a mistaken prejudice aga~nst articles of local production, considering them as inferior to imported articles. There is therefore a huge task to be done along the line of industrialization which would form an important part of any program of national economic development that may be adopted. No less important as a feature of such a national plan would --be the creation of more markets for the products of th\~ country and the expansion and dev·elopment of existing markets. Both in the domestic ma r}.~2t ann in tILe foreign field, wider and more extensive channels of distribution for our produ cts should be found. The present means of marketing and distribution available to our domestic producers should be improv1€d so that they may receive the maximum returns for their labors and so as to insure the regular and steady flow of commoditi es from the production centers to the places of consumption. Other important fe2;tures of the national plan would also have to be consider'2d. There is, fer instance, the establishment of a solid financial E.tructure to provide for a stable currency and adequate credit facilitk,s fer merchants, manufacturers, and producers, including small farmers, especiglly these in the rural centers where the bulk of our farm products are raised. Ther'3 is, also, the creation of more investm:mt channels t hat would t : nd to stimulate bu.s.iness dsvelopment and stop hearding that is still being indulged in by many pe ople elI'oughout t!1e Islands. The sucoess cf such a nati cnal economic pl2,n would have to rest on a systematic coordination of all the e::cncmic forces of the nation. The opening of road3 and highways, .s.hipping lines, railroads and otr.er transportatien facilities should 1::e in ha,l'mony with the national plan. The same thing s:10':.11d b2 true of our system of public education. There should be a proper adjuE.tment of the syst~m to the objectives of our national e~onomic plan. With such a well-coordinated naticnal policy, we can build up a well-rounded and well-balanced economic system. The Department of Agriculture and Commerce is now working to achi'2ve these ,ends. The different bureaus and offices un-

19


THE BmLDETIS OF PHILIPPINE COM MERCE

del' the department which are entru ted with impol't!1nt phases of the economic development work of the government ha '2 been recently reorganized with a view to secUl'ing not only greater economy but also more efficiency through a bett r coordination of their diverse activiti2s. The department is now undertaking ':1, comprehensive research and experim ntal work to determin th practicability of new inrlu~tl'i <: that may be st.arted by using local raw materials. The activities for the fuller dev lopment of our mining, forest, and marine resources have been yslematized. In the distribution and marketing end, new activities have be n launched, among them the Manila Trading Center and Exchange that was recently opened to the public. Through this trading establishment, the department expects to give practical aid to local producers and manufacturers in the marketing and di tribut.ion of their goods. Through a greater development of our economic resourc es, our trade~ and our ind u tries, the go ernment will be ::Jiforded new SOUl'C of income to sustain it not only for th present but also in the future when great changes will have taken place in our national 11 e.

I

20


l'HE PARTICIPATION OF THE FILLPINOS

IN THE MATERIAL

The Participation of the Filipinos in the Material Development of Our Country By

'ARSENIO N. LUZ President, Chamber of Commerce of the Philippine Islands The so-called economic mindedness of the Filipinos, more properly of a great number of them, is of recent years. Our .economic progress did not keep pace with our social and political development. While politically and socially we are relatively well advanced and progressive, economically we have been lagging be-

21


THE BUILDERS Of.'

PmLIPPl E

COMUE.::tCE

hind and 1csing countless opportunities. But now we are different , or at least we maintain or feel we are different. Now . we have decided to reverse our att.itude, to devote more attentlon and interest to our impi'ovement, to our material prosperity and well-being. Let us paL~se to make a cur ory Ul'vey of what we have already accompli heel in the way of our economic persollC:11ity and self-asseltion. A BUREAU OF STATISTICS BADLY NEEDED

Unfortunately, (lne of the most essential agencies n ded to make an intelligent and comprehensiye survey of the elonomic conditions of these Islands is lacking. We refer to a reliable, upto-date and complete Bureau of Statistics, which should coordinate and systematize all figures and data concerning the different branches of our eC\>nomic system. Incidrentlly, because we do not have such an essent al bureau, all attempt to make an intelligent, complete 'a nd useful conomic plan are bound to be a failure. With the incompl te and rath 11' meager statistics and data we have on hand we may, howeve', have a general idea of the participation of the Filipinos in the material development of our country. FIGCRES A

D FACT

During the lapse ')f thirty years between 1900 to 1930, the average income per capit.a in these 1 lands increased a litUe more than two-folds while the tax per capita increased almost three hundred per centum. In round figures in 1900 the a erage tax per capita in the Philippine was P2.80 and in 1930 increased to P7.3Q. On the other hand, the ayerage jncome per capita during the same period wa P40.20 in 1900 and P84.80 in 1930. Considering that 99 ( of the population of the Islands are Filipinos these figures epitomize in many ways the economic history of our country during the la t third of a century. During this same period, 'a tremendou improvement has been operated in the Ph ilippines. Thousands upon thousand of solid school building ha\'e been constructed and the anitary conditio~ of the I land "ery COli iderably impro ed. Beautiful, big hospltals have been e tablished in eyery province. Well-kept and I

I

22


'[HE PARTICIPATION OF THE FILLPINOS

IN THE MATERIAL

w ell r.egulated highways and rC 2.ds crcssing cur Islands from N ol'th to South and from East to West have been constructed. Our population has increased from seven to thirteen millions. More than 2,000,000 boys and girls are attending our schools and colleges and 98 % of the government officials are F ilipinos. The percentage of criminality is low and r an be favorably compared with that of the oldest and most orderly American and European nations. Public order is exemplary, Justice is administered hcn estly almost exclusively by Filipinos. The value of our real e ~t ate property increased ten-folds and our foreign trade jump ed from -'P124,028,140.00 in 1902 to po25,214,200.00 in 1929. Of cour s e, the present depression, which is being strongly felt during the last three years has reduced considerably our volumes of t r ade, but in spite of it the Filipino of tod2..y is financially and commercially far superior to the Filipino of a g.eneration 2..go. We are also better prepand than our fOl'ebears to face any fin ancial difficulty and problem and what is m ore important we are happier be~ause we 'a re convinced that life calls for ex.erticn and efforts to constantly improve our environ ent and other conditions surrolmding us., and We find satisfaction in working; because after all is weighed and appraised the acme of human happiness is the contentment tt.at work well done produces.

INSIGAIFICANT SHARE IN BuSINESS Our participation in busines3 is neverthel ess, yet very insignificant. It amounts to nearly 20 % in the whol esale merchandising business and only a little over 8% in tte retail trade. Our share in the sale of tax collection of the Government is barely 20 % , the rest being paid by Chi.nese, Americans and other n on-nationals. Of course we have to consider the fact that it takes time to cb2.nge the temper and ,t he mind of a people, to destroy de sprooted prejudices. By natur,e we are sentimental and, the r efore, impractical, and unbusiness-like. As stated above, we are just q.~g: nnil1g to be economic mind ed. We should not despair considering that our training, philosophy and traditions made us impractical and it would require many long years to completely cl:ange our attitude. However, our part ~cipation in the staple Exports is n ot so l1egligi.ble, r The sugar industry, the biggest and only really well organized industry in the Philippines, is mainly in our hands.

23


THE BUILDERS OF PHILIPPINE COMMERCE

The paramount production of sevent'een of our provinces is ugar. There are more or le~s seven million people living in t.hese 'eventeen provinces and nearly two million of them are engaged directly or indirectly in the cultivation, production and handling of sugar. The capital invested in this industry amount to nearly P500,OOO.OO. There are 350,000 hectares devoted to the cultivation of sugar cane. In the total capitalization of the sugar centrals, the share of the Filipinos is 37% and 91-0/0 of lands planted to ugar cane belongs to us. With l'egard to coconut oil and coconut by-product, Oul' second largest export, there are more or less 700,000 persons connected with this indu try_ More than 909'0 of the coconut plantations are in the hands of Filipinos. The hemp industry, which was the premier export of the Islands not very long ago, is also mainly in the hands of the E'il"pinos. A GREATER PROGRESS: CHANGE OF ME TAL ATTITUDE

Such is, in bri~, our contribution to the material de elopment of our country. But while the material progre wrought in the e Is1ands clning the las third of a c ntury has been remarkable in many ,vays, consideri the big 1 ndicaps and prejudices surmounted, the mental tl'an formati n of the people with regard to the material values of life has been notable. Old idea and prejud!ces have been discarded. And our people are now convinced that there is happiness, dignity and nobility in labor and in business and that the man who produces and adds to the sum total of human happiness is as much a benefactor of hi fellow men as the most not.ed and brilliant government official, }awyer, doctor or man of letters. In other words} the transformation of the Filipino during the last few years:: has not only given him material comfort and material gain, but has also changed his philosophy ~.nd outlook of life making him a more practical man with ambition to improve his surroundings and attend more properly to his physical needs. And yet, the danger of this viewpoint lies in the fact that immature minds and not ~relJ-balanced heads easily nconfound the propel' values and proper equilibrium of life. bl'iddled materiali m is showing Its ugly head in these Islands and if not properly curtailed will kill all that is best and traditional in the Filipino soul: natul'ai modesty and t.emperance, optimism, lo\'e, fear and respect for God. We should be alert and should be guarded against thi terrible and fatal evil. 2-1


NEW INDUSTRIES AWAITING GREATER DEVELOPMENT

New Industries Awaiting Greater Development By .

TOMAS CONFESOR Director, Bureau of CommerCI& Among the industries which have been established in the Philippines and which still 'a wait greater development are the manufactures of cordage out of hemp fiber, matches:, floor wax and bamboo. Good facilities exist for thes路e domes.tic industries. Besides the abundant supply of raw materials and of cheap labor, the local market for their output, as well 路a.s the foreign market, is fairly extensiv,e and can be further expanded.

25


THE BUILDERS OF PHILIPPINE COMME~CE

HEMP ROPE Th local - hemp rope manufacturing industry is fairly well developed. There are at pres,ent five well-established cordage manufacturing plants in Manila, namely: Gmeral Manufacturing Company, J ehnson Pickett Rope, J'uan Feliciano & Sist.ers, Manila Cordage Company, and Ynchausti y Cia. The yearly output of these cordage companies is vaked at n ::9 rly P4,500,000. The Philippines ha~ O(e11 exporting cordage fOl' sometime pa t, besides the raw hemp, fiber. The principal fOl'Eign market for Philippine cOl'dage is the United Stales which buys an average of 5,000,000 pounds of ccrdage from the I lands each year. In 1931, the Islands shipped to the United St8. tes 4,600,000 pounds of rope valued at fl~'20,OOv, The highe~t figlll'e on l'.ccord ill the exports of cordage from thE:' Islands to the nited States is that for the year 192a, wben a total Quantity of 6,851:000 pounds valued at P1,865,OOO was exported. Philippine rope now enjoys a spEcial tariff advan ag,le in the American market, being adm ~ tted free of duty, \vhile h mp rope imported there from foreign countries pays a duty of $0 02 per pound. If the rope i smaller than 34. of an inch in diame l' it ha to pay an additional duty of 15 pH cent ad valorem. Aproximat.:3ly one-half of tl:e hemp rcpe new L'3ing exported by t:l e Philippine~ goes to the Unij:Jed States, Next in importan:::e [IS a foreign market fol' this art:de i. the British East Indies, wl1ich in 1931 took 15 per cent of the total exports of this article from tbe Islands. Some Cl.n10unts of cordage are als bing expcrted from this country to Siam, Dutch East Indies, China, Hongkong and a few othEr countries. Due to the reduced consumpt~on of cordage in the shipping bus-iness, resulting from the pl'e ent 'e conomic depression, and the inCrEased prcduction of cheap competing fiber } the demand for Manila hemp fiber ha been considcra,bly redu ed in late years and the hemp industry is facing a grave crisis. The price of hemp has run down to a very low figure and has been continuously en tl:.'e down-gI'ade since January, 1929. The aver2.ge price for temp in 19:32 was P5.5¡1 per picul, as compared with P8.64 in 1931, and f'1:2,P5 in 193 . fiber abroad lies in the manuf.?cture of tl".â&#x201A;Ź fiber befel'e it i export ed , Tl:.e Philippines mjoys the ad\'ant::tge of prcducing the I

26


NEW INDUSTRIES AWAITING GREATER DEVELOPMENT

material for cordage factories, and what remains is the improvement of domestic methods of manufacture to 'a point which will place local manufacturers on an equal or higher plane as compared with foreign manufactmers.

MATCHES The manufactur1e of matches had its beginnings in the Islands in 1907 with the establishment of the first match factory here under the name of Carlos Gessel. In 1914, this establish-.ment was incorporated under the name of Philippine Match Company. From the beginning, the enterprise has had a fairly good business and has reached the point at which it can supply about 60 per cent of the total consumption of the Islands in matches. The Philippine Match Co. is now the only manufacturer of matches in the Islands. It 1S equipp.ed with modern machinery and is on a par with similar factories abroad. Its match splints are manufactured from domestic wood. That ther.e is still room for increasing the local production of matches is shown by the fac thFt the Islands is importing fl!600,000 worth of matches 'ev.ery year. The present local production of matches is estimated to be worth P800,000 a year. The export field would also offer a good opportunity for this industry. The American market offers a good ouUet for matches manufacture in the Islands. Matches imported from for€ign countries into the United States pay a duty of $0.02 3,4 per thousand matches shipped in boxes containing not mor.e than 100 matches each.

FLOOR WAX Another articl€ which offers opportunities of being produced on 'a bigger scale in the Philippines is floor wax. Part of the lccal consumption of this product is b.eing supplied by local factories of which there are at present thre€ already established in the City of Manila, namely those of the Ynchausti y Cia., Dr. Eugenio Quesada, and Rosel Laboratories. Only a small part of the dom€stic consumption of floor wax is being supplied by domestic manufacturers, and a good field remains for the greater production of this article. Floor wax is not separately shown in customs reports among the variolls wax products imported into 27


THE BUILDERS OF PHILIPPINE

OMMERCE

the Islands, the total value of which now range from P600,OOO to about PI,OOO,OOO, including animal wax, mineral \ 'ax and vegetablte wax. Floor wax being a household need in increasing use in the Island, and raw materials for its manufacture being locally a \'ailable, it can be pl'ofitably produced here in bigger quantitie". Flam' wax import d into the United tates from foreign cGuntl'ies pays a duty of 20 per cent ad valorem, so that if the Philippine industry can develop to a point at , hich a part of the domestic production is shipped abroad, th local product will find a special advantage in the nited tates market where it can now entel' free of duty. BAMBOO ART/eLLS

As material for con tl'uction, bamboo, e pecially wh n seasoned, compare favorably with vood in tensile and cmpressive strength-and for t ,'E! arne iz, the formel' is much light l' than the latter; for resista:\1ce to in E;·t attack, bamboo can not b e ,celled. And a to the co t, the fo 'mer ha the edge. Fo]' families with moderat eans, bamb 0 will remain tht choice. Fish corral still pI y an important role in the fishing industry in the Philippines, and the use of bamboo will continue untill the local fishermen adopt a more efficient method of fishing. The use of bamboo CIte n is on U-':2 inc rea e; it will IJ > more so when it price can compete favorably with the imported tuff, A list of the article made of bamboo inciudes ba k t, f]'arr.~:), sailboat accessori'e , cots, cart floering, 8.wali, young bamboo or labong, igarette cases, \\ ater containers, liquid measure, cupboard, fi hing rod, cigarrette pipe, chairs, hats and helm t , toy, fan, lamp shade , hat-rack, caned articles, vanity ca 'es, sledge, paper pulp, fi h trap, raft, cr€en, fish corral., broom and bru he , rope, fi h net acces orie , book racks, tray., napkin rings. lantern~, handles for cutting in truments, fences and inclo ure , water conduit, material for con truction, musical instrument , etc. orne of the manufacturers are the Bureau of Pri ons, Manila, which turn out a large number of creen, and the Bazar 2


NEW INDUSTRIES AWAITING GREATER DEVELOPMENT

Balagt2., , Ylaya, Manila, which sells many toys made of bamboo. Other manufacturers' names are not immediately avaliable at this writing. The sawali bus':'ness in the Islands, an important by-product of bamboo, amounted to P129,663 according to figur,e s compiled by the BLweau of Commerce.

.-.

The propagation of bamboo grov,es remains a means to swell the income of the native grovers .

29


THE BmLDERS OF PHILI PPINE COMMERCE

Developing New Industries and New Markets for the Philippines By

THEODOR E HOOSEV E LT (Excerpt

I:;x-Goycr lOl'-G~neral of the Philippines from hi Annual TIeport t~ the HOllc::able, thJ Seer tar Wa:::hing'tull, D. C., for tl t ye&r 19a2-1933)

of War

.:lGRICr.:LTf'RAL A~TD T Dl' T R IA L DEVEL OP JIENT The Philippine are remarkably gifted by nature in that there i 110 eason of the ~'ear in which crops cannot be grown in th vast majority of the I lands. Their natural reso urce are gigantic.

30


DEVELOPING NEW INDUSTRIES AND NEW MARKETS FOR THE P HIL.

The population is industrious and intelligent. In "pite of this, the economic development in many ways h2..8 be en faulty. The three defici,encies are represented by : (a) the fact that we imported in the past and still continue to import from foreign countr ies many agricultural products that could be grown with ease in the I slands; (b) that in many instances we are doing little or no manufa.cturing wher,e the raw materials lie near at hand and where the genius of our people is particularly adapted to the wor k; ( c) that there is too little flexibility of mind, i. e., we follow too much the paths -.beaten in the past without reference to changing conditions and new opportunities. Rice lands are under cultivaticn less than half the year-a heritage from the past-wher:eas wit:,. diversification of crops a large part of such lands could be worked throughout the' year, many products raised for the f:wmers ' cwn consumption, and a surplus cr,eated which would materially increase their annual income. To illustrate what I mean, as far as subhead (a) is concerned, the Philippines during the yea.r 1931 imported the following items which under proper tariff, agricultur al and industrial development policies, might reasonably be produced in the Philippines: Corn in the grain " .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. Rice, glutinous .. .. .. .. .. .. .. ., .. .. Rice, non-glutinous Cocoa or cacao: Crude ..... . Manufactm:ed .. Coffee: Raw .... Roa.sted .. Eggs: Duck ... . Hen . . . . . . . . . . 1 •••••• Fish .... " . . . . . . . . . . . . ' ... . Fruit, tropical .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. Peanuts .. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .. . Peanut oil . . .... . ... " . . . . . . Castor oil .... . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Beef, fresh " .. . . .. . . .. .. .. ..

B1

P 177,090 707,169 487,689 637,669 199,384 1,105,546 182,442 1,120,284 953,854 2,593,309 991,485 223,083 441,479 38,480 831,040


THE BUILDERS OF PHILIl:'PINE COMME~CE

-------------- ----

Poultry, fresh .. .. -. .. .. .. .. .. .. Beef, tinned .. Pork, tinned _. . - .. .. - . . . . . . . . . . Bacon . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1 • • • • • • • • • • Hams and shoulders . . . . . . . . - - . . . . Poultry, dried .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. Lard ...... _. . . . _ . . . . . . . . . . . . . , ... . Lard substitut.:s .. .. .. .. .. .. ., ., .. .. Oleomargarine

82,470 304,68' 100,221 77,477 732,663 17,921 800,671 5 ,200 294,592

Sugar: 152,848 38,218 25 208,542

Glucose .. Molasses and syrup Raw .. .. Refined Tobacco: Leaf . . . . . . . . . .' ., Cigars .. .. . _ .. .. .. . .1 . • . . •• Cigarettes .. .. .. . ... ' .. _. .. .. Chewing .. . Smckmg .. " . _ . . . . . . " . . . . . . " Other ...... .. . . . . . . . " ,. .. .. . .. . Buttons . . . . . . . . ', ' Soap . . . . . . . __ . _. . . . . _. . . . . " .. . . . Aerated water .. .. .. " .. .. .. ., .. " .. Beer .... " . . . ....... " ..... . Rum (molasses) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Stanch . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . ' . . . . . . . . . . _ Palm leaf and straw products, including hast .. Bltrlap and bagging .... " .. " . _ . . . . . . . . Cabbage . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .. , .. " " " Garlic .. .. .. .. . . . . Onions " _. .. " .. .. .. .. _. .. Potatoes, sweet .. .. .. .. .. .. .. Bean , tinned .. .. .. " .. " .. .. Tomatoes . . . . . ..O' .O' ..O' O'. Bean , dried .. . _ .. .. . .O' O'. 'Vood and wood products Cotton piece goods . . _. _.

.

~

••

O'..

O'

. . .

O'

32

O'O'

O'.

682,089 950 3,817,' 13 867,389 75,495 192 139,268 1,527,. 85 84,519 262,458 11,253 702,917 147,3' 1 1,515,395 191,596 157,669 626,152 5,788 76,528 61,2 5 390,506 1,121 052 2 ,490410


DEVELOPING NEW INDUSTRIES AND NEW MARKETS FOR THE PHIL.

Of this last item it is .estimated that approximately ro,ooo,OOO could be spun and woven in the Philippin es if capital were available and full tariff protection enacted. Imported fiber would be used at first but eventually from 1/ 3 to 2/3 of the fiber could be grown locally. It is to change this that we have undertak.en as intensive a campaign as our financial condition would permit in agricultural extension. Our problems, as far as manufacturing is concerned, is somewhat more difficult. Traditionally the Philippines hav.e always been agricultural. If a man makes money, therefore, it does not occur to him to invest it in a manufacturing enterprise. He is instinctively suspiciou\s of that form of endeavor as he has had no contact therewith. He tends, thel~efore, to put his money back again into land. Besides this, our standard of living is markedly higher than in the surrounding countries. We have the poten,tiality of growing cotton and are grow- '3 ing it to a limited extent already. In the north weaving is an old industry and there are some newly established cotton mills. Nevertheless, we are importing millions of pesos of cotton goods that we might well make ourselves. The Philippine Islands teem with food fishes of every variety. Ther.e is probably no part of the world with such marine wealth. Nevertheless, we import annually P2,500,OOO of fresh, canned, and dried fish.

TARIFF As one of the aids in remedying the above conditions, we undertook this year to reconsider carefully our tariff. The Philippine tariff has remained practically unaltered since 1909. Meanwhile conditions within the Islands had changed radically and those outside of them to an even gl'eater extent. Within the last two years, for example, the vast majority of the great countries of the world have gone off the gold standard. Their medium of exchange has been reduced 60 per cent and more with refel1enc'e to the peso. The l'el:lUlt has been that foreign competitors of our industries hav,e been able to undersell them and flood our mal'ket with cheap products competing directly with those produced in the Islands. Under the circumstances every33

ÂŤ"


one has suffered. Many of our young indushie which w re just beginning to take hold were faced with bC"'. nkruptcy. Before describing til(" mea_Ul es t:'1ken to meet these probl m , it will be well briefly to review the general tariff ituaiion in th Philippine Islands. Several ' years ago the Philippine Legislature had form d a Special Joint Committee on Taxation, consi ting of ranking members from both the Senate and House, for the PUl'po e of conSidering 1101.. only internal-revenue policieS, but also 101' l'evi ing the g~eneral tariff policy of t.he Philippine Islands. Fo}' the pa t several year an increasing number of communicatIon from commercial and manufacturing int rest have been i.egi tel' d 'with this Committee, as well as wrth the Bureau of Illsular Affairs, and the Office of the Gov 1'no1' General. Theie clearly indicated the need of incre~ ~d tariff rate and a reorganization of cel taill general features in the Philippine tariff prccedu1' which, except for increases in ric and cement rate , had not be n am ncl d since its enactment iI 1909. Th demands for changes aros both from those who ere inter ed in Philippine product ~ and from American manuf~cturel's and exporters who, in spite of f1'e路e tl'ade~ and because of the inadequate 1'2tes provided against for路eign non-American goods, were a't a disadvanta e us position in the Philippine mark,et especially as compared with Oriental and foreign countries exporting on a basis of dept' ciated currency. These gentlemen perceivEd that increased rat s in the nited States Tariff had benefited Philippine agricultural xport, particularly sugar, and that the Philippine Islands wer,e thereby enabled to obtain a favorable trade balance with the nitec1 States sufficient not only to wipe out their deficit with practically every other trading country, but to provide them an annual net surplus of from P.20,OOO,OOO to P40,OOO,OOO. In short, the demand from local producer was for protection; from American exporters, for greater reciprocity measured in dollars, under free trade. Sometime ago this Legi'lati\'c Committee enunciated and released to the public the following iatemellt: "The committee de ires to tate that in its study of existing tariff legi lation, it is being guided by the following two principles which, in effect, constitute a re lime of the policy of the 34


DEVELOPING NEW INDUSTRIES AND NEW MARKETS FOR THE PHIL.

- - - - - - - - - - - --- - - - - - - - -committee; 0) l't'vi<;ion for revenue~; (2) revision for the protection of Philippine and American industri es, especially to neutralize the adverse effect of the fluctuation of exchange rates with foreign coentries without sacrificing the interests of the consumers. "It is evident tha.t tariff revision is a very delicate task when the principles just enumerated are simultaneously taken into account. However great may be the desire to raise revenue, the protection to local industries and the unfavorable condition -. under which American goods are competing in the Philippine market with countri,es having depreciated currencies, should not and cannot be ign ored. There is not the least intention on the part of the committee b either destroy or disturb business. On the contrary. it is firmly convinced that if the revision work can be carried on with the two guiding principles, the inevitabl,e result will be a readjustme!lt of the inequalitiâ&#x201A;Ź;3 now existing in our tariff l,egislation." This was so sound, so clearly ph,rased, and so far-seeing and 's tatesmanlike an uttera ce, that it was taken and remains as our guide. But while the majority of the members of! the Legislature recognized the general situation and were in favor of an upward revision, the fact that they ha.d not previouly dealt with tariff matters imposed a considerable degree of caution, especially in the face of heavy protests from foreign elements in the local business community. In short, while they appreciated the necessity for a change, it was difficult b crystallize opinion in favor of specific amendments. I had outlined this situaticn in dEtail in my Second Message to the Legi!llature and I am gratified to say that the very close cooperation between the Governor-GEneral's Office, the Special Committee, and Legi'3lature brought r,esults far beyond expectation. The legislature accordingly amended the general customs policy by passing the following acts, all of which have heen approved by the President of the United States: (a) An act which establishes, for the purpcses of assessment of ad valor:&1n duties, that the percentage rates shall be applied 35


/!

THE BUILDEilS OF PHILIPPI E COMMERCE

to the foreign invoice value converted int.o Philippine currency at the prescribed legal pal' rather than at t:1e CUlT nt exchange rate of the fOl'eign currency involved. This Act sustains Government revenues from duties, specially as 70 pel' cent of Philippin duties are of the ad valolle.m type. It further corrects discrimination in duty payments heretofore Existing in favor of non-gold standard countries. A it affects only the duty factor in price wholesale and con ' umer prices arE' not therE:by unduly increased. (Act 403路1.) (b) An Ami-dumpir.g Act, modelerl. after :similal' law in the United States. and ether countries, but more simple in ap . plication and avoiding the necessity of determining foreign costs of producti on. (Act 4030.) (c) An Act repealing the claus,e in the enacting entence of section 8 of th PI1l1ipPlne Tariff Act of 1909 which prohibited the levying of any dutie' f more than 100 P,)l' cent advalorem. With t':e in rea ing depr ciation of foreign currencies, especially Oriental, the. pecific ont' e 011 many items which formerly represented fro 1 20 to 31) pel' cmt of the value of the good came t o repl'e ::mt from 90 to 150 per cent. This Act restore th e effecti\'eness of such specific dutie.'. (Act 4036.)

In adcLtion the fnll vYing measur,es, effecting specific revision, were enact ed and have b zen appl'oved by the President of the United State:s: (a) An Act increasing the rates on fresh, chilled, and refrigerated ::1e:::.t; c.n lard and sub~tjtutes ther~fore including peanut oil; on eggs and egg powders. This Act is designed particufal'ly to protect the growing beef and coconut-oil-lard industrie of the Philippine Islands and to promote poultry raising. (Act 4037.) (b) An Act increasing the rates on boots and shoes for the protedion of local industry, and for increasing the reciprocal free trade benefits to American exporters of rubber oled can as shoes. (Act 4038.)

A till more general revision, providing for \'ery moderate incrsa es in 70 out of the 300 paragraphs of the Philippine Tariff, wa embodied in an Act which was passed by the Legislature, u6


DEVELOPlNG NEW INDW'TnIES AND NEW MARKETS FOR THE PH1L.

and is now awaiting the action of the Pre ident (alre ady approved) . Practically all of the amendmmts conbin~d therein arose from demands f or prote:::tion of local production. As originally presented as an administrative measure it includ ed protection of t extiles which would have benefited bct~ local industry and American exporters, and for steel goods, wheat flour, automobile tires, and a few leE:s impol't~nt items of intel'est pl'incipally to American exporters. The textiles, steel, wheat flour and automobile tire ib~ms w ere, however, reduced in the House Com..mittee and finally entirely eliminated in the Sena teo

GRA VITY OF PRESENT ECONOMIC SITUATION The economic situatiUl1 of the Philippine Islands, though it may seem fair from a super,ficial glance, is perilous when studied. The trade statit;;tics in 1932 are aE: follow8: Total exports . . . .. . . . . . . . P190,OOO ,000 Total imports . . . . . . 15~,OOO,OO Bahmce in favor of he P . L . . . .

f~J2,OOO,000

So far so good, bnt these figures subdivide as follows: Exports to the l lnited States . P166,000,OOO Impmts from the ul1lted States 102,000,000 Balance of trade with the U. S. in favor of the Philippine Islands . . . . . . . . . . . Exports to all other countries . . Imports from all other countries Balance against the P. 1. . .

P24,000,000 56,000,000 32,000,000

Therefore, without the t r ade with the United States the balance of trade stands against the Philippin~ Islands to the extent of P32,000,000. . This is not all. Approximately P122,000,000 of exports to the United States represent sugar and its products. Therefore 63 per cent of the total ,exports of the Philippine Islands is sugar. 37,


THE BUILDERS OF PHILIPPINE COMMERCE

The Philippine Islands have been rapidly becoming a one export crop nation. This telldency has been particularly pronounced in recent years, as the figures .,how. In 1929, ;;2 per cent of the total exports by value was represented by sugar; in 1930, 39 pel' cent; in 1931, 48 per cent; and in 1932, 63 per cent. Without sugar the trade of the Philippine Islands would iSthow an unfavorable balance in 1932 of P89,000,000. In view of the possibility thal by accepting the Hawe -Cutting Bill the Philippine, may become an independent nation without the advantage of free trade with the United tate, th se figure assume a very grave slgniiicance. It must be a sumed that with the termination of free trade relationships mo't of the PI' sent volume of exports to the United States will be cut off. For sugar it is qu.e tionable if there can be foun 1 a mark t. Java, lying just to he south, is now storing 4,000,000 tons of sugar. She produce uga.r more cheaply than the Philippines do. She is on an eq al foobng th the Philippines in all mark ts, ,except the United tate. If ava cannot sell this I ss costly sugar how C8n the Philippines expect to s 11 theirs? Very evidently the Islands must devote immediate attention to developing new markets and di v rsifying products. It wa:.l with this in view that in December last we had a suney, made of trade conditions and possibilities in the Orient, sending a qualified member of my staff to China for that PUl'po e. Obviously, the surv,ey wa ha ty and on a broad cale, y t it clearly emphasized the nece ity of our taking the initiative to augment the cale of Philippine products in the commercial center of the Orient and particularly in China. That great country i now developing a new economic outlook. It is .experiencing great, pErhaps fundamental, changes. Before another generation hÂŁl passed, millions of Chin.e e may well have accepted commoditie , methods, and ideac~ little known to them no\ , but already a part of the economic life of these Island . It i during these impre ionable and plastic years of changing cu tom and habits, that the Philippines are offered an opportunity of incalculable potmtialitie for the future de\lelopment of their foreign commerce. '\T e have taken the pl'eliminary teps to gl'a p this op-

38


DEVELOPING NEW INDUSTRIES AND NEW MARKETS FOR THE PHIL.

portunity and are planning also to make surv,eys of the possibilities in other nations such as AL11dralia and Siam. In endeavoring further to broaden the base of our economic structure We have givlen careful attention to the subject of developing industries already in ,existence and creating n ew ones. We have taken as our motto that w,e should follow only natu ral lines and should not in any way attempt forced developments. Further, we hav,e tried to follow only such lines as might be indicated by undeveloped natural resources and special aptitude on t he part of our citizens.

--

THE FISHING INDUSTRY As an example, there is fishing. The Philippine Islands ar e extraordinarily rich in this respect. In our waters are found about one-tenth of the species of fish known to exist in the world. W,e have, of course, always followed this industry to a greater or lesser extent, but We had not made allY coher.ent attempt to develop in. During the last year i have visitEd and inspected the fishing communities in many different parts of the Archipelago. I went to Estancia, to the Gulf of Lingayen, to the fisheries north of Bohol, and to similar places. The general problem 'divides itself into two heads. The first of these compri8es that of large fisheries, whose catch is either canned or otherwise preserved, and whose plant should operate continually during the y.ear. The lc~w pass ed by the Legislature permitting general licenses to be obtained by fishing craft will, I believe, answer this. One r.ompany has already started and I think others will soon follow suit. The second featur,e deals with the far more numerous and ther.efOl:e more important class, namely, the small individual fishermen, or those who operate on a comparativ.ely limited scale. These路 individuals may be found all over the seaboard of the Philippines. They ar,e a hard-working, self-respecting p.eople, but often v,ery isolated. A typical community of this sort was one I visited north of Bohol. The路 island on which it was located could not have been more than a quarter of a mile long by three hundred yards wide. It was sandy and capabl,e of growing only a

39


THE BUILDERS OF PHILIPPINE COMMERCE

limited variety of crops. The inhabitants numbered well over a thousand. When I stopped theessel on which I was cruising in order to go ashore, I tried to find among the crew someone who spoke Boholano lor I did not believe in this small i .olated settlement I would find English spoken. The people had no idea that I was coming. When the launch in which I rode approached the shore a typical fisherman paddled alongside in a banca and greeted me in perfect English. Among the peopl,e with whom I walked over the island, were a number of men who spoke it equally well. The only paid official in the community was th school teacher. The teniente of the barrio and the councilors all served gratis. I askec\ them if they had any police. They answered no, that such differenoes as might occur were easily settled by their barrio office ·s. The health of the people was €xoellent, though there was no resident doctor. On their own initiative they had l'\lstalled worka Ie, simple sanitary regulations and vver,e living up t th~m . Mail came once every two weeks. There was practically no Ploney i circulation, as usually they b2l'tered their fish on t e mainland for farm products. They cured their fish by dri':ng or salting. There is no doubt that people of this sort, c3pable of 'colI ctive and individual action of the type mentioned, would be quick to benefit by such instruction as might be put within their rleach. The island is typical of others that I saw. In general there "v.ere two points that struck me particularly. The first was the inade~uacy of the fishing tackle used . Often there would be no steel hooks, merely inadequate bone arrangements. The second was the l2.ck of knowledg,e of proper means of preserving a catch. In order to aid this element of the community we are esta1:lishing in the Department of Agriculture and Commerce a "Fish and Game Administration." Its activities will include the following: (a) The establislunent at Estancia of an experimental station fol' the pre_en2tion of fish. In this station, among other things, the type of salt be t adapted to this climate will be determined. (b) The operation of a small, properly outfitted steam fishing boat, which the Government is purcha ing. Thi' will be sent 40


DEVELOP1NG NEW INDUSTRIES AND NEW MARKET FOIt 'THE PHIL.

ffDID-place.. to. -pla.ce..an.d use.d liS a- -mobil~ .demonstration. 11l1iL to :teach the people proller m Ethods of catching and preserving fish. An assortment of ho01{s will be carried, a limited number of which 'wH1 be "disttibllfed . gratiS, ' as ' seeds ·' a,N~'." nnw ~i~ri~uted). ~:r'he' c6mmunity~wi11 then ' be advised a's to where additional hooks may ' be lll:lrchased. · · .. ,. ~. . . ., , , :- (c) The

p~e'pa;atior; and dist~ib~tion, .for use' thl:ough t he

'conimunity :assembliis, 'of l-ectures ; on-- fuHhbds 6f":ftshing antJ:fisn "j)reservahon . . , ~ . ,

,

..

....

(.'

of

.. '

-

1

'.

'.

"'

....

.'

II".~

,

fresh water with,' cbmmercia~ fis\l. . :' , (,eo), ~ ,suf'v!eY ~f"' the most piactlc'al me3:ns ' of'transportiition: - ' (D ~ . stlldy. ofr.thQ ha~its p! ~sh" p~ti~~l~!.l:r. tl?-qs.e ,which are trtigratory: " -. , ." " ., ~ , " '/ Xq) -Ke-epin'g the . law ~f1fotceln1m't arms ' of the ~ Gover'mhel;t advised of the- commis ion ·of-such -illegal -offenses -as the -dynamit l <lng•. p'Qlluting; or poisoning of public waters. This year ' th~ ~~grsllh~r~: :pa~s~d::a c'Qlhpr~lfen~ive taw to • 1 • , ' . gove-rh' fisheries: "This law' -haS" one '01 its 'main: " pul'pos'es tlie 'Pravroing- for 'general - instead 'of ' local licellse. Before it was approved e\le:r:y fI~,bJel:man .had to QbtaiR ,an individual lic.ellse:irom :every..mUllicipa~ity .in -whQse wa,te.r s he- ope-rated~ In many. z:es~ pects --this prohibited . any but . extl'1~mely local fishing: . on. a. very small scal.e,. as the fIsh.. being. migratory; the :fisherman. had to follow ·them .. In .chasing a .g·chool of tuna., -he ~ould not,. when, it .cro£sed the , borde~ of . a diff"ment municipality, stop, go :to the town, .ar..rang:e for a J.icens~·, theJl. c.ome back and .find that school:, In· additioll,. the law .. pl'ovides as! folh,>ws:, "- " . "Without depriving munici-palit-ies 'Of their z:ights t'O con... , , trol the ,erecHon ' and- operation 'M 'fish corl'aLs L ana "ponds . within their--respective- munieipal' jurisdictions, the 'Fisheries A~t' .vests ·col1trol- of ..Qff~shol't.or -deep·sea fishilag.in -the [I1Sular Government; . rC.quil:es .a.n-.<uulUaLinsular license f017 all· powered vessels . of_more. than three tons · gross;, restricts thelicensmg, of such .vessels and. the fishermen .employed there-on. to. citizens of the United . States,.. the .Philippines, _ and {:ountries -the .laws. of. which grant- similar.. rights .to Gitizens of - the - Philippine~ and to .,those ..aliens already. engag'ed -in, '(d) The 'st<x:king

J '

l

41


THE BUILDERS OF PHILIPPINE COMMERCE

that occupation; forbids the use of poisons a.nd of dynamite or other explosivES, pollution of Philippine water, and the importation for propagation purpose of freign fi h, cru taceans, tc. ; provides for opened and closed s a ons; , xtends protection to fry and fish -eggs ; r.egulates the taking of mal'ine mpllusca and their shells, sponges, and turtles."

THE MA. "ILt HEWP INDl STRY Another instance is the Manila hemp or abaca industry. In the past the Philippines \\'er,e famous all over the world for Manila ]'ope. Of l'ecellt years the industry has suffer d g-reatly. It has come into competition not mer.ely with hemp grown in other places but with ubsti ute tiber and with steel wire. We export now less than half of hat we exported a few years ago and the price has dropped 75 p l' cent. The Govel'l1me t is und rtaking to confront thi problem. learly, with the red ced price, the co t of production must be brought down. This C~J be done with better methods of cultivation and :-:tripping. But this i 0 ly one pha e. As the buyer market for hemp-made tope has decreased and will probably not come back, new markets and new uses for thi product mu t be devised. We are working out in this connection such possibilities as (a) sack making, which can b.e carried on either by factori s 01' as a home industry, and which is now under experimentation by the Bureau of plant Indu try, (b) flooI', cov ring, (c) cords (l.nd twine, Cd) hammocks, (, ) sandals. In 1931, the Philippin.:~ Islands imported P1,500,OOO of jute 8acks and burlap and, in addition, the United States imported over PGO,(lOO,OOO worth. ~ e believe that with these abaca sacks we can find a ready market.

GOVER ME T AID TO PRIVATE ENTERPRIZE The Philippine Government owns a company called the N ational Development Company. The original purpose of this company was to aid in the de\'elopment of industries. It failed, in my opinion, becaus.e the Government undertook to purchase outright and operate industrie , wherea the governmental function should merely be to encourage private individuals to operate indu tries in a proper fashion. As the company is still in existence,

42


DEVELOPING NEW INDUSTRIES AND NEW MARKETS FOR THE PHIL.

latter doctrine. We plan to use it in the future as a means of we are changing it!:> theory of opel路ation to conform with this building up new indusLries, but building them up in the hands and under the operation of private individuals. In many of the new endeavors, some of them along the lines of e3tablished indu tries, others more in the nature of old industries, texpel'imentaticn is necessary. Sometime by work of this sort a crop which has become a drug on the market can be turned into different channel&. An illustration of this, in t.he case of < abaca, has already cem given. This is merely an example, of what can be done. We have an ably administered and efficient Bur,eau of Science. It is our plan to coordinate the Bureau of Science, the National Development Company, the BUlleau of Plant Industry, the Bureau of Animal Industry, aI)d the new BU1'eau of Commerce and undertake carefully plann d work along these lines.

43


THE BUfLDERS OF PHILIPPI NE Co I MERCE

filipino Handicaps in Business By

COR ELlO BALMACEDA A sistnnt D. i l (!ct01" of Commerce An analy i of the problem being enco untereci in the effort to secure a wid er participation of Filipinos in bu ine reveal. certc'1in handicap and common difficultie of Filipino bu ine s men. Among the e are: lack of experience, lack of capital, lack of credit, 2nd lack of organization. Bu ine ~ i an art with its own secrets and peculiar techni que which tho e v,ho want to make goed in it practice have to rna tel'. Filipino who go into bu ine ~ encounter difficu lties in

44


FILIPINO HANDICAPS IN BUSINESS

trying to hold their own against kEen competition that they have to face, and many of them have succumbed to such competition simply because they lack enough experience. They have not 1,ea1'n€d and have not followed certain ways, methods, and practices of their competitors. Some of these practices and methods are the products of skill, sagacity, sound business judgment, and long 'experience, but there are others also which are secret and underhanded, Gl.nd therefore dishonest or even fraudulent. There have been cas'es of Filipino failur,es in business that could be tracEd to questionable methods used by unscrupulous competitors. Frequently, new and inexperienced Filipino store owners meet the probl,e m of having to sell at much higher prices than those offerEd for the same article.s by some of their competitors. In, some ca~es, this difficulty arises from the failure of the Filipino trades man to avail himself of modern and economical systems of buying, such as taking a(lvant2.,ge of cash discounts and getting his stocks in big wholesale lots, or avoiding unnecessarily costly and wasteful v ays of keeping his store and handling his purchases. But cases are not lacking where such ability of the compEtitor to unden,ell t.he new, inexperienced merchant is due to dishonest and unfair practice.s resorted to in order to satisfy the public's craving f l)I' cheap goods. It is not of course to be desired that dishonest competitors should be met o:q their own ground, for that would only multiply the evil instead of eradicating it, but small and unwary beginners in trade must know all the wa,ys and practices that mig~t be responsible for the difficultioes and formidable odds that they encounter, for only with full knowledge of all such r,ealiti.es could they put themselves in a position to successfully meet t.heir problems. Lack of capital is commonly mentioned as the most serious problem that Filipinos in business meet. Individuals with an earnest desire to launch a new business enterprise or to expand a small business that they haNe started haVie been baffled by this common problem of lack of capital. There are those who ar,e now in business who consider this the hardest problem confronting the small Filipino business man and the beginner. One of our most successful Filipino business leaders said to the writer recently that ihere is no m ,e trying to embark in any real com45


/! THE BUILDERS OF PHILIPPI E COMMER E

mercia] entel'pl'i~e unles on is well pl'cyided with capital. H poiuted out that it tak s a lot of money to break in and m2l;: a successful start in bu iness. essE'nhal in any bu ines enWhile it is true that cajJital terprise, it is not always essential that one ha'c <'Ill <'Ibundance of cash to start with. A small amount of capital has ufficed to lay the foundation of many a big and llcce ~ ful commercial senti~)l thing- j<; the man behind the buentel"l)l'iEe. The most siness. I know of an actual cas, fo)" instance, in which a young Filipino business man was placed at the h hd of 2 new organization that wanted to start a big business. He had at his command ready cash of more than P50,OOO, and could g 1, mol' than this amount if necessary. The busine s failed in a few month . The cash was thel'e, and plenty f it. Capital wa'" hel' allenty. But the man behind the bu iness pl'o\'ed wantil1\!,' in thos qualities of judgment a d abilit) whi'h were needed to make th new v ntUl'e a succe s. I do not mean to mmlmiz~ th importance of having a big accumulation of capita fOl' tll pu PC~e of engaging in busin ~ in a big wa J . What I have jus aid l'efer to the 1':. lation of initial capital to small individual busine: \'enlures wh re th problem i not so much the amount of capital availabl~ to start with as the ability of the person or persons launching the busi .. ness. But this problem of lack of capital is felt more when it com . to bigger commel'cial enterpri e . That Filipinc do not now figure so prominently in many of the principal bu ine" activitie in thi country is due paltly to the lack of big Filipino busines corpon'ttion. We ha\'e man.\' FilipilW bu ine .. enterp]'i es but the majority of them are.mflll and weak. In bu. ine s, a in many other thing, \"8 Filipincs ar too mdividuali tic. We lack the gregariou~ne and pil'it of pulling togeth ]' and uniting effort for busin.., pl1l路pc~e. VCl'Y few are the Filipino corporation which tower high today in our busin ~s wodd. The greatr lllunber of su~h big and ucce. ful Filipino Lu ine . tabli. h~ ments that we now have fI.re indi\-idually-c\\'n d, and we know them and peak of them not a big corporate nterpri es but a. the busine of Aguinaldo of l1adrigal, of Yangco, of Puyat, of

46


FILIPINO HANDICAPS IN BUSINESS

Teodoro, and so on. We should admire and encourage individual initiativ,e, but we must not lose sight of the n ecessity of organizing Filipino corporations to engage in business here on a bigger scale than what we have been accustomed to see among Filipinos in business. Filipinos speak of bad experi,2nces that they have had with corporation that have been organized in the past and which lost ,everything not long after organization due to mismanagement, dishonesty or other causes. Such things have happened, and they always happen among corporate fOl'ms of business organiza.tion anyw21'e. But such unfortunate cases should not close the way for the organization of big Filipino business corporations. The modern corporation has proved convenient and effective in the development business. It is an excellent way of opening opportunities to those who have some capital to invest. If we had more strong Filipino corporation in this country, the small amounts of capital scattered and hoarded all over the country in the coffers of small wagle 'e arners and Filipino potential capitalists could find their way into prnduotiyc investment by being used in the purchase of shares f such Filipino corporations. Unless we wak'e up to the necessity of going into business in a big way, our participation in the nation's business will continue to be small and limited. One way to raise capital for Filipino business. is to organize strong and well-managed Filipino corporations and to pool together the savings of the people in investments in the shares of such corpon~Eions. In order to promote and organize them, we need able, energetic, and honest. men, of initiative and business acumen, endowed with the qualities of leadership and ability to manage big commercial ,e nterprises. Lack of credit is a great stumbling block to many Filipino business men. Credit is a necessary factor in the development and growth of business. It makes possible greater fr路eedom and flexibility in business operations. Filipino business men have been handicapped by the lack of the same credit faciliti路es that most of their competitors enjoy. Frequently, this has been due to their compa,r ative weakness, their small size and the limited extent of their assets and resources . The bankers naturally prefer to extend credit to those who do business with them on

47


I THE BUILDERS OF PHILIPPINE COMMERCE

a big scale a,ad.-wM-.c.o.unt. with-a - ~t.l'ong .ana solid. financial standing ~ L other Jirnes,......s.uclL lack. .oLthe--.iacilitie.s_of.. cred i t among some Filipino business mp.n has been the result of their failure .to follow the .~basic, ::rudjme"Iltal:Y ~ rules of- cr:ed~t, . A--loeaL bank executiv.e once pointed out .to the. undesirable habit of some Fi~ .Jipino bus.iness men of faiLing' to pay their ~ob1igations. promptly 'a s they mature,. or , at least of meeting th.em -partly, .or of going to the bankefy in case of inabilit,y to pay, an:d speaking. frankly; laying .thei-r cards- on the table and making an honest .appeal for :a.idlon the part of the cl~djtorT The .valu,e of cl?edit is wen known and apl;)'):'eciated -by ever:y careful and intelhgent~ business man. T.o him, anything:. that reflects. on his cl:edit standing is, a serious matte.r that- should be ca.J:'Iefully .a¥"Oided., He :r:egal'ds hi,s credit as his. own good name .and I is.: pr:incipaJ.. w.eaponof success. - He kno-v.:g that loss of cr-edtt would. mean the de.ath, or l'uin :of his busiJ.1ess. Hence, the: extr.em~ vi.g'il a ncel , with.. which "the success,. iul husiness.. man · atches and .g·ua:r;ds . his credit, -and this is a rule of . conduct that ust be carefully obser.ved ' by all Filipinos :in -business. _. '- • :: \- to ~ ~

",..1 -.' . . ':. . - : .

Lttck'- of org'anlzati6rt anmhg ' Fi ipiho busirress men is another g't'ear-obstac1.e ~ totheif' 'prOgT~SS': ' 'Theii' 'extr~me' individualism iIi

15l1siness- i~ ' manifested not only in the prevalence of numerous, small :i.ndividtlally-0wil·ed" bllsi1il~$S:- ·e·n.tetpl:ises and the scarcity of big corporate- f.orms of. busil\~sS organization among ..them, but also. in.the.ir. attitU'de toVlal:'d .one another' once· they are establishT oed in business. The . nationals of fOl'~ign, countri es ~ engaged in busitlss's' in this 'cotintry are trongiy .united.. They 'ar.e organized. .They oooperate- and help one · another. They have ' their I()wn permanent Q.rg:anizatioll~ ev.er- ready · to work ~or their- com .. mqn...int.erestsY- On the other hand, Fili.pirIbS in basines-s general~ (ly . think mOl'e : of competition 1:han .01' o'rganizatidn. _ They ~He not strong -for :cooperative . efFort in '3Il1attei's affecting th.eir .common business 'intel:esttV AS' a result they are often handicapp.ed in' fac~ ing their sttong alia '\-vell-organized competitors.. There should be mOre trad"e and bUsiness as ociations among Filipinos. They should:.. h6Bd" the- .:prE? ent cry fo}' more union and .rnutual-'coopera6 tion .altmg :national lines. ' (. Thi is ·1Jhe age ·of organized industry. -All o\'er ' th'e \{rorld~ :industrieS" and co~rciaL activities _are. being. organized. so. that _ .. ,:18 . . oJ


FILIPINO IJANDICAP3 IN BUSINESS

they can operate on a mutually helpful basis, eliminate waste and unfair competition, and foster business efficiency. The United States is witnessing a complete reorganization of her trade and industry. The· Industrial Recovery Act, under which codes of fair competition are being worked out hand in hand by all the indusb'i,es in that country, has suspended the anti-trust laws and r·cmoved the obstacles for a nation-wide organization of industry. There is no escaping the demand for better organization in trade and industry, not only here but in all countries where industrialism and trade tave developed to a g-eat extent. One.-.; of the main causes of the economic crisis from which the ,entire business WOl'ld is now suffering has been the lack of proper coordination and organization among the different factors of the world's economy. Filipinos in business must theI'efore find ways of organizing themselves for their common protection and benefit. Filipino manufacturers, for instance, should r·eceive the support and cooperation of Filipino merchants and distributors whose aid they greatly need in the mar eting of what they produce. The lack of well-organized system 0 distribution for articles of Philippine manufacture is one of the great ne.eds of industries owned and run by Filipinos today. They are hindered in their growth because they ha,ve no sufficie'nt outlets. Their sales are limited to the confines of their immediate neighborhood. They need distributors to introduce and sell their products in different parts of the Islands and in c.e rtain cases to ship them abroad for e·x port. The Filipino, generally spea:ij:ing, is still feeling his way in the field of business: enterprise. Untried and unschooled in the practices and ways of his experienoed and well-established competitors, he is necessarily handicapped in gaining a strong foothold and establishing his business on a firm and stable basis. He lacks experience. He is new in the game. For centuries, he has kept aloof from the field of active commercial life, content to remain in his little farm, la.cking in the urge of a dynamic commercial spirit because of the very narrow range of his few and simple wants, and drilled iIl/ a philosophy of living which shunned commercialism and business as low and despised pursuits inimical to his spiritual welfare. But times are fast changing, and the 49·'


THE BUILDERS OF PHILIPPINE COMMERCE

Filipino's attitude to business is different now. He i graduall awak'ening to the value and usefulness, to the dignity and real worth of business as a profession. He is coming to realiz.e the great opportunities in the field of business for the com pet nt, the active, the energetic, and the intelligent. And he is starting in earnest to win for himself the place of lea.der.ship and influence that should be his in the business affairs of his own country.

)

50


CHIN,\ AS A MAJUCET FOR

P. I.

PRODUCTS

China as a Market for P. I. Products By

K. L. K\VONG Eighty percent of the exports of the Philippine Islands find their way into the United States. Is it then necessary for the Philippines to look for other markets? The Filipinos themselves can best answer this question. They answer,ed it by participation in the Paris Exposition. They answered it by despatching a Legis_ lative Trade Mission to China, and Japan. They advertise their products in all countries, and they hold an industrial and commercial exposition every year to which many visitors from neigh-

51


THE BUILDER

OF PHILIPPINE

OMMERCE

boring countries are invited and where they are to what the Philippines . have to offer.

nlighten d as

There is no doubt that the ' Philippine are on the look-out for more customers. 'W ithout more demand from abroad th l' i little inducement to develop the va t resources with which the land is endowed by nature. The f rests, which contain the best hard wood in the world, haye hardly been tapp d. Th nrabl land i not producing to its full capacity. Thous.and of fi1~:m~l's haye gon e to work on farms in foreign land ' . Thou and of others are unemployed. Though this condition may b trac d to the general economic depres ion throughout the world, it is 11 c sary that preparations be made to prevent this condition from remaining the same upon the recov ry of bu in ss . If-int r t, and probably self-preservation, on the part of many co untl'i s, will decree restrictions again. t th importation of certain products of other countries. The end of the depl'es ion do ' not m an the return of prosper'ty through resumed comm l'ce with anoth l' country or countries on th am cal as in the boom y ar . There will be certain Ieadjustment , due to new tariff restri'tion , new conditions new demand and new int rnational agT ement. One country may not cosume the same "mount of sugar as before, another country may consume less hemp, a third country less copra, and so on. Therefore, it i always to th cOllomi . advantage of a country to explore for new market and 11 W COIlumers. Is China a good market for P. 1. products? If w only 'top to con ider the purchasing power of th immen population of China, we shall at once realize the superfluity of thi qu. iion. China i a country rich in natural resource. he is a cu tom l' with great potential wealth. She has need of many commodiLie which she herself doe not produce or is not producing in . ufficient quanti tie. The Philippine can supply her with much of 'w hat he mu t now buy from other countrie . Furtheremol'e, geographical propinquity should be a great advantage to trade between the e two countrie. Economy in time of deliy ry and in co t of tran portation hould make China the natural market for Philippine products.

52


CHINA AS A MARKE'l FOR -"---

------'--

P. 1.

PRODUCTS

---------

What can China consume ? The most important article tha.t should be uppJied to China by the Philippines is sugar. Sugar is one of the staple products of these Island. It has not been sold in any appreciable quantity to countries other than the United States, because the latter market has always had sufficient capacity to consume almost all the production. In the future, it may be different, and it is well that China be seriously considered as an addit.ional consumer. Philippine tobacco is known throughout the length and breadth of China. It is only necessary for some one to develop the markEt. Copra. and hemp are articles that the new industries of China will need. If China does not obtain them from the Philippines, she must buy them from lels,ewhere. Now, consider lumber. On account of deforestation carried on innocently for centuries, China is now dep endent on foreign countries for wood. In the reconstruction projects now undertaken throughout the country, immense quantities of railroad tiE'S and other lumber are required. Most of these are purchased from across the ocean, when they could be-pUl'chas-ed from thE! Philippines. The important questIon is then not what China can consume, but how can China buy more goods from the Philippines. Obviously, it is most important to adapt production to China's needs. Thi.s ought to be easier than to change the habits of the Chinese. A thorough study of this subj ect is necessary, in order that materials of the proper quality, size, shape and color be offered. The price is another item that must be considered. The cost of production of manv articles in the Philippines is high compared with the cost in other competing countries. Ii the difference is merely a question 9f method or efficiency, that should be easily remedied. But if the reason lies in the fact that wages are higher in the Philippines than in other countries producing similar commodities, or' in the fact that Philippine currency commands too high a rate of exchange, then the problem requires more serious consi d e ra tion. Another important point that has been overlooked is the necessity for advertising. The sugar merchant in China 'a lways thinks of Java, the civil engineer of Oregon pine and the tobacco manufacturer of Virginia and Turkey. Not that they do not 53


THE BUILDERS OF PHILIPPINE COMMERCE

know of Philippine sugar, wood 'a.nd tobacco, but that they seldom receive any offers and hardly know what quality and terms to expect. This shows the need of advertising, a subject most understood and practised in the United State, but most unde elop d in the Orient, China and the Philippines included. But above all, friendly relations are most necessary for th furtherance .of trade. The traditional friendship betw,een the two peoples should be maintained, and mutual confidence hould b preserved. Trade, to be lasting and mutually advantageous, should be built on a foundation of reciprocal privileges. Tariff barriers and other restrictions usually lead to misunderstandingand loss of trade, and should therfore be r.esorted to only after most serious consideration. China and the Philippine are blessed wiLh an unbroken trade relation for almost a thou and years. Let us hope th~t th two countries will ead the way to a new era of peace and prosperity in the Orient.

)

54


JAPAN AS A MARKET FOR PHILIPPI. E PIWDUCTS

Japan as a Market for Philippine Products By

A TSUSHI KIMURA Consul Gene.ral fOT Japan The opening of Japan ports to foreign commerce at the beginning of the ninekenth century saw Japan developing into a great industrial nation. The tremendous pressure of its 70,000,000 inhabitants increasing by millions every year, and the consequent intense competition forced Japan to change from agriculture to manufacturing, until it. is now one of the most powerful industrial countries of the world. It was the only way by which Japan

55


IT THE BUILDERS OF PHILIPPINE COMl-IERCE

could support its 70,000,000 people on a land ar a a little bigger than the Philippines. This rapid industrialization of Japan has driven her merchants in all parts of the world t') eek markets to dispo of it, manufactures. As a cOl'ollary, import increased tremendously to fe ed th e thousands of factories and mills that sprung up in the industrial cib2S. The t otal forei gn t rade soared up steadily until it reached to 4,000,000,000 yen in r ecent year. The position of Japan in the f oreign h'acle of the world is hown in the fo llowing tabl e ; for the pa t foul' years (1926- 1929) : Co un t r y

U. S.A .. Great Britain Germany France Canada Briti h India Japan. Italy H elland. Argentine . Belgium

E :l:pol't::;

10.849 7,447 6,176 4,320 2,649 2,55L 2,()52 ] ,676 1,670 1,955 1,764

Impo?ts

Toted

Ba lano

9,272 12,119 6,7: 9 4,675 2,594 1,933 2,210 2,378 2,294 1,800 1,935

20,121 19,566 12,915 8,994 5,241 4,49 1 4,262 4,054 3,96路1 3,755 . ,699

1,577 4,672 563 . 54 53 625 15 702 624 15 171

-

Strangely, imports in Japan grew ahead of exports. J apan today i one of t!1 e riche t markets of the world for exporting nations. From 1868 to 1930, Japan suffered unfavorable balances of tra de 43 time , her imports exc2eding exports by a tota l of 2,956,000,000 yen. The countries most benefited by this enormou import of Japan have been the agricultural and raw material producing countri'2 s. The greater bulk of Japan's imports ha a l way~ been ra,,{ material, which composes 55 c of the total imports with a steady increa e of 24芦 inee 1 97. L ikewi e imports in food stuff, iron, beans and pea, and oil cake are on the gradual increa e. Japen will alway import raw material. T he situation can not be helped. The land area of the E mpire is limited and there 56


JAPAN AS A MARKET FOR PI!ILIPPINE PRODUCTS

are no reserves of natural resources to speak of. There are factories in ev,e ry city. Eighty to ninety percent of these f actories go to supply the vast home market of 80,000,000 Japane se, and but ten to twenty per-cent of the total products are exported 'a broad. All these factories must get their raw material f rom abroad. The trlemendous possibilities to the Philippine Islands of the great demand in the Japanese industrial cities for raw materia! and foodstuffs ar,e further enhanced by the fact that no Philippine export commodity exCts'p t sugar comes directly in competition with <Japanese products. The J'a.panese, therefore, do not feel the necessity of protecting their industries from possible competition from the Philippine Is1ands. So early have the Japanese recorgnized the fundamental difference b etween Nipponnese and Philippine products that the Imperial Government has admitted free of duty most of the Philippine principal ,export products like hemp, tobacco, copra" timbef' and hard fibers. With the American trade preference, Philippine exporters were slow to takls' adva tage of the rich Japanese market, and the greater bulk of the raw material supply for the Japanese factories have to come from Southern Asia and the South Sea Islands,. Of late, howIe-vel', ther,e has been a perceptible flow of Philippine export products to Japan. Eventually, the Philippines will have to be the principal source of supply of Japan for tropical raw materials. The advantage of nearness will be 'a factor in favor of the Philippines. There is more than g.eographical significance in the fact that Manila is 1,600 nautical miles from Kobe, Japan. It means speed and low freight 路rates to the industrial cities and to the 80,000,000 Japanese. This 路 is a natural advantag,e, priceless iIlt an age of stiff international competition. The Filipinos are slowly learning to use their natural 'a dvantages. LEAF TOBACCO Leaf tobacco is admitted fre!e of duty in Japan. Philippine exports to Japan of the commodity have steadily increased both in volume and in total sales. 'Where Philippine leaf tobacco exports in 1922 was only 58,142 kilos worth f'33,493.00, in 1932, lexports were 1,865,951 kilos worth P604,411.00. The qU8..Iity of leaf tobac-

57


THE BUILDERS OF PHILIPPINE COMMERCE

co must however be kept uniform to command good prices in J apan. Thel'e is no market in Japan for manufactured tobacco because of the gOVternment monopoly. Philippine exports to Japan of leaf tobacco for the last 11 years are: Year Kilos Valu~ P 33,493.00 1922 ...... 58,142 1923 244,062 93,493.00 1924 .,.... 1,178,534 720,765.00 ...... 510,600 1925 293,180.00 1926. ,....... 740,512 381,150.00 1927. ........ 1,693,742 653,819.00 1,128,248 1928 . ..... 504,527.00 ...... 849,005 1929 410,256.00 ...... 676,146 1930 329,333 .00 1931 1,178,629 544,093 .00 1932 ...... 1,865,951 604,411.00

KAPOK Although Japan co lsu~es 2,000, 00 kilos of kapok e lery year, the Philippines supply nly 500,000 ~ilos, the rest being imported from the East Indies. Philippine export of this commodity has been irregular and unsteady due to price changes in Japan, the lack of grading of the Philippine pl'oduct, and the irr.egularity of the supply. However, kapok could easily be developed as an important lexport to Japan. Philippine export for the last nine years follows:

Y ear 1924 . 1925 1926 1927 192 1929 1930 1931

Kilos 42,355 19,915 84,553 8,969 160,769 64,714 182,573 408,470

ValuÂŁ P10,366.00 5,414.00 41,402.00 2,530.00 43,479.00 12,012.00 30,694.0 49,814.00

COPRA The soap and vegetable oil industries of Japan have expanded considerably in the last few years, necessitating the importa58


JAPAN AS A MARKET FOR PHILIPPINE PRODUCTS

tion of tremendous supplies of copra and vegetable oil. Copra, however, has the advantage over vegetable oil being admitted free of duty. In 1922 the Philippines exported to Japan only 3 kilos of copra worth ~1.00, but in 1932, the total exports of the commodity to Japan' was 2,175,759 kilos worth r147,826,OO This lexport can still be expanded 'as the needs of Japanese industries increase.

Eilos

Y ear

~

1922 . 1923 1924 1925 1926 1927 1928 1929 1930 1931 1932

. .......

Val~

P

3 1.18 113,080 52,821

..

1.00 35.00 24,494.00 10,159.00 -;

266 101,107 527,985 1,152,354 2,049,937 2,1715,759

! 11.00 20,537.00 93,384.00 182,676.00 181,379.00 147,826.00

LUMBER AND TIMBER The trade in lumber between the Philippines and Japan started only about ten years ago. An intensiv.e campaign conducted by the Bureau of Forestry in 1924 brought home to Japanese artisans the beauty and desireability of Philippine lumber. From one of the lowest consumer of Philippine woods in 1922, Japan rose during time following ten YJears to tllie top of the list, when in 1932 she took in 17% of the total amount of lumber from the Philippines. Despite an increase on the tariff rate on Philippine woods, Philippine exports of the commodity to Japan has not abated.

Y ear 1922 1923 1924 1925 1926

.'

Cu. M. 667 10,776 28,429 15,885 26,227

.

59

P

Value 28,920.00 309,377.00 608,655.00 311,158.00 574,978.00


THE BUILDERS OF PHILIPPINE COMMERCE

- - - - - - - - - - - --- - - - - - - - - - - - - - 1,033,721.00 1,067,612.00 1,400,699.00 894,854.00 934,217.00 722,737.00

44,799 47,040 75,366 59,968 84,430 84,952

1927 1928 1929 1930 1931 . 1932

MANILA HEMP, CANTON FIBER, MAGUEY, SISAL The rope, paper, twine, and rayon industries in Japan are steadily expanding and are needing an increasing supply of raw fiber material. In fact Japan has become one of the be t markets for Philippine fiber. Hemp, Canton fiber, maguey and isal are admitted free of duty. There is no immediate possibility of the demand d cr.easing because shipping, rope, textile and paper industries are recovering and n eding fiber stock. MANILA HEMP

Y ear 1922 1923 1924 1925 1926 1927 1928 1929 1930 1931 1932

Kit 25,29 ,775 31,413,403 24,905,578 21,545,585 29,969,474 32,498,737 42,002,055 44,828,173 37,288,924 42,287,950 38,618,733

Value

P 5,464, 01.00 7,813,836.00 6, 72,193.00 7,694,676.00 10,109,237.00 10,778,007.00 10,646,803.00 10,700,169.00 6,502,525.00 4,888,603.00 3,217,285.00

CANTON FIBER

Year 1922 1923 1924 1925 1926 1927

Kilos 525,237 626,818 1,900,686 3,037,289 2,341,031 2,151,74

60

Valu ~

,

58,430. 0 98,369.00 336,535.00 639,690.00 465,379.00 517,149.00


JAPAN AS A MARKET FOR PHILIPPINE PRODUCTS

1928 1929 1930 1931 1932

2,471,969 2,700,411 1,184J 685 1,310,930 2,360,627

446,357.00 484,654.00 182,807.00 101,380.00 136,560.00

MAGUEY FIBER 1922 1923 1924 1925 1926 1927 1928 1929 1930 1931 1932

5,497,177 7,081,488 6,205,296 4,398,045 4,281,794 5,546,667 4,123,536 4,371,731 2,60a,210 3,430,863 3,291,411

740,391.00 1,068,605.00 1,159,475.00 976,331.00 1,018,738.00 1,214,256.00 776,681.00 826,720.00 316,599.00 256,652.00 181,440.00

SISAL FIBER 1922 1923 1924 1925 1026 1927 1928 1929 1930 1931 1932

13,288 1,645 18,851 25,305 49,213 26,948 26,060 40,991 170,020 78,944 8,477

2,150.00 212.00 4,922.00 6,555.00 13,998.00 6,068.00 5,199.00 8,301.00 17,468.00 6,052.00 382.00

COTTON The Philippines should not lose sight of other opportunities for export in the Japanese market. The needs of industrialized Japan for raw material are increasing year by year. Lately there have been attempts to interest Filipinos to grow and lexport high 61


It THE BUILDERS OF PHILIPPINE COMMERCE

grade cotton to Japan, which today gets its supply from India and the United States. In 1932 Japan imported cotton worth 447,130,803 yen to feed its millions of spindles. The country is totall dependent on foreign countries fo!' its supply of the fiber. Recent developments in the United States and in India, chief suppliers of cotten, have lClade it more desirable for Japan to seek additional sources for its raw material. India has increa.sed its tariff rates on Japanese goods; the United States did likewise. The movement in Japan has therefore been directed towards seeking sources of supply for 1'a'w cotton besides the nited States and India. The Philippines is well adapted for the cultivation of cotton. The wide p}ains in Luzon are ideal areas for the raising of the fiber. The climate is also ideal. The Filipinos could start diver ifying their crops now and plant cotton besides rioe and sugar and find a ready market fOl' their products in Japan. RUBBER Rubel' is another ' ommodity th t is increasing in importance among the imports of J'fl,p an. At p'resent iis supply comes from South Eastern Asia and rom the South Sea Islands. There is no reason why the Pl1ilippiJ1es could not share in this growing industry and export rubber of excellel1t quality from potential rubber plantations in Cotabato, Basilan, Zamboanga and Palawan. OTHER

PRODUCTS

The needs of industrializ,ed Japan are so extensive that the Philippines could take advantage of opportunities to produce agricultural raw materials here and export same to Japan. Corn and edible fruits from the PhilippiJ1Jâ&#x201A;Źs have already been exported to Japan in what promises to be a more steady trade. Other products that could be profitably exported to Japan are minerals, buntal fiber, and forest products. The richest market in the Far East is at the threshold of the Philippine Islands. Japan alone can absorb most of the agricultural .export products of the Philippines except sugar and manufactured tobacco. Yet the share of the Philippines in the Japanese market has a yet been very insignificant. 62


JAPAN AS A MARKET FOR PHILIPPINE PRODUCTS

A growing consciousness is however spreading that eventually Japan will be the mall\:et for Philippine pl'cducts. The American market is slowly being limited and hampered by legislation and organized oppositicn from American domestic producers. The enormous profits in the American market aye teing slowly queezed and l'educed. The natmal advantages in the J2.,p8,nese market will eventually change the trade rcutes of the Philippines from across the Pacific tcwards the Japan Seas. The Filipinos can hasten the development of their exports to Japan by establishing trade ag1mcies for the dissemination of infOrmation in Jap'2.,n and for interesing industrial men in the possibilities ()f getting their supplies from the Philippines.

)


THE BTHLDE::S OF PHILIrPINE

OMlIIERCE

The Duty and Responsibility of the Manufacturer By

' enatol ELPIDI O QU IRIN O Chairman, Joint

ommittec on T axation

When the Philippine Legislature, in its last session, enacted the tariff acts and other economic development measures, a pronouncement more or les:: definite had been madl that the party in power wa committ~ d to the policy of protection t o home indu _ tri e , Thi proL,cti\,e policy, it hould be clearly. tated, is pl'emi eel upon the incere belief that it will lend encouragement to the pl'omoti n of indu trie ' which are not yet stabJis1.zc1 and which can b ::.ucceussfully pl'omoLd in th, country, 6-1


THE DUTY AND RESPONSIBILITY OF THE MANUFACTURER

Now that the! gov,ernment has paved the way, in that the most eff.ectiv.e agencies in the promotion of industries have been created it is incumbent upon our manufacturers to create a demand based upon competitive quality and competitive pric,8. Protection on the part of the government does nnt mean a dole or subsidy for inefficiency in production and management. Rather, it means that ah lEady 'established indu stries should be given an additional impetus to adopt newer methods of production, which are in vogue in many of the highly industrialized nations. It further means that, for infant industri'es , a pl拢Tiod of adjustment to ,e nable home manufaQ;.urers to compete with outside suppliers is imperat.iv,e. But in the last analysis it means that, as industries attain the full 'e fficiency of production and management, comp:::titiv1e pric.e and competitive quality should result so that, wiih or without tariff pro,t ection, the said industrie ~ could surviv'8 outside competition. A glance oVler our; import fig'll.n2s would readily show that in the Philippines a good number of manufactured products could be successfully promoted. We impo'r t a good quantity of foodstuffs. A na,t ion dependent upon outside sOUirtes for its foodstuffs is a . nation whos1e stability is insecure. A tropical country, like the Philippines, must produce all its foodstuff l'iequin:ments. Le'a ther goods of many types, including shoes; chemical products that ar'e typically tropical in origin; building ma.terials the raw products for which have been obtained at home; householld goods; and certain officl2; equipment are som2 of .the many products that we still import in great quantities, and which, judged by any standard, could and should be produced at home. If prot'ection is a dangier to national ,economy, it is becausle it may stimulate inefficiency and misma,n agement. Not too infp2quently, in the desire of manufacturers to reap the largest amount of returns, quality has belen Is acrificed at the expense of the consumers. From the practical point of view, every resident of this PhilippineS!, r路egardless of na,t ionality, should patronize local industries as much as pos'sibl'e. It is a dut.y and a r,esponsibility ccincident wit!1 residence. From a nationalistic point of view, citizenship impcses the unique obligation of patronizing the indus'tries at home. Howew;'l', to ,e ntiUe the home manufacturers to this gl'eat privilege of patrimony, the consumers must, first of

65 '.


THE BUILDER~ OF PHILIPPl TE CO:MMERCE

all, be satisfied. It is an accepted bu ine~s principle that an ' nduring busine s is that which ha a cli,mtele of ati tied 'u ~ tomer T because of ... ervice, because of quality, and becHLl of pI路ice. It is also an accepted busine _s promotional principle that satisfied custom ers ar,~ the best media of advertising, and hen "e of enlal'going the vol ume of sales. The industrial exposition being held at the Crystal Arcade is a 1'Ievelation of the potentialities of the Philippim f l' industrial expansion. Preserved foodstuffs, sho , hat, cotton goods, wines and liquors, vegetable butt r, oap, hou~, ehold furniture, pharmaceutical products--all these are po sibiliti'e b yond de eription. As I come from the northern region of Luzon, and a \\~e JUl\ a developed in that region a wine, generally known a BASI, the radio audience celtainly would IJ. curious to know that thi' industry is a old as our civiliza ion. In 1725, wben Juun de Salcedo, first encomend dol' of the noco l'egion, in a fea路t given in his honor. stood u and drank ASI in l'e_pons to a toa t, he remarked with delig 1t and sati~f ction that ''It i an excellent b.'e verag ; I :fell perfectly at home with this 'win . ,. This expo ition, in addition to the revelation of our potentialities for industrialization, j an cpen chall ng to th public. Either we must patroniz'e local competitive good without prejudice, or else our economic, sy nem shculd be l'evi ed to th nrl of submitting our economic policies to the dictates of mo)'e aggJ'e~sive indu trial nation .

66


THE IMrORTANc,E OF CHINESE - PHILIPPINE TRADE

The Importance of Chinese-Philippine Trade By

TAN SAM TO President General Chinese Chamber of Commerce Long be.fore the advent of the Spaniards in this country, China and the Philippines wer,e already having trade r.elations. It is a ma.tter of records that Chinese trade:rs were here sev.e ral centuries b.efore the corning of Magellan, who found the doughty sons of Cathay upon his arrival here. This trade relation has grown steadily from those distant days with the result that China is today one of the most important mal'kets of Philippine products outside of the United States. 67


THE BUILDERS 01-' PHILIPPINE

OMME3CE

Interest in the development of Chine e-Philippine trade is not confined only to the Philippines; the intere t is mutual. Both Philippine and Chinese official are no\'I' alive to ihis impel'ati\'e necessity that has been accentuated by their nearn ss, and th vast strides made by modern transportation and communication. In speaking of the develolJment of Chinese-Philippin e trade, the suggestions have always bem along purely commodity xchanges: that IS, China send here her manufactul' d good and products that are highly in demand hel'e; and the Philippin s, Slend to China her agncultural products and raw materials which will find ready market there because of China's teeming million . Whille all these are sound, and based largely upon those commodities that Teally enter into the trad e of the two neighboring countr ies. I believe these are not ev1El'ything. If we realize that the trade relations of the two countries need improvement from year to year, I beli ve that there hould be l',egular and more frequent visits of busines men fro and to these two countries. A case in point is the I st visit of tl Philippine Goodwill Mis lon to that country. That vjsit is till f 'esh in the memory of hine e officialdom and of the Chinese busine s communities. That visit has lent a human touch to the relations of the two countries. After all, it is not al1 money that counts in business. We must also have goodwill. Goodwill visits like the one mentioned above, now from hina, now from the Philippines, will make a long way to bring the bond of trade understanding closer. WhatJever be the political future of thi beautiful country, which fate has decreed to be at the gateway of Asia, she can not neglect the teeming millions of hina in her futUl e foreign trade expansion. The Chinese market is ju t next door. In the next f ew year, businessmen wil] be taking breakfa t in Manila luncheon in Hongkong, dinner in Shanghai. Then, re\'elsing the order, breakfa t -a t Shanghai, luncheon again in Hongkong and dinner in Manila. All these are now aIm..! t within lhe realm of reality as plans are being matured by bu ine men fOl' t he inauguration of commercial

68


THE IMI'ORTANGF OF CHINESI<; - PHILIPPINE TRADE

aviation between the t.wo nations. When this happens, China will still be closer to the Philippines than she is now. A potential market will thus be very much closer than now. Other nations of the world, notably the United States, Germany, Japan, France, and ev.en the Dutch East Indies realize the vast potentialitiles of the Chinese market. Right now, these nations are thinking hard on how they can gain a, permanent foothold in such a trading gold mine.

It behooves those of us in the Philippines not to neglect China itt the maping out of the foreign trade program of this country, now and in the coming years.

)

69


THE BUILDERS OF PHILIPPINE COMMER E

Cfhe need for Industrial Diversification By FLORENCIO TAME.SIS Acting DirecMl' of Fo; estl'Y The movement fostered by the Bureau of ommerc to patronize products "made-in-the-Philippines" and home indu trie is indeed a very laudable move on the part of the administration to awaken national intere t of the pecpie in economic and nationalistic ideas. The response to thi movement is equally laudabl . It is certainly gratifying to note that we Filipinos are becoming more and more economic-minded people, and for that reason I would venture to ad ocate furih e , the development of oUt' natural resources, both alo~g manufact urmg and indu trial line as w II as the growing of tr pical pr oducts; so that instead of only producing raw products, re could offer to the world market artic1e ~ of commerce in their fi ished form We are to-day depending upon foreign countries for many of the essential things we need in our civilized existence, WhiJ I believe that there is no country in t~le world that i self-suffici nt, still I am convinced that when our rich land and abundant natural resources are properly developed, the Philippine can very well approach the level of other natIOns in supplying the greater bulk of her nece ities, besides creating exce product for the export trade . In this, I have in mind the potential, industrial and agricultural possibilitie of our practically undeveloped land and natural re ources. MA JO R I D USTRI E

To-day, we a r e centering our trades on but a few products. vVe built our industries among them and thro ugh them it enables us to maintain our foreign trade. The greater bulk of our foreign trade is practically dependent upon four or five major agricultural crop . A to what would happen to each of th e crops when the economic condition of the country ar~ di turbed i very well known to everyone of us. \Ve see il in our hemp, rice coconut product, tobacco, lumber and many other thing . \\ hile we are helple ly fighting for markets for our product, our country i 70


THE NEED FOR INDUSTR1AL DlVERS1FlCATlON

being flooded with manufactured articles frem other countries, many of whi::h could be and should hav,e been produced and manufactUl'ed here. Thanks to oUl' "tariff-protected " sugar industry that in spite of all these worlJ economic disturbances, it was able to meet competition and keep helping the balan'ce of trade in favor of the country. But this would not last long. Our political freedom may tell a diffierent story. The economic storm blowing in our midst should serve us a guide to look forward to more divlersified undertakings to enable -:: us meet compJstition and supply our own needs, rather than be dependent for manufactured products upon foreign countri.es. This can be done and should be encouraged both by the Govlernment, the capitalists and the industrialists. We should not forget the fact that the Philippine Islands holds an ,e nviable position among tropical and semi-tropical countries when it comes to s urce of raw materials needed by the consuming temperate world. America alo~ne must necessarily consume over a billion dolla worth of tropical and semi-tropical prodJcts which could, in most caSles, be supplied by us, not so much in their purely crude or natural form but as finished products; -

FICTITIOUS ECONOMIC DEVELOPMENT There is where our own basic resources present a challenge to our own le xistence. We have been very much contented with our contributions to the world in the supply of raw materials and take for granted that with what we can crudely produce, we can in return receive the finished products of other countries. This stage of national economic development is fictitious and can only last up to a certain point wher.e our own products could creat.e better markets than the products we import. When conditions of the world are disturbed, we, who specialize in the production of raw materials, are the first to suffer. It gives us practically no means of diversifying our '8.ctivities in time of distre'ss and as a r,e sult the people suffer the路 consequences. In other works, w.e should not be contented with the production of raw materials, we should endeavor to utilize our natural resources in the form most advantagleous to ourselves. 71


THE BUILDERS OF PHILIPPINE

OMMER E

ARTIFICIAL SILK, CELLUPHANE, ETC. For a number of years past, the Bureau of Forestr , through its limited means, was able to bring forth certain fundam ntal in regard to industrial devel0pment of our natural wealth, the for st. As results emerged the development of certain industries, such as the lumber, wood-working industries, cutch extraction, lumb r preservation, etc.; but there remain numerous possibilitie that, I believe, should attract the attention of Oul industrialists and capitalists. We have the raw material , and in many cases th necessary elements for their development, but omehow capital or initiative is lacking. In this, I ha\'e in mind th pot niial possibilities of our Yal'ious fore 1. product up to thi..; time prhctically undeveloped, sLlch as, the utilization of \Va te wood throug-h various processes for the m:mufacture of artifitial silk, cellUphal1 , cellulose, pulp and he salvaging Of chemIcal components of wood through destrudive istillation; eKtl'action of dyeing and tanning materials for the deyelopment of th tanning industry and the u e of mill-waste lumber or toys and the home industries. Thes' are among the latest development,s in the u e of minor forest products that deserve fmther industrial studie. P l'eliminary work in the determination of alpha cl'llulose for the manufacture of artifieial silk or Rayon and extracti n of tannin have b n carried on by the Bureau of Science in conn etion with the work of the Bureau of Fore tryon various pecie of common alld what we may call usele tree. Some ery encouraging results in a number of our tree species are recorded and deserve attention for further tudies in a commercial production.

INDUSTRIAL RESEA.RCH Aside from tho e undeyeloped researche, we have Gth r natural pl'.oduct that, altho some v hat being exploited, are up to this time carried on by primitive mr,thod which necessarily bring out products into the market which could not compete with similar product from other countries in the world market. In ord r to so]ye thi and expand our industrial undertaking. either pr'vaLe intel'e ts must go into it or the Goyernment mu t und rtake indu trial re earch so a to 'olYe orne of the e dormant economic po sibilities of our country. 72


ADVERTISING IN BUSINESS

Advertising in Business By

FLORENTJNO GARRIZ M anagm路-Adv1e1路tising Bureau Eare all familiar with the gentleman who built mousetraps in the ba.ck\Yood~. The public was supposed to suffer the pangs of hardship, including climbing mountains and blazing trials, in its eagerness to buy this new and better exter-, minators of our household nuisance. Modern merchants read or listen to this beautiful tal,e of public trust with large and langourous yawns. The more sophisticated, somewha.t given to modern language.. are apt to say, "Oh Yeah."

W

73


THE BUILDER

OF PHILIPPI E COM11ERCE

Granted that the public would make that ffort in those day of yore, the same public 11as other and more int re sting t'1ings to do today, in spite of fa t mean of tum pOl'tati n and good roads. The attitude of the public today is "Shew Me." M ting that challeng~ the modern merchant, manufactmer, public rvic company has devi ed many interestin o' ways of recting 'guid e po ts' to show the public the way. - ndel' a broad gen !'al hC[l d the e ways and means are call ed "Advertising." lOll will find it on their letberheads, envelop , slore windows, tor sign::. lighted signs. The avel'age mel'chant may not can id l' his lett rheads and other stationery a " Adveltising" but it i . Many scholars have tried to explain just what adv rtising is, It is about as easy as explaining whatel ::;b'icity i. Mcst <1l ' agreed that advertising i 'making known.' That is mel' ly academic. The progres iv e merchant 0 1' manufactul l' ele es not waste time trying to figur out ÂŁ' sati factory an v\\'er; he gee' ahEad ,:n{] use it. WIlY? ADVERTI PL . E IN B - INE ' Most of u kno\y t a t ad I'e rti llW is in busin ÂŁss; it is a selfevident fact. But not e\' el'yone know ad" rti .. ing's place ill bu ... iness, Too manj people, bt:S ;II ss men among 1..h 1, conslcl ~t' advel'ti ing m erely a s a ne cessary evil. And jucigipg from I.e manner in which thou a nd of pe os are pent for 'adv Itisin ~ ' it is truly an evil, for which no one i to be blamed olh l' t.han th. merchant who so quander hi ad ' l'tising apprcpriation. The modern ad\'erti ing appropriati cn 1S a much a palt of the bu ine s organization as it PH onnel, it: ex cuti\' it pia' of bu ine ,it tock and it quipment. It direct plac in th 01'ganization is that of a "ital part of the s lling organization . I doe not, and, except for mail order concern, can not l'epJ?c th al men . It i , howe 'er, the valesmen' gJ'eate tally ADVERTI I~G' FL'NCTIO~ ince ad\'erti ingi an aid to !ling let u, e acC'oml)li hE' ~ it reonIt, ano what it rea] fUl1ctil;n T

IN TRODL' IXG KEW :\IER HA TDI E, de\'elop a ne \. article

de~irc

ju, t how it a!'),

. Ianl1factul'er anel d d! l' , when they he wid . t p c i1jl? mark t. for it

74


ADVERTISING IN BUSINESS

in the shortest time and at the least expense. If this introduction was to be undertaken by the salesmen alone it would m ean a treme.ndous ,e xpense to develop a wide market in a short time. The salesmen's time would mostly be taken up in telling the dealers all about the new merchandise, which means fewer calls per day per salesman. Advertising has this one important function to perform. Adv,e rtising makes it possible to tell not only the hundreds of de.alers about it but also, at the same time, tells the public, the ultimate consumer, by the thousands, about the new merchandis.e. The salesmen, when they call on dealers, when advertising has been used corIiectly, wlll find these deal'ers already acquainted with the merr;handise. The salesmen then can confine their .efforts to the more important function of taking orders. Cutting .out their introductory talks about the new merchandise helps them to cover more territory and makes them much more efficient. RETAINING CUSTOMERS.

In these days of ke,e n and much competition manufacturers and merchants must keep th~ir names before the pUblic. That merchant or manufacturer who contents hims.elf with the fallacy that "everybody knows me " is riding for a bitter disappointment. The 'other fellow' is out to make new acquaintances for his product and loses no Legitima.te means to do this. B.elieve it or not but in these days of high speed, the public e,a sily forgets and it is entirely up to you to keep reminding them of your pr,esence in business. CREATING

NEW

CUSTOMERS.

This world does not stand still. The business world is no lexception. New people are arriving in the community, the boys and girls of today are the men and women of to-morrow-a potential source of customers. They may not have paid much attention to purchas.es in the boy and girl period but as men and women they are important in your schsme. You must go after their business. Advertising, persist.ently and intelligently done, is the safest, surest, easiest means of lleaching them. CREATING PUBLIC INTEREST.

The public is always interested in new things. Your problem is to get them interested in true new things, or old, that you

75


THE BULDER. OF PHILIPPINE COMMERCE

offer. 'Old' thing are new to new arrivals in th field where you operate ,

purcha ing

CREATING GOOD VlILL.

No flne m erchant or manufa luI' r will delibel'at ly set out to antagoniz the public, yet many of them feel that it is unn c s ary to mak any effort to -create good will. W I2 hear much, III ale of bu iness, of the mon etary value of the 'good 'v ill' of th bu in Good will merely means a friendly fe eling of th gU1 ral pulJlic toward the merchant or manufacturer. The wis all among th latter continuou Iy strive to build up thi valuabl f,=ature. The advertising of the e firms is 0 prepared and present d that thi element is alway present, but neYI=r intrusive. Th i1' adv l'tising is so written that it implies a pel' onal interest in th w lfare of each cf it cu tomeI's. B TNK ADVERTISING There is a certa 'n c1 pss of adverti ing which can be cia d only as 'bunk advel'tis 'ng . I It is a lass of meaningkss phras , too often a repetition of whaL hundreds of oth 1'8 hav said. Among this may be cIa ed the "B~g Discount aI" adverti.'ing; " School Opening" ad\12rtising; ÂŤ50 (Reduction" ad el'iising, and such meaningles and too arlen misleading announc meni. Th r are merchant who do this not in the pirit of deception but 1 cau e they haYle not the time to put more thought into the adv l'tising. The result i that such advertising i a flat failur , an 1 the advertiser COi~clud â&#x201A;Źs that all adverti ing is bunk. The trouble is not with adverti ing but in its preparation. BIG TYPE ADVERTISING Thi is second only to "Bunk Advertising' and th,= only reason for it i to 'make the public read it.' Let the u er of thii) kind of advertising ask himself this que tion-" 'hall I t 11 my sale -people to stand out on the idewalk and hout at th,e p ople?" No elf-re pecting merchant would permit uch a thing but that i preci e1y big black type in an advertisement doe. inc.e no one like to be shouted at either vocally or by mean of type, that ort of ad\"erti ing defeat its own end. I it nece ary to add that uch proceedure is in extremely poor ta te? 'i6


ADVER'l'lSING IN "BUSlNESS

Attractive advertising intelligently written is true only kind that is worth releasing for publication. Its attractiveness invites reading, and there are sev,eral ways in which to make it attracth.-,c. Ii intelligently written it will be of interest to readers because it wiU appeal to their pe.rsonal interests rather than confine itseff to the bald fact that you want to sell. It must be understood that the public is not interested in YOU; it is intzrested only in what you have to offer and their needs or desires for it. Intelligently written advertising will create both the need and the desire. THE ADVERTISING AGENCY'S ROLE The average business does not maintain its own advertising department. This has created the ne.ed lor some central agency which specializes on advertising work. This does not mean that the agency knows more about your business than you do. No outsider can know more about your business than you yourself. no matter how much they may value their own knowledge as agents. The modern advertising agency concerns itself with advertising and its profitable application to yuor business, not in at路 tempting to run your business. Advertising agency personnel are trained in advertising, but their very close contact with business in general gives them wide opportunities t.o study merchandising methods, distribution methods, styles of advertising that have been resultful, campaigns that hav,e be2n both profitable and unprofitable. The result of this is a fund of information and facts that will be consulted in planning advertising campaigns for clients. One of the most important function of the agency is in the separation of the chaff from the wheat in advertising media-and only an agency realizes the tremendous sums that are wasted every yea.r under the head "Advertising". It has b2'en the habit in the past, especially in the United States, for the advertising agency to work for the adv,el-tiser without charge in the preparation of copy, illustrations, lay-outs and selection of media, his Demuneration coming in the form of commissions from the various media. There is today, in the United States, a very definite trend 'a.way from this vicious system in which th(~ interests of the adv,e rtiser was necessarily secondary. In the past thOse mediums that paid the highest commissions got the advertising, irrespective of the

77


It THE BUILDER

OF PHILIl'PThTE COMMERCE

value of the medium to the advertiser. That system, to some ex.tent, is prevalent in the Philippine today. If this present system i finally discarded, as it rnu t b in the future, the agency will b con erned only WiUl the b t interests of their clients. One of the outstanding agencies in the Philippines has evol ed what is, perhaps, on of th rno t equitable f orms fOl' payment for their servic . Thi::; ag ncy harg' s the client a flat, and mooderate, percentage of th~ amount of advertising placed by the client. This cover the cost to the client and is a service chal路ge. Advertising media is th n 'harged another, and smaller, percentage of all ad rti ing pIa ed through the avency, and this aL 0 is in the form of a sel' ic harge for preparing, deliv,erin..g and to a certain extent recommending th use of this media to adverti e'. The fir t and paramount interest of the agency is to their cHen ; the publications and oth l' medi.a al1C! seconda 'y. The e media are not a ked for any 'commission', no rare any accepted by the agency. Media is el ct d only on its proven va ue and thi i' decided by the agency, other media heing included olly on the x ress authority of, and ord 1'S from, the client. The l,esult has been, in every in tance, a decided saving t the client by the e1imination from their advertising schedules, of media of doubtful, or no value. The agency can also be of ine timable value in th form of illterviewing advertising solicitors. The e take up much of th valuable time of busy busine eXlecutives-time which could be put to more constructive use. The e solicitor are referr d to the agency, which take uch action as i n ecessary, or d sil'able. The m')dern adverti ing agency works closely with the adv rti&er in aU matters concerned with elling, even going 0 far as to uggJesting distribution means, designing of package label , special contests, in general. regular conferences with busines executives a to the be t mean of helping in selling. inoe elling and adverti ing are so clo elJ related it is ab olutely nec sary thai such close cooperation and understanding be maint.ained. And the better thi relation hip i under tood and applied the greater will be the results from advertising and the oon'2 r will progre ive merchants and dealer realize Advertising's Place in Modern Bnsines . 78


TAXES AND THE BUSINESS MAN

TAXES AND THE BUSINESS MAN. By BU JOSR M. HILARIO

S ecr,etnry, Special Gommittm on Ta xat ion, Philippine, Legislature The commercial exhibit at the Crystal Arcade represents the fruition of the efforts of our business men and the Bur-eau of Commerce to demonstrate in a practical way the industrial possibilities of this country. The campaign for home-made ,proglfcts, which has been going on for several months, has serv,ed to strengthen the spirit of economic nationalism, but I do not be. lieve that it has fostered a dislike for foreign goods. TA..xES AND HARD TIMES

In times of stress like the present, the business man not only turns to the thought of patronage, but also begins to consioer what the Governmen . is or is not doing fer him. The market is sluggish, and he begins to speculate on the causes' of this undesirabl,e condition. Beca &e: of the slowness with which money comes in, he pays closer atention than before to the money he pays out. After an examination of his accounts, he comes to the conclusion that he is overburdened with taxes. This is a natural feeling of the various economic classes, each class thinks that it is contributing mO)1,e than the other for g8vernmental suppOrt. Some persons go to the extent of exaggerating the effects of taxation on their business. A taxpayer, who apparently had unpl'casant experiences with the Government, has the following to say: "The Government has so governed my business that I don't know who owns it. I am inspected, suspected, examined, and r e-examined. informed, requir.ed, and commanded, so that I don't know who I am, where I am or wh~r I am her,e . "All I know is that I am supposed b be an ineKhaustihIe supply of money for every known need, desire or hope of , the human race; and because I will not sell all I have and , go out and beg, borrow or steal money to give away. ,' I am cuS&ed, discussed, boycotted, talk,ed to,. talked about, lied' ro,

79


THE BUILDERS OF PHILIPPI E COMMER E

lied about; help up, hung up, robbed and nearl. ruin zd; and the only reason I am clinging to life is to ee what in h, ,. is coming next." In anci ent times and the m edie al ages when th trad r wa consid ered a legitimized robber, public prej udice undoubt dl exerted an ihflu ~nce on the Gov ernment in the impo Ilion of taxes on business. That prejudice has disapp a1' d, and to-day the business man occupi.es a fixed placed in the economic structure. NOR~

OF TAXATION

With these premises, how can anyone conceive the exisl nce of a government that will impose taxes which will ultimately serve to strangle business? The fact is that there is not a ingl government in the world today which does nol con ider publi c sentiment in the imposition of taxes, and which is not guided by the accepted norm of ratiort-fac lty or ability to pay. If we analyze our conditions 'n the Phili pines, we shall find that our Government has not pa sed any la causing the und ~ il'able f:rect of discouraging production and eliminating the iniel'm diary between the producer and the con umer- the merchant. Limiting our attention to the legislative enactments during the last regular session, we _hall realize that there has been an avowed purpose of affording protection t o our pl'oducel's and bu in es~ men. The increa ed dutie on such arti cles a eggs, meat, lard, and shoes are Indic<-<ti\ e of the economic policy which PI' seni conditions in tbe \-\'orld bave forced our Legislature to adopt. Every country now has high tariff walls for ihe protection of home industrie"" as well as for re enue purpose. Even a traditional free trader like England has been forced to abandon her time-honored policy and fall in line with the other na ions. If the Philippines desire to maintain her economic equilibrium, sh cannot act in a manner different from other countri es.

THE PARITY LA W The Parity Law now in force wa pa_sed by the Legislature with the primary object of protecting its revenues, by requirill'l that the liquidation of eu toms duties he made on the ba i of the

o


TAXES AND THE BUSINESS MAN

mint par value of the various units of currency, instead of on the depreciated rates of exchange. If ther:e have been ~. ny 'immediate bad effect:s of this law, those eUEcts have not b ~en prejudicial to the business m en; on the contrary, unscrupulous mer chants have increased tl'--:ÂŁir margin of profits by telling t he public that their high prices are cam:.: ed by the n ew tariff laws. The Special Commit.tee on Taxation is still ,engaged in the study of the burden of taxation which weights upon the various economic classes. This study will certainly prevent the imposition of onerous taxes on bu siness, as well as on other lucrative pursuits. RELUCTANCE TO P.4.Y It se:,e ms to me th2"t the complaint which one healS from businessm011 with regard to t :_eir bemg over burdened with taX;2S is a manife~tation of th 'eluctance on the part of all of us io pay taxes. Anywher.e you '0, you will f ind t.his sentiment ag2jnst the paymmt of taxes pre ~ e It. However, the r e is t be consolation that a new conscience is V:ÂŁI' gradua,lly d veloping. It will manifest itself more d early with t.he pa~sage of t Ime, because it is the ne~e .::,sary count::rpart of the present principIa of taxation,-ability to pay. Civic-mindedness is becoming a more pr onounced characteristic of citizens, and the unwillingness to pay t,g,xes is receding b:dore the advance of this new force in taxaticn. Excellence in tax legislation and perfection in the administrative machinery are of little avail, unlers the community as a whole responds to the ne,eds of its Government. The consciousness on our part that each one of us is contributing to the maintenance of the Government in proportion to our re2.p ective abilities will mak,e our tax system sucCEssful. We should strive to be thus conscious, for we cannot deny that our very welfare and happines~, depend upon the efficient performance of the various public services.

81


THE BUILDERS OF PHILIPPINE CO~n.lITICE

SinceritlJ in Advertising By

P . M. ESCAT Man:.l{)O', I nte; national Adv,ertisin(J Agrncy

Of the innumerable anecdote on the ubject of ad\'erti. ing that ha ~ome to my knowl dge, the one tJ 拢It struck me as more to the poil1t~that de cribes the value of thi .. cience to a tee-i: that about Lou Holland, pre ident of he Holland Engraving om路 pany of K?nsa City, twice International Presid nt of the A,'ociated Ad\'ertLing lub of the World, and known a the' 'best2


SINCERITY IN ADVERTISING

- - -- - - - - -- - - - -

loved man in 'a dvertising", who was offering friendly counsel to a businessman whose plodud was equal to the finest in his line, but whos~ company was being distanced by competitors. The competitors advertised and Lou's friend did not. He argued that his goods were as excellent as human knowledge, skill, and conscience could make them; they had led their field for several decades. Advertising, therefore, would be a useless expense-burden on the busine,ss; and besides, it plainly affronted the old manufacturer's pride to think that, after so long an honorable record, his product should llt2ed self-prai路s e . .-. The usual sound arguments for wise advertising having failed to move his conservative fri.end, Lou Holland resorted to the solvent of humor. "Mr. Blank," he said, "let me illustrate the situation of a man who does not advertise." "He is like a man winking at a pretty gjrl in the dark. He knows what he is doing-but she doesn't." So, there you are, if a business ml;st succeed it cannot Ignore .t he value of adv.eltising as a complement to its sales plans and distribution_ But the advertising should be conducted in such manner and form that it is comprehen~ive, convincing, ethical and sincere. I have路 seen many a w.e ll-planned campa.ign go to shameful waste for lack of sincerity of purpose. For, we must remember, advertising is a subject that necessitates the highest degree of conviction on the part of all those who have something to do with it, and where there is no conviction ther.e can be no sincerity. There is no business, however small or large, that cannot be boosted up by 路p.d vertising of the right sort-of the sort that would win the confidence of the consumer rather than its enmity and antagonism. Until just recently the native population ofthe Islands which consume fully 95% of commodities of local manufacture as well as imported goods has been wary about the claims of some advertisers who do not seem to believe th2.,t consumers have a mind of their own and that they have the power to discern between unbelievable claims and sensible statement of facts. Really, to read some advertisements that have been and are being published in the local media one feels that his intelligence is bejng instated b:~ the claims contained in the ads, claims that 83


I

THE BUILDER' OF PHILIPPINE

O:MMERCE

- - - - - -- - - - - - - - - - - -------- - - ---no logic in the world can posiibly explain-l talon th fa 1. that the goods so advertised cannot, in a million y a1' , support what the advertisers say about them. An impulsive pel'~ on untrained in the ci HC of ad 1't!sing is apt to exaggerate when preparing copy. \V who a1' in the business a a rule make allowance in this l' pect and whil it may be true that much exaggeration is eff ctive, it i al 0 true that a great deal of exaggeration defeats its own PUl'POS . The mo t difficult thing in advert.ising i to get th l' ad l' to believe. And this is more 0 in this country where advel'tising-modern adverti ing-is as yet in it infancy. Frank, fail' and sensible statements are the only afe COUl'S for th advertiser who hop â&#x201A;Ź' to retain publIc confidence in his m rchanclis , trade or profession. Another thing that houid be avoided in preparing copy is what in the trade i known a " rordiness" I t~1at is: languag that covers much spac Qut really c nveys little m aning, a language which is completel, devoid of a~l ~ emblrnce of common sens . Writing copy to merely fill up the pace i so silly, if I may be permitted the u e of the word, that in nine ca e out of t en many so-called adverti ements are nothing but sh e: r wa t of mon .\' for, as Mr. Ramon R. Zamora, chi f of our copy departm nt, aiel in his broadcast over R~. dio Manila in the latt r part of last y ar: "Remember that when an adverti ing space 1. bought in any medium,a it tands at the moment of purcha e, such pac' ha ' no value whatever, and thi i true regardless of the co. t of 'irculation of thB publication. You must bear in mind that wh 11 you pay a certain amount for pace in any medium you -imply disbur e that amount for an opportunity. 'What you make of that opportunity depend on \.vhat you put in the pace.'Reader are sick and tired of eeing ad full of hackn ynl phrase "uch as: "be t in the world"; "ab olutely rual'ant~ d"; "the mo t wonderful bargains"; "come early ane! avoid the I'u h"; "peciaJ ale for 1. days only' '-(and the ale g e. on from January to July if not longer ~) I wish to make it plain that modern ad\'erti ing hould, a: ide

from

orne exception, be conci e and brief.

onci ene . and


SINCERITY IN ADVERTISING

brevity in an adv,ertisement, however. should not be confused with one another. An advertisement may be concise and yet be a long advertisement. At least, some should be owing to their purpose, more so in cases where the object 路a dvertised is of such nature that would nece sitate the educatipQal sort of copy. A writer must perforce extend himself if he wishes to educate his prospect to the use of the article he wants to push. On the other hand, poster advertisement will result in a dismal failure unless it is brief owing to its very nature which makes it necessary that 路't be re-ad at a glance. Considering the cost of space, adv,ertisements must of neces. si,ty be as concise as is consistent with the nature of copy because by all rule of mathematics ten Words will take less costly space than fifty. The copy-writer who can write in fifty words an ad requiring hundreds of words to be understood by the reader is sure an asset to any busines concern. All things being equal, a short ll(essage is likICly to be read by a larg!er group of prospects and more likely to be ~nderstood by the readers. Thus, conciseness in advertisements is a very good thing to bear in mind. Of course, much depends on the kind of product advertised. A golfer contemplat.:ng the purchase of a new set of clubs would almost always prefer to read a more extensive description of the advantages of the sticks he contemp}a.tes purchasing than another man planning the purchase. of, say, a tennis racket. A woman will read a long dissertation about a cosmetic that would keep her cha.rming complexion more charming, whereas the same party will not glance twice on a lent~lY argumentation as to why she would use a cer,t ain brand of 'laundry soap . . 1 am afraid this is getting to be too long, so I must end by saying that 'a .dvertising is just as important to a business as is any of the departments constituting the whole enterprise. Unless you let people know that you sell a certain article it would be futile to expect them to come to 'you for that article. Your comp etitor who los'es no opportunity to beckon his prospects will run away with the business!

85


If THE BVILDERS OF PHILIPPI IE COMlIIEnCE

fointers to filipino Retailers 13)' MIGUEL CUADERNO I', Philippi'll National Bank

Assistant Manag

One day I inquired at a Filipino grocery stOl e for " anka" coffee; they had none of it, I was cUltly told. I inquired in the next store owned by Chinamen, and the latter also did not have it. However, instead of the cold reception that I l'ecei ed in the fir t store, the Chinese salesman took the trouble of finding out why I wanted that kind of coffee and asked me for the name of til manufacturer, assuring me a the same time that he would look for it and if I came back next morning, he would have it ready for me. There you ha 'e an alert hop-keeper, ready to follow up th demand for a certai brand of commodity which he did not have. Inasmuch as he is the only one in ' hat vicinity who now carri s "sanka" coff.~e in stoc I find myse f forced to get the other groceries I need from him 0 save time He did not, I am sure, make it a point to carry a sto k of 'lsanka" coffee for me alon , but it is the thought that if he did so and if I should go ther again, I might buy other things from him besides.

COURTESY Courtesy is the cheapest inve tment that brings unlimited returns. Thel'\8 is perhaps no other human virt.ue which a . hopkeeper shoul~ utilize more than it. And courtesy, coupled with ability to put yourself in the ether person's place and to conside r the matter as it appears to him, or the magnanimity to d ny expression to such of your though a might unnece sarily offend '2. n other, is a little thing which the shcp-keeper has t cultivate extensively if he wishes to dispcse of his merchandise advantageously. Retailers should keep tr.'emselve abreast of the changing condition , both as to style and u e of the commodities they deal in. Some twenty-five )ears ago, CaJl-e Ro ario wa a favorite shopping plaoe of our provincial friends. The retail store on that place catf'r mostly to the needs of our woman and girl folks. They

86


POINTERS TO FILlPINO RETAILERS

carry in store a line of cloths which were then in use. Since then, time has changed, and so did styles and demand. Those who were slow to perceive the change suffered the inevitable and their shops w.ere clo~'e d. Those who were more progr路essive were quick to discern lhe advent of new things and of new desires, new fashions and new styles, and now they are on the top of others. I refer principally to the piece goods trade which has greatly displaced the "por metro" or "por vax'a" trade.

ATTRACTIVE DISPLAY In the way of adV'ertising, the shop-keeper can and should make it a point to make an attractive display of hi.s wares. Quite often, we ar路e attracted to a. store by a very ingenious and charming display of merchandise. W'e are tempted and in nine out of ten chances we buy things in its show windows though we had no intention to do so befor.c. w,e approached or happened to pass by the store. It s'eems that. certain stores have the knack of surpassing others in attract"ng attention and creating desire and buy.ers are led to believe pat such stores always. hav.e new and interesting things on hand. They got to form that favorable idea about those stores and 'ev.entually form a very discriminating opinion in their favor. On the other hand, retail stores that are improperly put up and display continuously old-looking and ill-arranged articles, have the appearance of sle cond-hand shops, and passers-by do not ev.e n take the trouble glancing at them.

OLD STOCK

It is poor policy for a store-keeper to keep for any length of time merchandise which hav路e no or very little demand. It might even be more economical to offer them at reduced prices than to allow them to deteriorate in the shop. In 'a ny ev.e nt, it is poor business to lose interest on the amount invested in it for a con. siderable l.ength of time. It should always be the aim to: keep fresh stock at all times. As regards pricing, while care must he taken to s,ee that overhead and other expenSES are fully covered, it should likewise be borne in mind that a rleputation for charging high prices has ruined many a retail store. Ret.ail stores run by foreigners in 87


THE BUILDERS OF PHILIPPINE COMMERCE

this country seem to h<3. e an understanding as regards pric fixing and this, gentlemen, is something that we ha e to ob ene. CREDIT The matter of credit both of the shop-k 'epers as v" 11 as of the customers also needs careful attention. As in oth r bU'ilY'SS 11terprises, a retail stol 'e-keeper need credit H can establi h it only by the degree of confidence which he i able to inspir," in his creditors. He is usually unable to giv a guaranty for th" credit he seeks to repl€nish his stock. But many a mall ··tienda" keeper is able to obtain on the basis of good chara t'et'. On who has established a fa orable reputation in his communily as 1 gards his commitments will net find it difficult to obtain cr dit. These retail stores have al 0 to grant credit to th il' cu. tomeI's. \'Vhile a great car'e must lJe ob er ed in selling on credit, at the S'3,,rne time a nell studied cr dit policy can and should be .evolved which would 'bring it good sale regularly. You no doubt know it to be an est blishecl eu ' t m among the hin e hopkeepers to 'establish cr dit to many of their cu. tom rs with no other evidence thereof than a few lines written with a pi ce of chalk on a post in the store. It i not hard to xplain this. These intrepid little businessmen,- fol' they are r 2Jly such-mak it a busine s to know their cu tomer, their occupations and ev n th"ir habits. I was greatly amused one day whil I wa buying a box of matches in one of the Chinese stores in San Juan, t.o ee Rev ral women, apparently wiv€ of ordinal' laborer, talking to the Chine e hop-keeper and offering to pay in tallment on a fe\\. cans of milk, some gantas of rice and for dried fi h obtained th week before. T

LOCATIO OF STORE Thel'e is another thing ,,'hich I believe ha contributed to some extent to the failure of many retail stores. I refer to the nece.ity of careful investigation and study of the place where a retail tore i already operating in one place with apparent ucce which i no rea on for other to e tabli h in the arne vicinity un!es , of course, there i enough trade that can be had in it. Thi one thing alone, I r€peat, has cau ed the ruin of many ucce ful bu iness venture in many part of the I land .

88


POINTERS TO FILIPINO RETAILERS

OVER-EXPANSION Another sugg,e stion which I hope you will permit me to offer is the ne1ed of guarding against any undue ov,er-expansion of the retail stores. Many business venturES would still be inexistence to-day w,e re it not for the fact that those responsible for them had gone too far in extending their activities beyond their means, or what was actually justified by market conditions. It should be our aim to find small bnsmess venture gradually increasing their ac~'vities in proportion to actual ne'eds ann as their own resources and reasonable credit facilities will permit, gradually and conservatively attaining a position of safety and stability which is a guaranty for growth. PATRONIZE HOME INDUSTRIES Another thing which I believe desc~:V'es the careful consideration of our Filipino retailers is the matter of patronizing homemade products. They can and should do much to foster their use and consumption. I shall not dwell extensively on the country's need of producing commodities which we now have to buy from other countries. Filipino retailers and local producers can cooperate in the matter of conquering local prejudic'e against local products and one of the things they must both do is to put those commodities for sale at reasonabl,e competitive prices. WIÂŁ; should all hope for the day when our retail stores will be handling largely home-made products. Such 'a n eVle nt would put them in a much better position in reference ,t o r:etailers of other nationalities. After all, Filipino retailers are in many casles at a disadvantage 'as regards their .competitors of other nationalities in the handling of commodities imported by compatriots of the latter.

89


THE BUILDERS OF PHILIPPINE COMlIfE:tCE - - - - ----------

â&#x20AC;˘

Busine ss Ethics By

FR. SERAPIO TAMAYO, O. P. R ector, U n i 1'e r ~ ity of . . to . Tom6...s

REV.

Ethics in general comprehends those moral principl â&#x201A;Źs, that are inherent to natural reason, and which are naturally known to every man, who enjoys a normal and sound mind. Natural reason teaches us to do what is right, and to avoid wrong actions. As the goldeh rule has it "we muBt never do t o tllers, 'w hat we don't want othel's do to us' '. These and other similar principles are the solid foundati on of every man's moral conduct in all his human actiYitie .

90


BUSINESS ETHICS

In the light of those principles, we must govern all our actions, in regard to society, public authoriti.es, rights of pl'op er ty, life and any other kind of rights of our fellow creatuIlCs. Confining now our consideration to Business E thics, we can say that in its moral aspect, it is derived from that part of justice, nam ed commutative', which commands to r,ecognize and f1â&#x201A;Źs-r;e::t the rights either of private individuals or of partie~ . Business ethics may be considered from the part of busin.::ss men, business contracts or transactions, or from any kind of good:! or: prop.erty involved in business dealings. As to business men, ethics 11fquire h om them a constant dh.lposition to be always fai r, jmt and loyal in their dealings with their clients or customers . This is a sterling quality that every business man must posse.:.s , if he is to ,e njoy a good credit that is paramount to success in busincs Sl. Business contracts, be they in writing or simply verbal, must be drafted in simple, open and transparent words, in such a way mat there be not place ro:r: misunders andings or mistak,e8, that might misl,â&#x201A;Źad client3 or a l ET paJl't.ies. Finally, the business man must be UPl"igflt, sincere and honest in all his dealings with his CLl'E;tomc::rs, so that he may c:;nvey to them the, conviction .that they will never t.e deliberately deceived or defrauded in their transactions. Due to lack of business ,e thics, very often clever business men . work their own failur<~ . Their ambition to hecome rich overnight, by any means, leads them to the loss of all their credit and confidenee on the part of t.heir costumers. Their avarice cause mi'Ele'ry, A Va1"US i'jJsemi8B/'i(Le causa es.t sua,e. The thirst for gold makes some business men not to cOllSli der if the means they employ to enrich themselves are right or wrong. To them could be applied the words 9f the Roman poet Virgilius, when he says: ...... Quid non mortalia pectora cogis Auri sacra fames (Ean. III-58) But the general rule is, that ordinarily those busines's, men succeed, who strictly obs1e'l've business ethics with their clients and a fair play in all their dealings; because in busineSl.3J as well as in any other profession, we can say that "honesty is the best policy." 91


THE BUILDERS OF PHILIPPINE COM MER E - - - - - - - - - - - - - - -- -

- - -- -- - -

---

The Methods of E portillg Philippine Tobacco By VI TORIO EST AR Philippine t cbacco has <~ h'eady attained a plac in th ,orld' markle ts. The Philippine Government, in its efforts to d 'v- lop the industry and to maintain and open n ew mal'k ~ t abroad, ks to improve the quality of leaf tobacco and it manufactul'es through the propel' enforcement of the provj ions of Act No. 2613 and it , aIDe ndments togetber with the ules and r gulations iss\.: d th 1"und 1'. According to this law, tobacco reaches the market in th f orm of leaf, or in the form of manuf?ctul'ed or partly manufactUl"'ed tobacco produ CLA. ' 'IF! " TION

Leaf tobacco is cla ~ified a folow : (a) Origin.-Isabela, agayan, La nion, Nu va Ecija, gasinan, llocos, and Gebu.

an-

(b) L ngth of l eaf.-Fir t class must hav3 a length of not less than 42 centimeters; seccnd clas.':., not les than" centirr. tIS; third class, not less than 23 02ntimeters; fourth class, not I s that 16 centimeters; and fifth class, less than 16 centimeter. Leaf tobacco can be manufactured into two forms: tandaJ'(\ cigars and the standard cigaJ:',zttes. To be classed as tandard. cigars must be manufactured under sanitary condition from geod, clean, s'e lected tobacco, propzr1y cured and eawned, of a crop which ha been harvested at least six months, exc1u ively tne pi 0duct of the Province of Cagayan, Isabela or Nueva Vizcaya. There are two ,grades of tandal'd cigarettâ&#x201A;Źs, known, re pecLi\' Iv a â&#x20AC;˘. standard" and "selected" cigarettes. To be cia sed as tandards, the cigarettes must be manufactured from good, clean tobacco, properly cured and ea on ed.

AMPLE A TD l~ ~ PE TION ections 13 and 14 of Admini trative rdel' ~o. 3:- of the Collector of Internal Revenue, dated ~Iarch 1, 191 , require that 92


THE METHODS OF EXPORTING PHILIPPINE TOBACCO

a manufactureT diesiring to export cigars or cigarettes to the United Sta,tes shall furnish the Collector of Internal Revenue with not less than ten cigars of each brand of cigars and fifty cigarettJes of each brand of cigar,ettJesl they desire to export. Said manufacturers shall likewiSi8i provide in their factories a sample case capable of holding at l,e ast five cigars of each brand of cigars submitted for approval and tw~nty-five cigarettes of e3Jch brand of cigarett'es submitted for approval, said caEie to be provided with a hasp and hinges f3Js:tened from the inside, capable of being s.ecuY18'ly r;;cked with a padlock. When the tobacco products offered for approval shall hav,e peen finally acoepted, the manufacturer will be advised of tha.t fact and five cigars and twenty-five cigarettes of each brand will be filed in the sample cas.e of the factory, and the rlemaining cigars: and cigar,e ttes of each brand accepted will be fiLed in .the samp1e case of, the Bureau of Internal Revenue. The cigars and cigarettes in the sampl'e case of the Bureau of Internal RI8venue will be uSied for primary ref.erence, and those in the cas'e at the factory will be used by the inspector for secondary referencle. In the case of shipment of tOb8.,CCO products other than by mail, the manufacturer or exporter shall submit a sworn deelaration in which he ,s hall state that the tobacco products coverled by the declaration are standard, within the definition of the terms containe'd in those regulations. This declaration shall constitute " and the manufacturer's or lexporter's application for inspection, must he in the hands of the CoHector of Internal Revenuea.t least seventy-two houIis prior to the advertised hour of shipment, exoept when, in the opinion of the CoUector of Internal R'2.venue, Siufficient reasons lexist for accepting shorter notice of the intended shipment. No inspection will be made m'o re than ten days in advance of the intende1d shipment, and in case an inspected shipment is, fO'r any rea,son, held in Manila ov,er ten days aft'2<r inspection, the Collector of Internal R'ev,e nue will cause such reexamination to he made as may be necessary to asC!ertain whether any deterioration has s'et in. In case of deterioration, the manufacturer must recondition the cigars and have a reins,pection made. Whene,~er a manufacturer offers a lot of tobacco products for inspection 'a s required which do not conform .to, the standard


of the approved sampLes, all cigar of the same hape in the lot offered for ins~ction will be rejected until such time as they shall have been brought up to said standard, at which time they shall agajn be presented for inspection. T11e inspection f e are due for each inspection and reinpection made.

STAMPS AND LABELS Manufacturers and lexporters shall make a requisition upon the Collector of Internal Revenue for the standard labels ne ded by them, and shall keep a record of the number rec iv d and used. The stock on hand must, at all times, equal the differ n between the number received and expended. Said labels shall be affixed to the package prior to pre. entation for inspection, as shall also the internal-l'8VenUe stamps and other marks required by the United State Internal Re enue regulations. Th insp ctor shall inspect t}1../~ contents of uch number of packages a shall be deemed nece sary to etermine wether th lot offered fOl) inspection conform to th\ e tablish-3d standard. Th face alue of internal-revenue tamps destroy d by the inspector in openin packa.ges for this purpose, and upon their destruction, stamps on cigars that are Defused shipment to the United State will be r funded. Cigars and cigarette, aft-er having been duly lamped and labeled,\ are ready for export.

PREPARI TG SHIPMENT Leaf tobacco for export, before shipment, is packed, in bal s containing varying quantities of the product according to the COl1"enience of the exporter. Bales ent to the nited tatEs or olher foreign countries a1"'8 further cover.Ed with a vecond wrapper of suitable material. The bales mu t be ecurely bounci with trong, suitable binder. om pact tandard bales or export packages f leaf tobacco a1 made by mean of a mechanical pre s installed in the warehou_e of packer. Cigar and cigarette for exports, unlike the unmanufactured leaf tobacco a1 e placed in packages and boxz 1'e p dively. Then they are fUlther placed in big boxes suitable for the purpose.

r4


THE METHODS OF EXPORTING PHILIPPINE

TOBACCO

Upon receipt of t.he ord'3r from foreign buyer, the local exporter shall prepare the export invoice covering the shipment. Such ,e xport invoice must contain the name of t he ship on which goods will be transport.ed from Manila to the port of d estin atior~, date of departure from Manila, place and name of consignee, number and kind of goods shipp'sd, name of the car riel¡, and the name of the manufacturer or exporter. The goods to be exported must also appear in the bill of lading which also shows the description and quantity of the cargoes. The bili of lading and th'8 invoice are usually prepared in quadruplicate, one for the exporter, one for the carri'sr, one for the Bureau of Customs and one to accompany the goods upon delivery to the consignâ&#x201A;Ź'e. Shipment of leaf tobacco or its manufactures i:; also made to the ag.ents of the local exporters or through the intervention of commercial brokers in the plac'e of shipment or in th e place f)f destination. TENDER OF PAYMENT

The usual practice followed by the local exporters in collecting the cost of tobacco products shipped to a fo r eign agent who is under his 'employ, or to for.eign customers, is t o accept banks' draft payable within 90 days or 120 days. Letters of credit may he also acceptable if it is guaranteed by a certain bank. If the price of the product ,e xported is made in foreign currency, ample allowance should be made in the rat3 at which conversion is effected for all possible fluctuations in 'exchang,e. In such cases an exporting concern should propose that invoice totals shall be converted into the desired CUrl'ency at the day's rate of exchange ruling at the time the shipmEnt is made.


THE BUILDERS OF PHILIPPI E

Merchandising Rules for Retailers By L. R . AGUINALDO Owner and Manag e-r of ilL. R. Aguinaldo" ( Sp e,er;h de livel'(; d be/orc th e R etailer ConventIon F ebruary 15, 1933) ,I

Ladies and Gentlemen: I am glad that this convention has been organized because it shows 'a growing intel'est on the part of the Go ernment of the importance of retail merchandising in our economic trucLure. It is a happy idea and I hope that it will bear fruit in th form of greater Filipino participation in retail trade. I am noL antifOl' ''ign, but it has always eemed to me that their predominance in our system of r etailing constituiJes a loud challenge to our}J opJe to go into this type of bu ines8. In the same way that the Filipino have accepted <: nd met simi} l' challenges in oth l' lin of 'end eayor I am confide that the d y is not far distant wh n \' n in t his business acti lit r our peo )le shall have recover d lost ground and proved them lve competent to handl it. Whether your store is small or big there al'e C2 路tain pl'indpl 's in retail merchandi ing which apply equally and which must b observed if success is to be 'ttained. From my own experi nc" and ob ervation a a 1 etail merchant I have come to th apPL:!ciation of each of these factors and I want to pass th m on to you in the hope that they may be of similar use in the operation and improvement of your individual busine s. CLEANLINESS I hall begin with a yery simpl e factor but yet so simple that it is many times overlooked by owners of "sa1'i- a1'i" stores. I refer to cleanliness. Every tore should try its best to attract customers but no amount of effort can overcome the f ~e ling of aver ion " 'hich one genel ally has for an unclean and in an ita l""}' 'establishment. If tore which do not sell food tuff employ every mean to ke ep their premi e clean how much more nece. sary i it for a l 'etai1 tablishment like mo t of yours where a large part of the producLs sold are for human consumption. If your store 96


l\1~~CHANDlSING RULES FOR RE'fAILERS

is iruanitary yOU( may get seme busimss which is forced to go your way for some reas :m or other-perhaps because of cl'editbut ke~p it clean and you do get not only the business which comes to you that way but more, It is human nature to prefer trading under clean and whole some environm ents to doing so in insanitary places. My first suggestion then is to s-ee that your store is kept d ean all the time . Unsightly spots in anq !ll'oupd the store should be eliminated and the ceilings, walls and fixtuI-es should T5e free from soot and should preferably ' be p9-intEd if possible. T'ake, away !every semblance of dirt and win the confidence of your customers as to the cleanlir:.::ss of the goods you sell. As a corollary to my first point I wish to bring out the need for k€'eping the store shelvEs and counters neat, orderly and presentable. A store in this l'es]:?ect is very much like a maiden who muSit be dress·ed up to win admirers. Any effort us'ed in a 1'., ranging stock, displaying merchandise properly 2"nd ke ~ pin~ th~ store as a whole orderly l 'epresent a good inv'estment i}! tim€! and effort which is invariably re paid in increased sales. This is particularly true of merchan<iiis'8 which are not ge}!er8.11y asked for by customers. Arranging and displaying in a retp.il store is an art which should be cultivated by every stor.e operator. Upon this factor many times depends whether a certain line of m 2Tchandise is sold or- not. LOCATION The next point I want to discuss with you is that of location, So many owners establish their .stores ~or their own p.ersonal conv,enience rather than for the Iconveni,e nce of the business 01' of their customers. That we don't see 'a ny Chinese . sarisari store in an out of the way plac·e is patent proof that the Chinese study and plan for the location of their stores. Good location naturally costs more because it is worth more and many times it is more economical to pay the higher rent than to save 11ent in a poor location which brings very little business, Don 't go into this business half heartedly. This is a field where competition is keen and to be successful .ill: it lOU must be equal in every respect with your competitors,

91


TIlE BDILDEiC OF PIIILIPPI E COM ~IF.!l('E

SALESMANSHIP Another very important point which retail l' anywher cannot overlook is salesman hip. Contl'atry to what ome p~ pI mn.\ think of it salesmanship requires not only lmovd路e dg , training', exp~rience and a broad under tanding of human natur but al J poi~ and per onality which can command th r peet and confidence of customers. In cleanlines and in al man hip I il1cerely believe that we Filipinos cannot only equal but also mpass our foreign competitors. These for igner are indu triou , hardworking and know thEir bU~l11es. . Yet there is much room for improvement on their part when it come to leanlin . and sal manship. This is no tin~c for m to dis us with you at. I ngth the intI'icate alld varied phase of a1 smamhip but all J want to 8a~' i ~ that if you want Lo h uc:c ful in ret.ai) m rchandisin~: YOll O\\'> it to yourself to pra.c ice the fundamental pI' cepts of gocd s 11jng, There are people in the retail u iness who b caUE; ~ of th i r temp 1 ament Hnd lack 0 the fundam ntal quaJiti of a goed sal sman have no place in ()Ul' retail true ure. A good alesman mllsl net only be pleasant but should know his good and know hi cqstcmel's. We should n-ever lose ight of the fact that custom J'S h<'vc the f:~te of OLlr busin ss in their hand and t.'lat w' .IJGt lei always try and enc1eavur to plea e them by all mean

KNOWLEDGE OF B SINE I 'hall now lake liP the factors which I heli v have contributed lal'gely to the ucces of foreign retailer. h r in our 'ountry. In the fir t place we must admit that they know how to operate thflir bu ine . In the econd place I believe their thrift must be given credit and then we hardly need to mention th ir wellknown chal'acteri tic: industry. Knowing how to run one' bu in~s take up about, 90 p r cent of surCE> s. rndel' thi we would naturaJl~' think of advantageous buying, of ound elling policies, of the maint nance of competitiY(> prices, of a reputation for hone! ty and. quare cieaJ, of prop l' keeping of; ~to('ks, of a . uitable y tem of accountjng adapted to th bll ines , be icie of COUl'se thE> factoI', which I hav> already d i 'ell ,ed. If \n ruudyze til rec rd of 1 tail bu. i TlC' .

s.


MERCHANDISING RULES FOR RETAILERS

failures we will pI'obably see that in nine cases out of ten such failures have be'en due to the fact that the person who managed it did not know how to run the business properly. Here again it is not possible for me to go with you 'at any great length in th e discussion of the probJiems and the methods pertaining to the proper conduct of a retail business. All I can do is to urge you to keep on preparing yourselv'e s for the job you have in your Iumds and always to strive to improve .\Tour business and your m ethods nIl the time. ~

THRIFT ~ost of us are not ,~ ndGw,ed with unlimited resoqr<;-es and capital to UE'e in our bu iness, This mcallS that if we ar~ to expand our business such an expansion must come from our efforts and from the fruits of our, own business. Thrift alone and the proper conservation of our individual r esources can lead us to any growth to which we may aspir£>. It is thrift which makes possibh' the growth of our b.usines ill f11l0St C:1ses, Let us not Eat up our profits nor squander them extravagantly even if we al' 8 making headway, Let us put back part or all our profits in the business which r€quil'e~, perhaps more than in most other types of busmess, clcse attention and supervision, up-to-the-minute activity, long hours of work, and in short, industry. There is no plac·e in the business for the man who wants to have an easy time. He must be up and doing eVlery minute of the day at the store during store houl'~. ~ompetition is keen and is changing almost constantly. Customers must be serv'ed equally if not better than they are being sEl'ved by our competitors. All this means work, 'Gl•.nd more work, I am sure that those of you who have been in the Petail business by any lengt:l of time have found this to be true.

Retailing does not necessarily have to be small busineEs, We have many examples right i:'ere in our midst of retail business tha.t have risen to towering heights, to convince us: that it can be a big business the same as any other. But first of all we must kno'w how to conduct a retail business ~nc1 E1econd we must be prepared to fight its battles.

99


THE BUILDERS OF PHILIPPI E COM MER E

- - - - - - - - - - - - - - ---- - -KEYSTONE OF DISTRIBCTIO From the point view of ollr national e~onomic trllcture l'e~ tailing occupies a prominent position becau e it i the key t Ollt' upon which our entire distribution ~ ystem rests. The r railer, as the last link in the chain of di tribution from producer to COllsumer, is in a posit.ion of power and influence not only in determining what must be produced but what could be consumed. The reiailer 01 modern times has a lremendoll influence lIPOll the trends and tE'ndencies of h'lInan wants, lik sand dislik s, preferencEs and idio. yncracies. I am sure that, as our peo11Je come to the realization of its true imporiance, t.hey will turn their attention more and more to thi type of uusil1'ess. \\ e \ ho are gathered here to-day carry i h us not only the responsibility for the success of OUi' private Lu in ss but also for th prop r start and demonstration to our people that Filipinos can, the sam \ as any other national't " mastel', and e'\:ceJ in, retail m rchandi ,mg.

)

100


FOREIGN TRADE FOR THE FIRST FIVE MONTHS INDICATES

Foreign Trade for the First Five Months Indicates Hopeful Signs By PERFECTO RIVERA H c.'ld Tariff and Finance, Sa vicE' The foreign trade of the Philippines for the first five months of the year has regi,sterled an increase of 1>9,321,570 oVler that of the "corresponding period of last year. This is a healthy sign and may he taken a further evidence that the Philippine foreign trade is gradually picking up. The Islands had a total foreign trade of P170,065,425 during the period, compared with P160,743,853 for the same period of 1932. The exports alone totalled 1>109,811,309 in value, as again t P91,332,398 for last year, or an incr,e ase of 1>8,478,911, while the imports were valued at 1>60,254,114, as compared with P69,411,455, or a decr'ease of 1>9,157,341. ExpresE)~d in another way, the exports have increased by over 9 per cent while the imports have dropped by about 15 per cent.

CUSTOMS COLLECTIONS There is, besides, a fa.vorable balance of trade for the Islands amounting to 1>49,557,195 during the period under peview. Last y,e ar, for the same period, the favorable balance only totalled P21,9~0,943 . The big decrease noted in the import trade shows that the country has been spending less for foreign goods this yea,r than it did last y.ear. Beneficial as this might seem to the country, yet it had the effect of Deducing the amount of duties and other fees paid by imported goods. From January to May 1933, inclusive, Philippine customs coUections totalled P5,917,892, as against 1>8,641,235 for the corresponding period of last yearJ or a drop of P'2,723,343. DuUahl,e goods that entered the country during this fivemonths period constituted 38.4 per cent, and, the duty-free imports 61.6 per cent. Last year during corresponding period, the figures w,ere 35.4 per cent and 64.6 per c'ent, respectively. Duty101


THE BUILDER~ OF PHILIPPI E COMMER E

free goods mostly came from the United State by yil'tu of the free-trade relation existing betwec:n that country and the Philippines, EXPORT TRADE The Unit2d States absorbed 0 er 90 per ent of the total sports of the Philippines as compc?red with about 7 p l' ent h imported from us during the same month of h:. st year. Thes figUl '::! are l'epreEented by P39,779,8Z7 and P79, 39,2 9, l' V ctively. The export trade, however, to Spain, Japan, and GreatBritain-all grea.t consumer of Philippine product - ha d clilled considerably, To Spain the Philippin s shipped P2,;390,710 worth of native products, as comparEd with "-.3,3' ,1,3' 1 worth she exported last year, or a decrea of P943,521; to Japan, P2,11l,26;' as :>..gainst n,981, 928 or a decr ase of P870,665 and to 11' nt Britain P1,163,734 as agains Pl,255,613 or a decrease of P90 ,121. A slight incl'eas was not d in the French imports from the Philippines, but th_ t tal export irade to that countr is n gLgivVe exported to' France during the period under con id 'l'able, tion P785,654 worth 0 native good , as against N .c! 2,223 for th ~2_ me period of last yea ., 01' an inCl sase of P3,1: ,431. SUGAR EXPORTS But big as is the increa~e of the exports over that for lh cOl'pesponding period of last year, yet this was mainly du to th large hipm::!nts of sugar th t beat all prGviou l' cords, Til sugar exports from January to May, inclusive, totalled 718,l;J:l,009 kilcs, a against 501,263,075 kilos for the sam period in 1932. Last May, alone, the export 2.<YC'l'â&#x201A;Źgat:ed 167,96 ,152 kilos, compared vvith only 50,237,17 kilo for the same month of last year. Of the total value of the export cf the Philippines during thi fixe-months period, over 75 per cent is for sugar, repr .- ented by P 2,616,596; about 6 pel' cent i for COCOUllt oil, rep res nted by P6,' 06,174; 41;2 per cent for copra, repre _nted by P:),049,23 ; 2,bout 4 per cent for abaca fiber Manila hemp), repre' ilLed by P4,239,997; about 3 per cent for tobacco and tobacco products, l'epl'e~ented bJi P'3,75 ,:-66; about 11 ~ per CEllt for embroideries, l'epreented by P1,7 ,2 6; and about 1 per cent for de~iccated coconut, reprEs-2 nted by PI 1 ,695. With the excep-

1 2


FOTIEJ(i_ T TRADE FOR THE FIRS'!' FIVE MOl TITS

L 'DICA1'ES

tion of sugar and copra that made each 'a n incr.eas'e of P22,248,603 and P1,631,311, respectively, all the products just named registered a decrease compared with the cOl'l'esponding figure.s of last year. Coconut oil exports dropped from P7,i81,144 to P6,306,174; 'a baca, from P4,863,239 to P4,239,997; tobacco and tobacco products, from '5,926,835 to P3,750,566; embroideries from 1>2,521,485 to 1>1,700,206; and desiccated coconut, from 1>1,166,010 to '1,108,695. All of these indicate that, .economically speaking, the sugar-producing areas in the Islands are much ~ter off at prese:R't than the rest of the country. But thes'e w.ere not the only export commodities that registered 'q decrease during the period under review. The exports of lumber and timber, copra meal, cordage, hats, molasses and sirup, knotted hemp, canton fiber, maguey and vegetable lard have all dropped compqred with the corresponding export figuroes of last year. Among the few however, that indicate an oposite tendency and which re~istered a slight increase are pearl buttons, cutch, including chemicals, drugs, dye, 'etc., buntal hats, and gums and resins.

QUOTATIONS RISING The statistics for May, the last month of the p.eriod under review, indicate considerable improv,e ment in the market conditions of some of the principal staples, which may mean that an upswing in business may be in sight. Several commoditioes have registered rising mark.ct values, notably sugar, abaca, maguey and rice. At this writing it is also said that copra is following suit. The exports of sugar, abaca, maguey, copra, desiccated coconut, copra., meal, cordage, hats bun tal fibers, gums and resin, cutch, and lmottoed hEmp are much larger than those for the same month of last year. The total foreign trade for the month was valued at P39,526,409, as against 'p2,888,325 for the same month in 1932.

IMPORT TRADE In the Philippine import trade, Japan is among the few foreign countries ""hos1e exports to the Islands registered an increase. She shipped to these Islands during the period under 103


THE BUILDER

OF PHILIPPINE COMMER E

review goods value at P6,914,183, c0mpared with 1"5,512,774 for Itl t year" or an increase of P1,401,409. On th other hand, import from the United States dropped from P44,024,682 fo last year to P26,628,729 of this year; tho~e from hina, from P4,608,6-12 to P4,135,870; those from Germany, from P3,360,904 to P2,:"23,fl90; and those fFom Great Britain, from P2,311,629 to P1,9 9 415. With the exception of India rubber and its manuf~'­ tures, rice and t£ather and its man u fa c t u l' e s, all the leading articles imported into these Islands have de lin d. Contrasted to last year's figurEs, cotton goods imports w nt from P15,029,860 to P13,744,005; iron and steel and their manufa tUl'e , from P8,250,113 to P6,828,788; mineral ils, from P 1,7 0.'194 to P3,437,618; dairy products, from P2,383,8-15 to P'2,227,008; silk and its manufactures, from fi' ,376,85'- to P'2,209,541; pap l' and its manufactures, from P2,121,882 to P2,096, 27; automobil s, from Pl,784,767 to Pl,672,775~ wheat flour, from P2,2 8,43:3 to P1,649,722; fibers and their manufactur , from P2,106,9¡1 to P1,593,225; electric I achinery, apparatu~le and appJianc s, from P2,093,637 to P ,(511,432; ch micals, drug, dy s, and m eliciLes, from P1 ,806,217 to '1,43 ,79 ; tobacco and tobacco produ t , from P2,432,204 to Pl,350,427; v getables, from PI,. 47,783 to P1,334,201; fertilizerS I from P1,799,705 to P1,193,215; fruits and nuts, from P1,115,589 to PI,109,360; meat products, from Pl,411,468 to P1,015,887; fish and fi h product, from P9:32,25:.. to 91,4L The few products that regi tel'ed an incr a e '.'" 1'e: India rubber and its manufactures, 'which 1'0 e from P920,217 of la t year to P1,078,182 of thi year; rice which jumped from P;~51,574 to "382,346; and l-eather and it manufacture \ hich w nt from P825,231 to P848,402. DUl'ing the month of May, however, a turn for the bett r i noticeable in the import trade. All the following Jin weI' imported in much bigger quantities than la t year during C01"l'e ponding period: Iron and teel and their manufaciur s, dairy products, paper and it manufactures, automobile, fiber. and their manufacture electrical machinery, apparatuse and appliancE , chemicals, drug and dye Yegtable. fertiizer , fruit. and nut.', India rubber and its manufacture meat proriucts, fi hand fi h product and leathEr and it manufacture. 1 1


Biogrdphical .Schetc-h es dnd

PictUl\es of ,jLeading Businessmen


T HE BULCERS OF PH ILIPPINE

OMMERCE

LEOPULJ)O R. -\GL'I"

LllO

Pr.£S J[J[.; /'{T

Mitsui

L. R. , IYl/ i ou/rio

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VI CENTE ALBERTO PROPR IETOR

Palace F ilm E f

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106

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TIm BUILDERS OF PHILIPPINE COM}.ILERCE AGUINALDO, LEOPOLDO R P' e/;i<lent. L. R. Aguiltaldo

Born N0vember 15, l 88S, Sta. Cruz, Manila, 50n of Ahastacio and Marce.· cela RaIne,s : 11l:'!,rri':ld to Andrea del Rosario; has thr'2e sons.; member, Club Fi·, lipino, Club Tbfo al Blanco, Phi lippLH! Columbian A ssociation, Black Cat and Japan clubs. Took his first letters in a private school; ~rades leading .to It. A., Enrique Mendiola college and Liceo de Manila; textile engineer, Higher Technical School, Nagoya, Japan. In the Philippines, wil'h associates, bought textile machinery and formc::d films; incorp01'ated The Philippin e re t & Braid Mfg. Co,; later establishJ , ~d own importing fil:m; which J1e sti ll dIrects. Now quite sucC12ssful, has a wide range rOf business; a civil leader among his peopl£'. Pl'esident Luzon Surety Co.; director, Manil a Railroad Co., and Manila Hotel Co. Had been pr'2silent, Philippine Chamber of Commel'ce; director, Philippine Carnival AssocatlOn and Associated Cha;rities of Manila ; member, Baguio Chamber of Commerce. President, L. R. Aguinaldo, one of the biggest aepa,rtment stores in the Philippines.

ALBERTO Y ARA ULLO, VICENTE G. P ?,'CJ pr'etor, Palace F i m E x chang e; Born April 20, 1878, Manila, son of Severino a ild Irene Araullo; married to Yvonuie Grenie; has seven childr.ell. Attended College of San .Juan de Letla:l and the Univcl~s ity of Santo Tomas, g:raduated in IJ ommeLc c, later in Pharmacy; m:lnaged l"armacla Ori ental; afterwa,rd, Central Drug Store. F ounded Lux Theater, ] 910; built' Palace Theater 1924. Owns and 111anag>eR, Pala ce FIlm Exchange. Bui:.t Ritz Theater in 1931; served as p.·esident, Philippine National Import and Export Co.; Vice-President, La Pl'evisora Filipina. Member, Philippine Chamber of Commerce and La !\ss c.~ iacion de Propieta l'i03 de Manila. Traveled ab .. .oad extensively.

AIO ZO, HERMOGE rES President, H. Alon21o & Company

, I

Born December ]2, 1885, San Miguel, Manila, S011 of Julian and Ro: mualda Dula.; married to Valen;;i i1a _\.ranzaso ; has five children; member, Dalisay Lodge No. 14, Tiro a;1 Blanco, Philippi112 Cham~er of Comm€,r ce. He is self-mad!). J)uring hi ,> boyh c,oct he wOlked hard for a few penollies a day in a hat factory to learn. He went in business, and as capital he had only ambition and knowledge. Now his stoll a, which deals in men's furnishings', linen piece goods and fine hats, is one of the best known stores in Maliila.

107


THE B UILDER

OF PH ILTPPI TE COMl\HDCE

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HUBERT C. AN] 'EH 0 GEXERAL MAN AGER

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WILLIAM HART ANDER 0_~IA. · AC :. -c TilllECT()R

PRESlDEXT

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THE BUILDERS OF PHILIPPINE COMMERCE ALUNAN, RAFAEL R.

President, Philippine Sugwr Association Born December 16, 1885, Talisay, Occidental N egros, son e,f Raymundo and Josefa Rivas; ma,rried to Asuncion de la Rama; has six children; member, Negros Golf & Country Club, Tiro al Blanco de Manila, Philippine Columbian Associati on, Wack Wack Golf & Country and Baguio Golf and Cc,untry clubs. WW Attended San Jose Coll ege, OccId ental -egros; Ateneo de Manila, Commercial :",chool, IVlanila; La J ul'isprudencia, Manila; and was admitted to the bar, Sept:<!mber, 1910. Membâ&#x201A;Źlr , Philippine Assembly, 1912-16; member and I loor leader, Hou s.;:! of Representatives, 1916-22; appointed Sc::cretary c.f Agriculture and Natural Resources, September 6, 1918; and Se(~,retal"y of Finance, 1933. President and manager, Bacolod-Murcia Milling Co., Inc., 1920-28; president, Philippine Sugar Association, 1923-33; member, Philippine Mission tc the UllIted c.:tates to prol1)ote agricult:u.ral and economic development of the I slands and to attend h earing, congressional committees held on th::! proposed revision of the tariff aff<!cting Philippine trade.

ANl'ERSON, MAJOR WILLIAM

P'r'csident,

n.

'illiarn H. And rson & Company.

Born in Ohio, Ohio, U. S. A _, in 18721 Graduate of the U. S. Military Academy, 'Nest Point'. Engaged in engineering work. Assistant Manager, Pacific Oriental Trading Co.; was promoted to manager, later o,rganized \~ illiam H. Anderson Co. One of the owners, Luzon Sugar Co.; president, Erlanger & Galinger Inc, Dellegate f,rom the Philippines to the Democratic National Convention, United States, in 1924-. Member, Elks (past' exalted Ruler of Manila Lodge), Army & Navy, Manila Polo, Manila Golf and Bagu~a Country Clubs.

ANDERSON, WILLIAM

P?'esident and Gelneml M,anager, L eyte Asphalt Mineral Oil Co. Born AplI'il 24, 1876, Copenhagen, son of Christopher and Elizabeth Christopherson; married to Remigia Diaz, has tow chiMren; member, Eagles and Lawton Post No. 27, Vetâ&#x201A;ŹlI'ans of Foreign Wars. His schooling was limite d, but through hard wOirk and systematic saving he is now pioneer in the Philippine Asphal,t industry. He was the organizer of the Leyte Asphalt Mineral Oil Co., and its president and general manager. It was he who built the Tac~::lb an and Cebu wharves, the Plaridel Rridge of) Pangasinan, and many roads, bddges all over the Islands. He was known as "'the most efficient government contractor."

109


THE BUILDE l~

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OF PH ILIPPI

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THE BUILDERS OF PHILIPPINE COMMERCE - - - - - -- - - - - - - - ANDREAS, H. R. P11esi ctent ,rend Mamag er, Pam panga B us Co.

Born A ugustJ 24, 1876, Pennsylvania; married to J essie Symelar; has one daughter; Mason, Elk; member, Army & Navy c1ltib; Colonel, U. S . .A.r my Reserve Corps. Finished his high school in South Carolina; enrolled in the Unive rsity of Pennsylvania as a medical student; joined tha army and was commi sioned second IlCutenant. HOl'llc,rably discharged from the Army, he t . aveled; and in Camarines &aI', engaged and made good in coconut plantatio.1 bu simss . Organized the Pampanga Bus Co . in San Fernando, Pampanga, whi ch 'i s now ,th e greatest trallsportation company in Luzon, if not in the whole Islands.

APPLEGATE, WILLIAM L. P?'esident, Lut;on Sbev edoring Co.

.... ~

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Born January 2, 1816, Wes,tfield, N. J., U. S. A., son of William L. and Mary l!:liza.beth t'irmit'l!e; married to N elb Rutan, has on e son; member, Elks, Uni\TIersity, Manjla Polo, Manila Golf, Wack \'Vack Golt & Cc.w1try, Manila and Casino Espanol clubs. Educated i'n the public schoolls of N e\ Jersey; became associated with the great Guggerheim mining and smelting business until 1912; came to the Philippines as secretary-treasurer for the Colorado Mining Co. Later he joined the Luz.cill. Ste\TIedoring Co. as secretary-treasurer, and in 1928 became president of the corporati!)n. President, Manila Terminal Co., al~J a member, Board of Directors, Peoples Bank and Trust Co. Owns t :ld operabes the Visayan Stevedoring & TranspoLTtatic.n Co. in Iloilo whicn has a brancil at-fica in Davao. He is part owner, Cebu Stevedoring Co. in Cebu.

ARAMBULO, PRIMO Prop?'ieto1' and Manag e')', Borrica Insular

Born June 9, 1884, Santa Rosa, ,Laguna, son IC.f Jose and Lorenza Capucilino y Alojado; marri<ad to Loreto Sevilla; has three children; president, Cil'culo Escenico; member, Philippine Chamber of Commerce and Colagio Medico-Farmaceuhco; vice-pTesident, Philippine Pharmaceutical Associaton. Began his ea:rly studies in his home town; finished his secondary course and pha.rmacy at the Licea de Manila; and Lli. B. degTee at the Universidad Rizal (Escuela de Derecho of the late Don Felipe Buencamino). Experienced a hard struggle, but with the help and cooperation of his wiÂŁe he ultimately won; his preparations, kY/JalgiTha, Hemaltona, Me..1tronina, etc., are well known for their effectiveness, not lonly in fche islands but also in foreign countries.

111


TH E BUILDERS OF PHILIPPI E CO M ~IER CE ., .

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112


THE BUILDERS OF PHILIPPINE COMMERCE , ,

- - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - -- - - - - - - - ARIAS, VICENTE P?'eside:n-q, Pa/xlce B:azwr. Born September 12, 1880, Manila, son of Manuel and Vioenta Fel'Ulandez Castro. He was educated in commerce at San Juan de Letran. Started his commercial career with Casa Editorial. His advancement was steady. He owns the Arias Building. N ow he is the treasurer, Filipinas, Compania de Seguros and Philippine Guaranty Company; director, InsulaJr Life Assurance Co., and presidel1't, Palaoe Bazar.

ARGUELLES, MANUEL V. Propnietor, Laboratorio Arguelles. Born January 22, 1891, Batangas, son of Manuel and EuLog-ia Marasigan. He was educated in the public schools, graduating from the Alraullo High School in 1909, and from the CoUege of Moedi,c ine and Surgery, University of' the Philippines, in 1914. H e took post gl':aduate work at Columbia and Harvard in 1917. Especialized in serology and bacteriology in the United S'tates in 1919. He served as health offioer, Mindanao and Sulu, 1918; chief, Laboratory department, San Lazaro ospital, 1921-28. He owns the. well known Labc,rator\io Arguelles.

ARGUELLES, TOMAS S enio1' M,e mber, A1'guelles & Ocampo, Born March 7, 1860, Manila, son of Norberto and P etronila Fernand路ez. He was educated at San Juan de Letran Co:,l ege, and Ateneo de Manila. He served as commander of Filipind Engineers during the revolut~Chll, inspec'to,l' of roads fo.r the Street Car Co. and the Manila Railroad Co. He was Honorary CommissiiCoI1er to the St. Louis Exposition 111 1902-07. Hresident, Philippine Tannery, Inc.; member, Board of Directors. EI Hogar Filipino; and president, N acionalista Club.

BACHRACH, EMANUEL MAURICE President and Gene1'al Manag.e'f', B aclvrach MotxJ楼r Co ., I nc. Born in Rusia, JUly 4, 1874, son cd' Mortche and Blume Bachrach; married to Mary McDonald; Mason, Shriner, Elks; m ember, University Club, Resided in Manila for thirty years; engaged in mercantile pursuits, later in automobile and garage business and the Bachrach Motor Co. Inc., which he heads as pl,esident, general manager and principal owner. Operaltes an extensive and modern plant. He was the leading factor in the c.rganizaJtion of the Philippine Aerial

113


THE

BUILDERS OF PHILIPPI NE COMMERCE

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114

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THE BUILDE:lS OF PHILIPPINE COMMERCE Taxi Co. in 19::: 1, introducing commercial aviation in the Philippni'~!' . He is a member of the Board of Directc,rs, Peoples Bank and Trust Co., and the peoples Mortgage & Investment Co. Mrs. Bachrach, business eXf<!cutive 'en her own responsibility, own Hotel Pines, Bnguio.

BAKER, FRED SHERMAN

Mamag e:r, CWdwalba<i-er-Gi'bson Lumber Co. Born N ovembar 22, 1886, Columbia City, Indiana, U . S. A., son of -.; Henry Edson and Co.<a Mason; married ,t o Jean Nielson Foote; SGc.ttish Rite Mason; Member, Ma:nila Go~lf, Alrmy and Navy Club, and Manila Polo Club; American Club, Shanghai; American Institub<! of Mining and Metallurgical Engineers. Engaged in lengineering and lumber manufacturing for more than twen'ty years; as~ e.:.: iated, Oriental Consolidated Mining Co. of Un sonkinko, Korea; Resident Engineer, Insular Lumber Co., lat€ll' became general superintendent and manag3:r, Cadwallader-Gibson Lumber Ce.. ; Vive-pre:;ident, Philippine flardwood Export A ~s ociati on. BALUYUT, SOTERO P.noprietor, l)!lani/':l, .cork 'fr.d j'nsu:ation Co. Born January 3, 1889, San F-ernanc.o, Pampanga, SGn of Leoncio and Casimil'a J ulao; married t'o Encarnacion Lopez y Escafto. After studying in th<! public schools he was sent as gov£irnment pen~ S1onado in the Uni'ted States. He obtained his B. S. C. E. degree in the University of Lowa. Returning in the Islands, he worked as di~ltrict engir,<!eJ.· for different provinces in Luzon. El1ect;ed provincial governor of Pampanga in 1925 and 1928 when he introduced many public improvement::; such as schools hospitals, roads, bridges, and the w<!ll known concrete road of Pampanga. He was elected Senator for the third sena' arial distL ict and he introduced an act Ito create the Nat'ilc.nal Electric Power and Dev·<!lopment Company for the purpose of establishing hydro-e:iectric power pla·n ts. He is a member of the Philippin<! Columbian Association; Philippine Ins'titute of Engneers and_ Architects, and Pampanga Lodg~ No. 48. \

BARNES, E . C. Ge'YI!fmal Manag·e?·, Wa? lnletl', Bwr'nes & Co ., Ltd.

Mr. Barnes, silent' but very indu strious, is one of the well kncoWn residents of the city of Manila. He is the general manag'er of the English firm, Warner, Brurnes -& Co., .Ltd., and goes once every th.!'<!e years to London where a branch ,of :1)is company is located. The company which he heads is an eXI's>rter of sugar, ,c opra, and abaca. It also deals in gen<!ral imports, insurance and machinery.

115


THE BUILDERS OF PHILIPPI 'E

OMMERCE

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FAUSTO BARRE DO PROPRIETOR M~lat(

Garage & ..tllto ReFill" Shop

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ALBERTO

BARRETTO

JOSE BARRETTO

PRESIDENT

El Ahoro

MA, 'AGER

hj.<rlll~,.

El A.horro I lIsldar

··,· ·•, 11

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THE BUILDEr.S OF PHILIPPINE COMMERCE BARREDO

Y

ALONZO, FAUSTO

Proprieaor and Ma'n,ager, Mabate Garage & Auto R epair ShopBorn December 19, 1874, Manila, son of Manuel and Gabriela Fargas; manried; has three childl'zn; member, Philippine Columbian Association, Tiro al Blanco, Club Filipi'Do, Philippine Chamber of Commerce; ex-president, Phlippinc.> Lawn Tennis A s ociation. Proprietor and manager, Malate Garage & Auto R'zpair Shop, largest institution of its kind in th e Philippines Ic.wned by a Filipino; one of 'the most imp c.rtant individual real estate operators in Manila. Has travel ed extensively in the United Stalt,es and Europe . .-.;

Studied at the Ateneo de Manila, B. A., Escuozla de Agricultura, Manila, B. S. A.; one of the besu known aJ!1d financially sound Filipino business men in Manila.

BARRET.O, ALBERTO President, El Ahorro Insular Born November 21, 1.867, Cabafigan, . Zambales, son of A!1tonio and Carmen Blanro; married; has four children. Educated at thz Atenec. de Manila, Sto. Tomas University, LL. 1;3.; prosecuting atto;rney, Batangas; s b-se.cret:a,ry, P rtworks of Manila; Jm:,fice of t'hJ Peace and later Judg'z, Court of Fi.rst I stance, Mamila, 1897-9&". Delegat~ for Masbate and Ticao to Malok.3 Congress, 1898; colonel Filipino Army, February 1898, la't,zr became' Director of Diplomacy and :represe11ted ,reVK:~ lutional'Y government ' before Schtirman Commission. General Sec.retary, Partido Independi sta, 1906; editor, "La Independencia"; president of the party; elected to the Philippine Assembly f,rom Zambales, 1907; served as Judge, Court d first Instance of Riz3.1 and Bulaean until 1917; Secretary of Finance, 1917-23 ; president, Nationall Development Co., 1917-27; since 1924, ex-president and manager, Cebu Portland Cement Co,; p,resident, EI Ahorro Insular; director, Philippine Chamber of Commerce, and Long Distance T elephone 00.

BAR-?ETO Y JACINTO, JOSE G. Mamage?', Vit~da e H ijos .de Pio Ba'f'or>eto y Cia., Inc . Born July 1, 1899, Fookien, China, son of Pio and Engracia Jacinto; married to Magdalena Cu Unjieng, has three children. Member, Knight of Columbus and Wack Wad<; Golf Club. Educart;ed at the Awneo de Manila where he obtained his A. B. degree in 1918, He studied architecture at the Mapua Institute of T echnology in 1930. He is manager of the firm "Viuda e Hijos de Pio Barreto y Cia., Inc,"

117


THE B UILDERS OF P H ILIPPINE

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THE BUILDERS OF PHILIPPINE COMMERCE BARZA, ISAAC Sllpervis:ng Agent., Insulwr Life Assurance Co ., Ltd. Born April 11, 1890, Panay, Capiz; marri ed to Felicidad Balgos. His schooling was very lim':teJ.. he is truly a self-made man. He was granted his h'Conc,rary high school diploma in l'ecognition of his many year~ work and supel vising- tlaacher. 'rook a few special subjecb, University of the Philippines; supervising teacher Capiz; executive Secretary, Student Y. M. C. A.; a ssocIate General Secre.tary, Y. M. C. A., 1923-26 ; pf'esident, Philippine Chamber of Commc.rce 1931. He belongs to the UnKed Church; member, Bagumbayan Lodge No.4; Philippine Columbian Association; Wack Wack Golf & .untry Club; adViser, In sular Life Underwriters Association. He was <the organizer and the promot'er of the First National Business Men's Conventicn. BEAM, WALTER A. Vicet-P1 'esident, B engt..e.t Cornsoliwated Mining Co. Born March 15, 1878, Bulionville, evada, U. S. A., son of T. W. and J o~ephll1e Alida A!lderson; ma.rLied to Lydia Hart McKee; has two chlldren; member, Elks, Woodmen of the World, Army & Navy, Univ€Irsity, Rotary, Manila Golf, Manila Polo, Wack 'Wack Gold & Ccruntry, Baguio COUll try Club, and l!;ng~neers Club of San Francisco. He is very well known fo:r his active leadership in the development of the mining- industlry in the Philippines. He was educated in th pub:ic school of Salt Lake City, Utah. He served as a volun:Leer in the 3panish-Ame:t;ican War. He is Vice-president, Benguet Ccnsolidated Mining Co.; vice-president and assistant manager, Balatoc Mining Co. " BECK, ISAAC President a,nd Gene·ral Manag e?', I. Beck, Inc. He came to the Philippines thirty yea.TS ago. Took the first job he could get, worked hard, saved, and with t~l'e first one thousand pesos he had, he established his small sUe.re at the Escolta. He studied as he did r~.:i,'b,usine, in his office. After a long', hard and honest struggle, his stope prospered, and he is one of the few who owns a miHion-peso establishment on the Escolta, the "I. Beck, Inc." BISHOP, ANCIL H. Manager, Koppel (Philippines ), Inc. Born March 1, 1891, Denver, Colorado, son of Edgar Herbert and Mary Ellen Van HOil' en, married to Amelia Charlotte Schmidt; has three children; Mason, Knight Templar, Shriner, Elk; member, Rotary, Manila Polo, University, Manila Golf and Manila Yacht Club. President and general manager, Oooper Company; transfe.rred to Industl'ial Car & Equipment Co. and managed its business in the Philippines. Koppel corporation is one of the largest in its line; handles railroad ma<terial and equipment, machinery and supplies. Educated in the schools of Doenver and a:t the University of Colo:radc.

119


THE BUILDERS OF PHILIPPI E

OMl\lERCE

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THE BUILDERS OF PHILIPPINE COMMERCE

nOURNE, MARTIN R. Vice-P're;;i,d e ftt, Martila T'rading & Supply Co. Born April l S, 1882, ", inona, Minn, U, S. A., son of C. P. and E sther Martin; married to Bessie HaZien ~ has one daughter; member, Elks, Manila Pok~ Manila Golf, Army & Navy Club. Educated for the [law at George Washington University, Washington, D. C. Practiced in Washingrton, then entered federal govlElrnmenJt service; in Manila, he joined tha Bureau of Posts; occupied various offices; returned to the U. S. and joined t'h e U. S. Posta~ Saving Bank as chi ef accountant till 1916. One of the principal owners of the Manila Trading & Supply Co., -.: president, N. & B. Sltables Co., Inc. I

BRADFORD, GEORGE PRESTON Vic e-P1 'esident, L. EV l3'l,ett, InG.. Born May 11, 1897, Stockton, California, U. S. A., son of Charles P. and Mabel Van Lac,n, marri,ed to Rl/th Herdman; has three children; Mason, past master, Ca.l'regidoll' Lodge No.3, Manila; Elk; member, Manila Polo, Univers,i ty, Manila Go::tf d Manila Bqat clubs. Chairman, Associa.ted ~ eamship N avigat::on Co.; secretary, Inter-sland Steamship Co.; and secr€l~aty-trkasuwr, Philippine Stevedoring Co. Educated at the Manual lA.,r ts High Scn <31, Los Angeles, California, and St. Mary's College, Oakland, California, sel!ved in the U. S. Mairine Corps during the we,rld war; general agent for Struthers & Barry at Hongkong, al~d ~tates Steamship Co.; Vice-pL 'e sident, L. Everett, Inc,

BRIAS ROXAS, Al TONIO Il'Janaging Dinct01', San M'iguel B?'ewery Born February G, 1883. Manila, sun of Enrique and Lucina Roxas; nmrried to Carmen 8chcgoyen; has five chiMren; member, Casino Espanol, Manila Polo, Army and Nrwy, Ulliversity, and Tiro al Blanco clubs. Educated in Manila, Spa,i n and in the U. S.; graduated as an 'engineer Polytechniocum at Zuri::h, Switzerland; wlc.rked, engineering dep8il·tment, Sewer & Water Supp~ly, Manila; joined San Miguel Brewery, 1907; director, El Hogar Filipino, Philippine Constl'uction Corporation; president, Casino Espanol, 1931; vice-preside11t, -Spanish Chamber of Commerce, 1931, president, Hc.spital Espanol d,e Santiago; managing director, San Miguel Brewery.

BRIAS ROXAS, ENRIQUE P. P1'esidelnt ,and General M,ar.Jage1·, B-rm Roxas, Inc. Born October 23, 1881, Manila, son of Enrique Brias de G6ya and Lucina Roxas; ' manied to PileiI' Sanz; has thl'ee daughters; member, 'Casino Espanol, Manila Polc~ Sica. Mesa Gun, Rotary, Wack Wack Goltf &. Country and Cosmos clubs; Philippine Chamber of Commerce, Spanish Chamber of Cc.merce and Property Owners' Association.

121


o IMERC'E , ............... -------------.------------------------------------------------------------------' ji THE BUILDERS OF PHILIPPINE

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122

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THE BUILDERS OF PHILIPPINE COMMERCE B. A. deg-ree, Sto. Tomas Univ-ersity; attended Military Academy, Avila, Spai n; took commercial oc.urses, Kensing-ton & Pitman 's Colleg-e, London. Sel'ved in the Philippine g-overnment Civil Soervice, Executive Bureau, Bur eau of Pos(:s ; Deparltment of Justice ; founded Brias Roxas, Inc., 1918. Direc'lOr, San Mig-uel Brewery, Bank of the Philippin e Islands, and Philippin e N aticUlal Bank. T.raveled extensiv,ely. BUENGUA, SERGIO G. P7'esic/;â&#x201A;ŹIY/,t aoo Manager, M,aniba D esigning School Born in Bulan, Sorsog-on, son of Quintin and Maria Grevilde. H.cceived his primary education in hi s home town a nd later attended hig-h -.school at Sibaco, Albay. Studi ed at tha Mitchell Desig-ning- Schoc,l, American Fashion s and Master Desig-ner System. Went in business for himself; in 1917 became a master cu(:t ~ r and later prospered. Founded the Manila D'esig-ning- School, Inc. in 1933, which is destIned te, become the most popular school in desig-ning- and cutting- m en's wear. BUENCA,MINO, JR., FELIPE P/'cs,ident anA Gâ&#x201A;Ź!one'nal Man{tgerr, Nnev[t Ecija Sugwr Mills, I nc , Born December 12 1886, Manila son of Felipe and Guad al upe Ab,reau; married to Maria Rom ro; member, Philippin e Bar A ssociation, and other Ma.n.ila clubs; director, Philippine Carnival Association; and major, Philippine National Guard. S\: udied at lha Univers ty cd' California and Rizal University; was admitted to the Philippine Bar, 1909; and Ito the United States Supreme Court in 1914. He is one of the be t corporation la wyers of the I slands, and one of the leading- m ambers, Philippine House of Representatives . CACHO, MARIANO Genelml Manag er, PQJriJay Eleotlric Co , Born November 23, 1893, Iloilo, soh of Francisco and Candelaria Soria]10, marri ed to Juanita Escay; member, International Chamber of Commerce, G.~,lf & Country Clubs, Guiso Club, Ca sino E spanol, all of Iloilo. He is an eno-ine'ar and architect ; one of the best in the Philippines ; cred,t ed with having constructed more bui ldings than any other eng-ineer in Iloilo. Educated at the Ateneo de Manila, San Juan de L atl'an College, University of Sto. Tomas, and Co,r nell University, Ithaca, New Ylc,rk. H e is general manager, Panay El-ectric Company. CAMPBELL, WM. MAXWELL LAW Geneml Mamag e,r, Stl1(Lchan & M,cwMu rmy Ltd. Born December 2fi, 1878, Scotland, son of Moffat and Agnes Law; married to Marry Anne EleonQr Alger; has twoO children; Mason; member, Iloilo, and American Society of Mechanical Eng-ineers. Employed as an eng-in eel' in Australia, Fiji, New Guinea, and the Solomon Islands; Eng-ineer for the Sun Ca.rlos Miling Qc,. for two years. Educated in the schools of Perth and Glassg-ow , Scotland. General manager, Strachan & MacMurray, Ltd., Iloilo.

123


THE BUILDERS OF PHILIPPINE COMMERCE - ._--------------------------------------------------- ----------------------------- -- ------------ ~: '\ I I I

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TIlE BUILDE.aS OF PHILIPPI E COMMERCE CABO CHAN, JUSTO

PresiJdent, Overseas Business Law

.4g,~ ncy

Bern in Hinende, Manila, SOil ef Frallcisce Pengcu and Terr::sa CabUnLati. he was breught to. China to. be educated at the Themben Cellege, Amey. At 16 he jeined t he revelutienary ferces reaching the rank c.f lieutenant. Returned to. Manila, and werked as beekkeeper; later", ent to. Cabanatuan and feunded Justo. Cabo. Chan & Co. Henerary Chinese Censul for many years; adviser en fereign affairs by the Chinese gevernment; president, Nueva Ecija Chines'e Chamber ef Cemmerce, 1919-1923 ; and Nueva Ecija Club, 1919-20; present president, Ov'erseas Business Law Agency. Marri ed to. Paula Paul,jna; has eight children. At: seven,

CARBUNGO. AMBROSIO O. Banquet Cc.ntracter B c,rn March 20, 18::;2, in Perac, Pampanga. His scheeling was limited ; studied Spanish in a private scheel; werked as a waiter, "Ambes Mundes" restaurant, and as a ceek "Plaza Lunch" Casino. Espanel and fcll' seme preminent families in Manila. Went in business fer himself since 1926 as "banquet centractor". Wen prizes a chief and catt!l'er, past Manila Carnivals. CAMPOS, PE RO J.

President, Bank of the Philippine I slands. Bern Aplril 20, 1891, IleiJo, ef Spanish-Filipino parents; married Cencepcien Peblado.r; has two. children. He desired to. beceme a captain; entered the Nautical Scheel, but due to. eye treubl'e he teek anether ceurse. He al1tended the N ermal ScheeL. To. him, life is a centinueus educatien. Hi s is a reman tic career. Sitarting as a messenger he rese to. the presidency ef ene of the eldest and biggest banks in the Philippines-the Bank of the Philippine Islands. Mr. Campos made g'C,ed wherever he worked. CAMPOS RUEDA, ANTONIO Bern Oct'Ober 15, 1881, Malaga, Spain, son ef Anten ie Cam pes Marfi] and J esefa Rueda Lepez; married to. Resarie Valdivia Reyes ; has five children; member, Casino. EspafiJol, and T~re al Blanco.. Educated in the cellege ef San Hermenegilde and Escuela de Cemerc)e, Malag-a, Spain. In the Philippines, tarted werk fOT Rueda Hermanos, became president and general manager. CARREON,

UMERIANO D.

Dirootol', Natwrzal Institute Bern in San Luis, Pampanga; ebtained el,ementary education, Philippine puhlic schcols; g,raduate, Philippine ermal Scheol, March, 1917; princi-

125


THE BUILDERS OF PHILIPPI E COMMERCE :~---------------------.------------------------------ -------------------------------------------_.

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THE BUILDERS OF PHILIPPINE COMMERCE pal, City Schools, 1933; Bachelo:r of Science in Education, College of EducatJon, U. P. 1924; Bachelor of Laws U. P., and member, Philippine Bar, 1929; Assistant Chief, Homestead and Free Patent Section, Sales and L ease Section, and Miscellaneous SectiJcJl, Bureau of Lands; director, National Institute, April 17, 1938; Sixteen years teaching experience; an a bl e businessman. CARMA , PHILIP DURKEE POJrvner, P. D. COJrman Co., Ltd.

Manag~ng

Born January 8, 1882, Chicago, Ilk, son of D. M. and Mary Lee ; ma rried to Edna Lenora Mertz; has three children; memb er, American Legion; first resident; Philippine Council Boy Scouts of America; president, Seamen 's Institute, Manila Tennis Club, Manila Pic.lo, University, Army & Navy, Manila Rotary, Tiro al Blanco, 'vVack Wack Golf & Country Clubs; director, Conununity Players. Educated at Cornell University and Halle University, Germany; with H. W. EIlSer, founded the San Juan Heights Co. and P. n. Carman Co., Ltd., dil'ector, Manila Building and Loan Associatilc.n; Major, U. S. Army, World War; proper1;y officer, Expenditionary Q. M., NewpOlrt News, Va.; property audito.r, Phihppi:ne Department, U. S. A. CARMELO, ALFREDO TheOJS1.d'l ur, Ca;rmelo & BU/W~run, I'M. Born July 8, 1896, Manila, son of Eulaho Carmelo de Lakandola and Maxima Casas; married to Elvira Ullman; has three daughter; member, Ligue Internationale des Aviateurs, Paris; Aero Club de France, Knights of Columbus, Deutscher Klub, Casino Espanol. First filipino to qualify as ' aiuplane pilot; in Europe, made first flight between I'rance, S\"itzerland, Germany and Spain. Educabed at the Ateneo de Manila, San Beda College ; studied painting and lithography in Leipzing, Germany.

CARO,RAMON P.'I1eside{/'/)t and GI':nerp,l Manager, Ram Ca1', Inc. Born February 10, 1894, Manila, son of Roman Caro y Mora and Engracia Bellison . Studied commerce at San Juan de Letran College. Manages one of the largest genera], automobiJ.e business in the Philippines. Established Cam Electrical Service, Auto Service Co., Oriental Battery Manufacturing Company, Super Service Station, Ace Motor Sel"Vice. His other ventures are the Wack Wack Pictures Corporation and some agricultw'al investments in Mindo.ro. Member, Wack Wack Golf & Country Clubs, Philippine Columbian Association, Automobile Club of the Philippines, president and general manager, Ram Car, I'nc.

127


THE BUILDERS OF PHILIPPI IE COMMER E

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128


THE BUILDERS OF PHILIPPINE COMMERCE CA VE DER, HOWARD MARION Gen ral Agent, Robe;rt Dolkvr Co. Bc.rn July 14, 1897, Billingham, Washington U. S. A., son of James lI",rrison and Anna Kildall; married to Dorothy May Gray; has two children; Mason, Shriner Elk; memucr, RotalY, Manila, Wack Wack Gc.If & Country clubs, Manila Polo & Baguio Country clubs. Educa,ted ill the schools of Bellingham and Seattle; with Pacific Steamship <';0. at 19; president, PhilIppine TOllJri t Association; director, American Chamber c.f Commarce, Hamilton Brown Shoe Store, Mamla Hotel Co. Philippinc Hotel's, Inc.; captain, Officers' l{esorve Corps, U. S. A. Genuerai agem:, Hobert Dollar Co.

CHIN SAYOG, AGRIPINO Munuvel, San F el'nmuuo Hotel

Born June ~ ;; , 1907, lmu, avite, son of Joaquin and Maxima Sayagj single. Begun his eady tudies at the Santos Private School, San Ft!rnandJC~ Pampanga; altended the Pampanga High School, but the untimely neath of his father forced him t('l quit: chool and attend to his father's business. Believes in patienoe, tl rift and, in devotion to .c.ne's work. Mr. Chiu tipifies a man who will be f:ucessful in his work, whatever it is.

CO BAN KIAT Manag er, Co Ban Lin & Co. Born thirty-fo 11' yc路ars ago in Tong An, Fukien, China; married; has five children; member, committee of Chinese Community; treasurer, lJogia Luz Oceania No. 85. Began his schooling in China and atended Chinese Thirteenth High School; arrived in the Philippines in 1913; now manager, Co Ban Lin & Co., and Ban Kiat.

CO BAN LING P'I1e.si(j,ent, Co Ban Ling (Druj Co, Ban Kiat

Born Thirty-one years ago in Tong An, Fukien, China; Jrullrried; has seven children; Mason; vice-president, Oriental Masonic Club. Received his early education in his home town; later, attended the Chines.e Thirteenth High School. Came to the Philippines in 1907. Started from humble beginnings; now president, Co Ban Klat; vice-president, Chinese HardwaTe MeTchants Association.

129


THE BUILDER

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130


THE BUILDE::iS OF PHILIPPINE COMMERCE CO PAK President, 00 P,ak & Co. Born in 189:3, Amoy, China; married 1:0 Go Bit: has six children; membar, Chinese Chamber c.f Commerce and Oriental ~a sonic clubs. Came to the Philippines in 1910; wOi'ked in his father's soap business; established business in 1917; engaged also in oill and grocery business; president, Co Pak & Co., and Chinese Soap Factories Association. COOPER, LAWRENCE A. M(J)nag er, Goodrich Intewnational Rubber Co. Barn April 7, 1882, Peabody, Kansas, son c.f George H. and H elell i..yon; )~ried to l'ri~ca F>.lrazo; has four children; member, M: anila Golf Club, Wack Wack & Country Club. Educated at the University of Kansas; served in the Bureau of Education, 1920; with the Goodyear Tilre & Rubber Expor,t Oe" Ltd. ~n 1926; manager for the Philippines, Goodrich Internatiollal Rubber Co. CORPUS, RAFAEL Vice-Fresident and lI1rt1'lager, Philippine Na.tional Bank. Born October 24. 1880, San An-tonic" Zambales, son of Pablo and Juliana Mistan; marri,ed to Ele.,ute.l'ia Pablo; memLer, Philippine Columbian Association. Educated at the Ateneo e. Manila, Esc ela de Derecho; George Washington University, Washington, D. C.; m ember, Philippine Assembly 1912; sponsored establishment, rural credit: association t,c. aid small fa;rmers; uppointed solicitor General which he resigned to become Director of the Bureau . of Lands; advocated cadastral su:rvey in tJle islands to give {:,r,c,perty owners due security in the title to their lands ; Slecret:ary of Agriculture, 1922. Director, Philippine National Bank, 1920; Vice-president and general managâ&#x201A;Źil', 1931; acting manage.r, Phi lippine Sugar Agency, controlling the largest Filipino sugar interes,ts i'11 the islands. President, Binalbagan Estate, Inc.; official delegate in the U. S., Philippine Sugar Association; Chairman, Bc,ard of Directors, Philippine Iron Mines Co.; Vice-president, Y. M. C. A.; p.resident Associated Chrurities. CRAIG, COL. JOHN W. P?"esident and Gemer1al Manag e?', Y NLnklin Bake.r Co. of the Philippines Born July 22, 1873, Selma, Alabama, U. S. A., son of George and Alvena Finley Whilte; married to Ethel Lowe; has .t wo daughters; membe.l', Army and N ayy, Manila Polo and Manila Golf clubs. Colonel U. S. Army; director, Peoples Bank and Trust Co., Peoples Mortgage :ll1d Inve8tment Co., Radio Corp;>ration of the Philippine and the Philippine Cic,::onut Industry Associat.ion; prp.sident . and general manager, Franklin Bake.r Co. of the Philippines. Educat.p.d at the University of Alabama and the U. S. Mili,t ary Academy at 'West Point; had been chief of the Constabulary forces of Mindanao and Sulu.

131


THE BUILDER

OF PHILIPPINE

Ol\IMERCE

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THE BUILDERS OF PHILIPPINE COMMERCE CUHEL, FRANK JR. Managerr', Dodg e & S eymour, Ltd.

Born Sept-ember 28, 1905, Oelwien, Iowa, U. S. A., son iCof Rudolph and Frances Halva; member, Phi Dappa Psi, Scabbard and Blade, A. F. 1., Surrey Club, London, England; Army & Navy Club, Manila; American Amateur Athletic Union. Educated at the University of Iowa and Oxford University; held the world's record fo.r ,lhe low hurdles in 1924; broke Wlc,rld's reco:rd in 400 meter iow hurlles in 1928; won second place for the American Olympic ,team in Amsterdam, Holland, against Luyd Burleigh of England; second illieutenant, "Officers' Reserv,e Corps, U. S. A., Manager, Dodge and Seymour, Ltd. CUSTODIO, MARCELO Elecflric Supply Contracto'l"

Born in 1882, Santa Rosa, Laguna; son of Mariamo and Vicenta AImendra; man'i'ed, has seven children. Mr. Custodio is another self-made man. He had practically no schooling but had industry alld daring. In the la~t twenty-five years he has tried many jobs. He was not contented with be~ng an 'employee always. With his litt-Ie savings, he started a store and became an eleot.rical contractor. Here he made go d. ~t present he is ICoIle of the most successful contractor for el'e ctrical supplies and i!lls;tallations in Manila. DANKWERTH, GEORGE C.

P?'esifAent, Philippine T ruS't Co . Born October 23, 1896, San Francsico, U. S. A., son of George E. and Mary VICol1. Wyl; married to Anne Thuman, member, Anny & Navy, Manila Polo and Baguio Country clubs. Had been a bank examiner for many years, joined Philippines National Bank as assistant auditor; bank examiner, for the Federal Reserve, San Francisco; director and vice-president, Fidelity and Sur-ely Co. of the Philippine Islands and the Philippine Realty Corporation; director, MO!llt'e de Piedad and Savings Bank; Philippine Long Distance T eleph one Co.; presidEillt, Philippine Trust Co. DANIELSEN, FRIEDRICH JULIUS Mianager, B.enn, M,e yer & Co. Born May 12, 1885, F1uesburg, Germany, son of Joachim Wilhe:1JTI and Marie Rickestsen; married to Herthe Sophie Niel8'en; member, German and Manila Polo clubs, director! and first president, Gennan Chamber of Commerce. Educated in Germany. Before coming Ito the Philippines he had been located at Hamburg, 1902-05; Antwerp, 1906; Hongk,ooIlg, 1907-14; and Japan, 1914-20. Manager, Behn, Meyer amd Company.

133


THE BUILDERS OF PHILIPPI E

OMMERCE

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THE BUILDERS OF PHILIPPINE COMMERCE

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DEE C. CHUAN Presid.e,nt, D ee C. Ch'UJatn & Sons, Inc. Bo.rn Chinanchiu, Fo.o.kien, China; <:ame to the Philippines in 1901; presid,e nt, Dee C. Chuan & So.ns, In<:., and N egro.s"'Philippine Lumber ManufaotUiring Co..; president and o.ne o.f the fo.unders o.f the China BankiQg Oorpo.ratio.n which now successfully o.perates banks in the Philippines and China. A liberal suppo.rter o.f scivic and semi-public instittutio.!ls diredo.r, Phiiippine Chinese Educatio.nal Asso.ciatio.n; member, and fo.rmer president, Chinese General Chamber o.f Co.mmerce; ho.no.rary president, Chinese Y. M. ~. A., member, vVack Wack Go.lf and Co.untry allU,b, Oriental and ac-smo.s clubs, Widely kno.wn and highly r'e spected by peo.ple o.f all reces; did much to. harmo.nize relatio.ns between Chinese and Filipino.s.

DEE HONG LUE Plresirknt aJncl General Mtarnag er, D ele Hong

LUI!.

& Co.

Bo.rn March 13, 1897, Amo.y, China, Elcn o.f Calixto. Dyyco. and Tan San; married to. Kah Tui 'n, Amo.y, 1918 ; has two. children; m ember, Co.smo.s Club, Oriental Club, CH'nese General Chamber o.f Co.mmerce, Philippine Hardwo.o.d Expo.l'lt Asso.ciatiQn, and Manila Lumber Merchants ASSOlCiatio.n. One o.f the leading figures in the lumber indus tTY o.f the lsol'a nds which ha s had a mo.st remarkable develQpment in recent years. His business in,t€lrests center in lJee Ho.ng Llle & Co.., Inc. an.d the Zambales Lumb<'l' Co.., bo.th o.f which he heads al> president and gene.ral marllag'sr Vice-pres.ident, Negrv.sPhilippine Lumber Co.rpQratio.n; directo.r, Philippine Lumber Manufacturing Co.rpo.ratio.n and sto.ckhQlder in ()ther co.rpo.ratio.ns which deal alSlC' in lumber industry'. Educated in St. Jo.s'eph's Co.ll.ege, Ho.ngko.ng, China.

mCK, R. McCULLOCH E rdJitM' ,ancl P?'oprietor, Th e Philippines

F(f'~e

P ress

Mr. Dick began also. f.rQm the bo.tto.m. He wQrked as a messenger and later as a repo.rter fo.r' different American newspapers in the city many yel::,rs ago.. W'hen he acquired enQugh experience, he went in business fo.l· himself, started his o.wn publicatiron, the no.w po.pular Philippines Fl!:'e Pres:;;. In the beginning Mr. Dick enco.untered many difficulties. Others less co.urageo.us that he was wo.uld have been dishearted, bUit Mil'. I'-ick carried o.n, and no.w his w'eekly is o.ne Qf the mQst widely read in the Islands. His interests are no.w valued at mQre than lQIle millio.n peso.s. Mr. Dick is co.nsidered as Qne o.f the mQst po.werful editto.rs in the Islands. His edito.rials are po.inted and viglrQUs. 1I3 is married to. a Filipina.

' 135


THE BUILDER

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THE BUILDERS OF PHILIPPINE COMM ERCE DIEHL, HOFFMA N THEOBALD ViCe-P1"es. & Asst. G c"Y/.. Manag e,)", Frwnklin Bo'£k e~' Co . of tVle P. I. Bc.rn August 21, 1903, Parisruhe, Baden, Germany, son of Franz and Mina Diehl; ma.rried to Helga Johns en; has one daughter; member, Army & lTavy, German, and Manila Yatch clubs. After attending the Grothe school, and the School of Technology, at Ka.rlsrnhe. he began w,c.rk wi th a banking institution in Germanv. Came to Manila, .Tune 28. 1924, and was employed by Wm. H. And(:'rson & Ct•. : later he joilled the Diehl-Anderson Coconut Co., in San Pablo. At present, he i3 vice-pY'<!sident G.nd assistant general manager, Franklin Baker Co. of the Phil'ppines ; and director, Mantecoc0 Company of the Philippin es. DIZON, DOMINGO P. r1'opn f 'tr>)" and MaYIJc£ger, Fcwmf"£oi[£

S'~}1gand1aan

Born Augm:t 4, 1904, Sta. Ana, Pampanga, son of Bernardino and Ramona Pafigan; marri ed to Angela Paiigan; has two c.ns. Began his schooling in his home town; took bookkeping while fini shing his elementary course; worked as assistant bOlckk·eeper, Tom's Dixie Kitch en , while studyi'ng in the igh School and up ported himself; later transferred to Pacific Engineering as head bookkeeper, att:ended the University of Manila and the National Universi,.y where he graduated as a pharmaceutical chemist; employed as a pharm cist a yea.r af er graduation. Op·aned his drug store, Farmacia Safigandaan, at Ca~c()can, Rizal, 1929; and after a few years of diligent preparation, produced the well known Castoria Dizon, J a,rabe Ubolina Dizon and Dizon's Ink. Has a remarkable grasp of business principles; will succeed in any business calling. DIZON, PACIANO Camp t1'0 lle'r, Marnila Rail1'oad Go. Mr. Dizon was born forty-three years ago at Po rae, Pampanga. After a few years study in the publtie schools, he went to Manila where he landed a humble job. He continued his studies at night and worked ruc.ne::;tly and hard. He was the first Filipino appointed to the position of Deputy Insular Auditor. Late,!" he was made comptroller of the Manila Railroad Co. Mr. Dizon is also Vice-President, National Development Ce.. and President, Cebu Portland Cement Co.; member, Board of Directors, Postal Savings Bank, and Manila Hotel. DUMAS, JOHN Manag e?', B inalbagam Sugar Central Born September 8, 1884, New Orleans, La., son iC.f Edward and Josephine Dumas; marri·ed to Victoria Helen Rolle; haf, two children; member, Manila Polo Club; president, N eglros Golf & Country Club.

137


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THE BUILDEHS OF PHILIPPINE COMMERCE

Engaged in the production of sugar in the Philippines for more than twenty y>ears, having first come to the Isl ,mds, February 11, 1910. Wi,t h the Philippine Sugar Dev'elopment Co., 1910-13; Calamba Sugar Estate, 1913-22; operated a sug3Jr hacienda, 1922- 27; and since 1927 has bee associated with the Binalbagan Estate, Inc., being manager of its sugar central at Binalbagan, Occidental N,egros., P. I.

DY BUNCIO, GUILLERMO Manag er and' Treasure",', Dy Buncio & Co ., Inc. Born Jun e 25, 1905, J:'ukien, China, son of Dy Buncio and Ong' Le,ng; -married to AmpaJllC, Lim Genco; has three chi,ldren. Obtained hi s elementary and highschool education at the San Beda College, and continued his studies a.long commercial lines at the Jose Rizal College. He hagan as a clerk in hi s father's company, but through the able training of his faJther he SOlCiIl learned the business. Now he is the general manager of the company; Vice-President, manager and t,reasurer of Ong Long & Co. He is a member of the Oriental Club, Casino Espa.nol and the WalCk Wack Golf Olub.

ELIZALDE, ANGEL Managing Pp!Y'tner, YnchausPi i

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Born April 1, 1903, Barcello na, Spain, son of Joaquin and Carmen Diaz Moreu; mwrriedd to M3Jri'e H ungtil'lgton Spreckels; has three children; member, Casino Espanol, Manila Polo, Manila Golf, Manila Yacht, Wack Wack Golf and Conn try, Manila, and Army & Navy club s, Philippine Columbian ASSIcciation. Educated in Spain, United States and England. Entered in business, Mwnila in association with his father and brother as managng partner in the big fum of Ynchausti y Cia.; direct'or, Anakan Lumhzr Co., Philippine Airways Corporation and Philippine Shipowners Association.

ELIZALDE, JOAQUIN MIGUEL P'r'esidielnt, Ynchausti & Company BOl'n August 2, 1896, Manila, SKliIl of Joaquin Carmen Diaz Moreu; married to. Elena von Kauffmann; member, Manala Polo Club (directoll', five consecutive Iterms) , Spanish Chamber of Commerce (president, since 1928), Casino Espanol (president two terms), Army & Navy, Manila Golf, Manila, University, German and Wack Wack Golf & Qoun.tll路y clubs; director, Philippine Carnival Association. Long' indentified with the commerce and industry of the Philippines; major intelrests, shipping and sugar production. Managing partner, Yn-

139


THE BUILDERS OF PHILIPPINE COMMERCE

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THE DUILDEltS OF PHILIPPINE COMMERCE _.- - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - chau ti y Cia, president, Central Azucal'era de Pila and the Anakan Lumber Co., Mindanao, vice-president, Central Azucarera de Sata-Ajuy; first ViC2president and chairman of ,the Exec utive Committee, Philippill e Sugar Association; and member, Philippine Fibe.r Standardization Board, Educated in Spain, England and Switzerland; ~erved 0;1e year in tthe Spanish army befc,re N!turning from Europe to the Philippines to a ssume his share of the family's widespr'ead ,responsibilities.

!ELIZALDE, JUAN MIGUEL

Managing PMtner, Ynchau slti & Compwny. -. Born Februa,ry 6, 1902, Manila, son I(.f Joaquin and Carmen Diaz Mareu; unmarri ed ; member, Manila Polo Club, Casino Espanol (secretary for three terms), Manila Club Army & Navy Club, Manila Golf Club. Associated with his fath3l" and brot'hers in the managemer.': of the extensive interests of Ynchaus.ti y Cia., one c,f the largest commercial and industrial houses in Manila, ope.rating principally as general merchant's and ship owners, ana rope, paint and sugar manufactu,rers and exporters. VicePresident, Anakan Lumber Co.; manager, Ynchausti y Cia.; director, Central Azucarera de Sar.a:-Ajuy. Educated in Spain, England and the United States. ELSER, EDWIN EMIL P'N3siJdent, NI, ;nila B uilding & LO'an Association Born February 21, 1867, Hartford, Conn. U. S. A., son of F. and Maria Louise Tschumi; married to Ida May Brown (deceased), 1891; has two children; ""Mason, Past Grand Master of the Grand Lolge of the PhIlippine Islands and P,l'esident, Masonic Temple Association; Elk, Past Exalted Ruler; member, University, Manila Tiro aJl Blanco, Manila Polo, Golf, Swiss, Wack Wack Golf and Country and Baguio Country clubs, and Jonathan Club, Los Angeles. Educat'ed in public and private schools, Connecticut and California. Arrived in Manila, 1902, to become associated with the McCu}.lough Printing Ce,. Ent'ered the insurance business under his own name in 1906, as representative of a number of foreign companies. Built up one of the most important insu,l'ance agencies in the Philippines. PresiderJt, Manila Building and Loan Ass,c,::iation; director, numerous other busine')s entel'p,rises. FAIRCHILD, GEORGE HENDRICK P1'esidemt, W elch-Fa~rc.hild, Ltd. B c;l'n September 18, 1867, East Highgate, Vermont, U. S. A., son of Geo,l'gc Edwin and Emily L . Day; married to Elizabeth K. CW11ins; has three children; member, and director, American Chamber of Commerce; member, Manila Polo, Army & Navy Manila, University, Spanish, and Baguio Golf and Country Clubs, and the Champter of ,t he Catedral of St. Mary and St. John.

141


I- - - - --- - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - --- - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - ---.---THE BUILDERS OF PHILIPPINE COM lERCE

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142


THE BUILDERS OF PHILIPPINE COMMERCE Graduated, Western Reserve Academy, Hudson, Ohila., June 1888; vicepresident, and manager, Makf:e Sugar Co. 1805, Hawaii. Carne ,t o the Philippines, August, 1912, to establish the pl'esent firm of Welch-Fairchilld, Ltd.; of which he is ,the president. F~rst President amd diredor. San Carlos Milling Co.; president, Mindoro Sugar Co., ,t he first modern sugat< central er'2 cted in the Philippine Islands, 1912. Served one year as the first president o,f the present I sabela Sugar Co., and was la.rgely r esponsible for the incorporation .c.f the M a 路oa Sugar Central Co., Inc., 1919; diroector and vice-president, Malabon Sugar Co.; hag. been secretary-treasurer of the Philippine Sugar Associat~()on since i,ts inception FERNANDEZ, RAMON J. Mcmaging Partne?', Compafi:ia M urVtimr!' Associated, as an official or oi,rector, with a number of the most important business organizations in the Philippine'3; for the past twenty-five yea:rs, has been a contributing facna,r to the industrial and commercial development. Born in Manila, 1878; attended the Ateneo de Manila, and studied elec~ trieal engineering in r.; nelon. Became associated with the San Miguel BiI'ewory in 1907. With his rothers, Vicente and Jose, formed the partnership of Fernandez Hel'manos. Vice-President, Brias Rox,as, Inc., and Peoples Bank & Trust Co.; diTector Peoples Mort age & Investment Co. , and El Hoga.r Filipino and the Philippine Engineering Co., and member, Fiber Standardization Boalrd. Served as p;resident, Chamber of Commeroe of the P. I. Mayor, City of Manila, 1920-23; elected to the Senate from the Fourth Senart;orial District in the special ,election c.f 1923. FERNANDEZ, VICENTE T . P'Y"esident, V. T. F etrnandez & Co" Born June 26, 1887; Bachelor of Arts and Machelor of Laws; member, Philippine Bar; has much business expelrienoe, specially in carbon and tobacco; ex-representative, first district of Cagayan, Fourth Legislature; member, Committee on P u blic Works, Banks and Corporations. Consul of Costa Rica; member, Tobacco Boalrd, Interna:jJ Revenue; chainnan, Laborers Compensation Committee; member, Board of Appeals, City of Manila; direct-or, Ynchausrt;i Steamship Co; president, V. T. Fernandez & Co.; president, Agri,ct'lltulral Congress; ex-pl'esidel1t and member, Philippine Chamber of Commerce; ex-president and director, Anti-Tuberculosis League. GACHES, SAMUEL F. P1'esid(tont, H. E. H eacock Co. Born in La Conner, Washington, U. S. A., son of .J ames and Rhoda Francis; married to Elsie McCloskey; member, Army & Navy, Elks, Polo

143


THE BUILDERS OF PHILlPPINE COMMERCE j----------------------------------------------------- --------~ ------------------ -------------:II

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144


THE BUILDERS OF PHILIPPINE COMMERCE and Golf Clubs, Manila Lodg.e No.1, F. & A. M.; Piresident, Manila Rotary Club. B. A., Leland S tandard, Jr. University, Palo Alto, Califc,rnia. Member, Fiber Stand ardization Board; Tuberculosis Commission; vicepresident, Philippine-American Drug Co. With H eacock Building, introduced modern American structul'es in the Orient, BOlrn a leader; a personality of America and the Philippine.

GANA, VICENTE Q. Ma'YIJaglYr and T,ech'nical Dtitnector, Philippine Ta'YIJnery, I nc. -. Born October iS1, 1880, Bifiang, Laguna, son of Edu3.,rdo and FiJomena de O::am po; learned his fir st letters from a private tutor; obtained A. B. degree a t the San Juan de Letra n; left!; for Eur,c,pe in 1901; entered Leeds University, England, 1902, took applied chemistry and specialized in leather mQl1ufaci'ure. Reiurned to the Philippinet; in 19Q6; chemist, B ureau cf Sci,enee, J!)14; la.t er organized Philippine T a nnery, Inc . , a half milli~,tl-[l es o CO'l'poration; ,the only one of its ki'IJd in the Philippines. GAN, WALTER PAUL Gene'Y'a l Manage'" Mamila H uma Pipe & Ti le ni orks. Born January 4, 1895, oldach (St. Gall) Switver land, son of John and Paulina Haas; member, LoyaJ. Order of Moosse, Cosmos Lodge No.8. F. & A. M. and German Club. Edacated in the public schc.ois of Goldach; fi v'e year s with the Textile Works HIlumenegg at Goldach; thr'ee years in the consular service of the Swiss government. Office manager, Manila Foundry & Machine Works; and from January 1, 1927, general managelr, Manila Hume Pipe & Tile Works.

GARCIA DELGADO, JOSE MARIA Ma nage'r, B an /" of the Philippine, I sbwnds ( Geb'u Branch). Born August 5, 1888, Manila, son of PedXlc, and Francisca Delgado 'i Rodriguez ; married to Francisca La 0 y Arenas; has two children; Gll'and Kni g ht of Columbus of Cebu, amd formerly of Zamboanga . Attended the Ateneo de Manila, Saint Joseph 's CoJ,l ege of t he La Salle Christian Brothers, in Hongkong, China; took a comespondence course with the La Salle Extension University of America; stenographer, Chartered Bank of India, Australia and China, in Manila; Bank Examiner full' the government; vice presid,ent, Bank of the Philippine Islands, until Janu ary, 1924; later transferred to the branch at Cebu, his present position. Awaroed the Gross of San Silvestre by Pope Pious VI, and was recipient of the title of Knig'ht of San Silvestre. â&#x20AC;˘

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THE BUILDERS OF PHILIPPINE COMMERCE

GARCIA, MANUEL 4..ssistaJnt manager, 13acplod-M'/krcia Milling Co., I nc. Born May 10, 1890, Iloilo, Iloilo, P. 1., son of Jose and Maria Gonzales; married to Emilia Jaime ; has three children; 32 degree Mason; member, Negros Golf & OciUntry Club; Kanlaon Lodge No. 64, F. & A. M., Philippir;,e Bodies, Scottish Rite, Graduate Iloilo High Schooll, 1908; entered the employ of Ayala & Co., China Mutual Life In surance Co., BUI1eau of Health, Insul ar Life Ass . So.; private seoretary, President (),f the Pnilippine National Bank; stenographer, Bacolod-Murcia Milling Co. Inc., appointed accountant, 1921, and on ~eptember 15, 1922, was a ppointed assist~nt manager.

GEMPERLE, WILLIAM F. Ma'Yl'(tg etr, Kopp,e~ (P. I.),Inc., Iloilo. Born September 12, 1899, St. Gall, Switzerland; son of F,ritz and R egina Dudler; married .to Margarita Lacscm; has two c'hildren, member, Swiss Club, Iloilo, and Casino Espanol, Iloilo. Educat'ed in Switzehland; came to the Philippinea 路 in Deoember, 1919; wo.rked in the textile bus~l1,ess; joined the Coope'r' Co. in 1921; appointed manager, Hoilo branch offloe, Kop-,?el (P. I.), Inc. 1923.

1 GERONIMO, T,OMAS J>q路opri(JI.tlor and Mamager, El PorverWr Born December 21, 1887, Quingua, Bulaean, son of Julio and Francisca Castillo; mal1l'ied; had practically no schooling; orphan at six; worked hard .t o feed his small bnc.theJ.路s. Started "La Filipina" a sari-sari store, 1911; established "E路I ProVlenir" purveyors of flour, sugar and other foodstuffs, 1912; later, built Geronimo Building on Azcarraga, Sheet, Manila.

GOLDENBER~ ~ICHAEL

J>q'esident and Genetral Mamj(J,g'ff/', Goldenbe,r g & Co. Born November 8, 1889, Singap,o.re, StraiJts Settlement; married to Irene Herman; has two childl'en; founder and Past Master Mount Lebanon Lodge, IN o. 80." F. & A . M.; ,c ame to the Philippines in 1895; one of the first products of CiUr public schools. Devoted self early to business; started in 1918 the Goldenberg Co., which deals lexcl'usively in general texti:Jles, silks and .retazos; the biggest of its kind in the Islands.

14'7


OMMERCE

THE BUILDERS OF PHILIPPI

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THE BUILDERS OF PHILIPPINE COMMERCE GONZALES, MA UEL Glme;ral Mlawtge,l' and PUTtner, Vulcano Engineering Co. Born April 26, 1885, Bais, N egros Occidental, son of Santiag'c, and Concepcion Gomez; married to Elena Aehlle y Bertrand; has eight children; member; Wack Wack Golf and CountTY Club. General managelr and partner, Vulcaho EnginE.ering Co., marine, civil and mechanical engineers, structural shops', boiler makers, and founders, operating one of the most important industrial plants in Manila. Educated at the San Luis Gonzaga College and the Escuela Norma!. GO TIANUY, MANUEL P resident and M a'nlr.拢ge?路, Go Tilalnlo co Hnos. Inc., (Cebu). Born May 25, 1885, Ching Rang, China, son of Pedro Go Tiaoco and Go Disy; married to Alicia Wong; has three children; member, Far Eastern Club, vice-president, Cebu Chamber of Commerce, former president Chinese Chamber of Commerce of Cebu. Educated in Ching Rang, China; came to the Philippines in 1901 to enOer his father's business, which he has 'headed as plr esident and manager sinc'e 1928; Honorary Co suI, RepUblic of China; directclr, several corporations ill! ,Cebu.

P?'opriet,M" anI' Mmnag /', MaxiJn,.(t La. ;erat ae Guzman Jew6lry a d Diumond Store. Born August 3, 1871, Manila; ma:rried to Maxima Lap'eral; studied hc.::>kkeeping at the Escuela N ormall du;ring the Spanish time; later attended Escuela de Dmecho de Manila and obtained LL. B. c.egree in 1907; first grade eligible, 1902; worked with the Bureau of Non-Christian Tribes. Reorganize wif.e's jevYelry business and m'ected a modern building; one of the most popular dealers in jewelry and precious stc.nes in the I sla:ndsl, :,' I Member, DOpstO!l Lodge and Camara de Comzrcio de la s I slas Filipinas. HALL, WILLIAM GARVIE S econd Vic e-President{ and Managimg Direct01', Eal l ns /'lJaws Docks anin Hionohltu hlDn W0'1'/"s1 Born March 3, 1874, Summerside, Prince Edward, Ireland, Ca:lada, son of Thomas and Catherine McRae ~ marxi.ed to Alice Templeton; has three children; member, Manila Polo, Manil'a Golf and Army & Navy Clubs, Mal\ila; Honolulu Rotary (past! president), Pacific and Oahu Gc.untry Clubs, BQnolulu Chamber of Commer-ce, American Society of M路echanical Engineers. Began as a mechanic fOl' Catton, Neil & Co., Ltd ., Honolulu, became president and general manager; later jloined .the Honolulu Iron 'Yorks Co., assistant man agel', for six months; appointed and made g'eneral manage路r , March 1, 1929.

149


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Appointed ~c:ond vicz-president and managing director, Earnshaws Docks & Honolulu L 'on Works, 1920. Granted a number of va luab _c pata,t3 in cor.ncctio!l with sugT,~ m€.chinery, Cc.ntributed matorially to .tile ir:1pL'ov ~­ mel.t in sugar mill efIiciency throughout tL,.] wCl ld by hi::; invent,cn and through cooperat.ion with other inventors.

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HARDEN, FRED M. MwwJ,ge?" and Pir'op'rrietor, Pl(J,za Lunch. Mr. IT a,rden came 1:Ic, ,t he Philippin es with only the det ~.rm in a~':on tG wOlk and to SUCCflJd, many years ago. BelievhllS' that in rest:lurant busil:(cES, there is success just as in any othm' calling, 'h e wznt down to work, and worked hard while others drifted. Today hi s esi:ablishment, Plaza Ll'..'1ch, is O:le of the most moc':,rn and Pl'c';:)(TOUS r estaurants in Manila. It is the rcndczvouz of businessman of aU cn. eds and climes.

'HARRISON, ROlDERT J. Pl;esident, N01'i:on & H c£rrison -Go., InC. -

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Born Dl::cember 31, 1871, San F,rancisco CalifoI'!1ia, U. S. A., £IOn of nobert J. and Mary Louise NaJnara; mr.'yied to Can'i,:) Augusta Hargis; member, Elks, Mani!a ':;olf, :(VIanila Polv, Army & Navy, UniverSIty, and B:lgui(; Country clu.bs. Educated at i:he St. Joseph's AcadeJuy, Oakland, California. Organizer of the Nm tcn & Hamison ' Co , Ir:,c _; president, Phiiippina Inter-Island Steamship Co., Tondo Deve:I:,pment Co., 11: c.,' I su3n Co.rpc;raticn .i and director, Manila Railrod (;0.

HASHIM, A7,IZ T ANNUS PrelSitietYIJil.a.nd Mana g er, A. T. Hashim BCtrn October 31, 1877, Damascus, Sy,ria, E:,011 of Tanni1il .1oseph ahd Freda D. Roza; married to Emily Anna McCall; 'has two children; Mason; member of many masonic 10Jges in the Philippines and abr<~ad; member, American Chamber of Commm'oz of Manila and National Rifle Association. Educated in Sonoma County, California. Engaged in business fox more than thirty years; retail me~'challt in New Westminister, B. C., Canada, 189698; he came to the Philippines in 1899; was in the r'ztail and wholesale busi~ ness until 1914; goyernmellit contractor and ' manufacturer of army and navy uniform~; eonducts business under the name of A. T. Haa'h im & Co., Ltd., im~ pcrt3r, and who].zsgle diamond merchants, Acting consul general for TUl-key in ,Manila f,:'om 1912 untjl the U. S. entered the World War.

151


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152


THE BUILDERS OF PHILIPPINE COMMERCE HAUSSERMANN, JOHN WILLIAM Vice-president, Bengu.ert Oomsolidated Mining Co. Born December 14, 1867, OJ:ennont Country, Ohio, son of Louis C. and Dorothy Traub; married to Jessie Edith Moonlight; has two children; member, Mas.coI1, Knight of Templa.r, Shriner, Elks, Modern Woodmen of America; Court of Honor, Military Order of Carabao, Spanish-American War Veterans, Veterans of Foreign Wa.rs, Rotary, Army & Navy, University, Baguio Country, Wack Wack Golf & Country, Manila Golf, and Manila Polo clubs; Congressional! Club, Washington, D. C.; Cincinnati Automobile Club, Cincinnati Chamber of Commerce, Ohic. Society of New York, American Ba,r Association, American Chamber of Commerce of the Philippin e Island s . ...-; Graduated from the University of Cincinl1!:.,~i in i889; city attorney in L eavenworth, Kansas; practiced law uTlltil 1898; second lieutenant of the 20th Kansas volunteers; Judge Advocate during the latt€lr part of t:he Insurrection; Cirty Attorney of Manila in 1900, and Assistant Attorney General in 1902; head of the la w firm Haussermann, Cohn & Fisher. R eti:red from the legal profession, and electred president Benguet Ocmsolidatect Mining Co., 1915; president, Balatoc Mining Co., North Luzon Power Co. 1927; Directpr, Pliilippin e American Drug Co., Manila Hume Pipe & TUe Oc.. , Peoples Bank & Trust Co., and the Peoples Mortgage & Investmen t Co., vice prcsic:\elJt, Ame.rican Chamber of Commerce. HEADINGTON, JOHN LABON l"iDe-P t'esiden,t and Mwnag e'[', Philippme Button CO?"POI cd·:on. Born March 29, 1879, Mount Yernon, Knox County . Ohio, s.c,n of L. N. and Mary Margal'et Ma,r ker; Mason, Shriner, Elks; member, Army & Navy, University and Manila Golf clubs; and Y. M. C. A.; director and treasurer, American Chamber of Commerce; Past Oommander, United Spanish War Veterans; Deputy Commander-in-Chief f.c.r P. I., Vetsrans of Fo.reign Wall'S of U. S.; Provincial Viceroy for P. I., Imp erial Order of the Dragon; member, Military Order of the Carabao. Attended Mount V,ernon High School, and Kenyon Military Academy. $erved in China with the expeditionary foroes in the Boxer Uprising; awarded medals for the Spanish-American War, the Barto-Rican occupation, Philippine Insurrection and Chinese Relief Expedition. Served Philippine Government in variou~ capacities; became tr>easurer, Manila Trading & Supply Co., and San Juan Hei ghts Co.; Vice-pres ident and manager, Philippine Button Co;rporation.

HEILBRONN, JOSEPH P. P1"opriet01' am Pre.sident, J. P. H eilbrO'nn Co . Born in a small town near Wiesbadell, Germany; ma.rried to Charlotte E. Klopp; left school at fifteen, staTted practical education in printing and

' 153


T HE B UILDER

OF PHILIPPI

; 'It .. - .... __ .... __ ............ _ .. ___ .. _,. __ .. ____ .. __ .... ____ .. _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ - - ........................ _ . . . . . . . . . '. _ .................... __ ....

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.

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WILLIAM P. LANE

BEN ITO LA 0

GE ERAL MAN GER

MANAGER

Kodak Philippin.{!s, Ltd.

La Dichrt Cig. & Ci!lrt,.r/,tlf FIIClolIJ ...

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ROBERTO LAPERAL

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PROP.

1 ictorina G. de Laperai Jewelry Store

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FORTlL <ATO G. LAPID

IA:>iAGER

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THE BUILDER

OF PHILIPPINE COMMERCE ---

_._--------

paper business in Breslau and B ~r lin, Germany; went to the United States and worked wilth J. E. Linde & Co. New Y e.rk; moved to Chicago and joined B r adner, Smith & Co.; later engaged in paper manufacture with Willamette Papac Co. Oregon. Came to the Philippines and worked with Schmidt & Ziegber for six years; tarted own paper business in 1909, establishing J. P. Heilbro11ll Co . which has since gmown and became the leading pap e;r company in the Orient. Once president, Philippine Drug Co., and dil'ector, Philippine ational Bank. HERNANDEZ, MAXIMO C. Mamag e?", At<lt and Wiborg Company Born at Parafiaque, Rizal, Jun e 2, 1898, son of Jacinto and Maria Cornelio; marLied to Rosario Cruz; has five children; member, Mu e.g Lodge No. 89, F. & A. M. Educated at the Univer ity of the. Philippines, receiving his A. A. degree in 1924, and his LL B. degree in 1929; became manager, Ault & Wiborg Co., manufacturers of printing inks) vamishes, and deal€,>:"s in printing and Lithographic machinery, paper and suppli es; second ]eutenant, Philippine N ationa] Guar:d.

I

HESS VON WICHDORFF, G. Assistamt !'dan.age1·, L. Model & Co. Born N e.vember 28, 1877, in Erfurt, Germany, son of Hans and Mathilde Hess von Wichdorff. Educated in Erfurt, Germany, came to the Philippines in Ifill, and 'employed in Adc,]fo Richter & Co. as :store manager. Resigned afIter three years and joined the Botica Boie. Employed as manager ,c.f the textile depal,tment of Hintz &. Landt, in San Francisco, California, 1924. Returned to Manila in 1921 to join the Dehn & Ebsen Co. as import manager, until 1924; later joined L. Medel & Co. as assistant manager, a position he sLll holds.

HEYW ARD, ARTHUR SMITH Pnesrident, Cebu Sugar Co.., ,and L uzon Sug'alr Company. Born A ugusi 28, 188(), Bluffton, South Ca,rolina, U. s. A., son of George Cuthbert and Margal'et Dear; married to Grace Hazeltine; member, Army & Navy, University, Manila Polo, Manila ·Yacht, and Baguio Count,ry club, and Pacific club of Honolulu. Attended the public school at Savannah, Georgia; entered Clemson College, Sc,ut.:.'1 Carolina, and graduated as a mechanical engineer.

155


TIlE Dt;rLc~S OF PHILIPPINE COM1ILnCE

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ATALI i U LA \'AUlA & GE.'ER,u. MA '\AGER La ,'Wtill & Cu 11/ prill II

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T HE B UILDERS OF PHILIPPINE COMMERCE President and director, Luzon and Cebu Sugar companies ; memb(,r, -executive and finance commlttee, Philippine Sugar A ssociation. J oined the San Francisco offi ce of the G'aneral Electric Co.; manager of t he General E lectric Co., 1912; (,rganized to the Cat ton N eill Engineering & Machinery Co., 1920, and was vice-presido,mt and manager until 1926 . First lieutenant, Nat ion a l Gu a;rd, H awaii, 1916 .

HIZ ON, PRIM O Pr oprriefo?' aq.d Marnag â&#x201A;Źlr, L abanatorio Hizon. Born F'abruary 9, 1872, Mexico, Pampanga, son of Atanacio alld Anicet a Hip Coli t o . Obt ained his ealrly ed ucati on in a private school ; pharmaceutical chemist, Univer sity of Sa nto Tomas in 1895 . Began his lif e's work with the :eot:ica de San F ernando , 1896; opened Farmacia Hizon in Manila, 1903; lat er' t h e f a m ous Laborator io H izon. Pion ear in his line; the first t o wo rk in t he a nalysis of blood" stool and sputum. His prepa.rati.cJ1 one of which is " Smilaxir" won prizes, and are wellkn ~-w n.

HO EBRECK, LE ON VON M an,agâ&#x201A;Źll', UniVoersal Piot1Alres Corporation, Manila B l'l1mch. Born July 16, 1882, W esu Flanders, B elgium. St udi ed mechanical engineering, University of Ghent; sDught a dventure in Kongo Free S tate; It.rave]].ad much; joined the United States Air Ser vice during t he Wor ld W ar; came to th e Philippines in ] 919 ; tri ed agriculture in Calulua n , Conception , Tarlac; joined the Lyric Film Exchange, Inc . , became manager ( Manila Branch) Univer sal Picture Corporation, 1931.

HOYER, ARTHUR Vioe-P?'esiden t, M anilt), Gas Corporation Born November 30, 1885, Meseburg, Germany, son of Hugo a nd Eli sa Sander; membor, Germany, Manila Polo, Manila Golf, 'Vack Wack Gold' and. Country, and Manila R otary clubs, and European-American Y. M. C . A . R eceived his commarcial and banking education in Germany ; specialized in the administration of gas companies. Came to the Philippines as a m ember of the construction fi rm which erected the Manila Ga s Corpor a tion; r ose through various :responsible posit ions; lat'er became vice-president and m anager of the latter. Commer cial manager for the installation of an enormous water works system in Holland, befc,re coming to the Philippines .

157


T HE B UILDER

OF P IIILlPPH\E

011 IERC'E

ii----------------------------- ---~~,c~--~'"--------------- - -~-~----"- ---------------- -"-" -- - i

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JOSE L, DE LEON ' I

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THE BUILDERS OF PHILIPPINE COMMERCE JINKS, BURTON FLOYD lVICl!YIJagerr, Subscription Dept., The Associat.ed P ttlblishe路rs. Born July 29, 1897, Sabetha, Kansas, U. S. A., son of B. F. and Martha L ewis; married to Theresa Agnes 1.'Ilaly; member, University Club, Manila Golf Ol'u b, Army & Navy Club, Baguio Country Club, Veterans of Foreign WaTs; Master, St. John's Lodge N e,. 9, F. & A. M., 1930; member, Luzon Chapter No.1, R. A. M.; Oriental Council No.1, R. & S. M., Far Eastern Commandery No .1, K. T. and Islam T emple, A. A. O. N. M. S. Came to the Philippines, December 25, 1919, as an Army Field Clerk, U. S. A. Manager, Subscription Department, Associated Publishers, since -.1921. JOLLYE, HENRY PATRICK LYNCH General Manag er, Mani l(~ Elecbric Co . B c,rn October 22, 1884, Dov,er, Englarid; member, Wack Wack & Country, Manila Golf, Manila Polo, Army & Navy, and Baguio CountTy Clubs. Educate.d in the p,rivate schools in Eng.1and. Came to the Philippines in January, 1911; asso iated wirth the Manila Electric Co. fOIl' more than twenty one years. App eJnted general ma ager in 1925. Served with the British force in Salonica and France, dllring the World ar .

'r

KAHN,.LEOPOLDO P.l'esidmt aJnd Gene7'al Manag er, L a ~st 'r e lla del Norte.

Rom in Alsace, France, in 1870; came to the PhilippiDes, and through his firm, La Estrella del N or,te, first introduced into the islands the phonograph in cinematograph, and the French Autol11Je,bile. Spent many years in busin.ess ; ha.rd worker and fair in his dealings; decorated by Governor Pasquier of Franch Indo-China as the most cultured Frenrl1l11an in the Jslands. Own EstreMa Auto Palace, Estrella Second-Hand Auto She,p and La Estrella del N ort'e, biggest jewellry store in the Philippines.

Gen

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KENNEDY, JAMES EDWARD Sup e?-intJendent, Bao.olocl.-lVIu?'cia Milling Co.

Born Mendocino, California, U. S. A., son .c.f James P. and Jane Fletchel'; studied at the Mendocino High School, entered the mechanical engineering department of the Unioll Iron Works Ce,.; joined Honolulu Iron Works Co., and later, worked in various engineering works in the United StateS! and,/Hawaii. Assishin,t Superintendent, San Carlos Milling Co., San Carlos, Occidental N egn'os; Cc.n>:truction SupeTintendent, Central Del Carmen at Del Carmen, Pampanga; and later, with the Bacolod Murcia Milling Co., Bacolod, Occidental N egros.

159


TH~ BUlLDER~

OF

PH ILIPPINE COMMERCE

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III L. D. LOCKWOOD

J. R. LLOYD

VICE-PRESIDENT

MANAGER

Th e rl mericrvn E.rp/'pss

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160

--- ----------.-


THE BULDERS OF PHILIPPINE COMMERCE KISHIZOE, YOHU Proprietor and Manager, Triangulo Studio Born October 15, 1894, Hiroshima, Japan, son of Kasushi and Owasa .Kisilizoe. O.htained early education in Japan; was in Java in 1910; later in Batavia; came to the Ph ilippines in ] 912; worked as photographer for Sun tudio, and Bernabe Studio; founded Triang ulo Studio, May 1, 1921, which has since become one of the biggest photo studies in the I s l ands~

KNEEDLER, HARRY D. P?'esident, K n e.dle?路 R ealty Co. Born Septembelr 23, 1880 colhosvill e, Ill., U. S. A., sen of Christopher Dohne and LON!tta Penny; ma.Tried to Ethel Helen, Mason; has twc. children; member, York Rite Masonic Bodies, ile Temple, Mystic Shrine, and Manila Lodge of Elks. Practiced as a physician in Havana, Cuba; came to the Philippines in 1900; was in the boxer campaign, China; served with the American Red Cross in Siberia, 1917-18. Owner kneedle.T Building, Leonard WCoOd Hotel, various apartment houses, and Bay V' ew Hotel, "the last word in steel con truction,"

LABAYEN, SEGUNDO DiAZ

Supe?-1ntendent of Ji1abrication, Binalbag,an, E state', Inc. Born March 29, 1890, Talisay, Occidental N egros, son c.f Segundo L. and Hormesinda S. Diaz Labayen; married to Mary Charlotte Lyncker; har. three children; Ma~on; member American Chemical Society sinc路a 1917, and Philippine Sugar Association, Received early education in the Philippines; studi'ad in Nagoya, Japan, 1907; attended the College cif Agriculture, Universilty of the Philippines, at Los Banos, Laguna, and I'aceiYed his B, S. degree in 1915; M, S. degree, Louisiana State University, 1917. Chemist, Meeker, Raceland and Oakland cent.rals in Louisiana; chief chemi t, Central Alto CedE',re~ Cuba, for five years and I'a ter assistant superintendent of fabrication; associajced, Binalbagan Estate, Inc" 1923, assuming the position .cif superintendent of fabrication, a post he has since held. Member, International Society of Suga.r; committee of .the Philippine Sugar As ociation concernad with Chemical control and sugar manufac~ure; fc,r some time presdent, Binalbagan Estate Employees' Mutual Aid Association,

161


THE BUILDER

OF PHILIPPI E

01lI1mnCE

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162

1',', 88


THE BUILDERS OF PHILIPPINE COMMERCE LAGMAN, ROGERIO Proprietor a/rod MGlnag er, JtUGIn di3 La C1"'IA,z

St t~dio

Born January 5, 1887, Mexico, Pampanga, son of T eodoro and Simona Canda; married; has five children. Blind fr c,m childhood; studied art; the School of t:1e Deaf and Blind, government pension ado 'to the United States in 1909; excell ed in the clasEes where he studied; headed a .school debating team in th e U. S.; taught at San Fernando and at the Philippin e Normal School for the Deaf and Blind; joined the Hea()c,::k Company as chief agent of th e contract deparlcment in jewelry business. -. Started the Ester' Studio on CaUe Azcarraga wher e Juan de la Cruz Studio No. 1 now stands; Juan de la Cruz Studio No.2, now one of the biggest in Manila.

LAN DAHL, JOHN President, Jokln Lan'dahl, Inc. Born January 7, ~870, Lunden, Germany, son of Joachim and Maria Uffelmann; manried ito Dolores Suarez.Llanos; has four children; member, German Club, Casino Esp~fi.ol. Educated in Humburg, Germany; cam to Manila in 1890; worked for Seckel' & Co.; became pro rietc.r of the same in five, years; placed firm unde,!' his own name, 1900; business confi ca.ted by American authorities during the World War; was returned to him in 1920 by the Alien Property Custodian; reopened with more vigor, now one of the leading import firms in the Philippines, handling textij,es, hardware, machinery, rai1road supplies, sundries, etc., also conducting branches in Cebu, Aparri, New York and Hamburg; Dir.ectQr, Bunning & Co. Inc., and Remnant Co., Inc.

LA 0, BENITO Manage?', LIJ, Dicha Cigwr & Cigarrette Factory Born in 1873, Amoy, China; ma.rried to Manuela Gonzales; has 'three children; came to the Philippines in 1891; worked as a clerk in the firm of Pablo Ortega. With savings founded "Viva la Suerte" in 1899, one of the earliest cigarrette and tobaeco factories in the city. Later founded "La Paz y Buen Viaje", now a first class establishment.

LEDDA, FELIX Z. P.)"esidoent, Ledda & Co., l ine. Born February 21, 1894, Balaoan, La Union, P. I., son of Estanislao and Liberata Zembrano; married to Felicidad Nera; has six children; mem~

163


··

..

THE BUILDERS OF PHlLIPPI~E C01\IMETICE

..

..

.

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THE BUILDERS OF PHILIPPINE COMMERCE

ber, Wack Wack Golf Club, Philippine Chamber of Commerce, Philippine Columbiam Association, Dapit'an Lodge No 21, F. & A. M. Educated in the primary schools of La Union, Phildppine School of Commerce, Manila, took a course with the International Correspondence Schools. CIâ&#x201A;ŹlI'k fOir one year, and later a telegraph operator wi.th the Bureau of Posts; entered the employ of A. Alkan, Inc., as bookkeeper, and in 1922, was promoted to assistant manager. Engaged in business for himself, since 1931, conducting firearms, ammuni'tion and sporting goods. LAPERAL, ROBERTO Proprietor amd Ma11;{LgCtr, Victorina G. LapCtrul J ewel?'Y Slto1'e Born December 31, 1890, son of Roberto and Tarsila Flores; married to Viqt{),rina Guison. Educated at the Manila High School; worked for the Bureau of Science; stariiJd jewelry business with his wife in 1913 ; peddl ed j ewelry in the provinces. Hard wo.rking and honest; now owns the biggest and finest Fil~pillo concern dealing in diamoil1ds coming from the largest mines and firms of t h e world. LARKIN, WILLIAM WILEY Born May 27, 1880, Mo ristown, Termessee, U. S. A., son of GeorgeTaylor and Martha Ana Carriger; married (to Marie Durst; has two children. Studied at the High Sc'hcol of his home town, Halbrook Bunnen College and Tennessee Normal Colleg>e where he obtained his B. Accts. degree. Came to the Philippines in 1903; worked with the government in variou.s capacities; chief accountant, Bureau of Public Wo,rks in 1909-11; practiced privately as Public Accountant; professio.llul lecture.r, U. P.; president, B c,ard cf Accountancy, P. 1.; and Philippine Institute of Certified Accountants. Member, various American societies of Accountants; American Chamber ()f Commerce; Manila R c,tary, Manila Yatch, Wack Wack, Circumnavigators Baguio Golf, Elk, and Masonic Clubs. Possesses masonic 'highest h c'norary d,egree. LAVADIA, CATALINO P1'oprieto1' and Manager, LavadiJa and Co., Inc. Born February, 1888, Pagsanjan, Laguna, son of Elias and Romana Unson; married vc, AngeJ'a Lopez; member. Club Filipino; Columbian Associaltion and Sinukuan Lodge. Educated at the Ateneo de Manila; deputy provincial treasur'2r of Iloilo, Bulacan, Pampanga and Pangasinan; assistant executive secreta;ry and later Under Secretary of the Depal'tment of Conunerce and Communications. Technical adviser, Independence Mission, 1923. Proprietor and Manager, Lavadia & Co., Inc.,

165


THJl;

BUILDERS OF PHILIPPINE COMMER E

._ .. -------_._.------------------_._.-----------------------------------------------------------

JOH

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MA TAGER

M,,/It r & Phippx (Manila), LM.

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166


THE BUILDERS OF PHILIPPINE COMMERCE F OR'l'UN ATO G. LAPID

Prop. & Mal~'Lqcr, Ri-:.ai I ce Phn'. Born February 27, 1888, G"!lagua, Palr)paI'g&, tion of Francisco and J a路 cinta Gabiola; manied ic. Sofronia Paras; h&s nine children. Education; eklmentc,ry llea,rning, Gua~ua, Pampanga; seoc.ndary learning, BUCJ1Camino Private School, tlJell enrolled al the Liceo de Manila bu~ di~contimled because he was more inclined to bu~ine"s. Began hi s uusiness in bakery in 1907. He met with hard luck. He t:hen established the "El Fruto de Cacaq". Again he failed. Then he again l"f'-es,tablished his bakery in H)24. ""ith his littie savings he bought a fis h-pond. In 1929 he ~I~,ld this and inv'ested the a mount in an ice pl ant, I<izal lee Pla nt, at. Bacluran, RizaJ. Bu ilt another lee P;ant in Cavite but was short lived.

LEDESMA, CESAR

Vic e-President

ana Gerl,e'ral

Manag er, Talisay-Silay Milling Co .

Born February 3, 1883) J aro, Iloilo, P . I., s,on of Simeon and T omasa Villalobos; married 'three times; has thre children; member, K night of Columbus. L eading figure in th e development of tn e suga,r industry; vice-presi ded and ge.neral manager, Tali sa y-Silay Milling Co., N egros Occidental; owner , several large haciendas; vice-president, Central Azucarera del Danae. ; chairman, .executive - committee, Cent.ra:l Azucarera of- N egro'S Dccidental.-路 Educated at the Seminary of J aro; Qbtained Ba::heior of Commercial Science degree, Ateneo de Manila, Novenlber 15, 1902'

LEON, JOSE L. DE

President, Pampr.::ng,g,

S~Lga7'

Development Co., Inc.

Born Septembe-r 12, 1867, Bacol er, Pampanga, son of Damaso and Graciana Hizon; ma.rried lto R egina J oven, 1886; and to Natividad in 1906; has one son. Rated as one of the wealthi est men . in the Phil ippines; recognized leader of the sugar industry; extznsive operate.r in reall estate; owns many valuable improved properties in Manila. Self-made man; started to work in ag1riculture when very young- and opened a g-eneral merchandise store, the "Indispensable" in hi s hor.l e t own. Member, Land A ssessment and served as councilor for the Municipality of BacoloT. President, Pampang-a Sugar Development Co . , Inc . ; vice-president, Central Luzon Milling Co; and member, Board of Direct e.rs, Philippine N ational Bank.

167


THE BUILDERS OF PHILIPPI lE COl\I l\IE:!CE ~ ""."""".""" •• " ••••• ". O~~ """ •• "" •••••• " •••• " •••• ~••• "."'"" '"'""'""""'""""""'"""~l

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ENRIQUE MONSEHHAT

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PRl':~lDl':N T , M A AGER ManilCL Yellow Tcui,CIIU CO'IllfJ(jIl/l

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THE BUILDERS OF PHILIPPINE COMMERCE LIM, TIACO PING Gene,rat Marvager, Phil. Ar-omatic Cigar·ett.e lVI.rtnujact!ll'ing Co., I nc. Born September 12, 1900, F c,okien, China, son of Lim Chou Bien; married Tinay Tee; has !:hree chi ldren; member and past master, Hagdang B..to Lodge, No. 87, F. & A. M. Eclucru :acl in Chilla; entered In8tituto de Mani :a; obtained B. S. C. degree, Jose Rizal College, 1924. Started business career as cashier, Philippine Aromatic Cigarette Manufacturing Co., ~o on became manag;ar; treasure,!, ana director, Manila Hill Flaschrackas Ce,rporation.

LIMLINGAN, GERARDO S. Dir.ectoj·, Guagua NCltion~ll In sti;·ute. Born October 21, 1901, Guagua, Pampanga, Sic.n of Eulalio and CorneLa Sa.: tiago. Fillished his elemeRta!;~y and high school education with honors; obtained his Ll. B. degree in three years, Philippine Law School: member, Philippine Bar:; practices his pr,[,fession anJ the same time miJllages and dir'ccts, Guagua. Na . nal Institute; Itraveled in Europe, Africa, and in the Orient, 1930.

T JRSO Geneml l)IJanag er, L izan·dga H f'.T·m((llos . Be,rn April 12, 1888, Iloilo, Philippine I slands, son of Tirso and Maria Fernandez; married to Nadine de Potestad; has three childr.;m; member, Casino Espanol, Manila Golf, Manila PolCo, and Army and Navy c~ubs; Manila, Real Automotive club de Espana, Real Club de Puerta de Hierro, Casino de Madrid, and Gran PC'lHt; Cluh Cantabrico, San Sebastian, Espana. Educ8lted in Spain, France and Scotland; returned to the Philippines in 1£07 to start his commercial career, in which he has beCColTIe one of the leading sugar manufact urers and ,axpe.r1:ers in the 1s1ands. General manager, Lizarraga Hermanos; pl'~sident, Kabankelan Sugar Co., Inc., and the MCillnt A,rayat Sugar Co., Inc.; and direc1:or, La Urbana, and Philippine Aerial Taxi Co. Member, Spanish Chamber of Commerce (president from 1922 to 1924); Philippine Chamber c,f Commerce; and trustee, Philippine Sugar Association.

LOCKWOOD, LOT DEAN A tf ol'ney and Dil'ecto?', rhilippilne .4ir W(~US, Inc. Born February 20, 1879, Broowsville, California, U. S. A., f;on of Thomas J. a11d Albartiva Brown; membel', Manila Lodge, Elks, Past Exalt-

169


THE BUILDERS OF PHILIPPINE COMMERCE

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THE BUILDERS OF PHILIPPINE COMMERCE - - - - -_._ - -- - - - ed Ruler, Manila Golf Club, Manila Polo Club, Rotary club and Baguio Country dub. Studied in 'che public schools of California; Winkins Normal Institute and Stanford University. Taught for four years in California; was supervising teacher, provincial and district audita.r in Ithe Philippines. Began law practice in Legaspi, Naga, in 1913; later specialized in publ~c urtility legal maters; represented mast of the large transpOlI'tation companies and electric light plants and other public utility corporations in the Islands. Attorney and director, Phillip pine Airways, Inc., and Philippine Taxi Company; president, T'ampanga Bus Ce.. lnc., N orth!':rn Luzon Transportation Co., Inc., Motor Service Co., Inc.; vice-president, A, K, Ammen Transpor~tation Co., Inc.

LOPEZ, DON CARLOS

M,amag err and S'upervising Engine.e1', Lopez Sugflff Ce'ntrral. Born October 12, 1884, J aro, Iloilo, son of Eugenio and Marcela Villanueva; married to Jovita Delez; has six children; member, Columbian Association, Cornell club, Arrow Gun Club and Malipayon Club. Received his primaroy educ<lJtia.n in Manila; entered Cornell Universi<ty, Ithaca, N. Y., 1903; obtained his; C. E. degree in 1909; engineer for Philippine government from 1909-11; general manager and Supervising Engineer, Lopez Sugar Centr I since ;1.928.

LUNA DE SAN PEDRO, ANDRES Born more than fifty-five years ago in Paris, France, son of Juan and Paz Pardo de Tavera; member, "SocietJe Central de Architectes Francais." Began his early education at the Ateneo de Manila;; took a course in architecture with the International Correspondence Schools; went to Europe in 1912; served his apprenti.c eship under the famous artist constructor Gilardo; a<ttended the Superior School of Fine Arts in Paris and worked in the office of Paulin, noted Franch architect; and Emil Bertc.ne, Chief Architect of the Fr~mch Government; .studied sculpture with Vermon, and in 1918 iOibtained the A.rchitect Diplome Par Ie Government Francais. Became Chief architect, City of Manila 1920-24; built Perez and Samanillo Building, Santa Escolastica Conservatc.ry of Music and the magnificient Crystal Arcade.

L UZ, ARSENIO N.

Dimector-generral, Philippine Can-nitv.al Association Born December 14, 1889, Lipa, Batangas; ubtained his A. B. degree at the Liceo de Manila; attended Escuela de Del'echo de Manila; took advanced journalism, Columbia University.

171


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TIlE BUILDETIS OF PHILIPPINE COMlIETIC'E Worked with La Vanguardia and EI ~enacimi ento; edited El I deal and the Philippine Herald, 1918; represented lho Ph llifJpines in the foreign trade Convention of San Francisco in 1920 and in the Tropical Products Exposition, London, in 1921; member of many independence missions in the United Staues; al!;o of many social and civic clubs and organizations of the country; direcr.c.r-gencral, Philippine C2.rnival, Association; in charge, Philippine Pal1ticipation in the Paris Exposition; general agent, National Life Insurance Co.

MADRIGA 1" VICENTE President, ivladrigal and CO'm1JCJ!ny, Inc. Don Vicente was once a poor man. He studied at the University of Sto. T c,mas, but: much of his success was due his outstanding quaHties as a worker and a business man. As a student, he was quiet and thoughful; and as a business man, he is scientific. From employee, he became the coal king of ,the Philippines. He also owns various inter-island steamers . He is president of the Philippine National Bank. He is considered Cil1e of the most successful' Filipino businesslnen.

Asst. General Manager, T,nlisay-Silay Milling Co., Inc. Born Febraury 14, 1901, Talisay, Negoros Occidental, son of Dic,nici"o and Adela Lizares; married to Loreto Ledesma; has one daughter; member, Smiles Club, (president, 1922-23), and Philippine Sugar Association. Educated at the Ateneo de Manila, University of the Philippines, and Jose Rizal CcJlege, Manila, goradualling at thp. head of his class in 1923 and obtaining his A. C. S. and B. C. S. degTees. Entered the employ of the Talisay-8iJay Mi'ilillg Co. as Secretary tn the President and general manager; Assistant. General Manager, 1926; director and Se::retr,:,y-TreasureI', Central Azucarera del Danao aJld manager of its main offioe in Talisay; director geJleral, Talisay Can:ival, 1927.

MAPUA y BAUTISTA, TOMAS

P?'esil..ert;t, Mapua Institurte of T,eohnohogy. Born December 21, 1888, Manila, son of Juan and Justina Bautista; married 'to Rita Moya in 1916; has three children; meJllber, Club Filipino, "Gargoyle", Philippine Chamber of Commerce, Bagumbayan Lodge. No.4, F. & A. M; and the Philippine Be.dies, A and A. Scot:ish Rite. Educated at Manila and at Boone's Prepa.ratory School, Berkeley, California, 1903-07; attended Cornell UniverÂŁ~ty, Ithaca, New York, 1907-11,

173


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where he obtained his Bachelor of Architecture degree. Architectural Draftsman, Bureau of Public Works, 1912-15; supervising architect, 1918-27. Built the Philippine Normal School, urses Home, Psychopatic Hospital. Organized the now famous Mapua Institute of T,echnology in 1928; and Ithe M. Y. T. Construction Works.

McCLELLA ,CHARLES TRAFFORJ,) De.puty Generral Manager, Radio CO'rp011ation of the PhilippinelS Be.rn September 25, 1900, Chicago, Ill., U. S. A., son of EdwaJ.'ld Wheldon and Edith Traffo.rd; man;ied to Anna Kragerud; has one son; member; Army & Navy Club Polo Club, University Club, Tiro al Blanco, Rotary club. Educated in Red Bank, New Jersey; served with the Radio Corporation of America as a radio traffic expert; traffic superintendent, Corporation of the Philippines, 1927, and, deputy g'enerai manager, 1929; was loaned to the Norwegian government as a radio traffic expevt, and to the Japanese government, 1932; lieu'tenant, U. S. Naval Reserve.

MF.LIAN y PAVl'A., ANTO 10 (Count de Peracamps) P'Ir esident, El Hogarr Filipino. Born May 21, 1879, Las Palm as, Canary Islands, Spain, son of Don Luis and Dona Dolores Pavia Van-Halen; married to Dena Margarita Zobel de Ayala j has five children j member, Casino Espanol, Sta. Mesa Gun, Manila, Army and Navy, Manila Polo, Wack Wack Golf and Country, and Baguio Golf and Country Clubs. Graduated as a Bachelor of Arts, San Isidro Institute, Madrid, Spain, spent ,t en years in the Spanish Civill Service; has beeri- either a founder or a director for many firms in Spain, South America, United States and in the Philippines . Founder and vice-president, La Cas a de las Espafias, New York, 1926; founder and president, Philippine International Cc.rporation and Baguio Improvement & DeV'elopment Corporation; and vi,c e-president Metropolitan Theater Co. and Aviation Corporation of the Philippines. Elected hanorary president in perpetuity, Casino Espanol, Manila, February, 1914; appointed Comendador de la Real Orden de Isabela La Catolica in December, 1918; named successOlr to the ititle of Count de Peracamps, March, 1923. Vice-President and member executive committee, Anti-Tubercolosis Society, P. 1.; director, and treasurer, Hospital Espanol de Santiago; appointed Spanish Consu~ General and interim fOlr the Philippines, July, 1929, and Honorary Consul for P'eru, July, 1930.

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THE BUILDERS OF PHILIPPINE COMMERCE Pre ent President, EI Hagar Filipino, Filipina Campania de Segu;ros, Philippine In1ternatonal Corporatictn, Baguio Improvem ent' nevelopment Corp.; vice-president, Metopolitan Theatre Co. and Aviation COTporation of the Philippines; director, Insular Life Assurance Co., Ltd., and Philippin e Guaranty Co ., Inc.

MEN CARINI, JOAQUIN D.

M.wnag etr, linternatiorval Correspondence Schools. Born Septemher 22, 1893, Foochow, China, son of Juan and Rosario Blancc, ; married to Augustia Vaca; has three children; member, Spanish Chamber of Commerce, Rotary Club, Casino E spanol, Philippine Philatelic Association. Manager, Philippine International Conespondence Schools; took a general and commer路c ial course, Madrid, Spain, and in Shanghai, China; awarded a certificate by the University of Cambridge, Eng land; took a degree from the CoHage 10;拢 Engineering, Univ81TSity of Sto. Tomas, Manila, 1912.

LBERT

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Co.

BOTn August 19, 1875, Switzerland, son of Julian and CaJtherine Elizabeth Mettler; mamied to Margaret Link; has one son. Educated in his country and at tha California School cil' Commerce; resided in Manila for mo.re than thirty yeliJ1's. President, Kuenzlle aDd Strieff, Inc., La Flo.r de Intal Cigar Manufacturing Co.; vice-presidenlt, Baguio Gold Mining Co. and Mangol Developm ent Ce,. ; president, American Chamber of Commerce of the Philippines; Manila Tobacco Association; member, P. I. Government Tobacco Board; directo.l', Bank of the Philippin e I slands and the Philippine Trust Co.

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MEYER THEODOR MCJ!IW,g err, Philippine Manuft(Lctwring Co.

Born August 27, 1894, Zunich, Switzerland, se,n of Theodor and Maria Baluff; marri,ad t'O Sima Andl'ieff; member, Manila Polo alld Manila Golf clubs. Educated fo.1' a business career in his native country, Switzerland; 'twelve years a~sociated with Lutz & Co.; ten year in .the Zurich office and two years in Manilla. With the Philippine Manufacturing Co. since 1922 as general sales manager for the same. Has four years of military service in Swi tze'l'land.

177


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MICIA 0, JOSE Assistctnt M imager',' Chi S eng Ca;ndte Fact.ory Born April 24, 1898, Amoy, China; married to Sy Koc; ha s three child.r en. Educated in an Anglo-Chinese School. Came t e the Philippin es in 1914. Started work as an office boy; rose through hard work; now, assi stant manager Chi Seng Candle Factory, the biggest in Manila.

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MILLER, VERNE E. President cind Gerne?Ytl Mcwag e?', Philippine

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B c.rn Fet.:·uary 15, 1877, Amherst:, Virginia, U. S. A., son of Abraham Baldwin and Camilla N elson Crane; married to Elizabeth FarmerBa:dwin; past master, Corr.agidor Lodge No.3, F. & A. M.; member, Scothsh Rite and York Ri,te Bodies; past pat.ron; Mayon Chapter, O. E. S.; director, American-European Y. M. C. A .; and ATmy & Navy Y. M. C. A; mcmber, R c.tary, M.a Mnila Polo, and Manila Golf clubs. Obtained his A. B. rom Rotges College; came to the I slands in 1901; work·ad as (teacher, 'h igh school principal, and division sup€.rintendent: of schools, 1907. Engaged in business; be aTIle the Hresid nt and Genaral Manager, Philippine Education Co., Inc. MONSERRAT y CALVO, ENRIQUE Pr,e sident and Manage?'1 lJ(Ianil.a Yellow Taxicab, I nc. Born November 18 1897, Lingayen, P angasinan, son of Dr. Rafael Monserra t and Soledad Calvo; man-ied to Rosario Caballero; has one sen; member, Tiro al Blanco, Antoni a. Sanz Law Office; Morri s Motors, Ltd., Cowley, Oxford, England; Dunlop Rubber Co., Engl and ; and Ohmer Fare Register Co., Day,ton, Ohio, U. S. A . Began his studies at the Ataneo de Manila; .received his A. A. degree at San Juan de Lctl'an; Ll. B., Sante. Tomas University; admit:ted Philippine Bar, 1919; prac'ticed in Manila till 1930; during which time, he kept planning' how to give the city a modern, effici>ant and economical means of .transpol t a tion . Studied taxicab bu sin ess for ten years; founded t:he "Manila Yellow-Taxicab, Inc.," the fir t and biggest taxicab business in t:he Philippine I lands. MORENO, JOSE P?·oprie.to?- and Manager, St. Jloseph's Ho spit\'J,l Born at San Isidro, Nueva E cija in 1902; son of Jose and Felisa Romano. Beg-nn his s tudi e~ in his home town; obtained his A. B. degree, At'eneo de Manila, 1921; n ector of Medicine, Sto. Tomas University, 1926.

179


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Work-ed with the San Juan de Dios Hospi.tat r esident physician, St. Paul's Hospital, 1927-29; practiced privately; ltraveled in the Orient. Physician, San Miguel B,rewery, Inc., Manila Boxing Club and Pampanga Bus Co.; established St. Joseph's Hospital, 1930.

MORI, TEIZO P?'oprietor and M (JfYb(J,gerr, Mcmi B icycle Sto?'e.

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Bc,rn August 27, 1885, Japan; marri,ed to Mesako Soto; has seven children; member, Japan Club. Received his early education in Japan. Came to the Philippines a poor man; tried bicycle business; succeeded through hon est and hard work. Established Mori Bicycle Store, now the most popular Japanese store ,00: its kind in Manila.

MULLEN, NICOLAS EDWARD P?-eStident, P eopZes B amk and Trust Company. Born August 25, 1'886, Brooklyn, N,ew York City, son .cÂŁ Nicholas Ambrose and Ellen Rose Flxn; mason, and a ShrineT; belongs also t'O different clubs here and abroad. Graduated from Sst. J, n's, Orange, New Jersey; worked with the International Banking Corpor tion, 1915; joined the Singer Sewing Machine Co., 1916-18; and to the Asi,a Banking orporation in Shangsai. Resigned Ito organize Peciples Bank and Trust Co.; President, Philippine Iron Mines, Inc.; treasurer and director, Philippine Aerial Taxi Co.; dilrector, EI Orioente Fabrica de Tabaccos, Inc.

MURPHY, JOHN HOYSTED President, T'r~aswrer, HO t~ston Rubber Co . BOIrn September 19, 1879, New York City, son of J c.hn Micha.el and Ann CaToline Hoysted; married to Lucy Munoz; has two sons; member, Odd Fellows, Casino Espanol, Baguio Country and ViTack Wack Golf & Country clubs; Lawton Post, United States-Spanish vVar V~terans. Chief derk, U. S. Engineers' Department, Conregidor, and later Finance Department. Qua'l~ermaster Depot, in Manila; manager, Acme Motor Co.; later manager, Moderu Vulcanizing Plant, Manila; and since September 1,1928, presiden\t and treasurer, Houston Rubber Co., Inc. MYER, J. LINSDAY Managerr, Sam Jwan Heights Company, Inc. Born Augu~t 20, 1883, GIJybanks, Oceana Co., Michigan scm of George. 'Curry and Lena Hanson, married to Lucy Par-ent; member, American Chamber

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THE BUILDERS OF PHILIPPINE COn~ERC:C of Commerce, Manila Golf, Wack Wack Golf & Country and Coscop oJ:ta:l GU ~l clubs. Worked as a surveyor from 1908 to 1919 fo-. the Bureau of Lands; eng'ineer and surveyor fClr the San Juan Heights Co., ll:..ter became a member, Myers Huck Co.; diredc.• , San Juan H eights Co., In c., an:.! the San Francisco Estate, Inc. M Obtained B. Sc. and C. E. degrees, Michigan Stat'e College.

OCAMPO e HIZON, FERNANDO Partne.1·, A ')'guelles & Ocmapo. Born August 7, 1897, San Fernando, Pampanga, son of Dr. Basilio Ocampo and Lec.ncia Hizon. Studied at the Ateneo de Manila, A. B., 1914; University of Sto. Tomas, C. E., 1919; University of Pennsylvania, Bach~lor of A~· :, i :.: ult1.ire, 1921; wo.r ked with E. G. Pemot, Philadelphia; - spent two y'~ ars in Europe; assistant architect,. Bureau of Public W c.rks, P. I., four years; aS30cialced with T. Arguelles und r firm name Arguelles & Ocampo; built many prize winning buildings in Ma~ila. Memb:,l', Board of Ex miners for Architeoture, Manila, 1929; and faculty, School of Architecture, Sto. Tomas niversity.

ODOM, WILLIAM JAMES P1",e sidC'M, Odom & Ca.ntem Engi.nee?'ing Co.,

Inc.

Born alt Rutland, Vermont, U. S. A, son of Charles and Emma Graham McKay; member, Ul1jve~'sity, Manila Golf, ii\'~ck, iVa::k Golf and Countlry, and Internationa! Gun clubs. Establish~d self as engineer and contractor in the Philippines since 1899; built many of the finest buildings in Manila; erected the University club Building, In su lar Life Building, Masonic Temple and H. E. Heacock Co.; built many bridges in /the provinces. Pl'esid'i!nt, Odom & Cantera Engineering Ce.. , Inc.; directclr Peoples Bank & Trust Co., Peoples Mortgage & Investment Co., and University Building Corporation.

ORTIGAS, FRANCISCO Vice-Presid.entl and' GeniElra l Nlanag ~)·. Filipin(~s C:Ympa?li(L de S egtt?'os Born S.~p tember 11, 1875, Borac, Pampanga, son of Igna~ic, and Asuncion Barcenas; married to Julia Vargas y Camus; has seven children; member, Club Filipino, Casino E spanol, and Ti.ro al Blanco.

183


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THE BUILDERS OF PHILIPPINE COMMERCE Studied at San Juan de Letl'an College, University of U:c.. Tomas, gracuakd in Law, 1896; practiced for more than thirty-three years; staled for high government offices; connected -i n advis(,ry capacity with many big and important corpor&t.ions; specialist in ce.rporation organization and managemellt. One of the founder, F'i~~pinas Ocanpafiia de Segulros ; director, Manila RailroaJ Company, In sula.r Life Assurance Co., Lt::l., Philippine Guaranty Co., Inc., Pee,ples Mortgage and Investment Co., and San Miguel Brewery; member, Board of R egents, University of the Philippines; president, Code Commjttee, Philippine Govc,rnment!

PALANCA, CARLOS Proporiet,_',r, La Tondeiia, I nc., Mr. Palanca began life in the Philippines as a poor man, but he recognized no obstacles. He was indus路t rious and determin ed; he studied as he worked hard. He owns many .disH e ries and refineries of alcohol; membe,r, Board cof Directors, China Banking Corpora'ti on; president, Ayala Incorporada; vicepresident, and directc,r, Peo les Bank and Trust Ceo .; director, P eoples Mortgage and Investment Co.; m nager, Philipp noe Moto;t路, AIcohc.l Corporation and Bais Distelle;ries, Inc.; ice-president, anila Rice Mill Corporation.

P ANGAN, JOSE P. Assistxnt M anage?', Pimes Ho,fje l Born June 6, 1900, Ap'llit, Pampanga, son of Reman and Virginia Punsal,a n; married; has four childl路en. Received hi s early education in his home town; ran to Manila :with some b[,y fr:':mds to try their luck; Itook what wOTk he could get with some of the Manila Hotels; his diligence won for him good posit:ons ; was transferred :to Baguio; now assistant manager, Pines Hotel.

P ALARCA, ,JOSE Proprietor R ,eliable Prin ting & Supply Co. Born Odober 3, 1905; valedictc'~' ian, U. P. High School; Honor Student, College of Liberal Arts, U; P.; p.resident, Club Cervantino; Speaker Protempore, Junior House of Representatives; three times chancello;r, Philippine Barristers, College of Law.; Preside,nt Protempore, Junior Philippine Senate, U. P.; passed first grac,e examinabon and junior commerciall agent, Philippine Civil Service; LL.B; University of the Philippines; fifth place, Ba,r Examinations, 1930; sp,;~cial attorney, Bureau of Comme.rce; chief, Commerce and Miscellaneous Sec'jon Division of Statistics, Department of Agricultul"e and Commerce.

185


THE BUILDER

OF PHIL1PPI

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THE BU1LDERS OF PHILIPPINE COMMERCE PENNING, CORNELIS JOA NES HOGO Manag e?', ViC'bor~ns Milling Company, Inc. Bo.rn December 15, J 883, Rotterdam, Holland, son of A. and D. J. Elemans; married Lily Sidwell Brock; has one son; member, American Society of Mechanical Engineers; pl'asident, Sagay Escalanl:e Suga.r Co.; member, Manila club, Manila Pole. club, Manila Yacht club, Army & Navy clubs, Iloilo club, Bacolod country and Golf club. Educated in Hol'l and, gradua'ted as suga,r tecnologist from a schoc.l of technology, Amsterdam. Became manager, Victoeias Milling Co., Inc. i manager, St. Lucia Sugar Co .. , Natal, South Africa.

PEREZ, MATIAS P. O)',i (mutl M,anag el', World Book Company IOf Mew York.

Born September 25, 1895, Dupex:, Nueva Vizcaya; married to Caridad Ventura; has five children. Attended Haverlin~ High School, 1908-09; took enginee.ring Genesee Wesleyan, 1909-13; obtained Bachelor of Science degree, W,asleyan, University, 1913-17; passed Civi, Service Exam,inatic.n for SUPerintendent, 1915; joined Reserve Officers' Tl\aining Corps, 1917; fi,rst Filipino Assistant Supe,rin'tendent of City School 1920-22. cmpany, 1922, later became Became Represen,tative, 'Wodd Book Oriental Manager for the same; presiden and manager, Philippine Book COmpaJ1Y, Inc, since 1926. Obtained Ll. B. deg1ree, University of Sto. Tomas, 1932; member, Philippine Educatic.nal Institutioll, Na!tional Teachers Federation, Philippine Columbian Association, Camara de Comercio de las I slas Filipinas; vice-president, N orluzonia, Inc., and p,resindent, Cagayan de Luzon Associatiool1.

PITCAIRN, ROY CAMPBELL Mamage?', H.nwlai~an-Philippine Co. Born Novembe,!' 7, 1873, Pittsburgh, Pa., U. S. A., son of Hugh and Anne Sherfy, married to Margaret Smit Langley; has two step-children; member, Hawaiian Sugar Planters' Association. Educlited at Hamisburg Academy, Princeton University and Hahnemann Medical College, Philadelphia, M. D ., 1932; Physician and surgeon, Hahnemann Hospi'tal, Pittsburgs, 1890-98; University of Berlin, Garmany, 1898-99; with the staff of Hahnemann Hospital, 1899-1901; civil engineering and surveying, Colm'ado, 1902-12; city engineer, Storling, Colorado, 1908-12; chemist, Tobacco Plantati on C., Mexico, 1915; genâ&#x201A;ŹlTal engineer, Holly Sugar Corporation, Huntington Beach, California, 1916-18; superintendant, 'Vailuku Sugar Co., Maui, Hawaii, 1988-19; superinltendent, Hawaiian-Philippine Co., 1919-20, and since 1920, administrator and manager, Hawaiian-Philippine Co.

187


T HE B nLDERS OF PHILIP PI~E ('O :\DIERCE

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THE BUILDERS OF PHILIPPINE COMMERCE POA NGUANCO Manag-Jng Pwrtme?', Poa Ngu.anao & Co. Eorn fifty-foL'c years ago in Amoy, China. Educated in his home town. Came to Manila in 1893; worked in ciff'Jrent stcres in Manila; rose t:hrough different p c.sitions; now mar.aging partner, Poa N guanco & Co. Marriod to Chan Nuy; has four chJl drcn; membe.路, Chinese. Chamber of Commerce and Filipino-Chinese Rioa Merchants Association

POND, I:ORACE B. P?'esiden t, Pacific Ccmmercial Ccmpany Born Ju:'y 21, 1882, Waltham, MassachusEc :s, U. S. A.; member, Rotary, Army & Navy, ULiversity, Polo and Casino Espanol clubs. Came to the Philippines and began as a stenogJraphar in the Bureau of Cust;oms, joined Pacific Commercial Comparty; became import manager, 1919; late;r, vice-presicl3nt and general mar:l1gu:, and in and.her three, elected pL'esident of the companY, with a~ its subsidiaries, American Hardware and Plumbing Co., Irfternati na] Cold Stores, Fatola Bodegas and many otheL路s. One of the found(,~'s, American Chamber' of CommJrce; memb6r Board of Regents, University of e l'hilippines.

PUYAT, GONZALO President ,amd Gene?'al lYl,cnage.T, Puyat and Sons, Inc. BOrll Septembor 20, 1878, Guagua, Pampanga, of poor parents. SElf-made; acquLed all what he has now through hard work and systematic saving. Sta.lted a ~ma:a bLliard repair s]:(':;:1 many years ago, work'3d aione as long as 18 hoUl"!'s a day, economizeu much and made good investments; manufactul'ed billiard tables; bowling alleys, barber and dentid chaLs, ana household fumiturcs; busil1(sS prospared; com:idered the furnitDre king of the Islands. Travel ad abroad; member, vari c.'.ls ~ ocial an::! civic organiza'jons in the city; president, TbJi:)pin.e C1,amce.- cf Commarce.

RALSTC'N, P? ~esident

Al~THUR

WEAVER.

allul Geneml Mamager, M(Vni~a Machinery & Supply Co., Inc.

Born August 31, 1888, Schuyl er, Neb., son of John Calvin and Mary Melissa Miller; marl ied to MarguE,rite Connie West; has two chi:::jren; member, University, Elks, \Vack Wack Golf an::! Dagu:o Golf & a:.ur.'~;ry clubs.

139


THE BUILDERS OF PHIL1PPI E

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THE BUILDERS OF PHILIPPINE COMMERCE Graduata from the Dodge eb High School, ebraska; occupied va.rlous posi,tions; manag'er, Fir Three Lumber Co. until 1914; general manager, Koolau Agricultural companies, Hawaii. Represented Magor Car CorpOlI'ation of N ew York; latel' entel'ad the sugar central and general machinery supplly business; organized Manila Machinery & Supply Co., the R ed Cross and Liberty Loan campaigns in Koo)au, Hawaii, during the World Wrur.

RAMIREZ, JOSE V. Pr.esidient, Centmal Luzon MiUing Co. Born January 13, 1875, Manila, son of Jose F. and Dolores P. Miranda; married Eloisa de Marcaida; has four children; assi'tant manager, Central Luzon Milling Co.; m amber, Philippine Chamber of Commerce, Realty Owners Assc,ciation of Manila, Cliub Filipino, Tiro al Blanco, and Casino Espanol. President, Luzon Central Milling Co.; manager and owner of an ext-ensive real estate and insurance agency which is operated under his own name; managing partner, Centeno & Co.; tru tee, Philippine Sugar Ass.cciation; director and treasurer, Reality Owners Association of Manila; director, Insular Sugarr Refining Corpc,ration and d~l'ector-treaswrer, Tavera-Luna, Inc . President and director, Philippine Chamber of Commerce; director, El Hogar Filipino, dtl~otor, Philippine National Bank. Filipino and Phildppine National Bank.

REESE, JULIUS S. P)'eS'iident, Manila Tq'ading & Srupply Co. Born May 17, 1876, Cincinnati, Ohio, U. S. A., son of Samuel and Bertha Dreyfus; mrurried Florence Bomne; has one son; Elk; Masoill Shriner; member, Army & Navy, Manila Polo Manila Golf, University and Baguio Counltry clubs, Military Order of Mandarin; in New York, Grassy Sprain Golf, RailYol3.d Club and Powntown Athleti.c Club. Educated in the Cincinnati public schcoOls and at the University of Cincinnati; five yea.rs after I'eaving college, served in the Cuban Campaign, the Philippine InsulU'eotion and the China Relief Expedition during the boxer uprising. Was in the Philippine civil government service for years as provincial treasurer, acting governor of Romblon and Occidental N,egros; general agent, Philippine Railway Co., and assistant director of navigation, Philippine government. Manager, Erlanger and Galinger, Inc., 1915; purchased Manila Trading & Supply Co., of which he is president and principal own-er. Vice-president and dil'ootor, Peopl'e s Bank & Trust Co.; diJrector, Peoples Mortgage & Investment OCo., and vice-president, N. * B. Stables Co., Inc.

191


THE BUILDERS OF PHILIPPINE

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192


THE BUILDERS OF PHILIPPINE COMMERCE RENNOLI'S, WILLIAM HAROLD

Vice-President, Manager, Wm. H. Andelrson & Co, Born January 25, 1886, Chicago, m., u. S. A., son of John Copp alJd Maud A . Andr<:''W; mum'ied Antonia Lopez-Palma; ha s five children; mason, Elk; member, Uni\llersity, Manila Polo, Manila Golf and Bagui(). Countl'y clubs, Spanish-American Chamber of Commerce. Studied mechanical engineE:ring, University of Notre Dame, Indiana came to the Philippines in 1902. With Castle Bros . , Wolf & Sons, nom Pacific Commercial Co., then joined Wm. H. Ande.rson and Co as sales -: manager; and since 1918, as vice-president and manager of that firm. P,residerit, Wm. H. Rennalds Co., Manoecoco Ce.. of the Philippines, and secretary and assistant treasurer, Luzon Sugar Co.

REVILLA, 楼ANUEL R. General Mwnager, Sta. G/;ama L wmber Co . Inc.

Born September 4, 1889, Manila, son of Euliogio and Eumelia Eleizegui; ma.rried to Trinidad Za ora; has fi\lle children. Studied at the Ateneci de Manila and at the Philippine Normal School. Began as a clerk with Stevenson & Co. Ltd.; joined law division, Executive Bureau; 1<e3.iI"ned mudl as a salesman; with Roces & Co., 1919; started wit'h Mr. Ramon Arevalo and others the Stu. Cllara Lumber Oe..; became its ge.neral manager ; traveled in the United Sta'tes and Europe.

RIO, TOMAS DEL Rio y OlabOff'l~eta

M,anag ~r,

Born May 11, 1878, Bustos de la Segueda L eon , Spain, son of Luis and Tel'esa Gonzal,e s; married Ventura Goitin; has five chilc!Jren; member, Casino Espafiol and TiJ:o al Bllanco. Educated in the public schools of his na!tive town; entered Spanish army at 18; came to the Philippines in 1896, opened a b8ll" in Manila and having accumulat-ed pnough money, orgallWed a small shipping concern with Mr. Juan Olabanrieta as partner. President, Corporation de Cara.may and the Palawan Agricultural and Industrial Co.; and direcilc.r, Vulcano Enginee.ring Co.

RIV A y DIAZ, ANTONIO DE LA a,1lJd MuntJ,g c?', Soloca,n De1J elorJ?n~nt Co., Ltd.

VicI!!-P'I路e.~ident

Bqrn October 29, 1875, Cabezon del Sol, Santander, Spain, son of Antonio and Eulalia Diaz Co-Gayon; married Milagros Schmid y Gaskell; has

193


T HE B UILDER

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194


THE BUlLDERS OF PHILIPPINE COMMERCE

eigth children; membeI, Casino Espaiiol, and was president in 1027-28-30. I At:tended the primary schols and the -Instituto de Jerez de la F,l'ontera of SantandET, where he took a bache1c.r's degree in commerce, Been i1', busine s f01' more thall a quartpr c.f a century. Yke-president and manager, Solocan Development Co., Utd,; Treasurer, La Urbana; director and trea surer, La Yebana, Inc" and manager, Rizal Park Co., Inc.

lWCES, ALI;;JA DRO

P1'e,sicRent, T. V. T.

Pt~blishing

Corporation

Born April 28, 1875, Manila, son of Alejandro and Filomena Gonzal es married Antonia Pardo; has nine children. President, TVT publishing Corporation since J.918; publisher and executive director (elf three of the larg'est and most influential dailly newspapers in the Philippines-Taliba, The Tribune and La Vanguardia . President, Ideal Moving Picture Co" Inc,; has manY' other business interests, me.rcantile and real estate. Educated in Europ e ,

ROCES, ALEJANDRO ,JR.

Vic e-Al'esident and Gen flal Man,ageq' T. V. T. Publishing COl'por'atiQn. Born July 24, 1899, Manila, son of Alejandro and Antonia Pardo; mar:ried to J oaquina Heras; member, Philippine Columbian Association, Club Filipino, Wack Wack Golf and Country Club. Assc,::iated with his father in the newspaper business since 1929; has been vice-president and general manager of the TVT PubHshing Co;rpora'tion, the holding company of thn;.e influential Manila dailies-Taliba, La Vanguardia, The Tribune. Educated at the NOl thwestern Military and Naval Academy, Wisconsin, U. S. A.

ROCKWELL, JAMES C.

Vice-President, Manila Elec1Jric Company. Mr, Rockwell is an able businessman. B,esides being the vice-p,resident of the Manila Eelctric Company, he is a member ICif the Board of Directors of the Philippine N at:ional Bank; di recte.r of ,the American Chamber of Commerce of the Philippines, and president of the Tayabas Coconut Company. The Manila Electric Company which he now heads is the biggest ,electric pc.wer and transportation in the Philippines,

195


THE B1.!ILDr:;l~, (IF PHJLIPPL Ie

u~nIFRCE

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THE BUILDERS OF PHILIPPINE COMMERCE RODRIGUEZ, EULOGIO M . .I1slSist{tn t Dir,ecto Na ,1icnal L ibHL?'Y of the Philippines. l /',

Born September 10, 1893, Grani, Bataan; mal',ried to Loul'dzs Tecso:'!; has twc, children; member, Am zrican Library Association, University of \\' isconsin. Alumni Library A ~oc iation and the Philippine Columbian As ociation. Obtained his A. B . deg,:'ce, University of th2 Philippin::s, liL'ary science ccrtficate and M . A., Univf,r;.ity of Wi sconsin; Ll. B. National University, ~shington , D. C. Worked in the National Library since 1914; passed successive promotions from library apprentice ',0 a£sistant director; and studied libra.!"y cience in the United States; vi ited and studied the functon s of the biggest libraries in Eu:rope and America. Listed in America's Who's Who as a notable figu.re 'vho beli eves that the library serves as the peoples c,::.~,'cinua­ tion school.

JWGEh , lWBJ<JRT STERLlNG

Managor, Li gett & Myers Tobacco Co. Horn N ovembr.r 28, t88G, Virginia, U. S. A., son iC.f' Sbzphen Thomas and Ida Co~,lins; married to Helen Crampton; has three .:hildren; 32 degree Mason, Knight Tel'nplar, Shriner ( ile Temple), R ed Cross of Cons'~antine; member, Manila Polo, Army & Navy, Wack 'Wack Golf and Cc,u ntry, Manila, Elks, Manila Golf and Eaguio Country clubs, and American Chamber of Commerce. Educated at the Fishburner Military School, in Virginia. Joined Liggett and Myc,rs Tobacco Oe, . ever since heaving school; held positions with the c c.rnpan~T in Philaddphia, 1906-12; in N ew York, ~912-15; and SInce December, 1915, come to Manila as manager of the company's extensive business in the Phili ppines.

BALUYUT, ROMAN ..

Manager, S . Fdo. Elect?'ic Light and Pow.er Co., Inc. Born August 9, 1886, San Fernando, Pampanga, son of Leoncio and Casimira J ulao ;" married to Bernarda Lopez. Studi ed Spanish in ] 8&!); public schools, 1~04-(j6; tailor, 1900-04; passed econd glrade, civil Service, 1907-09; pCGtman, Bureau of Posts, 1910-14; manager, Baluyut Studio, San Fernando, Pampanga, 1915-20; contractor, roads, irrigation 4 buildings, etc., 1920-26; manager, San Fnnando Elec:~n'ic Light and Power Co., Inc.; 1927; dir.ector-treasurf,r, Riverside El ect:i'ic Plant, Inc., July, 1932; municipal councillc,r" San Fe,r nando, Pampanga.

197


THE BUILDERS OF PHILIPPI TE COl\nrER E

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THE BUILDERS OF PHILIPPINE COMMERCE - ------

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ROMUALDEZ SY KEE, JUSTO Manag,e;r, Chi Seng Candle Facto?¡y.

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Born Janual'y 7, 1896, Chingkang, Cruna, son of Sy Yin Co and Taw Tang; married 00 Gau Suan Tee; has six children. Received his early education in his home town, 1902; came to the Philippines in 1910; later est'ablished "Chi Seng,'" one of the bigges'e candle factOories in the Islands. Hard worker; very popular; his products ar distributed not only III the Philippines but also 'coUtside of the Island s; president, Candle Manufacturers of Manila.

ROMULO, CARLOS P. Vice-P?'esident, M. H. M. Pubbio.ations BOom January 14, 18:)9, Mallila, . on of Gregorio and Maria P,ena; married to Virgini8, LJamns. Obltained his A. :&. degree at the Univer sity of the Philippines, 1918; M. A. degree, Columbia University. Assistant P;rofessor in English, University of the Philippines, 1924; prof,essional lecturer in A ~r ican li,terature, 1928; manager, undefeated U. P. Debating Team which on fame abroad. Asociate Editor, The Citizen, 1919 ; has been managing editor, T. V. T. Publicwtions; now, vice-president, M. II. M. Publications.

ROSADiJ, A.NTO~~l0 President and MU/YlJage?', Philippine, Co;'k & In'Ldation Co . Born March 25, 1906, son of Jose and Ma.ria Opisso; member, Casino Espanoi, Rotary Club, Wack Wack Golf and Country Club, Bagnio Country Club. Educated at the A tenâ&#x201A;Ź1O de Manila; president, Manila Builders Corporation; director, Construction, Inc., senio.l' partner, Rosado Hermanos.

ROSALES SANZ, MIGUEL A. Chief Chem1'.sf. Central AZ1~caor e ra de, Bais. BOorn April 3, 1903, 1\'f::.nilll; SOll of Miguel and Margarita Sanz Conde; member, American Chemical Scciety, Philippine Sugar Association. Received his early education from La Salle College, Manila, Instituto del Cardenal Cisneros, Madrid; completed education, Santo Tomas Univeil'sity, Manila. Obtained degrees in Analytical and Industrial, Chemical Engineer-

199


THE BUILDERS OF PHILIPPl E

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200


THE BUILDERS OF PHILIPPINE COMMERCE

ing', 1923; spent some time in the labol'ato.ry of the Bureau c,f Science, making study 'Of analysis in food work and in the determination of suga:r house products. Became associated with the central Azucarera de Bais in 1924, where he supervised the chemical probl,ems of one 'Of the la.rg路est sugar centrals in Negros .

ROSENSTOCK, C. W. Pt'oprietor and Mevnag er, Rosenstock & Co. Came t'O the Islands about thirty years aglC.; general manager, Yangco, Rosenstock Co.; publisher, R(jsen~tock Manih City DlJredory; treasurer, American-European Branch Y. M. C. A.; executar, Henry W. Elser Estate; financial agent, Great Eastern Life Assurance Co., Ltd.; and viceplresidenrt, Philippine Education Ce. Masen, Past Grand Mas'ter, Grand Lodge of F. & A. M. of the Philippine I sland s and a Shriner; a Lsc. conn0cted with many sQcia l and civic 01'ganizatiol1S of the city.

RliEENSTEIN, MAX HARRY Ma,n.agell路, anitGiry Stemn cmndYry Co., I nc. Bairn December 25, 1887, New Yerk, U. S. A., SQn of Louis and Lena Braver; Mason, Shriner, Elk; member, Ge,rman, Columbian, UniveTsirty and Manila GlcJf Clubs. Was in the Medicial Department of the United States Army from 1909 until 1919; came to the Philippines in March 15, 1915; joined the Sanitary Steam Laundry in June 1919, operating the largest plant of the kind in the I sland s; supervises the same as general manager until p.ow.

SALEEBY, MURAD M. P-resident\ Scvlee.by F ibel/' Co ., Inc. Born May 5, 1882, Sweir, Mt. Cebanon, Syria, son 'Of Mitsy and He],el1 Bal'uly ;mall1ried te Mary Ann Teeter; has two daughters; 32 degree Masen, S11l'iner (Nne Temple), honorary ' member, J effa Temple; member, Manila Chamber of Commel'ce, Army & Navy, PolQ-Baguio Country and Manila Golf ~lubs; American Genetic Association ,ei Vi ashingten. Educated art the American University, Beirut, Syria; came te Manila in 1906 as manager, Abaca Plantatien of D'avao; was employed as fiber specialist by the Bureau 'Of Agriculture, later became manager, Hansen & Orth; Qrganized Saleeby Fiber Co., Inc., which he now heads as pl1esident; directool', Benguet Consolidated Mining Co. and Balatoc Mining Company. Has written several technical articles on abaca which have a wide cir.culation, especially where tropical fibers are of interests.


THE BUILDER

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THE BUlLDERS OF PHILIPPINE COMMERCE SALEEBY, NIMLR S.

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Bc,?n January 1, 1889, C€banon, Syria. Educated at the Amei:ican University, Beirut, A. B. in 1910, and Massachusetts In stitute of Technology; B. S. lJegrE-'e in civil engineering, 1913 . Member, Permanent; Inte,rnation a l Association of Road Congresses, Rota-ry l rute.:natile,nal, Army & Navy, Polo Club, University Club, Casino E spanol, Caloocan Golf, "Vack Wack and Baguio Count,ry club. Came [,:, the Philippines in 1914. Vice-president, director and manager, ..,Agusan Coconut Co. ; director, Manila StlCoCkyard s, Inc., and Philippine Coopetl:t>L1Y Livestock Association.

SANTOS, JESUS J. Sec'ne tOJTy-111" eaSU1'(~T, Cebu P01·tland Cement Co. I

Born January 20, 1895, Arayat, Pampanga, >le,n of Ciriaco and Margari,ta Cacnio; ma,rried to Rosa!,i a Avancena; has five childJren; memtJ.er, Y. M. c. A., Club Filipino, and Lao~lg Laan T en nis C.1ub. Attended both public and private schooLs; studied stenography; Bachelor of Business Adminis'tratiol1, University Ie,f anila, 1924; Bachelor of Laws, 1930. Se(:1:':!t:l,ry and as:.;istant to the for ei~n manag€l1", United American Trading Co., 1918-20; manager, sundry and textile departments, China, J apan and ~outh Amenca Tradillg Co., Ltd." 1920-21; Secrdary-Treasurer, Cebu. Po,rtland Cement Co. since 1925.

SANTOS OCAMPO, DELFIN

Mana.q e.· . · Unicco·s.oxl Dl'1t!J S tore Born in Candabu, Pampanga, forty-three years ago; WIC,rked his way through college. Beg-an ns a ph'lrmacy clerk WWl Fa,rmacia San Gabriel, 1914; wiih others organized Univer al Drug Store, 1920; sb.:,!ted Sar.tos Ocampo Laboratory, 1928; produced the well-known Fine-O-xina, Castoria Santos Ocampo and other capsulcs and ampoule~. Member, Philippine Chambe.r of Commerce and Philippine Pharmaceutical Association. .

Sf;HEUKIG,

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T'reasure1', Jlila.nila Gas

CO'rpo1~ation

Born October 20, 1900, Zurich, Switzerland', son IC'£ Anne Baltisser; member, Swiss Club.

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THE BUILDERS OF PHILIPPINE COMMERCE

._-- - - -- Educated in Zurich; was employed fOT a time by t:he Swiss public ut ili ty holding corpora.tion, and the General Finance Co. Came to th ~ Philippines on February, 1920, as accountant f e.r th e Manila Gas COlporation; in 1927, installed new accounting systems in all the departments; appointed trea surer and giv en charge of all office operations in 1928.

SERRA 0, VIVENCIO Pion er, Ca scl) Tr·an spo)·talJion Born January 13, 1882, Sampak.:!, Manila, son of Apolinar and B ene~ dicta Reyes; ma.riried to Maria Guison; member, Caball eros de Santa Cruz, and Philippine Chamber of Commerce. Got his primary and secondary school education in privat.;;) school. Had a hard struggle early in ltife. Tried casco transpo;r.t ation. Hrosper.ed through hal~d work and fairdealing; now considered the pioner in Ca sco transpo.r tation in the Islands.

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Educated in't'he public schools; Wient a s far as first year of high school; became country schtc.ol teacher; established a lit.tle store oppo site Paco ma,!'ket; invested saving on barber shops; becalne stockholder of Cine Paco; organized, with Vicente Albo, Albo & Sevilla, Inc., now owners of many of the city theaters; one of the principa] stockholders in t;;1'3 Lyric Film Exchange; d~rector, Eagle Cinema Co., Inc., of IloiLo ; Tivoli Cinema Co.; Malayan Pictures Corporation, Subwrban Theaters Inc. , Cine Moderne., Inc.; Oasis Lunch, Inc., and EI Prog;reso, Inc. Married to Ursula Urbano; has nine children.

SHAW" WILLIAM JAMES P'! 'csidrnt and Gen. Mana.'} !!')', A tlantic Gulf & Pacific Co. Born September 20, 1877 r Barnet, Vermont, U. S. A., son of John McFee and Jesse Abbott; past presid,ent and member, Manila Rotary, Univ~ ersity, lVJa.niln Golf and An:erican Guardian "\ssociation; president and on(3 of the founders, Wack Wack GtcJf & Country Club; menlber, Army & Navy Club. Educ:lted in the Santa cruz (California) High School and the Uniy€,rsity of California; came to the Philippines in 190]; started work for th e Firm which 'he now heads as president and general manag-er, the Atlantic Gulf and Pacific Co.

205


T HE B UILDERS OF PH ILIPPINE

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206


THE BUILDERS OF PHILIPPINE COMMERCE Director and chairman, B.eard of Dil"ectors, Peoples Bank and Trust Co.. Peoples M ortgag(' and Inve,;tJTIent Co.; p.resident, H ume Pipe and Tile Co.; treasure" nnd direotor, Syndicate Mining Co.; Philippine ational Bank and National Development Co.

SIMMIE, GEORGE W.

Vice-President. Vuzon Ste'vedoring Co., Inc. Born January 21, 1875, San F,r ancisco, California, U. S. A., son of James

W. and Mar? E. Ward; to Lecnore E. Regain; has one daughte.r; mf'mber, Masons, Elks. Univ ersity, Baguic. Count'ry and Wack Wack Golf & Coun-. try clubs. Came to the Philippines in 1898; engaged in stevedaring business. Vicepresident and one of the owne,rs of the Luzon Stevedoring' Co., Inc ., one of the largest concerns 'C.f the kind in the Fal' East; also vice-pl"esident, Manila Terminab Co., Inc.

SIMPSON, ALFRED MERVYN Man ag e:r, E o,/,shaws Docles & H onolultt hon Works. BO~'n May 12, 1883, Auckland, New Zealand, son of T eodore and Fannie Empson; married to l\largal'f't A. hby; MaSllJl, Hawaiian Lodge; Shriner, Abba Temple, Honolulu; member, Casino E spanol, Manila Polo, University, Army & Navy, Manila Golf and Wack Wack Golf and Country clubs. Came to the Philippines in 1921 'to manage the Earnshaw Docks and HonieJulu Iron Wo.rks. Qualified as mechanical engineer through practical experience, and for seven years was chief engineer of the vVaianse Sugar Co. Vice-president, Bago-Medellin Milling Co.; president, American Osygen and Acetylene Co.; director, Manila Finance and Discount Corparation. Educated at the St. Louis ac.uege, Honolulu.

SIOCHI, PEDRO Proprietor o,'M Mo,'YIJag er, Sriochi & Co ., Inc. Born February 23, 1885, Malabon, Rizal, son of Roberto and Martina Angeles; ma:rried to Esperanza Willongco; has three children. Began his schoolling in Manila; obtained his Civil Engineering degree at the Univ,ersity of Ghf'nt, Brigium, 1911. Civil engineer, Bureau of Public Works, 1918; joined Mas Construction Co., J DJ n, as consulting engineer; did many big engineering WlOIrks in the provinces. Member, Club Filipino, Philippine Columbian Association, Wack Wack Golf and Country ClUb; din:ctol', Philippine Anti-Tuberculosis Society; proprietor, Siochi & C'l., Inc. , twice president, Philippine Institute of Engineers and A.rchitects.

207


THE BUILDERS OF PHILIPPINE

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THE BUILDERS OF PHILIPPINE COMMERCE SlY CHONG KENG Presiroc:nt and Munager, Sriy Cong Bieng & Co., lnc. Born January 2, 1897, Amoy, Ch ~na_ sr·n of Benito and Siy Lo Shi; married to N g Kim Kheng; ha ~ fOUlr childl'en; member, Casino Espanol, Cosmos, Tiro al Blanco, and Wack Wack Golf Clubs. Educated at the Ateneo de Manila where he obtained his n. A. d,egree. Upon Clc.mp~eting his education, joined his fath €.r's firm, Siy Cong Bieng and Co., Inc. Became rflanager of the finn in 1923, and in 1926, following his father's dea'th, aS31lmcd full rt:sponsibilitics a~ president of the Fllipinas Lumber Co.

SORIANO ANDRES

PresiJdent, S.an Migwgl Brewery Born Febnlary 8, 1807, lVianila, son of E du :.rdo and Margarita, Rlc.xas; ma-rrilsd Carmen de Mon1:"mar; has two children; member, Spanish, IvIallila and German clubs, Manila, Manila Polo Wack Wack Golif and Country, Ma~ nila Golf, UnivE.'rsity, Army & Navy, EI Tim, Cluh Filipino, and others. Educated at the Atopen de Manila, Stonyhurst College (Lancashire, England) and Es('uela Super'or Lie Comercio, Madrid, Spain. Joined the Sall Miguel R~'ewe ry in 1918 as assistant accountant; appointed acting manager and gen ral managc.r in 1924; elected president, Laguna Sugar Corporation; and &,r x y Cia.; v\ce-president, Central Azucarera Don Pedro, and Philippin3 Iron Mines Inc . ; di.rector, Filipinas, Compania de Sog-uros, Insular Life Assuran·!e Co. and the FhiJippiue Graranty Go.

so ,NGEN HOCK Manage?', Rip-lto St'/,dio RlCoI'n May 23, 1870, China; married Chua Tee Kua, has three c'hilc!.ren; member, Chinese Chamber of Commerce; directQ~, Chinese Educa'.ional Schools; a Mason. Obtained education from private schools. Came no the Philippines at twenty and worked at small stores. With savings voartured in lumber business and lost. Tried photography, and sucoeeded. ~ Within a short time, was able to- operate .three studios. Owned, and ,managed.' the well known Rialto Studio.

·.' SPRINGER, ROY STANLEY Gen&t'al ManagfPr, Phi.lippine AmlJlrican Drug Co.

Born N oyember 15, 1892, Elm Creek, N ee,raska, U. S : A., son of H~warq boughls and Lilia Fern Worley, married b Catherine Davidson; has PIle son ~

209 •


THE BUILDERS OF PHILIPPLrE COMMERCE Elk; Mason, Shriner; member, Casino Espanol, Polo and Manila Golf lubs. Gr.aduated f.rom the University of Kan as, A. B., 1915; came to the Philippines in I!H6; ent:?red the employ c.f the German Dispensary which is now known as Philippine Am01klin Drue Co; ha been general manager of the same sincl' 1922.

.,

STAIGHT, RONALD D. General Ag£"lt, Filipi.Ut,i Compn iii'l rl

St'U11I'OS

BCim _<\ugust 21, 1904, Ep on, England, .on of Mark "'ray and Ethel Partridge Staight; married to Grrtchen Renard; member, asil'~. Epafiol, Manila and Peninsular clubs. Educated in England and the United Slates. Came to Manila in S p;tember, 1917; worked in 1919 a a sale man; w~th hipping d partment, W. F. Stevenson & co., 1920-22; and from 1922 until 1925, affCiated with Filipin&-s Compania de S g1.-,-os; serving successively a field m.-r nt, <li'trict agent, cashier and office manager of life agency, and upervising ag nl. Joined the Camera Supply Co. and Moct.ly, Barnes & o. as vice-pn·sidcnt and manager, but: returned to the in uranc·e company in 1928 as gcneral agent. With Mr. Be S. Hou 'Lon, Qrganized the Manila R uub r 0., of

STEELE, JA ms Kl 'G Manag r, Philippi,Le TOlLrist A88oc-iatiofl Ediner, publisher and touti t; founc"d 'Del Monte Weekly", 10] 0; dltor, Pacific Motor Magazine, 1916; ad,,'ertizing manag r, Toyo Ki. n Kaisha; founded "Japan" magazine in 1916; tra\'eled 2,~ound the world; a. sociat d with Japan Touri t Bureau, Hawaii Tourid Bur au. Became direc~or, Philippine Touri t A !"l>ciation, 1!)2~); memlwr, California Academy of Science, Pacifjc Geographical Socic·ty, atlcnaJ G OgTaph real Society, Polo, Rotary and Army and 'avy dul! .

STEVE fOT, J. E. H. 1 ice-presid nt, Ge1! 'al Mmwg r, PhiL Long Di.8tallc

Tf l., C".

Born Decl'mber 2:-1, 18 8. Melone, alifornia. U. S. A., ~o'l of EmilI' R. And '1 ara h Hamilton t~phf'n,' marrieJ to Elml1 1.. Kimball; hl1 one daughter; mcmbr>r. Ca Ino B. panol, )lanila -relo. '..;ark "'ack G If . Cour:try, Army & N a,'Y. and Baguio and Country cluh , Interna:ional Chaml!~r of Commerce of loilo. 'Yorked f-:.r YariOH electTlcal and teJephone companie in the Uni £>j [atE'. Came tn the Philippine and became chid cn2in(>e1', B""uio Electric Light and Power Co.; "a later manager, C«ntury Elect:-ic So.; mana-

210


THE BUILDERS OF PHILIPPINE COMMERCE gel', E. C. McCullough, electric department, and consulting engineer. Vic.epresident and general manager, Philippine Long Distance Tel,ephone and Teleg:raph Co.; holds the sarrl8 po.:,itions with the Panay, Cebu, and Negl'os Telephone Co.; director, Philippine Telephone & Telegraph Co., Fidelity and Surety Co., of 'the Philippin e I s,t ands, Baguio Chamber of Commerce, Aviatictll Corporation of the Philippines and Philippine Aerial Taxi Co.; trustee, for bondholders, MindQro Sugar Co.; trustâ&#x201A;ŹJe, Philippine Anti-Leprosy Society; member, Board of Aministrators, Hacienda San Jose. Educated in the schoc,]s of San Francisco, La Salle University and Univ'ersity of Texas (Aerctllaulics); served as a major, Aviation Corps, during 'the World War; and Signal Corps, Philippine National Guard.

SUAN, SIMEON O. Prop'rif!to1', Mwnagfff, Simeon O. SU(JJ/t

Born May, 1878, Amoy, China, son Of Ong Fi and Quing Tou; married to Co Bong; has eight childreI\; member, Bau Siong club, Philippine Tai Guan Ong's Association, Chinese Hardwalle Merchants' Association., and Chinese Schooling limited; wi Q- industry, pat i,e nce and fair dealing to aIL his customers has suceeded. Hi firm deals in constructootll, plumbing and electrical supplies; one of the be t known in Ma ~ila.

SY CIP, ALFONSO Pres'bdent and General Mrmag e1:, Yek Hua TtNUiing Corp01'atwn

Born August 5, 1883, Manila. Educated at the Anglo-Chinese College, Foochc,w, China. Entel'ed early in business; managf'l', Joaquin Castor Co., 1903-14; manager and vice-president, Siy Cong Bi,eng' & Co., Inc., 1914-21; president and general manager, Yek Hua Trading CQrporation; president, General manufactu~es Company; dinector Bank of the Philippine Islands. Membar, Chinese Chamber IOif Commerce; Rotary Club, Columbian Club, Co mos Club, Oriental Club, Sun Club, Lodge Cosmos No.8, F . & AM., Philippine Bodies, Scothish Rite, and Nile T emple of Seattle U. S . A.

TANCO, ARTURO V. Chief

Engine~r,

Philippi:ne Engineering Co .

Born May 7, 190y, San Isidro, Nueva Ecija, son ,ef Pat.ricio and Victoria Valle; member, Philippine Association of Mechanical and Electdcal Engineers, . Philippine Columbian Association, Laong Laan Tennis Club, Rizall Cen-

211


THE BUILDERS OF PHILIPPI E COM IER E

ter Fraternity, University of the Philippines Bachelors' lub, Philippine Chamber of ~rnmerce. Educated in the public schools of Nueva Ecija and the College of Engineering, University of the Philippines, where he obtained his B. S. degree in Mechanical Engineering in 1923 and B. S. in Electrical Engineering the following y,ear. Passed both the government Board s Examinatioo for m chanical engineers and for electrical engineers in 1928. Appren'tic engineer, Bacolod-Murcia Milling Co., 1924; and assistant engineer for tho Talisay-Silay Milling Co., 1925. Joined the Philippine Engineering Co. and became chioe£' enginee.r since April, 1928; acting manager from August, 1930 to January, 1931; member, borurd of directors, Malayan Pictures, Inc., inco March, 1931, and secretary-treasurer, Board of Examiners for Electrical Engineers since September 1930.

TEODORO, TORIBIO M. Prl3sident and Pr01)rieto-r, Ang 'I'ibl11l Shoe a,Lr[ Slipper F'atlory Born ApriD 27, 1~87, Caloocan, Ri~al, son of Julian and Apolinaria del Mundo; marri ed two fimes ; has ix child.'en; memu r, Biak-na-Rato Lodge No.7, Wa\!k Wack Gu~ Club; dircctor, Philippij~c Chamber of Commerc', and chairman, CCnlmil.tce on Mallufa"tur Known as the "Slippe king"; 1'e('o izpd a one o,f th industrial leaders of the Philippines. P Educated in the public .<.'11001 of Manila; began work as a cigar mak l', 1897-1907; entered a small slipper shop as an apprentice to learn a n(:", trade; opened a small slipper shop in 1910, which rapidly dev'wp d into the largest slipper factory in the phjlippines. The only Filipino facl'ory producing over 6,000 pall'S of slippers a week; employs more than 20 workers, with mnnthly payroll of P15,000 and operates a chain of stores, hranchcs of the main too-e and factory, with agencies in the Provinces.

TEUCHER, \YER ER Pr sident - Tr asurer, Elm~c, Inc. Born September 1, 1882, Tauris, Per ia, on of Jacques and Bertha Wuerth; IDRrri-ed to Maria LfJpe:r. Palma; h3. one on; member, Ca ina E8· panol de Manila, Swi s, Un iyer!':ity, }faniJa Polo and Bal.t1lio Coun,ry club. Educated in the schuols of Kreuc;lin~l::n, S\\;tzerland; and a commerCial college at Zurich, Switzerland; spent a YP.ar each in Rom!', Paris and ,lexico City bf'fol'c coming to the 'philippinrs in J 904. Entered the pmn)oyment of Kuenzle and Streiff, Inc.; for the laSt five year , manager and pr ide nt, manager and president, A...1hamol'a Cigar and Ci·,-ardtt> • ranufacturin~ Co. Wiib S. ,idler and. .T. Haa (lr~::lnizeri Elmac, Inc. in 1!124 which ha_ since developfod into a large and rH'O-perous finn.

212


THE BUILDERS OF PHILIPPINE COMMERCE TIMMERBERG, CARL HERINRICH

Manag er, ,Alha,miYra Cigwr and Cig,(brotte Manufacturing Co. Born October 18, 1890, Berlin, Germany, son';-of Herman Dorea-tea Steinkamp; marrl1ed to Else Adoipfine Feder; nas two chilcLren; member, Board of Trustees, American School Inc., and Deutscher Klub, Inc., Engaged in the tobacco business since his .:illrly youth; associated with Alhambra Cigar and Cigar.ette Co., and became manager since 1924; ,received his education at the Realschule in der Alt ~tadt and the Han<Li3sschule Union, in Bremen; served three years at:: an apprentice and two years as an assist"ant 'I'l'ith leaf tobacclc and cigar manufactuning fiJr ms of Bremen and Heiligen~­ tadt, GerJllany, 1906,-11; member, Philippine Government Tobacco Boa>rd in 1928; director, Manila Tobacio Association. • .•

TIN SAY, David C. Proprietor, Tinsay Film Exchange. Bc.rn March 25, 19UP, Silay, Occidenta l Neglros, son 'of Nicolas and Celedonia Celis; ma;rried; m mber, Beverly Hills, Municip;:tl T€iI1nis Club, Loang Loan Tennis club, New Yo .k Institute of P otography. Finished his elementary course at Jaro noilo, and his secondary cc.u.rse at San Francisco, California U. S. A.; "tudied photography at the New Yark Iu::titute of Photc.grap1iy and DuhaIil ,MoLion PictuI'e School.

'l'RINIDAP,

WEKfjESLP~O

Maw£ger, Pantpanga SU[JfJ.·r Devf'l.opment Born fifty-two years a.go, Talisay, Batangas, son of poor parents. Studied at" San Juan de Letran; became a municipal treasurer; later, Certifi'ed Public Accountant; pmvincial tr.easurer; Collector or Internal Revenue; g'enoeral manager, Philippine National Bank; manage,r, Pampanga Sugar Development Co., Inc.; Vice-President, Luzon Surety l: Co., Inc :-;' pre' sid,ent, Luzon Investment Co." Inc.; director, Philippine Carnival Association; trustee, Philippine Mi.liling Co., Inc,; p;resident, Philippine Sugar Assedaton; Past Grand . V1aster . Masonic G.rand Lod.ge of the Philippines, , !

, \

TUAZON y RIVERA, CIRIACO Manager, Proprirto7'J C. Tuazon ,e Hijos Inc', Born June 18, 18'i'S, Patero?, Rizal, scm of Pedro and Njcolasa Riv,era; married to Florenci~ Gatdula ,' has six children; member, L edge Nilad, Phil, ippine Chamber of Commerce, Tiro al Bl,anco ,a nd . CLub Filipino.

213


THE BUILDb'RE OF PHILIPPINE COMMERCE Operates one of the most important industrial plant in Mru1ila i Pl"Oand manager, C. 1'uazson e Hijos, Inc., manufactu.rer of tiles, pipl', marble work and the famous "mayon" stove . The f r t Filipino to stnblish 'a tile factory in the Ishnn alld im .;;nOO1· of the "Mayon" tove, . S. patent No. 1,70(:j .94 :~ , and register€d in the Philippines Nit .. !F:i6; technieol director, Manila Tire Work. t' . Served as first lieutenant in the mil1~ary foreoes of th Philippine ReI 'Yolutionary gove. nment ; "a~ as!':ociaten W1th t.he fn'st elvII g-o\'erllln nt tor 'many years as a technical d~signur; was technician for tr...} Fr s 11 til. , fuctc,ry; and worked with the Bureau of Public WOlk for twelve years. Educated at the T acher's Spanish No.mal :';chool of ManJla, and took architectural draftsmanship, Spanish T.rac<:l SchooL. priet.:~,l'

P?' c¢iuC'nt,

UN SON, MIGUEL NatiolwL Lif e IIl¢ /Jratlc£' Co.

Born September 2, 1877, Mo:,c, Iloilo, ,. on of .'uan and Germano. Yulo; began his studies at San Juan de Lct~afl; work d h; \\ ay tho uugh codeg'; graduat3d with an A. 'B., deg.ree at the Soo. Tomu s Unlv rsity. Began as a clerk in 900; wa mad¢ provincial SCc l ctacy, traveling au Ittor; treasurer; and Rpcl'atal'y' of Finane , 1928 i establi shed buJget sy t 'Ill of the Philippin.zs; calfted he Filipino Vi ancial Wiza.rd. 1\1a ~1l1, Past Master, R al Lodge No. 22, & A. M. i Pa t Deputy Grund Master, Grand Lodge of the Philippin .

URME ETA, y ROBIOU, FERMI DE Manager, C.entral ~lzu('a,rera de Jjl!is, Ha Ul, Or. ~

(f(J'·OIJ.

Born December 20, 1888, Burcelona, Spain, son of Fermin de Urmcnet·.(

y Tobia and Maria Robiu y de la Tone; married two times; has four chile ren.

Educated in his native h\ l:o:1 in Spain; g,Taduated from the Unlver 'ily of Barcelona, specialized in mechanic !md chemi try; ass'CICiated with th ompaii.ia General de Tobacos de Filipina ; present manager, entral Azucorel'u de Bais.

URQ ICO, MA~' EL Director, Central Azucar 1a de T(lrVic. Bc.rn April 28, 1883, Tarlac, Tarlac; married to Fhn-iana Agua'; has eight children Educated at San Juan de L tran; latcx, Escuela d · Verecho de Manila, graduating in 1909; recognized as a leader in agriculture \'ic<'president, Congrero Agricola de Filipinas; one of the c.rganizer " Pampanga ugar Development Co., Inc.; became trca ur,er of the l:ime and memLer. Board of director ; Central Azuca.rera de Tarlac. bigge t central in the world.

214


THE BUILDERS OF PHILIPPINE COMMERCE

----_._----- -- VALENCIA, FELIX

General Superintenient, I sabela Sug,GJr Co., Inc. BDrn NDVlzmber 14, 1885, Silay, NegrDs Occidental, sc,n Df RamDn and Edilberta Tajanlangit; member, American SDciety Df Mechanical Engineers, and SDdety o.f American Milit:::.ry Engineers. Educated in private and public scho.o.ls in the Philippines, Univ,ersi,ty o.f Illino.i s, and Purdue Univerl£ity, where he Dbtained his B. S. M. E., de~ \:le. Taught in the Trade Scheol o.f IDilD; engir:oeer, B~reau o.f Science, Manila, 1914019; chief engineer, Hinigaran Suga,r PlantatiDns, Inc., 1919-22; superintendent, Binalbagan Estate Inc., 1922-25; and later appo.inted general superintenden t, Isabela Sug~r Co.., Inc.

VASQUEZ, PRADA ENRIQUE

Mamagl3'r, L a u.rb,Gmfl . BDrn August 9, 1886, l\law'id, Spain, so.n of Emilio. Vasquez Prada and Toresa Esain; mar,ried to. H ~ len LDewinso.hn; has two. childdren ; member, Casino. E spafio.l, Spanish Chal11bea:- cif CDmmerce (treasurer), univer sity Club. Organized La Urbana, 1923, o.f which he later became manager; directo.r, Kabankalan Sugalr CD. Educated at the University of Madrid, and Superio..t Scho.oL Df CDm· merce, Mad'l"id, ;receiving his B. S. deg,r ee in 1900; chief, banking department; So.ciedad AnDnima, B2.rcelc,na, Spain; acco.untant, Co.mpafiia General de Tabaco.s, until 1923 .

VIEGELMANN, EDGAR

PTesi,d ent, Veigelmann, Sch?"o ede.r & Co., Inc. BDrn July 21, 1876, PDrto. Alegre, Brazil, so.n o.f AdDlph F. W. and Elsa lwersen; married to. Paula Bertha Elise Schn :df.r; has three children; member, German ChambeT o.f Co.mmerce, German club. President, Veigelmann Schro.ed€lr & Co.., since 1902. Educated a.t the Ho.lstento.r Citizens' Scho.Dl, Hamburg, Germany, 18) 4-9 3 ; was emplo.yed by vario.us eXpDrt firms until he came OC, Manila, in ] 897 to. jDin C. Heinszen & Co.. Established his o.Wl1 business, E. Viegelmann & Co. no.w Viegelmann, Schro.eder & Co.., Inc" in 1902; president, Manila Butto.n Fucto.ry, Inc., since 1917.

215


THE BUlLDERS OF PHILIPPINE COMMERCE WE -DT, HARRY ALDEN A. tltlctic npply Co.

P1CJ]J/ ictor

Eorn l\1Hch 5, 1894, Sringfield, Oh· .. U. S. A., son of Athur and Cath rene Alden; man 'i zd to Julia Kipping; Mason. Shrin r, Elk; memb'l', Manila Polo, Ullivers;ity, Manila Golf, :lnn Baguio ountr~' club. G!"aduated iro'n Oberlin Cell ge with a R. A. degr e in 1!l1 ; became a • sociated with ErlalJg~r and Calillg r, where he remained until he organized his own company. Founden the Athll'tic ~upply Co., in 1921t; incorporated H. A. \\' ndt & Co., 1930; one of the founders of th ommunity Player_.

WHITTALL, HENRY CECIL Asiatic Petrolcum Co. (P. 1.), Ltd.

Ma'Yl(~ger,

Bc.rn in January 27, 1888, Smyrna, Asia Minor, on of IIi!rb rt Otuaius and Louisa Jane Malta ' ; member, Yokohanla Unite, Il c.ngkong, Iunila Polo, and Army & Tavy clubs. Educated at Chel. enham olJeg, t. Paul's School, London, and ambrige University, wher ,he obtain d hIS B. . degr2e in 1910. Arrivt I in Manila, in October, 1 1 ; jc.ined A i tic Petroleum o. (P. 1.), Ltd., oil importer and m€lrchan , of whicb h i- now manag r. Had stations ill Japan and China beforz co ing to thePhil)ppines.

WILSON, SA {UEL J. Prc 'idellt, Cannelo & BaH rmalln, Inc.

Born February 19, 1897, Philadelphia, Pa., S. A., son of Jame and Kathryn ( lcGern) \HI on; marlied G rtrude H. 0 to in Manila, P. I., February 27, 1926. Iember, Manila, Polo, Elk , unh:~r Ity, G rman, Swis , Baguio Countl-y and Rotary Clubs. Engaged in l~thographic work ince 1912, lea.rning the trade a' an apprentice. ned in the United States Navy, during the World War, la~ 1917 to April 1919. c Followed hi profes ion in Philadelphia, Baltimore, and l - ew York it:, qualifying a an expert befor~ coming to Manila in 192:{ under contract with Carmelo & Baue:rmann, Inc., lithograph r and printers.

,no 'G, E GE. 'E En:;LETII M naga, ChiTlfl B1.lIking ··poratiOIl Born HnTten~e

~:o\"e::1ber 2 , 18S!), Fairfield, .Iaine; £on of Franklin PIer z all Gib on; married to Nellie Gl'ace lfacbeth; ha one daugh er; mem-

216


THE BUILDERS OF PHILIPPINE COMMERCE bel', Phil Beta Kappa, Zeta P si, University Club, Casino Espanol, Deu'tcher Klub, Elks Club, Army and Navy Club, St. J ohh's Lodge, Luzon Chapter No. I, R. A. M.; and CircumnavigatOO"s Club. Received his education b the United States; has been connected with banks for a long time; now manager, China Banking Corporation.

WOLFF, THOMAS JOHN

President, T . J. W,ollf alVa Comprtny Born May 3, 1880, Reading, Pennsylvania, U. S. A., son of Thomas and Caitherine Watson; married to Cruroline Cecil,e Crawford; Scottish Rite Mason, Shuner, Elk; member, Manila Lodge, Army, & Navy Club, Manila PoLa., Manila Golf, Wack Wack Golf, University, Elks and Baguio clubs, and "The Falily," San Francisco. President and controlling owner, The SanitaJry Steam Laundry Co., Inc., Rio Grande Estates, Inc., in Qcltabato Province, and T. J. Wolff & Co., importers, expo,r ters and commission merchants. Chairman, executive committee, Philippine Chapter, American National Red Cross; and vice-presidenit and chairman, ,executive committee, PhilJi.ppine Carnival Association which year p1100uceS Manila's major entertainmenJt. Major, Qua:rtermaste Department, Philippine National Guard, and Quarterma1l'ber Corps U. S. A

I

WUNDERLICH, J. K.

Vice-Presidlent,

G ~Ybe?"(J,l

Manag e?', El Orriente Fabrica de Tabacos, Inc.

)Born December 28, 1887, Dresden, Germany, son of Reinhard Paul and Auguste Schanz; manr:ied to Blanche Wallker; member, Deutscher Club, University Club. Educ3Jted in a college in Dresden, learned the tcbacco trade in the factory of an uncle; went to Antwâ&#x201A;Ź.rp, and while there was engaged by M1'. Ingersol, formerly owner of El Oriente Fabrica de Tabacos, to come to Manila; became an assistant manager to this firm; advanced through various posts of responsibi!lity to his presel1lt pos~tion as vice-president and general managev. Went to Tampa, Florida, 1919, where he was employed for one year by a large tobacc.c. company; returned to Manila in 1920 and has since remained with HEI Or,i ente".

YANGCO, LUIS R.

Manager, Hacienda Florerncia, Oce. Neg 1¡os. Born in Manila; Mal~ried to Florencia Fernandez; reoeived his prJi.mary education in the Public school of the city; atitended Dulwish College and Cusacks Commercial School, England: .traveled much.

217


THE BUILDERS OF PHILIPPINE COMMER E Managing directQr, Bazar Sigolo T.'; pI'lesident, Yang-co, Hos n t'Ock & 0.; captin, Philippine National Guard; Mason, member, Eli ha Yard Wilbur Lodge ~ o. ) 01; Manila Sccttish Rite Bodit;s, York Rite BodIes and the Shrine, San Francisco, California, U. S. .r\.

YA CO, TEODORO RAFAEL Presi,]el~t,

Yatl:JcfJ Dr:Jdocks

(I/cd

hipwaYN.

Born a.t San â&#x20AC;˘ ntonio, Za~l1bales, P. 1., oyenlb r q, 18Gl, son of Luis R. and Ramona Arguelles. One of the outstanding business figures in the Philippin ' . Educated at: the Ateneo de Manila, Bachelor of Arts, 1888; pl~pared him elf for a commercial cal'eer at Ealing College, L011don, 1882- G. Shipowll r, ,real state operator and general mel'chant, proplietc.r of th Bazar iglo X.' and Yangco Drydock and Shipways. President, Y. M. C. A., in the Phili ppines and "La Got.a d Leche ;" Resident Commi sioner to fhe U. S. O1)gre.s fl'om 1.h Philippine', 1!J17-20; formerly consul for M~co; president, Chamber of omm rce of thl' Philppines and Anti-Tuberculo i Society; known as the for most philanthrophi -1. of the Philippines.

ZAMORA MEDINA, PASCUAL Manage,), and Prop-rietor, Arte y Trrabajo.

Born May 17, 1881, Dagupan, Pangasinan, son of Fernando and Tomasa Medina; married to Cirila Legarda; has one daugh.ter i Mason; member, Nilad Lodge No. 12; Philippine hamber of Commerce. Attended Julio Guzmal1 School under control of an Ju"n L'Lran Ilc¡g; later studied painting, sculpture and engraving School of Fine Arts, University of the Philippines, obtaining his B. A. degree. The first Filipino to introduce sculptural 'reproduction by electro-galvanizing, electro-plating \vith all metals.

ZOBEL DE AYALA, E. 'RIQUE

Business malt Born in Madrid, Spain, October 9, 1887, son of Jacobo Zobel Zangroniz and Trinidad de Roxas; married two times; has seven children. Studied in San Juan de LetI-an College, ~Ianila; obtained his A. B. degc e from the Real Colegio de Alfon 0 XII, E_corial, Spain; attended Saints.: Barbe College and Ecole uperieure des ~fines, Paris; came to ~Iani1a to

218


THE BUILDERS OF PHJLJPPINE COMMERCE

JOIn and manage his family's interests and the fLnn Ayala y Cia; founded the first p.c,rcelain factory in the Philippines and with Mr. E. Soriano, the first: g lass factory; partner and manager, Viud:\ y H erede,ros de Pedro P. Roxas; presiden);:, Philippine DistiJl.eries Association; dir.zcto;r, Camara de Comercilc, Filipinas, Associal~ ion de Prop,rietarios, Brias Roxas, Inc., Filipinas, Compania d-a Seguro~, and El Hogar Filipino; director and treasurer, San Miguel Brewery Co.; director and executive cwnsellClr, Filipinas, Compania de Segurns, Thp Tnsular Life .\ssurance Co. and the Philippine GuaIranty Co.; director and treaSUrE'lT, Philippine I nternational Corporation, Baguio Improvement and Deve10pment Co., Metropolitan Thealter Co, Central Amcarera Don Pedro: trustee. Phili ppine Sugar As!:'ociation; pn!sident, and director, Central Azcarera de Calatagan; manager and senior partner, Ayala y Cia. aYLC,CW Membe,r of various social and civic organizatkil1s of Manila; correspondent member of the Real Academia Espanola de In Lengua of Spain .

â&#x20AC;˘ ZOBEL ROXAS, ALFONSO Manag er and Part'YIJe1', AyaLa y Cia. Born in Manila, P. I., Decembfll' 20, 1903, son of Enrique Zobel de Ayala and Carmen Roxas de Ayala; married to Carmen Phitz. Educalted at La Salle College, Manila; obtamed A. B. degree flr om"Real Colegio de Alfonso XII" EscoI'jal, Spain, and B. Ph. F. C. degree in 1924 from the University of Notre Daane, Sc:uth Hend, Indiana, U. S. A. Dh'ector, "Filipinas, Compania de Seguros", Insullar Life Assurance Co . Philippine Guaranty Co., Hospital Espanol de Santiago, AssociaciICil1 de Plroprietarios, Camara. de Comercio Espanol; directo.r and' tveasurer, San Miguel Brewery and Central Luzon Milling Co.; vice-president and h :easurer, Central Azucarera de Calatagan; manag>er and partner cf Ayala y Cia.; member, Casino Espanol, Manila PoJo club, Club Filipino, Tiro el Blanco, Baguio Golf and Country Club.

219


INDICES TO PICTURES AN7J I

BIOGRAPHIES


I~[)~X T() J)ICTUl?~J

- AAbe, Ginjiro Aguinaldo, Leopoldo R. Alher to, Vioente AlWlso, H .. Ampil, I3aac . Andersen, Hubert C. Anderson, Wm. H. Andoh, K. Andl'!â&#x201A;Ź'as, H. R. Applegate, Wm. L. Aragon, Francisco Arambulo, Primo Araneta, Jose Arguelles, Tomas . Arias, Vic.ente AubI1ey, S. F.

Pag es 106

" "

" 108 " "

" 110 "

" " 112 " " "

-BBachrach, AI,exander Bachrach, E. M. Balete Cu Bun Jin, T. Baluyut, Roman Baluyut, Sotle'l'o Barredo, Fausto Barreto, Alberto Barreto, Jose . Beam, Walter A. Berger, S. M. Bishop, A. H. Brias Roxas, Antonio Brias Roxas, Enrique

114

" " " 116 " " " 118 " " " 120

-CCacho, Jose Campos, Pedro 1. Canson, John

.

120

..

" "

Carman, Philip DUl'ke,e Carmelo, Alfredo Caro, R'a mon Carrion, Enriqt:.'e . Cavender, Howard M. Cabo Chan, Justo Chin, Agripino Sayog Cohen, Isidore Cole, O. S. ConnanSt, R. Corpus, Rafael Co Pak Correa, Lorenzo Cotterman, C. M. -DDalamal, Hassama.l Dankv,:lerth, George C. Dazai, T. Dee C. Chuan Dee Hong Lue Dizon, Domingo P. Dizon, Paciano Drakdord, A. P. Dreyfus, Jules Dy Buncio, Guillermo . Dy Buncio, Jr., Guillermo -EElizalde, Joaquin Elizalde, Juan Miguel. Elser, E. E. Escat, P. M. -FFanlo, Felix Fernandez, Jose F .. Fernandez, Jose L. .

Pages 122

"

" " 124

" " " 126 "

"

" 128 " 128

" 130 ,/

" " 132

" "

" 134 134

" " 136 136

,. "


ii

Pages F.ernandez, Ramon Fernandez, Vic'2 nte F€rnandez, Carles A. Ferrel', Antonio Finley, J. B. Fuente, J . de la:

-GGaches, Samuel F. Gallego Manuel V. Garriz, Florentino R. Goldenberg, M. Gcnzales, Manuel Got, Adrian Guasp, A. Gunn, Donald O.

-HHale, Fl'ank H. Hall, William Garvie Harrison, Robert J. Haus erman, John William H ilbronn, Joseph P. Hernandez, K. H. Hernandez, Maximo C. II o ~'e r, Arthur

-JJahrling, Carlos Javier, Ignacio R.

-KKahn, Lecpoldo Kiat, Co Ban Keng, iy Chong . Kneedl:::r, H. D. KybUl Z, J. -LLagman, Roge rio Lammoglia J. P. Landah1, J olm Lane, William P. La 0, Benito Laperal, Uoberto Lapid, Fel tum"to T.

13 "

" " 140

" 140 142

Lawren ,F. L. Lavadia, atalino Ledda, F lix Z. L'egarda Jr., Btnito Leon, Jo e L. d Limlingan, G.: rardo Ling, 0 Ban Lizmraga, Tirso Lloyd, J. R Lockwocd, L. D. Luz, AI' enio N.

" " " 144 " 144

" 146 "

" " ]48

14 "

150 "

" 152 152 "

Pag , 150

.. "

I, 16()

" "

-MMadrigal, Vicent Madson, Elmer Ma1u nda, A. Mapua y Bauti ta, Toma Me ulloch, Di·k McGrath, R. A. M Micking, Jes n. 1\1 dina, Pascual Z;::mora M lian y Pavia, nionio M IlZI, .J. )l. M y r, John M y r, Paul All eli Mill r, ern E. Moelich Jr., hal"! I on ~ rrat, Enriqu Moore, Leonard 'hapin 1\<101"a, E. J. :Morokuma, Y. Mull n, icola Edward l\iurphy, J. A. Myel' , J. Lind ay

W() 1()~

" " 1()J

.

.,

1 ('" fj

" 0'

.

170

~akamurao

.. I. ~'ell, Eciwal'd J. ~guanco. Poa

172 '0

-0"

"

Ocampo. Delfin. ante. Olaguer Lui Per z Ortiga , Frand co

17~

171

.


iii

-P-

Pages Simpson, Alfl-ed M . . 174 Siochi, Pedl'o . . So N gen Hock . . . 176 Soriano, Andres . . . . Spellman, L. L. . . . . " Springer, Roy Stanky " Stevenot, J. E. H . . . . " 178 Stevens, FrEdrick H. . Romualde , Justo " Suaco, Martin . . . . " Suan, Simeon O . . .

Pages Paez y Naval, Jose. Palanca, Carlos . . . Palarca, Jose . . . . Parsons, William . . Pond, Horace B. . . . Porta, Antonio Oto . . Prada, Enriqu ez Vasqu ez Pritchard, Thomas Puy1lt, Gonz'aJo . . .

-QQuimson, Luis . . .

178

-RRal s t~m,

Arthur W. 180 Ramirez, Elias Marco " Ramir,ez, Jose V . . . " Razon, Bmito . . " R'ÂŁlese, Julius S .. 182 Reyes, Joaquin . . " Rio, Tomas del . . . " Riu, Joaquin . . . . . " Riva y Dias, Antonio de la 184 Roces, Raf .el . . . . . . " Rockwell, J an:es C. . . . . . " Rodriguez, Eulogio . . " Rogel', R::Jbert Sterling . 186 Romulo, Carlos " Roosa, A. B. .. " Rowlands, S. D.

"

-SSalet, R. N .. . . . Salmon, Charles S .. Sampedro, Jose Miranda Sampedro, Paulino H. Santos, JeSUS . . . . . . Schmidt, Joseph H . . . Serrano, Viv'2ncio . . Shaw, John R. . . . . Shaw, RichErd E . . . Shaw, William James

188 "

" " 190

" " " 192 "

" " 194

" " " 196 " "

" 198

-TTeodoro, Toribio . . Thompson, F. A. . . Trinidad, W E.l1ceslao . . Tu ason y Rivera, Ciriaco

- u-

Unson, Miguel . .

198 " " 200 200

-VVa)}ejo, Angel S . . Vi.egelmann, E . .. Vill anueva, Augusto

200 " 202

-WWdll, Alex. Weidmann, R. . Weinzheimer, L . Wendt, Harry A. . Wing, E. E. .. .. Wolf, Thomas John. Wunderlich, J. C. . .

202

"

" 204 " " "

-YYamasaki, K. . . . Y angko, Teodoro R. Ynchausti, Restituto

206 " "

-ZZeitlin, William . . . Zobel de Ayala, Enrique Zob el, JaGobo . Zuellig, F. E. . . . . .

206 208

"

"


I~I)I:X Tf) 131f)f3~AVtill:.1

-APag:s Aguinaldo, L. R. . . Alberto y Araullo, Vicente G. Alonso, H . . . . . . . . Altman, Rafael R. . . . . Ander on, Wm. H. . . Ander on, William . . Andreas, H .. R. . . Applegate, Wm. L. . . Arambulo, Primo . . . Aria , Vicente . . . . . Arguelle , Manuel V .. Al'gu lIe, Tomas .

107 " " 109

" " 111 " " 113 " "

-BBachrach, E. M. . . Baker, Fred h rman . Baluyut, otero . . . . Barne ,E. . . . . . . Barredo y Alon 0, Fau to . Barreto, Alberto . . . . . Barreto y Jacinto, Jo e G. Barza, I aac . . . Beam, Walter A. Beck, 1 aac . . . . Bi. hop, Ancil H. . Bourne, larLin R. Bradford, George Pre ton Bria Roxa, Antonio . Bria Roxa . Enrique P. Buenagua, ergio G. . Bllencamino Jr. Felipe

-c-

113 113

" 117

" " 119 " "

" 121 "

"

12: "

acho. Mariano . . . . 123 Campbell, Wm. Maxwell Law Cabo han, Ju to . . . . 12:Carbungco, Ambro io O. . ,

ampo , P dro J. . . . nmpu , l\lIedu. ~ ntol1l'J '<11'1' on, 1 umerbno D. arman, Philip DUl'kL arm 10, Alfr do . a1'O, Ramon . . . . . . a\' ndel', Ho\\ard I"riOll hin, ayog, Agl'ipino . . . o Ban Kial . o Ban Ling . . . ('0 Pale . . . . . . ooper, Law renc.;e orpu , Rafa I . . raig, John \\'. . . . uh I Jr., Frank . . u lodio, Mal' 'elo . .

.,

-,

1')"

1

" 1~(I

.. "

l:n 1:\:\

..

-Dankwerth . or' C1niels n, Frielri 'h .Juliu: ... D e hllan . . . Dee Hong LlI . . . . . . ick, R. Me uJ]u'll . . . . Diehl, Hoffmann T<!olJald. Dizon, omingo I. Dizon Paciano Duma. John . . . Dy Buncio Jr., ;uiJI rmC)

'1" ) dtJ

.,

"

..

-EElizalde, Angel . . . . . Elizalde, Joaquin Miguf I Elizalde Juan .dig-uel .. El er E. E . . . . . -FHelldl路iek. Fairchild. Fernandez. Ramon .J. Fernand z, Vicente T.

.'

1 II

,.

~Ol'ge

.

.

1 1 1 1.)


v

-GGaches, Samuel F. . Gana, Vicent$ Q. . Gan, Walter Paul . . . . Garcia Delgado, Jose Ma. Garcia, Manuel . .. . . Gemperle, William F. . Geronimo, Tomas . . . Goldenberg, Michael . Gowales, Manuel ... Go Tianuy, Manuel . Guzman, Esteban de .. . ..

Pages 143 145

" " 147 "

" " 149 " "

-HHall, William Garvle Harden, Fred M. . . H al'ri~on, Robert J. . Hashim, Aziz Tannus \ . Hauss'el'man, John William Headington, John Labon Heilbronll, Joseph P. . Hernandez, Maximo C. . Hess Von Wichdodf, G . . 1. Heyward, Arthur Smith Hizon, Primo . . . . Hoverbeck, Leon Ven. Hoyer, Arthur . . .

149 151

Pages La 0, Benito 163 Ledda, Felix Z.. " Laperal, Roberto 165 Larkin, William Wiley " Layadia, Catalino . . . . .. " 167 Lapid, Fortunato G. Led.esma, Cesar . " Leon, Jose L. de . . " 169 Lim, Tiaco Ping . . Limlingan, Gerardo S. " Lizarraga, Tirso . . . " Lockwood, Lot Dean . " 171 Lopez, Carlos . . . . . Luna de San Pedro, Andres " Luz, Arsenio K . . . . . . .

"

-M-

"

Madrigal, Vicente . . . . . Mapa, Placido L. . . . . . . Ma~ua y Baustista, Tomas . " McClellan" Charles Trafford " 155 Melian y Pavia, Antonio Mencarini, Joaquin D. " Meyer, Paul Albert . " 157 Mey€,l', Teodor . Miciano, J ose . . . . " Miller, Verne E. . . " Monserrat y Calvo, Enrique Moreno, Jose . . . . . . -JMori, T'eizo . . . . . . . 159 Jinks, Burton Floyd . . . . J ollye, Henry Patrick Lynch Mullen". Nicolas Edward " Murphy, John Hoysted Myer, J. Linsday . . -K159 Kaka, Leopoldo . . . -0Kennedy, James Edward " Ocampo ,e Hizon, Fernando 161 Kishizoe, Yohl.1 . . . . Odom, William James Kneedler, Harry D. . " Ortigas, Francisco

" 153

-L-

Labayen, 'Segundo Diaz Lagman, Rogerio . . Landahl, J Oh11 . . . • •

161 163

"

-PPalanca, Carlos . Pangan, Jose P.

173

" " 175 " 177

" " 179

" " " 181 " " "

183

" " 185

"


vi Pages

1 5

Palarca, Jose . . . . . . . Penning, Cornelis Joane Hogo . . Perez, Matia P. . Pitcairn, Roy ampbell. Poa N guanco . . . . Pond, Horace B. . . Puyat, Gonzalo . . . .

1 7 " "

1 9

"

oriano, Andr o Ngen Hock pringer, Roy tanle~' taight, Ronald Do el ,Jame King tey not, J. E. 11 uan, im on O. ip, Alfon 0

aleeby. l\Iurad aleeby, lmn° anto , Je u J. an to Ocampo, Delfin cheunig, \Y illiar.1 errano, '\ iyencio evilla, Eug Hio . haw, "'illiam Jame immie, George \Y. . imp~on, Alfred )len'yn iochi, Pedro . . . iy Chona Kellg 0

0

0

0

0

0

" 0,

" 1" :-

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Tanco, Arturo T odoro, Toribio Mo T eucher, \\' mel' . Timm. l'b jog, ad ll ' )'illl'icho Tin ay, avid . . . . Trinidad, \\' n'e lao . Tuazon y Ri\, llC1 , 'ida'u 0

0

197

" "

" 201 "

" "

" " 207

2119

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"

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l n 'on, Miguel . Vl'men ~ la, y Hu\)iou, min d rquico, Manu I . I

" 197 199

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191

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Hon. PABLO ANGELES .DAVID Governor of Pampanga

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JACOBO ZOBEL Partner AYALA Y CIA.

El Rogal' Filipino Bldg.

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Manila, P. I.

路路 II

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Dr. LAZARO IYAMBAO MEIHCO-CIRU1L'JO

Macabebe

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32 Plaza J. Hugo

Tel. 5-4.7-78

Manila

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MANILA OSAKA

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FanGY Goods China Ware Glass Ware Enamel Ware Silk and Cotton Piece Goods Toys and Toilet Articles Haberdashery, Etc. School Supplies Sporting Goods Groceries Carpenter's Tools Marine Engine Drugs Dry Goods, Etc.

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Telephone 2-26-76

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·•••• ·•• • ··•• ··• •

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Oficina: Panadel'ia 'El Sol" Safigandaan, Calooca n, Riza l

-P-5~, --P-6~ y -P-8~

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Metro cuadrado--Sin anticipo i ·· Aplazos: 5 a 10 anos Ii Distancia 10 metros desde el Mercado

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1'1()DlEl~NA

832 Clave], BLlo., Manila

Tel. 4 9;31

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OOMPRA Y VENTA

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Tel. 4-80· 74 GOS Tabora Manila

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10z1-1023 L"vezorea St., Tel. 4.91.29 MANILA, P. I.

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433 Int. D. Martin Ocampo Tel. 2.61-32

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Prompt Service Phone -=·l cs .3~

Rizal Ave. 839 Katubusan 17

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: Pascual Zamora Med.na : I: 1:1... ......... _....... _. _. ___ . _. _____________ ~_________ .=___~~:~:': :~~::~___ . _. :-:-.=_._ ..... ...... : ..___ ._. ____ ___ __ .. __ .... ___________ .... \! ~ --- ~=:~ a ~~ ~ -.~ -.-- -

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Arayat, Pampanga

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------------------- -c--~--s-T-o--R--i-A- ---D- -i-z-o ~~ - ------------· ~· - - ilr Sure remedy for stomack troubles, indige'tiolls, t1y>;clltery. h :.!{worm;, and for the Babie's health. - AL OHOL :~( ( FORMULA: Sf'nna Leaves ......... . 15 00 Gm. Roch Ile salt .......... . .t 00 Gm, Worm seed ........... . 2.00" S ~ hum citrate ..... ,,'. 1.00 Pumpkin seed ........ . 2.00" odium BIcarbonate ",. 1.00 2.00" Sodium B:!nzoat, ., .... . 1.00 Smilax officmali Aromatic >;yrup ....... . JOO,DO C.c. In form of infusion PREPARED BY

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FARMACfA

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E-TSIN un cc ndimento en polvo, .' usado por 101 j!(-nc·· ra lidad para dar mejor gu-lo a los plat abre el apctito, aJ pat" (Jue s nutritj\'o.

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tlendas 1/ groceries

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TEL. J- O-f:

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Takahashi & Co., Inc. IMPORTERS and GEN. MERCHANTS 753 Tabora, Manila

\ 4-96-18 PHONES: I 4-96-19

P. O. BOX 220

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MUl?l

IjIC~CL~ §TU l?~ I~C. IMPORTERS OF

AMERICAN, GERMAN, ENCLISH & J.APAN BI(Y(LE~ AND COMPLETE ACCESORIES. ZEPPELIN COLUMBIA

STERLING

FUJI

EMBLEM

SPORTS

SPEEDWELL

PERSON

DUNLOP

MAYON

HERCULES

M. B . S .

Wholesale and

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TRADE

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General Hardware, Construction Materials and Agricultural Implement Cement - Paints and Oils - Ga oUne and Petl'o12ulll

BAZAR

Sl~LO

IIXX'!

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TEODORO R. Y ANCeO No. 101 Plaza del ond, Manila TELS : 4-97-04 4-97-06 4-93-49 BRANCH: 542 Azcarraga, Cor. Tabol'a, Manila. Tel. 4-99-50

.,

:::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::':.'.\~::".~:::::!::~:~:~::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::: 1 LA AMISTAD · .

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··•• ··• ··•• ··•

530 Ave. Rizal, Sta. Cruz, Manila

··•• ••

"\Ve hereby inform the public that we are carrying a complete line of 'Yatch, clock f the late t ·ty l ~: and make; aloof ariou set of tablewar . handmil'l'or: having- et, and all ort of earing ~ , ring. brac:el't. loc:ket kl'ementz cuff-button, watch-chain ' and other.. "\ e al 0 receive watche for l·epair . 1.11' watchmaker al'e among the be t, tried and exp~ ri nced men on the profe ion.

JOl"ERIA, RELOJERIA Y OPTICA -DE--

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REYES P.

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Taller de Marmoleria V Escultura

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315 Bustos, Plaza Santa Cruz, Manila

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RECIBE TRABAJOS DE MONUIVlENTOS, MA USOLEOS, LAPIDAS, ETC.

\ R. MORENO

JULIAN MORENO

ESCUL TOR

E HIJOS

PROPIETA R I O : '\,

Telephone No. 2-43-53 PTi vat~ E xchange Connecting All Depts.

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P. O. Box No. 47 Cable A dd. YUTIVO MANILA

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YUTIVO SONS HARDWARE CO. Yutivo Building, Manila, P. I.

Galvanized Sheet, Steel Plates, Bars and Shapes, Galv. and Black Pipes, Paints and Oils,

Plumbing Fixtures, Builders Hard\vare, Ship Chandlery, Mills Supplies, Etc.

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P. P. Gochec-o-Go Sing Goe Company :1., CIGAR BOXES FACTORY

Lumber Dealer &Buildiog Contractors

Main Office : 1219 Azcarraga, :Manila. Tel. 4-96-30

Mabuhay Lumber Branch Offic : 938 Azcarraga, Ma nila T 1. 4-72-30

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Co Ban Ling & Co Ban Kiett ,

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HARDWARE. PAINT AND AUTO SUPPL Y

ALMACE N DE PINTl RAS, HERRAMIE "T

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EFECTOS DE CARROCERIA, ET . ET .

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:,, P. O. Box 2216 ,,

Rosario 197-199, Binondo Tel. 4-97-55

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~------.- --.--------- ~-- -------- ~-~~~-~--------.-------------~ ~-~ ----.--.--~-~


TIm B UILDERS OF PHlLJPPI NE COMMERCE .-~--------------.---.------.-------------

.. ------.---------------------------------------------- ..-

of the

Pam~ang~

Sugar Development Company 11 11

San Fernando, Pampanga

11

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THE BUILDEHS OF Pl-llLIPPI. E .... U~n1ER('E

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Arm;a~nd

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Contractor

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GROCERY

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~r::~dler

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Provisions

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WHOLE ALE A D TIETAIL

FA rey GHO En[E.

YO R PATROi TAGE 1. COl\1E

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F1 }IY

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EEDED F.\\,

TOnE 1'EL. 2-:11-Ci:2

110 VILLALOBO

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;-----------~----~----------------------------------------------~--:\-~- --~-.-.----~-=~~~~~-------~-~------------------.--------- -.--.----'~----

·: ··••• ··•• •

PHONES Up tairs l'own tairs

2·,)8-22 2-65-9:)

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Panciteria Antigua Established 186 5

:l17 ·~1.1 PIll/.

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rC·rr'.1 I~OllljuilJ()

Mattill, I', 1.

TO THE PUBLI : Your pa.tronage of u f ·r oy r (j.) year: today prove. that WI' hun' rendered ati faction to ou.r patron' in very way po, .. ibl, \Yp hopl' tt) merit thf' cOJ lfide:r,'e }"I"p""'?ci ill 1I - f e r many veal' .. to C '"11', \Ye ha\'e come to be known a "Th . ;\Io.t anitary Panci ( ria" III th City for th following- te~ ott : • (1) All tahlt:ware _ are "',,J] heated hefnre th"~ ar' plae d to {Jur patrons' l~e, (2) All tabl line] , <Ire nt\~r upd twit', All fol uff are !'('fri ernl\ed 'n (lUI' :.'!,f':ial cold ~tolag rlar-t (1) .\11 dining room and kitch n :uc ':lLi .. ff'<'t .... ! f,\': ice a day, C';) All f .od" arp pI' parr'cj in tile mo t sanitary manneL . \\'1" do ai,' the,e i.t grc ... t I:XI' n:::1" in orrl !' !.o \; liminal' ' II fi' illl " cha Ice of inf€'cti.. n Lu 'Jur patrun, Ther fore our O:Jtrl'n~ are ~af~ to dint' with u , ince the e tabli.hment of thi panci c.!"ia r,G :ear- today Wl' hav" pecialized in the nllJ~ uy-to-date Chine. €' rli,hc, 01 all .orts, prel,ar!lJ only by expert cook, \Ye have al 0 eat2re11 to banqu t.. i,l our. paciw ami \'cll ventilated di ;1ing- r :>1'" . or any" here cl <! dl' ~ir<,J at y, y r'd on .. ble r rice . We are alway at your drposal for T"'" ic I: , comfort and sati fae ion, Re peel fully yOUI' •

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THE MANAGEMENT

..

------.-.-.----- _. ~=-==.:...' - - •• -- - _•• -- '-'--'

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THE BUILDr:f.S OF P HILI l-'PINE COMME~Cr:

. . .... --.......... -.-.-........... -.--..- --.--.----_& .. -.. ~

- . ~ . --.-

... .-... ... ---------.

DEE HONG LUE & CO., INC. Office & Yarl 920 -950 JUlin Lun a , Manil a

·,, 11

Telephones 4-99·27 & 5-95-08

Ca ble A dd ress "ZALUC"

P. O. Box 2978

Code U sed " A CME"

Manufacturers, Dealers and ExpJrte

·· ·,

in All Kinds of Philippine Lumber Operating

Zambales Lumber Company Po rt Matalvis , M a~inloc, Zambales Branch Agen cy:

B ra n ch Agen cy: A par ri, Cagayan

Nagabungan, Ilocos Norte

Philippine Red Lumber Co., Inc. P ata, C laveria, Cagay a n

Manila LUl11ber

CODlpany

910-916 Juan Luna , Manila

Service that satisfies!' Quality! Prompt Shipment! ._--------._ .. _._-_ .. _------_._-._-------------------------, ---_._._--_.p-._.,----... _------_.--


Co ii··········· ........................... ......... ..... ..................... ... ... . THE BllIL::L:"hS OF PHIl.I?PINE

nIChCE

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INC LA~~3~!~ied~Ma~1?;: . Phones: 2-3 -26 & 2-38-88

L p . . Box 1594

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Ii tzxclu"ive Distl ibutoi" of: BERLOY Steel Filling Equipm nt DIEBOLD Fi1'-_- proof <1£('8, and Bank Tault D VvOOD"TO K 'fypev,Titel's Bl'unsvigo. Cal ulatiIw \.'lachinc GRIEF Rapid Duplicatol'~ and t n~il P al l ' KOLST ER Int21'no.ti n:;11 "RejcctoC'tatic" Radios

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·, Also ?naintcdll I I

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Expelt Radio

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ervicc

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any mak of Radio. et.

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fo~'

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REAL ESTATE OF WIDOW & SO~S OF

F. M. LIM TUICO Ii I:

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P . O. HO~' lriOi

PHON E 4-G6·2.) '1'.

200 RO A HI

:ILL' J LA, P.

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TIlE BUILDERS OF PIIILIPPINE COMMEhCE

·: , .':1 •,

· · ~

TO ALL SHOE BUYERS:

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\tVh : : n buying your "hoes or boots or having them made to order '1;ee that your order is placed with the right

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shoe.maker : t' ~~ "

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WHOSE MKTERIALS ARE FIRST CLASS WHOSE vVOR

IS GUARANTEED

1tVHOSE PRICB IS REASONABLE AND , -

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There are the most vital points to bSl consid3red by shoe buyers; to these four points we give special attention

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Insist on getting a pair of first quality and made shoes that give the very most satisfaction.

EGMIDIO DIZON ...

~I , ,,, ,

"

WHOSE SERVICES ARE UNEXCELLED

1315 Azcal"raga,

Proprietor Manila.

:.----------------------------~--------------------~-- --------_ ... _-.---------------------------.-_.,


THE BUILDERS OF PHILIPPI E COM!lIE~CE

1-----------··.···-----···.···.-.-.···--------.---------.--.---.--.-----.. ---.---.-~---------.-~-., ~l !

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Compliments

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of

La ;Proveedora, Inc.

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. Makers of High QuaJi1y Fnrnit ures

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-Angeles, Pampang8

___________________________________\_. _______________l____ .. ______ ._.... _.. ___~.~..~ . ~~. 1 ·•• __ ------.s. ___ .. _----_ ... _. ... .•

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RIZAL CEMEN1

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Because of it special qualitie

STRE-, TGTH

ECONOMY BEAUTY Always tand. alone in the field of can trudion T o be

··,• ··•• ·•••• •, ·••• ,

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3111'e

of your

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tm nt and \\'ork

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'The Builders' Choice",

MADRIGAL & CO. 1rl A NIL A

.. ------ .. --.-.--.~~~~~.~.~.~~~ ...... -...... -.. --- ~. ~ ... ------.-.~~


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! Ambrosio Carbungco Ex-Chef-Cosino EspofioJ CHEF &

CATERER

Recibe Banquetes y Otros Encargos Especiales : -:::

··

:· : ,: 1

, ,

·:,, ··: · I: · ··,· ···

MARIA CLARA 163 y 165

TEL. 2-67-21

OFFICIAL CHEF AND CATERER To the 1. 2. 3. 4. 5. 6. 7. 8. 9. 10. 11.

12. 13. 14. 15. 16. 17.

18. 19. 20. 21.

following: MANILA COLLEGE OF PHARMACY fr om 1920-1 932 PHILIPPINE DENTAL COLLEGE f rom 1925-1 932 MAPUA n STITUTE OF TE CH OLO GY hem 1826-32 PHILIPPINE CONSTABULARY f rom 1927-1 932 NIVERS):I'Y OF THE PHILIP PINES from 1929-1932 UNIVERSI'BY OF STO. TOMAS fr om 1921-1 932 PHILIPPINE WOMEN'S OLLEGE fr om 1928-1 932 STA. ROSA OOLLEGE fr m 1930-1 932 PHILIPPINE SENATE NATIONAL TE ACHER'S COLLEGE CLUB F ILIPINO MASONIC TEMPLE PLARIDEL TEMPLE TEODORO R. YANGCO PROVINCIAL GOVERNMENT VARIOUS SOCIETIES WEDDING DAYS : a. Syyap's family-Manil a b. Oahufigas family-Tayabas c. Velilla family-Manila d. Sanchez family·--Manila e. GalvEz family and Yangco Twins BODA DE PLATA BODA DE ORO MASON LOD GES COLEGIO MEDICO-FARMACEUTICO DE FILIPINAS

We have also a seperate Restaurant in Antipolo, Rizal.

CHEAP and CLEAN _ . _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ .. _ _ _ _ _ _

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____

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l----c;;I-~~----~~-~~I~f3----C-u-~vuvATI----~~---il

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of th e Philippine hlaJld~

Incorporated und er th e la\\

A nthorized Cari'la; ... ... ... ....... .... .... ... Pail'-up CHpital awl Res 2rve , over .. . " .. . .

:

,

P10,000,000.00 7,100,000.00

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REPORT OF CONDITION

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a~

,

of 'larc h 18lh, 1933

RESOUR CES 1 0ans ~lJ,tl lJis'ounts ... ... . .. . .... OVE:!rrlraft£ .. ' .. '" .,. ." ", ".,. Cust:omers' LialJility Acceptance L J "" ' " , ••• CU!:>tOI1ICl'S' Uubility T R '" '" ..... .' .. Stocks, Bonn. , tc ... ". .., ... . .. ,. ., .. Banking Hou e, Furniture and Fixtures . .,.. . ... Other real anr) personal propety u ~'ned r·u,~ from Rank£ . . .. , ... , .... , .... ' (~aEh

., . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . ,. ' ...... .

P .J ,~:12, ·1:l.ti7 -l,2lti,7 l.li:i li..J~ , 71 (i.Ii' 2,·HH', mUl3 :J5..J,71i1.7ti 7:?:~, 8 ~7 . l i7

l,(;:~",7

Chrcks an I C'n h It(:ms O.!lC ReSOU1'(!es . . ". ... ... .,. . ... ,

,

!):i,70;-d7 (j,:11 ~),721.27

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.

7.~Jl

2:J,I:~ l. 7·1

:2:l G.2;).t.l 7

LI 4. /HLlTlES Capital Stock ... ... ". ... . .. . ... . Surp lu s .. . . . . . . . . . . . . ' " .. ... . Reselve .,. . . . .., Hr!cii vidpd Profits '.. .,. ." ... ' ... , Due to Bank ea hier', Manager' and el'tifi ed ch ~"', Incl i\'idual Deposit ubject :> check, .. . Saving- an 1 Time Depo_it::; ...... . Oth r Lia.bilities ... ." . .. .., .... , . .

r> 5,71:1,:lOO

no

lij .I,84U . .>(; :i 1,721.0'i (;1;2,J :i::!.I:~ ·1.17 ,Hi 1.:.' ~::fj.!Hi1l.21

loU';'!),7lil 4;:

li,;-,;J (j,8" '.07 2,1;18, ':~:U 7

,,

PZI ,OOl,8!)] .72

I . _____ ---.---.-----.--.~---.~----.-~-- • • - - - • • - - - - - • • • • _ . ____ • __ . _ • • _____ ~_. ~-~ • • • --.-~.-.-.--.-- • • :

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BnA,' nFl' I CE: .lA. 'TLA OFFICE: ;);) Al ejan-lro \,1 f'::.~<! iiaqu l' HI:AD OFFI E: Tf'1. ;j-r,2-1:.l Tcl 2 2fi-28 Tinaj cl' " Malabon, R izaJ Tel. a l. 3- :) Rizal l\Iani~a

Excellent

AUTOBUS

SERVICE

For Excursionists \\'~

I. : I:, I!

can :: ff cr the ::af('~t and mo -t cOlllfc;~ ./1'(' 1'1lT':pc-ta.ion a ruth-,?l: lOWQl' co::~ t:,an anyhody eLe with our 42 pa"~p.lg'r autohu \Ye can takc you anywhere in RIZAL, CA \'ITE, nUL.\CA.' ancl i\ A P L:.vinces . Our regular .:en-ice on the c"t3hli:>heri lin£' of the ompany i 30 inten'als, exc>2pt on the Ca,-ite li!le where the inten-al i l.j miru e".

PASAY

TRANSPORTATION

compa... LAG minute

COMPANY

:

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J:~----------------------------------------------- .. ~-.-----~-- ... ---.. -.---.-- ____ ~-~-- ~.. -.:


THE BUlLDERS OF PH ILIPPI NE C OM MERCE

·------------_._._ ---------------------------------------------------------------------------------

JW~~V§T AI\~

I2AC~J : : I

I

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:

For the purpose of raising' money with which t.o build the JO SE RIZAL MEMORIAL STADIUM and athJ.e tic parks in various -.parts of tbe Philippin es.

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Warning to the Public

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The MANAGEMENT wishes to remind the public tha.t everY Two Pesos (rf2.00) and that no more than Agents are not authorized to con~ ct any excer;,s amount of money on tickets sold. Ther'e are, and there will b~, tickets for sal,e until December 15, 1933, at 2 o'clock in the flotternoon. Tickets CAN BE BOUGHT not only from the authorized fl,gents but also from the offices of the Management, in the Car nival Grounds, f}'om 8 0 clock in the morning to 8 0 'clock at night, ev ary day, including holidays. ti~ket is worth only th~l.t should be paid.

I Buy Your Ticket Now and Win Any One of the Following Prizes

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, 75,000.00 First Prize . . . . . . .' . " 37,500.00 Second Priz'e . . . . . . " 25,000.00 . Third Prize . . . . . . . ,,1 7 Prizes of P3,676.40 each . " 62,500.00 250 Prizes of '200.00 each . " 50,000.00

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II

TOTAL . . . . .

'250,600.00

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l l ~ ······· · ····················==-·= ·= ··················

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.........-..==. ~..... -..... j:\

MADERA~

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TUAZON y SAMPEDRO Cal1 c Globo de

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• • _______________- ______________ .. _ .. _________ .... ___ .. _ . . . . . ___ ..

j • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • •~ • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • •

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Nos. 01-817. Manila, I. F.

01'0

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,•, o. 23756 II " :,• =..-:. . .... :-:---.....

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P. O. Box 237G

63 Rosario Manila

T El. 2-21-2

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Compliments of

PANADERIA MODERNA T~L.

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2-34-1

139-143 Bu tillo , Sampaloc,

,-_ .. _- ......... _..........._- . ----- .... ----- .... -.

:Manila

.. _-_. --_ ..;-;-:-;. ... _. _....... -..... . . _--- -_.--"_o. _":_ . . '" ...... __ . . _.o._ ._ .. _-___ . ___ .. _. . . ____ ........ __ . __ -__ .... __ .

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~-=-~- =.:::::::~::~:::~::._;:. ..:..:..:.:...:.:....:..:.::.:~

Compliments of

Panaderia tiEL SOL" ~ 'afiga 1. cia an

Caloocan, Ri7.a l

.

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'-THE BUILDER~ OF PHILIPPINE COMMERCE

"7--.-------------------------------------------- ---------- -------------------------- --------------1

··

Importacion directa dePerfumeria de las mejores marc as. Novedades y objetos para regalo

.1 .j

-.

Juguetes y muiiecas - ,

FANtO Y CiA., INC. P. O. Box 860

Ave. Riza l 518

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Manila

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••

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Sta. -Clara Lumber Co~-, -Inc. ENOINEERS

Calle Oagupan 901-903 Manila

«

CONTRACTORS

Tels.4-97-41-4-99-39. :•

,•• --------_ ...----._....----_._.. _-----_._._ .. -._------------------------------------------------_.'


THE BUILDERS OF PHILIPPINE COMMERCE

,-------_._._--._._ ..... _._._-_._.-._. __ .. -. __ .... _---_.---------_.-._---_ .. _._---_ .... _.... ------ : •

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One of Manila's Leading First Class Dry Cleaning and Dyeing Establishment

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Telephone 5-59-35

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Dry Cleaning & Laundry

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11

fREE COLLECTION &: DELIVERY

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Mrs. Perpetua S. Pangan

:

PROPRIETOR

·•:,

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116 Nebra ka, Ermita

:vlanila

P. I·

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·••••

.-------------.----.------~-------.--------.--------.------~,·~-'--e~=e·--t·-·-···--------··~·-·~ .

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THE BUILDERS OF PHILIPPINE COMMERCE

------M-~--n--i-L-A-~-~-----F-i-n-E-s--T------lil For

I··

Parties

, ,

Banquets

··•

Celebrations The Largest Cabaret in the World

STA. ANA CABARET

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,",()Il~ CA~S()~ PROPRIETOR

,

Spagheti Dinner, Our Spec; ally

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-------------------------------------~-------------- --j -------------------------------------

~--~-

..-------------.----.-----------------------------------------------------------------------_. Pro bad las Ginebras ··I\ALA~AA~~~ ~ ··LIWA~A~~~

Fabricado por la Destileria •• A~f3 TU~A ~~~ 6 G

Oficina

L.~

V~':

<..;entral

K 0 A D

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Ahnacen de Bebidas

!Hfl·5l0 Sto. Cristo

131:~IT() ~() .l'U~

Tel. 4 · 96-73

Prop. & Mgr.

-------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------~-------~-~------------------------------------------- ---------------------------------------------#

[)AVI[)

c.

Motion Picture Cameraman & Film Exchange

We send cameramen and take still and motion pictures anywheTe. We 'also distribute local and fOlleign pictures. 456 Dasmarifias St., Third Floor, Room No.8

Tel. 2-54-97 Manila

.

•- - - - - - - - - ________________________________________ • ___ --------~---------------------- ______________ J


THE BUILDERS OF PHILIPPI E COMMERCE

III

JID 81Lq ~I[]I[]IQ ]1~le ~Irleยง

:I~ lie 10 '"

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Ji[]1Qlie '"

PUOTOENGRAVERS Jfaljtones - Line E tchi1t9S -Color fl6rk. <=-'G>~O>~~~~

Offici,,1 Engrclvers of the Free Press and Sampagita Also for other /eadinq newspapers and publications such as

Herald

LrLT

M abuhay

.D'JTJT

La Opinion~.t? EI Debate .d"..?

M.anila Dailv Bulletin

Q"(/L?

Union.Q Collcg'e Ma~azine oQ'..t>Our Schools..7L? and many provincial newspapers. Such confidence in lettinq us enqrave their illustrations is a

testimonial When

[0

the qua/irq of our lI/orb and service.

you have photoens-avin6 to be done send your wor\( to us. Joaquin Reyes &Co .. Inc. FREE PRESS BLDG., MANlLA

680 Rizol Ave.

Tel. 2-21-10

P.O.Rox 326


I.............-.·......... ... .. .. ...___ .......... _................ _...... 1 ~ A T I (~ S~OO~f ~~Ogl~iZ~ S~l!g-~ T 11 THE BUILDERS OF PHILIPPI E ~

~.~

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0lfl:l',; The Follouiin!J : 1. Day and Night General Hig'h Sch . :3.

:, 2. Day and !\ight : School. : .:

,

,

1.

2.

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Commercial High Vocational Typewriting Bookeeping Bu iness Engli h

OMMER E

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CUIlJ'Il{'S:

Tight Intern;edlUte. ollegiate ourse;; Lading- to th . : Title of A' 'oC late ill unlTIlt'l'l'lal I:',

COu1'Sell: ci n .

I!:,

tenography 5. Accounting 6, ommercial La\\' .j.

.:

:,' 23 R.::gi tl'ation in Collegiate Oll)'SCS 7. Spanish for the Second Sem ,' l '1' B g-in-; on (),'t, , al1d closes c.n Oct. 28, 19:33. n gular c!ase lwgill Oll Oct. :30. College fees range trom 1"12.00 to P:30. 00 per em tel' according to lIumlJl'r of units taken. High School Tuition F <!e ar very moderate and are payaul in T 'n Month ly InstfllJment. Girls pay much 1 ~s. Every Summer vacatioll, dIe institute operate a ummel' 'chol fur un· dergraduate teachers only to nable them to compl ~ te th ir Ilig-hchool ('ours.'. Fees for thi summer cour e are v~ry mod rate, Very t.r('lng and Efiici ?llt J'aculty wiih the best Ar.aclen.ic and Profl'l'si::.nul Quali fication~, For furth r information, see, ring up, or writ to I": J:, rUM,ERI U. C RREO ,Din'ciol' ,, /'IIf TI L I \ n ru-rr= Cornn of Rizal A '<!. and ZUl'baran treet laniJa T t l. 2- !J .09 Ask for a free catal cg

Taller de Reparaciones R eciben obras de I II 'taZCtcioll

CUI itCt)'ia

COil (I

J'J'cglo (( los

6rd.en ,de SeLil idad , ----

aja. de Hi nwrca .

Expe1'to en R epc£1'ClcicHCS de

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FAV RE 'E oTiene el gu to de anlU1Clar A RES y a1 ptlblico En O'eneral el tra ladt) d u ficina a] 1 DE" 0 EDIFICIO DE PR PIEDAD, Av, izal, No. 2029, T 1. 2-76-33, de de ('1 I rimero de Ago to de 1 33 en donde confia poder pre tar]e 1a rni rna cl;l,·e de .:ervicio (i no mejor) que viene pre tand 1(' de dl' hac(' mao - . de _')-D ano

IGNACIO R . JAVIER :MAE 1'RO P L ?tiER LICE.' IADO Y ONTRATI T.1. DE OBRA

A '\e. Rizal No, 202.

T

Tel.

~-75-3

,----.--.----.--------------------------- - ---- ~ ----~-- ------------._---._-----------_ ..

--_._ .... ..

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THE BUILDERS

OF

PHILIPPINE COMMERCE

.-------------------------------------------------------------------------------------.'----------_. WE MAKE AND SELL THE LOVELY AND BEAUTIFUL L . N. E. BAPTISMAL DRESSES AND FILIPINO LADIES' DRESSES F OR WE DDING AND SOCIAL WEAR. THEY SATISFY THE MOST DISCRIMINATION USERS . YOU TOO, WILL BE SATISFIED. COME AND SEE THEM.

LA NUEVA ECIJANA TALLER DE BORDADOS "'604 RIZAL AVE.

MANILA. P . I.

t-------___________________________________________________________________________________________ . I

)--------- -- ----- --------------------~---------------- ------- - ----- -- -------- ----------- ----- ------

:•

:

: :•

!

:••

•• ,•• ,•• • ~

:• ••

IF YOU WANT A WELL KNOWN GROCERY HIGHLY QUALITY GOODS, REASONABLE PRICES EFFICIENT SERVICE (,AJ,L AT

tS~A DE CUBA INC. 233-238 CARRI~DO, MANILA

TEL. 2-19-03

• ~---------------------------------- ~-~-------~---- ----- ----- ~-------------------------------------,

\

,---------------------------------------------------_ .. .. --------------------------------------------~

MARIANO G. MALLARI Representing PHIL. BOX FACTORY

NATIVE LBE. FUEL

Manufacturer of Modern hoxes 64~

Distributor - Lower prices

Cataluna

52 N avanra, Manila

••

Tel. 2-69-06

I

----------~------------------------------------------- -------------------------------------------_ .

•, ----------------------------------------------------- ---~-----------------------------------------, I

•• I I

,•

• •• • I

·• ·• • I

La Flot' de LU 'l,on ., FABRICA DE TABACOS

I

:No. 701 Clavel} Manila, P. L

I I

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:

·• I

P. O. Box No. 64

Tel. 4-84-41

! -- .. ---- ------ .. _... - w_ a

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THE BUILDERS OF PHILIPPI fE

0 IMERCE

. ~------------------- ------------ ~--~-~~-------~---~-------~--~-~~~-~---··n

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Co p'ak &Company

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SOAP MANUFACTURERS AND AGENTS

Carrer , ViQal & Co. I .., :,

CO PAK President

'fel. 4-99-31 P. o. Box 2154

426 Sto. Cristo Manila, P. I.

·

I-~;I

___ " .... _ ................. __ ..... _ ... __ ... _

...... ;;: . . . . . IlL" _ .... ____ . . . . _ • • • or ............ _ .

··,

___ .. ____ . . . . . __ . . . . . . . . . . . . :.";":':"":":'.-


THE BUILDER~ OF PHILIPPINE COMMERCE ~--.----------.----~- -.---.-~ ~----- -----~------.------ ---- ---------- -------------- - - ------ - -- -----

•,• , ,,•

•• •• •• • ••• • ,,••

Dee C. Chuan & Sons, Inc. Manufacturers and Wholesale and Ratail Dealers in

,

: TANGUILI :, -.. ,• ALMON ,,, ,,, APITONG ,, , GUIJO ,,, ,, , YACAL ,,, ,, IPIL ,, NARRA Ii MOLAVE Il ETC. ouldings, Baluster~ and Large stocks always on hand. Scrolls. Customs sayving and all classes of Millwork. MANUF ACTURERS !I Wholesalers and Retailers of all kinds of Philippin€ ~ Hardwoods. Also operating

to

jl,

The Philippine Lumber Manufacturing Co. Saw :Mills at Catabagan, Camarines Sur.

,, ,• ,,

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TELS. ~ 4-88-26 . (4-96-83 ·, :

Office & Yards: 18-24 Soler

Branch Yard: Ii 702 Azcarraga ':

~----------------------------------------------------- -------------------------------------

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THE BUILDERS OF PHILIPPINE C01ln1ERCE

l············iN·sui~AN·c·E·····=·····il !·

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I

I

For Every Need and Purpose

~

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I

:

Fire Workmen's Compensation Autornobile

Marine Accident Baggage Plate Glass

:

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" AtIa Assurance Co., Ltd. The Employ l' ' Liability Ii,' Continental Insurance Co. SSLl1'anc(' ol'l)o::ation Ltd. I i Ol'ient In urance ompany Ii

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Gen€1'al Agent

• •

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I~ Telephon(J 2-24-28

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1I~ ~ i Kn edler Buildin.e; : I

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.EL CRECIENTE

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TALLER DE MUEBLES

··

Arcadio Juat. Prop . AFA]\1ADO ALMACE~ DE IvfUEBLE FRE UE~TA­ D O POR LAS FAM ILIAS DE SO I EDAD DE :MAN ILA Y PROVI NCIAS . 11 EBLE A PRECIOS l\10D ERADOS, ELEGAi\T ES, FUERT ES Y EX ELEXT E OBRA DE •• T

I

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1 88-92 A. Mabini , •

Caloocan, Rizal

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Tel' .

1-2-1- 4

,

._-----... _--.----_._----_._----_ .. _---------------- - - .-.---------.-.--- ~ ------ - ----- ~ - - --- . * ~- -- .


.---.----------------------------.. -------------------·----r-------- ----- ----- --------------------

Pampanga Candy factory San F e rnando, Pampanga PEDRO M . PINEDA Prop. & Manager

Aside to our delicious Lemon Especial [Candy], we Gre also selling Fruit Drops. Known everywhere for their quality .

.. Apa " Cups and .. Barquillos ' • are our Specialties. CLEAN, CHEAP &

DELICIOUS

:,

,• -_.-._--_ .. _._--_ .. _.. _.. _----------_._-_._---------_.--------------------------------------------,• ---------------------------------------------- ~ t------ ---.----------------------------------------~

"IYAN"

! ~

(FABRICA DE AGUAS GASEOSAS IVAN)

:

WE MAKE AND SELL Aerated Water "IY AN" Coffee

"080gS0"

VICENTE JACINTO

·•

Proprietor

Malolos .____________________________________ _______________ ~.

Bulacan , •• _________ J_

-----~-a---------------------------


..---.---------~----------.----.--.-.-- -.-.~- .-------

,,, ,,

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... ------.------~----

MUNKRO LAMPS Th e Best by T e t

11

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.. -.-- ------- .. ------------- - - - .

MU,....I\V()

Ij[?A~[) JTA~()J'

For Durability - Economy - Effi 'iclIcy All si::c{] of llILL TY?E a:zd GA.SFIOLD LC'~71,1)S Sol

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Agent :

I

,"A~aLA ~UV[)L ~ TV hol sale and Retail El ctJ'ical Deal 1'S.

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MARTIN SU .4 CO··Prop. P. O. Box 2378

·

2-21-7..1 ?054 - 2056 Rizal Ave. Tis. } 2-78- 4

! .. __ .. ____ ...... __ .. _____ .. _.. __________ e _ . . . _~"' __ •

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FABRICANTES DE CANDELA 130 Villa lobo Quiapo, Manila, 1. F. Tel . 2-63-57 - P. O. Box 2 :...0

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pOl'

:1 Atendemos pedidos C. O. D. de todos parte" y e l' l comienda particularment2 a todo los PalToco de Filipi-

na , la inmejorable calidad de 'lela que fabricam " mucho mas, la que He an la marca " Y KEE para altal'e:, en cuya confecci6n u amo. 60 r; exac 0 de cera virgen de upel'ior calidad. Hacemo a i mi mo vela para pl'oce ione y otl'O acto del curto de diferente tamaiio y cia E • Facilitamo informe Ii ta de precio , cIa e y tamafio . Se Vende Toda Lla",e de '21'a, al pOl' .. Iayol' y :Menol" --

- - - .. ... --_.--_ .... --------._----------_. __ ..... _------_ ._------ ------- ..----- ... ----.--.------.--.~


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-crea.te estates and incomes for famili(:s -Vay 01'£ mortgages -ed ucate children -provide income in tha event of retirement -establ~sh busin ess credits -stabili ze business organizatic,ns by -.indemnifying them againslt tne loss of key-men -p.rovide group p.rotection for ,amp!oyees covering accident, old age and dewth -provide income /C,n account of disability ,resulti11g from personal accident or sickness. INSULAR LIFE POLICIES on i'ndivi'dual lives, i,n various de partments, range from P500. 00 up to pno,ooo.OO 0 '1' n101'e.

: :

I:

Fl'altcisco J. Santos Insular life Representative For your insurance needs feel frefl to call 2-41-11

THE INSULAR LIFE ASSURANCE CO., LTD. Plaza Moraga

Insist in Using the Best Writing Fluid In Town

InK For General Office and School Use Writing Fluid and Fountain Pen Ink A FILIPINO PRODUCT

FARMACIA SANGANDAAN CALOOCAN, RIZAL . ~ ~_ ~ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ ~ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ a

_ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ ---~-------------------------------- _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _

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Clean, Comfortable, fast Steamers I~I

I

"BISAY AS" "VIZCAYA" "VENUS~'

"SORSOGON" Enjoy the luxuries and convenience offered by "the pride 0 f the Philippine' ~.~ coastal service" .

Ynchausti Steamship Muelle de la Indu tria

Tel. 2-27-93

yeo

YNCHAUL TI

ROPE The rope of the !>ftter kinduse din all quarter of the globe. --TEL. 4-95-65

Company Manila, P. 1. TAN AY DI TILLERY 1tIanufactur r ' f high quality GLT. WHI KIE LI E R' TEL. 2-14-1

PAINT OIL VARNI H and FLOOR "'AX I TEL. 2-2"'-5

. I

1 1,

YNCHAUSTI & CO. I

ESTABLISHED IN

!___ • _______ __ . ____________ .. _____

~_ .

1854 -

MAN I LA, P . I.

____ • __ ... ___ ... ___ ..... ..

~_

.... __ 9-_ ..... _______________ ...

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THE DmLDERS OF PHILIPPTNE COMMERCE

Manila Carnival 1934 Watch out for the COInin g

1(; S

OW g

Jan. 27th to Feb. 11thl 1934

· ~I ~I ···,, ,,

""

~

THE ONLY YEARLY AFFAIR OF ITS KIND

in the

FAR EAST

••• •• •• •• ••• •• •• ,•, , • •• •

e

Where Oriental Splendor is Allways at ,its Fullest Glory

"

:1

'.

AN ORIENTAL EXPOSITION

"

Ii

Magnificent Exhibits of the

Ii

PROVINCES GOVERNMENT BUREAUS and COMMERCIAL AND INDUSTRIAL FIRMS of the .:..,.

PHILIPPINES AND ABROAD

, ARSENIO N. Ll)Z Director General

..'

•• ••• •• ••

..-..------------- . -~-------- ..... -.----- .... ~;,--- .. ---------~--------- ..... -----,-.. -------------,


~

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COMP ANIA Mt\RITIMA The E xpress Lines to tlu? South

We maintain the most extensive inter-island hipping sel'- . vice between Manila and the principal pal' of Vi ayas ,:! and Mindanao. 'll l':". 1 Frequent and Dep<'ndable chedule , Fast and comiol'tabl€ hips

·

··• I I

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Corteous service and Excellent cuisine

f:

FERNANDEZ HERMANOS

I:

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C O M PLI ~I E

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MA_ ILA

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Adolfo A. Scheerer A rrORNEY-AT-LA w

Tel. 2 42.2.6 Manila

21 Santo 1 Bldg.

:\ PI8Z1 SlI,. Cruz ,, I

, _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ ... __ _ . ' _ '_ _ ....... .......... _ _ _ _~

--.-

_ __ • . • __ ...... . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . _ _ _ _ _ _ .. _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ .. ~ _ _ .. .... .

..... -

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Vr. ARTURO REYb'S Optometrist Ex-Professor, Ex-Asst. Dean (Philippin e Culle:;c of Optometry) Ex-M ernb f!q· (s, r llrd of Optical EX.wrniners fo?' the P. I. )

H. DE L CARMEN L

,

M embe.r of the Fi1m

ARTURO REYES OPTICAL CO. I "

Successor (The Opt. Mfg. Co.) S cientific Organ (Visual Defects)

P. O. Box 2180

Plaza Moraga, No. 34

\ ........................ -------------.--..

I

~~·~~i~~· - ·-···---~·---··---·------··-· 11 1

13~

A~

~XV~ l2T

Automobile Mechanic and Driver in Six Months. Theoritical and Practical. Your Success in Automobile Works f u lly Guaranteed or T uitiCl:l. ·r efunded if not satisfied. E nroll a.ny date at t he

Radio Operator and Mechanic in Six Monl~hs. Them'itical and Practical Instruotions enabling students to earn by repairing radios after one month. Your Success in Radio Work Guaranteed or Tuitio'll refunded if not sat isfied. Enrolll any date at the

Lineolrz AutomobIle School Cosmopolitan Radio Schoo l 311 Soler, Binondo, Manila 134'1 Hen'an, Paco, Manila

Santos Building, Plaza Sta. Cruz, Manila

Cou rses in T ouch T ypewritil1g, Stenograp'h y, Bookkeeping, Spanish and Complete High School are conduded st.rictly 011 Civil Service Sta!l1.dards . Enroll any date and any time through out the year in Commercial and Technical Cour ses .

LI~C()L~ 311 SOLER, BI. OND(" MAl I LA

1~~TITUTt: 1411-1347 HERRAN, PACO, MAN ILA


i·--·---------------------------------.--~~.---------------.--------- ---------------~ - ~~~-' ... ,,~ ,,

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\Atte1'.HOI\-!!!

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eflel.

fW cmJ,Qlmtr~ I·U flu

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Dr. F. B. ACEBED() [ Optical COIlll)all)T ' :

428 \ \ ' . Ri zal Front Cine Id ea l 3nl F loor Padill a Bldg.

TEL. 2-10-76 RAM.

.

EJ It C. E.

Opt. Expc;t

Free scientific examination of the Ey s. Fr · repair of anykind of spectacles. Free simi anual in ~ p ciion of Ey & gl",,~ ss. Fne adjustment of glas es and Framt: to every individual. \\' ClttCpt your old spectacle as trade in or ( onvalach) valu J r <l ' UIHtl>ly. We offer easy terms on in tallm ent . Gll?sses fitted and duly guanlllteed. lO 7c deduction to tl:'e gencl'al Public in r p llSe to t:1e mon ctary crisis in the en ire world . PI.OO Every Pay Day t, Employ t:i acceptable.

:i

MAYON IRON WORKS MACHINE SHOP, FOUNDRY, BOILERMAKER SHOP, STRUCTURAL STEEL AND ALL KINDS OF WELDING WORK.

We also do blue printing work ,,

·•

··,

,,

1017 Azcarraga

Tel. 4- 4-:..1

I

I~

_____ ------------------.-------------- •• ---.- •• ----- __ ~. __ •• ________ • ____ • ______ • ________ . _~ _ _ ._

.


THE B UILDERS OF PHILIPPINE COMMERCE

,

,,,.---.-------------------.----.---- ~ ------- ~- ----------------------------.- ~--- --------- ----.------.

THE LEADING STORE

!

WHERE

THE LEADING PEOPLE BUY WE HAVE

WONDERFULL VARIET Y OF SILKS AND ORIENTAL CURIAS

BRITISH INDIA BAZAAR

l

( Wassiatpull Assomull CO.) .

: :,

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121 ESCOLTA

:

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·-----------------------------------t------------------------------------------------------------i-·-----------~-~ ------·------------------------------~~------------------ - ------ - - ----- .. --.---

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Alejandra Navarro's fashion

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CUTTER AND DRESSMAKER

:I

1318 Azcarrag3., Trozo, Manila, P. 1.

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11 11

W e df,sign, make, and

We also giv.e lessons in

cut lady 'Is and child-

dress cutting and

r en's dT'{;-$,ses

sewing.

II, ,,

Alejandra Navarro Modlst

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Efficient Service

Reasonable Prices

!,

"

~ _ .~~_"

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__________ .. _

~

___ ____ .. _'!"" w_ .. __ .. ___

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.... __ ....... ____ a _ _ _ _ _ _ .. _ _ • _ _ _ _ _ .. _ _ _ _ • wa . . . . . . . . . - - " - ... - .. -_~------


THE BUILDER. OF PHILIPPINE COM]'IERCE

•~ - - ------ - --- - . -- -- - .- --- - ---- -.-.~ --- .. ---.---.- .. -- .------.- - -.--.--- .- ------ ~~ -:-

..,

CROWN SILK STORE CHOOLARAM & SONS IMPORTERS & EXPORTERS 27

ESCOL TA

·• ·

···•• · ,I

MANILA , P . I.

) TELEPHONE 2-21-51

P. O. BOX 2267

BRANCHES::

Palace ·· Manila - 9 E colta 11

Bombay Silk Store 337 -339 L garc.la

:1

·'-------... 1\

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.. -_._--------- .. -- ..._--------------------.---~-.----.-- - -.- - - .. -----.---- ..- --- ~- .--..


T HD B U ILU"BRS OF P HILI PPINE COMMERCE -.---------- - -----------------.-------.--- . ---~ ------- ------------------ - - -----------------------

Compi imenls , ,,, ,,

I'

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of the

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",,, , ", "

,

I

Riverside Electric Co., Inc. ' -~ -~\\

\

\

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Don SERAFIN LAZATIN . . . , .. ..... .. ... , .... Presidente "

ANACLETO PEREZ , .. . . , .......... Vice-Presidente

"

BONIFACIO M. CRUZ .... .. . . . . '., .,. , .. Secretar'o

"

ROMAN BALUYUT ., .. . (j,prente G2neral y Tesosero

Dr. MARIANO D. BAYANI . . . . ' . . " . ... ' .... .. Director Don RAMON IBANEZ . . " ., . , ., ., .. . ,', .. . , . ' .. . . Director Hon. SOTERO BALUYUT . . ...... . ... .. ... . .. .. Director

r

Apalit .. ____ a_ ... _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ a ___ . : ::• • _ . ___ .: .... : : . . _____ .... : : . . . . . . . . . _ ............

Pampanga :7:;;;' :;., ..

~4 t . ~ _

.... ___ .... \ ............. ___ a_ ...... ..


THE BUTLDERS OF PHILIPPINE

:-------------.. ----_ ... _-.----_ . --.-.-------...... ------.... -_ .... ,,

:

OMMER E

. _. . .

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--~ -;-;-;:-··-~~I

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, TIMBANGAN The Mo

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~rnac ular

In Central Luzon

· ·:,,,,

Published T1L'ic(' A Month Anel CirclIlat(' d Tll/oug/wlll PaJ/l)Jw/{}Cl,

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t Popular Palllpan<r()

Ta rlac, Enicuen, Elllacan.

lU' I'a

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Ecija and Moni/a,

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EVERY ISSUE CONTAINS-

I:.'

INTE ESTI G ARTICLE, T RIE and IMPORTANT NE'" by Famou and Prominent Filipino Wr'ter .

The Only Pampango Paper With A I:·•• Ii• , Ouality Circulation , , ,

The be t advertising m diurn with a lrernenduou Buying power that reaches every potential horne in

Iii

the Parnpangan region, the riches mark t outside the city of Manila.

II,,

..,,, I

,

I

Editorial And Business Office

11

35 Raon, Manila

Iii

TEL, 2-5 -4-1

,

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R em edies fOT:

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A Wide Range of Valuable

to Cold , Bron- & ~

Whooping Cough,

A thma, and Tuberculo i .

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FORMULA:

Alcohol . . . . . . . . . . . Morphina . . . . . . . . . . Sulfoguayacolato de Potasico . . . C7H502, No. . . . . . . . • . . Jbe . de T c,)u . . . . . . . . . . . Mi st. GJycyrrh. Co . y Excep. q. s.

. . 48 % by vol. . . .0048 % .• 4.50 Gm. .• 6.00 Gm. . . 80.00 c. c. ad.l80.00 c. c.

. Ii

_PrepaT.ed by

7JOM INGO 'P. 'DIZON PhaTmaceu iical Chemist

f armacia Sangandaan Ca;lo,ocan, Rizal

~I~ "'i',: Ii···················································....•......•........... / 1 ' -1

;___________ !

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l---:~:~~::::~~~~~;::~~::::~:~_~::~;~~::---Ii·

·------~~:~-~~~-:~~-~-~:-~~~-~~:I~~l~::~---··-ill

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For Qua lity Ask

" RADIO" and SILLE RS

11

T elephonzs 2-2 1-46 and 2-21-47

11

P . O. Box 2527 Cable Address "Sosuan", Manila

:t

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SIMEON O. SUAN I~

1

Mani la

:

______________ ___________ -____________________ 11

':

The P lace Where all Peoplc 1\1 t'l to Eat Gunl Low Priced Food Fit Ev ry Purse If You \\'ant to Know th' B<>st to Eat.

':

P lease

•• •• •• Hardware, P aint , Plumbing ••• •• •• & Electrical Snpplie • ••• •• • D E ALE RS OF

324-326 Echagu'il

Birthda \' Parti ('s and 8tt'. Sati 'factor~ S n ' ice Special OMWA HI A PCI' Mea l tOts. anI 80 ts. Try u ' and h' convince l. T o Saye Tim~ of \\'aiting :'. l a1;.c Ord('r by Phone Eat To Live alltl Lh'e To Eat.

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PANCITERIA RAMON LEE 322 Ro :)quillo l. Opposite 1 E l'ALA E Mani la, P . 1. Tel. 2-64-20

,

Sp cial Pri"ate Dining Rooms

·,.- .. --.. ---- .... ---

-..

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... ~":. : ..: . : ~-- ..... -....::.:..:...:

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.:.:~ .-

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r-=~::~==-~==~=---i: 456 Dasmariiia , Manila T el. 2-36-19

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P. O. Box 541

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TIGHT

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TWO MODERN GALLERIES

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Our Galler y i

E quipped \'\ith the

H , I I

Modern E quipment- ,

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•, ::=::: ___~_ , _;:::::; ___:::::::: __ ::::;: ___::::::: ___~ __ .:

r:=:::::;__~ _ ._:::::::: __

Abogado y

J.

Totario Puu!Jco

I~,, ··,, I

429 A uncion, San ~icola., ~ranila

ll', 1

800 Jabonero , Binondo, ~lanila

PICTURE TAKE:\, DAY &

:

Patricio G. Gatbonton :

Candaba, Pampanga, P.

r.

I.

:

,, , ! ,,

T el. 4-97-73

p . 0, Box

1(i6(j

·:, --------- ------ ........ ------------··, _________ . __ . ___ . __ ....... _________ . ___ . __ . ~

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THE BlHLDERS OF PHILIPPINE COMMERCE

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~ : ~~~ .~ ._ ~ I. ~ ._ ~ _.~~~ -. ~ -- ~ .-~ .- .~~d~~~~~. ===~~_~._~ _ .~~ ._~ ._~~._~~._~.~_: I

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Official Organ of the Chamber of Commerce of the Philippine Islands S. O. De F ernandez, Bldg. Entered as Second Class Matter 51 Escolta, Man"ila, P. At the Manila Post Office P. O. Box 1607 Tel. 2-67-16

I: I: I I I I

r:

III

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Monthly Magazine of Businessmen for Businessmen

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t:

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· ·,,• ·•••,• • ,,,

,• ,• •, •,, ,

COMMERCE Yearly subscription payable in advanoe P2.00 in the Philippine Island cl; $1.50 in the United States. F oreign Countries: $2.00 Remmittance by Inte':r;n'abonal Money Order or Draft on a bank ,

1:0 SUBSCRIBERS: Instructions for c ange of '2,ddress should reach us before the fifteenth of the month 0 assure del' ery of the forthcoming issue. Plmse give old and new addresses.

I I I

• ,,•• • I

I I I I

·•• I I I I I I

, •• ,,•• •

TO C01VTRIBUTORS: The pages of this magazine ar,e open for fI'ee but temperate discussion of all matters connected with commercial topics. Articles should be brief and written legibly on one side of the paper only. and must be 'a ccompanied by t.he writer 's name and address, not necessarily for publication, but as guarantee of good faith.

I

I,

I I

,,, ,, , ,,, ,,, I

I

(~O~IMI~RCE Org.ano Oficial de la Camara de CO'1neTcio de las , Islas Filiptnas Vicente T. Fernandez-Director HonQrato E. Ordoiiez-Administrador Precios de Suscripcion : Islas Filipinas, P2. 00 al aiio-Estados Unidos, $1.50 Otros Paises, $2.00

~.~~_~~

__

k_~

___ ._ •• ____ ••

_ .~

__

'~_~_~_""_"_""'"

•••••••• _______ • ___________ - - -_


THE BUILDERS OF PHILIPPINE

OMME:'C'E

~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~ 10':..···················································· ......... -.... -..... -.....--..~.-' ~~~ ""=='·-1\

Reliable Printing & Supply Co.

· \1 , ·· • o

358 Raon, Sta. Cru7, Manila

\1 o •

Tel. 2-58-44

11

101,

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We 1"eceit'e all kind. of printi.ng wOTk· .'

) PROGRAl\1

o o o f

BUSINESS AND PROFESSIONAL

:1

ARD

OFFICE SUPPLIE

H o 1,1

BOOK - BINDI G

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·

PHOTO ENGRAVU\G, ETC.

I

··" :1 ·, 'I

·,•,,, ·,,,•, ,

Jose Palarca Proprietor

Ciriaco Roxas }lancw~r

I

.

,-----_.,._------_._--------_ .. _-_ ... _----_ .. --------- --------.-.-------- .. -------~-.---.-- .. -----~


:.•....•..•............... _...........•.................................................... ........,.

.

.

i

The Overseas Business

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"Law Agency"

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ABOGADOS CONSULTORES, SR. GREGORIO O. SANTOS " FLORENTINO T. OCAMPO

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11

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MIGUEL LANZONA, JUSTO CABO CHAN Chairman

I., Office 401 J. Luna, St.,

Tel. 4-97-89

P. O. Box 2954, lVlanila, P. 1. Residence: 910 Magdalena, st.,

Tel. 4-75-03

\ , ---.---.-----------------------------.-.~------------ --------------------------------------------

Or. Ricardo ffi. T eodoro PHYSICIAN - SURGEON Internal Medicine General Surgery Obstetrics, Children, Women And Venerial Diseases. CbNSULTATIONS:-

Formocio Boutisto 356 - 358 Herbosa, Tondo 8:00 - 11:00 A. M.

I:

formaci a SofigondooD Caloocan, Rizal 4:00 - 6:00 P. M.

CLINIC: 1185 Sande, Tondo, Manila. 1 :00 - 3:30 P. M. RESIDENCE Tinajeros, Malabon, Rizal ~----------------------------------------------------- --------------------------------------------


..

-------- -- ---.- ~-==--=------------=~~.~-

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.. -.-.········------··-·1\

SFELAPCO SAN FERNANDO ELECTRIC LIGHT & POWER CO. INC. ====:=:::::::======:::;:::;.;::::=::=::;:;;::=:::;::...: - - - - --

ILLumInATES

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· 11

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··· :1 :'

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·

The

I.

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Town of San Fernando · .

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liIi'-U:%%~$f~~~-U~~~1I'%~::

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BOARD OF DIREC1iORS Pres . . . . .

S ~rafin

Lazati

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BACOLOR

MEXICO

Tre.as . . . . Amado L. Santos

MINALIN

Manger. Roman Baluyut Director . Andr es Euse b io

·:; Director. Luis W. Di20n

~~%~~~~~~%U"".~~ .... ~::.'(

,

BRA:~HES

Vice . . . . .Simeon Ocampo

Sec . . . ... Jos e Gutierrez David

!I

" .. ~%"~~:l'-'''''''' .... ,.-:.;.".#,.:,

and

STA. RITA with 24 - hour service

··• i OPERATING THE · ! SAN FERNANDO ICE PLANT ·:, . "

ii Only

Pure Crystal I ce Sold i.

··----•• ----_.----------------..--_ ....... ~

..

----.-.' -;;-;;-~=-:. -- . ~ ... . ~ ... . ":,,.-~~ ...... ~ . -... ::.-.... !


--------------------- ~~~------ . -------------------------- - ------- ~- ----- ---- --- --------- - - .

El

40 ~

Del Calor Se Desperdicia

En Los "KALANS" Y Fogones Ordinarios

No Sucede Asi Cuando Se Usa El

Fogon "MAYON" _

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En este fogon la combustion de la lena es perf ecta, y TODO EL CALOR SE UTILIZA, resultando en una economia muy grande. La economia que S8 obtiene en algunos rneses pagara con creces su cos to. Ademas, piense V d. en la conw~ niencia. Es limpia, sin hurno sin hollin, y se cocina con mas rapidez. /1, ,,, ,,, ,,, ,, :, ,,

c.

TUASON E HIJOS

FABRICANTES DE BALDOSAS Y FOGONES ~ 5-71-29 MANILA, I. F. Agno 1174-1188 Tels'l5_44_20

,â&#x20AC;˘

~.-.-------------------------------------------------- ---------------------------------------------,


~------------.-------------------------.--.----.--------------

.. ---------~---=-.--.--------------,

------- ------

Ii

DESIG SPECIFICATION ESTIMATES SUPERVISION OF CONSTRUCTIO

BUILDI ' G R OAn -\ ' Tl HAILTWAl l<:' BRIDGE P RT \YORK S nWIGATTOX Y TE 1 FILLING

. 1\

SOTERO BALUYOT CIVIL ENGINEER &1CONTRACTOR an F rnando. Pampanga or

2181 Herran

~

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··• ··•

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Paeo

TEL. 5-73-73 ._-----.,---------. --- - ._......... --.. =--=-.. _.....-:-;-:-::.."':. __"':'""- --_ ...... _...... - :..=.::--"- ... ---

- - - - . - - - - _ ._ - - - _ ... .:..:..,:.- - ,:! _ ..

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THE BUILDERS OF PHTLIPPlNE COMMERCE

. ..

r········~~·i~~·;~···h~··,~~j~~i~if;,~·~~~~~;~·;6~···· ~ 2487 HERRAN, P ACO, MANILA, 1. F.

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DIRIGIDO POR LAS

~ija 5 ~2 - In O1ari~Nb

oe /7;.

~icente !l2

Jaul

SE' OFHECEN LOS CURSOS SIGUIENTES:

Ensefianzas :

Cursos:

PRIMARIA - INTERMEDIA HIGH SCHOOL

GENERAL - COMERCIO CIENCIA DOMESTICA

El plan de ,estudios es e.n todo igual al de las ,escuelas del Gebierno OBJ E TO.-Este colegio tiene por objeto ofrecer a la juventud una educ cion solidarnente religi csa conbinada con una instruccion .acomodada a las exigencias de la sociedad.

,

, ,

-- ... ----- -- --------- - ------------ ---- ---- - -- - - -- -- --- ~--- - --------------------------------------'--------------------=----------------------------------------------------------------------------LA ACADE;I'1IA IDEAL PARA SU HIJA

COLEGIO DEL BEATER IO DE LA COMPANIA 157 Shl. Lucia, Intran1ul'os, Manila, 1. F. Moderna tanto en sns mi' todos de instrucci6n como en sus complet c-s equipos en sus salas de estudio, biblioteca, dormitol'ios y departamentos de Ciencia. Domestica. Una academia COll'pleta que se glorifica en moldear perlectan1ente el ca,racter en sus estudios. Una academia progresiva que est'll. a la altura de las model'nas eXl,l2'Bncias educaci,(' naJl~s en ECONOMIA DOMESTICA, CURS OS ELEMENTALE S Y SECUNDARIOS l'econocidos pOl' el gobiernc.. Una academia valerosa que enseiia las verdades fundamentales perte'l1ecientes ,tanto a la vida etexna como a ftla vida 'toemporal. Dirigida POl' las RELIGIOSAS de la Virgen Mar la. PROFESORADO : Las RELIGIOSAS del Beateno asistidas pCit' maestras debidamente cualificadas. Ta'es dorrnitorios dirigidos pOl' las Ven. Hennanas del Beaterio: I MMACULATE CONCEPTlON LADIES DORMITORY (cer ca de la UniversidR;d de Santo Tomas) . Calle Espana, Sampaloc, Manila. SAINT J OSEPH LADIES HALL (cerca de la Univ. Filipina). Calle P . Faura, Ermita, Ma'nila. SAN ANTONIO'S DORMITOH,Y (para las Recogidas) . Singalc.ng, Manila. Muy mo,dera.dos son los derechos que porIa enseiianza se exigen. Se dan especiales descuentos du rante estos tiempos de depresicin econ6mica. Tambien se otorgaran descuentc-s a las estudiantes que lleva:ren cO'nsigo tres compafi eras. Pam oatalogos, dirijanse a la Secretwria. POJra Pormenores dirijanse a la MADRE DIRECTORA

.. --------------.. ---------------------------'--------------------------------------------------;;t


THE BUILDERS OF PHILIPPINE

o_rMER E

I:j----------------. --------------------... ---. -. ---------_. '=--,,-= ---=- -= -------.. -' '1/ 00 -

il

CENT ROE SCOL

il

COURSES OFFERED

:/ : :1 •

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:A~IL.P ESE NOR IT AS

MAIN BUILDI G A zcar.raga StI'eet

U

Secondary Commerce CUTTING and DR~SSMAKING

I ER ITY BUILD!. 'G Menrliola treeL (Exclusively for wom~n PHARMACY INDUSTRY EDUCATIO, T }lOMP. C {)j OMIC fORMAL OLLEGE OURSE GE 'ERAL OCR E lIOnlE ECONOMI LIBERAL AHT ' GF. l EHAL 'UUnSE f'REPARAT()l~Y L.\ \\' PREPARATOHY U1EI)[CI~E PREPAHA'l'URY UJ\1l\1En 'E OMMEI 'E A1'\lJ BUSINE 'S AnM1. . I T I AT 10. r LA \\' C~r~~ 1'\1~]' LA \\' A' l> U 1-

FI TE ARTS MUSI (Piano, Voice C 1 ure, Yiolin a'n d other string in tlUments)

GRAUL:ATE 0 RSES Mast r's llegree 1Il nee

:. 1

KINDERGARTEN PRIMARY

, : : :

INTERMEDIATE SECONDARY GE ERAL COURSE SECO DARY ACCELERATED (3 Year Cour e)

:'

SECONI;'A RY HOME ECO OMI S COMBINED SECONDARY GENERAL AND HOME ECO O~lICS

!/

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CENTRO

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It·alling t) Art am]

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COLAR DORl\lITORIE '

MAIN BUILDI G U ' n 'EItS ITY h ILIll.'G Azcar.raga St. M('l1diola Sl. CENTRO E OLAR HALL AZcarraga t.

MA ILA LA '~T

LLE E

(Fc.rmedy E 'cuela de De:e ' ho de ~Ianila) 5:.. l-'laza J.lcKillly, l.lt,amurc, Offer Preparatory Law and La\\ ('uu" e

further informatioH plc(Js(' ode/r('.·.· Centro E colar de efiol'i~~ ~cal'l'aga 't., Manila Fo]'

II -~-

... ------~-------------------.---.-~--~--.--.~--~----------.-~.- --- .. - --- -~- .- .----.-~

.,,~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~ _._----------------------------------------------------------~~-~ -----~-~ ------ -------

Compliments of

ATENEO DE MANILA ~lanila

----------------------------- ..

----..

---.----~-~~------.---- ~~~~-~ ---- ~~ -. --


THE BUILDEnS OF PHILIPPINE C OMMERCE

------_._-------------------------------- ... _---------------------------------- -------------------

ltniurrsillall <!!atolira (Real y

"l! lIiilipinas Pon tificia Universidad de San to T o'YYUis) FUNDADA EN 1611

LA MAS

ANTJ(~UA "EN Sn"IILAr~ES

TODO EL EXTREMO ORIENTE Y SUS EN LO S ESTADOS UNIDOS

Facultades qu,e se ens,e nan : FILOSOFIA

TEOLO GIA

DERE CHO CANONICO

1ltniuersitg of ianto momas COURSES OFFERED:

Liberal Arts General Courses '" Pharmacy Chemistry Course Civil Eng . and Arch. P n pal'utory La\'\' * Education P reparatory Medicine :\ O'jJ~en to Me-n and Wom en. ,;: HI gh School R equests for cat~logue <:"\ nd inqn iri es for f urther information should be addressed to The Se<':l'ctnry, University of Santo Tomas, P. O. Box 117, Manila. I =I<

Philosophy and Let ters

* Meciicine and Surgery

\

------------------------------------( --_ ... _-----;--------~.------ - -.------ - --.---------- - -------颅 ;._-----------------------------------------------------------------------------------路 ----------- ~I

!II

HOLY GHOST COLLEGE

I

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163 Mendiola, Manila

i:

~o~~~~~G;~\I~b~~t!~~~f::u~~_

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II

:

tion, Commerce & Home Economics

I':

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SECONDARY DEPARTMENT> General Home Economics Commerce Elementary Course - Killdergarten Special Classes in Paillting and Designing

,ll

i/ 11

For paTticulars apply to R ev. Moth er Superior Holy Ghost College, MANILA.


':--.----.-.- .....

THE BUILDER ,';";.~~-----

--- OF-

PHILIPPI fE

0 IMERCE

.. --.--.-- .... ... . --- ..... -.... -..........-;:~- .. ~- ..... -.......... ~ - '~...~....~~

fAR EASTERN COLLEGE TIO~

A GENUI TE FILIPIN 0 1:K TIT

THE PUBLIC'S CO

FlDE~CE

I!

£ TABLl HE]) IHlD

J STIFJ ED··-

LTY DISTINGUISHEI' ALl :\1 rI E'\'CEPTIO~ALL\ STIW. -C 1,'A THOROUGH TRAI 'I TG In the preparation of the courses of insll ut',i '11 offered in the Far En~t · ern College, suffici ent ela licity hu ue n allowed for adaptu tioll to i llli\ iduul needs. '1 his yst em of ins truction as ures th e stud ent the oppOJ tunity to ma£t,zl' eve:ry pa,·t of a cour» ~ unu r t'h personal guidulw e oi t'ompet 'nt in tructor . COURSES OFFERED: COLLEGE OF LIBERAL ARTS COURSES Leading' to the Title of Af'''ociate in Art ' (Gf'neral our 'e ) .sociale ill Arts Prepa.ratory LaW' Cour e) L zading t~ the title 01 BachelOr of SCIence In Hom EcoJlomlc ' HIGH S HOOL Gen eral High School o, ,-s Dome ·tic Science our: e I ' TERMEDIATE OURSE Special Cour es in ookElry, Tl sig'ning and utting

E . f RO L L

NO"' !

For pa licu :a rs write l c :

FAR

~~~

520 EVANGELISTA, MA

T~ IL

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P. O. BOX 29 2

I:·

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THE REG I STHAH

» ... '"

· ·

....~( .. •;

11

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TEL. 2-21;-71

. .. ---.... ---....... -.----.---.... -..\ ~... ------------ . J ---- ------------"'-~~~----.. ---....... -.'

!'···········N"ATioi~AL···U

·

NIVERSiiY-""" . ..i :

M~in Build;ng: ::-;:5 Intramuro~ Branch:

1.1

··•• ··•• • ···• I:· IiI ·••• ·· : I

i: !

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Lipa • treet, "ampalcc, :\1anila. 1 1)<) (;ral. Luna :1., lnlramuro ' , ~1:mila . Col1 ege of L aw: .:' Anda tre ::.t. Jnlramu)'n.' ..\Janila. Students, Att end the Bigge t Private lnstitu ion of L 'arning' ill the PhilijJpine ,th . TaticnaJ Cni\' r ily. DAr .1. 'D ErE'Sl1 TG CLASt 'E'!. ' Junior. Tormal liege Education Elementary Engine ring Comn: ercial II i~h . chuol D enti try Admi- Home Economic ~ Commerce ~.l1d Bu ine Boukk e ping nistration , tenography Pharmacy T.\'}J £writing Law Surv ring Li beral Art T he i\Tational "Cni\'er ity i' the Jar e!'t prh'ate 'nive r. ity today in U:e Philippine . For further particulars add 1'.;. , t}~ e n gi:trar.. ~atiollaJ 'niver ity, Manila, P. I. -

f ________ •

___________________ •

____ . _ • • _______ ~ _______ •

_ _ _ _ ._~ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ •

_ _ _ .~ _ _ . _ . _ _ .~ _

'

_ _ _ _ ~~ _ _ _ • • • • •


THE BUILDERS OF PHILIP PINE COMMERCE

iii-----------------------·--·-····-----------------------------------------------------.-----------

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San Bed a College (Corl-duct ed by the Benedictin e F athers)

"In th e Heart of the City" Course s Offered: Primary, Intermediate, High School Pre-Medicine & Pre-Law:

Write for a Free Catalog

:

SAN BED A COLLEGE Mendi~la St. Tel. 2-32-9 2

: 00 0000-00-00000000-0000-

-n-nnn-~t--

00 _ . __ 00_00.

--J.--

_00 .

_

.000000000000-0000. __ _

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t---------·_-----·_-------------------------------------------------------------------------------- ,

THE PHILIPPINE WOME N'S COLLEGE A F ILIPINO UNIVERS1TY FOR ' VOMEN T his Unit-'(; )'siLy Offers Diff e?"e'td and Complete G OU1'DeS for lY01nen of all Ag.cs. Kindergarten P.rimary Grade l'n t ermediatJa Uradl'!s , High Sch ool , • . H ome Economics (Secondary) H(.~n e Economics & Hign School (Combill cd) Commer ce _Conser vrotory of Music Fine Arts Physical E ducation 1'\ ormal Cou rse (General & Home

E conomics ) Associa t e i n Arts (A. A. ) P,l'epa t cJry Law Prepa r a,.t,_,:y Medicine ilachelor of Aries (A . B . ) Bachelor of },hilosophy l P h . B . ) Bachelor of Scie,;ce ill E duca tion lB.S . B . ) Ba ch elor of' Science in Co.mmerce (B.S .C .) Gra duate in Pharmacy Ph aJ~'maceutical Chemist

T h e Univer sity Campus and coll eg e building a re ideall y sit uated acoverbg an entire block, facin g" T aft Avenue between T ennessee an d Vermon t streeb. Completa and modern class room a nd laboratory equipment. Spaclcus and well vent ilated dormitories .

Fo ~'

F m "th eT Pw"ticulars, Apply To

THE SECRE.T ARY Taft Avenue, Manila

Tel. 5-66-72

.. ------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------


THE BUILDER,' OF PHILIl'PINE

OMMERC'E

li ------§t~----§~4~i;~-ti~;~~----Qi-~ii~-;~~ -----~!

·:

A

:

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:

·:

4- Year S'econdal'Y ourse in Home Econom ic 2-Year Collegiate Cour 8 in Hom Economics

SECONDAHY

OURSES.

Ii :

Ii·

General omnL rcial

1.

:

2.

COLLEGIATE COUR E : 1. Commerce ' ..... . & B. C. . 2. Libe1'8J Art - -A. A. & B. 3. Education - B. S . .8. & ollcgiate Tonnal 4. Music -B. _f. 5. Postgraduate - ·M . A. SPECIAL coun E: 1. Kindergar en. 2. Music and language .

·,

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~t. § qnlasiita's QInllrgp

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PennsylvaJ ia

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01115,

Manihl, I. 1.

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l---------- -- - - - -- - - --- -- ---- - --------r---- -- - - -- - -- --- - ---· -- ----~ --- --· - --- - --:;-~~~--I !

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The Largest and ··: Coziest Dormitory for Ladies 1

.1 ·:"

NEAR TIlE U. S. T. IS THE

Sta. Catalina Girls' Dormitory ~

G

YER~

R FORBE. . T.

1ft an aged by Domin lea n Sisters Apply in Person to SOR AMADA. OLEA. O. S. D. :

·'• - -

~= ----------------

DIRECTRESS

. . ------.. ----.---------... ----------------------------..

-~.-- - .-- ~- ~~ .

.,


TIll; :Ct;ILDl;:l

r: ....

·

"

.!.:.!-!... . . . "'" •••• ••

OF PHILIPPINE COM :riIERCE

=.-...-----. -- ..-.--=..~ .--~. --~ - ..~. --~ ---~ ---~---~ ---~ ---~ ---~ ---~ ---~ ---~ ---~ -- -~---~---~--:I

.

"TOM' S"

1

·

; DIXIE KITCHEN... ,

··

Known throught the world for its

:

III ORIENTAL GRILL... :M anila's Mo t Modern Re taurant!

F I K~1' CLA 88

COOKI G! Delightful Ahnosphere ••• Excellent Orchestra ..• Good Dance Floor!

The Meeting Place of Manila's Epicures

DINNERS... GAY SUPPERS EARLY BREAKFASTS

The Best of EVerfJlhing And EverUlhing at its Bests!"

FRESH STATES VEG1:r48LES AND FRUITS 8Y EVERY PRES/[)ENT BOAT A COMPLETE C~TERING SERVICE

Accomodation for Banquets, Parties etc. Caterers to Homes, Clubs etc.

--- ... -------------_._--------------_._-----\ - ----- --- -- ------- ------.--------------------------- ~". i-- --------------------------------------------------- ------- -- - ----------------------------- - --- :~

Compliments

ii · .1

Iii

of

LA SALLE COLLEGE

1.:.. -... -.. __ .. __________________________ ___ .... _. . ____________________ -__ __ ____________________ ____ .

..:.,

- --- ~ ---------~------.--- ~ - - - ----------------------- --- - -------------------------------- ------- - -

···

Compliments

II

SEMINARIO MAYOR DE SAN CARLOS

11

213 San Marcelino

, ,

,

·:,,

of

Manila

I ~'--"----' ..-------.------.. ---.----.... ----------------------------------------------------------.


THE BUILDERS OF PHTLIl:'PI E

OM~m:-:CE

tl'O l ~'ln I (J

PA'l'RJ.l

Directed Ly

:1

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Foreign Mi ion ' i t r of St. Dominic Address : Rf~Y. 81. '1 ER UPE'RIOR Coun:'e Recogniz : - d by the Go\'el'nment.

Dll'ecciol1 :

eCl'(~ta riH

Instituto de Mujeres Tayu man T UDdr) '.1 d . J- ~/5-:d Ro~a

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F• Z• LEDDA ' CO. ,INC. IIIil ,,

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P. O. Box 23~6 --- 684 Ave. Rizal Free Press Bldg.---Manila, P. I. Phone 2-13-66

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Colegio de la Consolacion

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Il U J)ER TIlE DIRE 'TW. I OF TIl , 1

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A UGUSTL ' IA .' ~lOTliEns

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:' : School, Off r JJom(' 'lit: • ci 'nee, High: Int('rm(~diat2 and PI iJrla.r ' : I : cour ' a' pr" 'riL by lne i::'

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: ment. Engli-iJ i · Ll' la.1KUa~(· III i 11 : : tlle Cul flcula. GOLDSMITH ATHLETIC 11 : ADIS t(J develop !,(JUIl'\ jUd"/ll"lt : :1 1:1 : r nd ~.. . UtJ. i[;'Lt co 1.ciNlce i . b_' i)',: Equi~m~nt :1 : \:I\.h i . t I\fctua\ trainIng an I t'U l'J- : ., l~l att- il.r:ltnb La r g e. ~roLln 1 ('n-: 11 Trac:r and Fie: d, Bac~buH, : cl(,s e ~ b' ~ t " e v: alb fur,li. h facJii i : : for dail' r !C.<'.!..ti('TI and whol : phY!ilcc.1 d nlol'ment. pi Dasket Ball, Volley B all, Ten: BOARDER. half-boar IpT • 1 nis, Gclf, 'etc., etc. , • Dav chJlar ar ~ .rre j\·c't

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\Ve offer Complete Line of

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ALSO Firearms, Anunur:.ition , rluntiag Accessorie3, etc.

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·.-.--_._---.---------.------_._------------.--. -

THE REVERE D MOTHER SECRETARY


THE BUILDERS OF PHILIPPINE COMMERCE ), -- ~ - . I

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POLYTECHNIC INSTITUTE

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The Only One Of Its Kind In The

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Philippines

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School of Engineering & Vocational 11

Training.

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OFFERS

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Collegiate COU1·se.'3 : Ci viI Engine'el'ing Electrical Eng;ineering

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VO Gafional Cou11s,es. Surveying Automobile Engineering Radio Engineering Marine Engineering Stationary Engineering Archi tectural Draftsman Mastel' Electrici'a n Master Plumber Industrial Chemistry

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Mr. J cse Paez, (C. E.) Chairman

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MEMBERS Hon. Mel scio Arranz, (C. E.) Hon. Sotsro Baluyot, (C.E .) I Mr. F lorencio C. Dnson 1 (B . S. E.E. ) 1 1\1r. Luis Francisco (C.E.) 1 Mr. Pedro M. T elmo (B.S.M.E. )

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Sccre~ary-Treasurer

Communicate with the

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.Exceptionally Brillant & Strong Faculty Informat~on,

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For

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BOARD of TRUSTEES

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SECRETARY-TREASURER Mr. Pedro M. Telmo 209 Legarda, Manila ~ ----.--------.--,--

Telephone 2-31-63

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THE B UILDERS OF PHILIPPI E

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OMMERCE

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Comfortable room to let Clean, dEcent su rroundings

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Just the place to re t after th day' grind Visit us, before engaging a room.

SINUKUAN HOTEL PONCIANO REYE

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PI' pl'Lto!' 1817 A U IL R, MA .. TIL

TEL. 4-47-98

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~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~\~l~~~~~~~~_~~~~~~~~~~~~~.~:~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~: Iii v ARADERO DE SAN MIGUEL i I;

L . A. CHEEl &

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0 ., Proprietors

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Builders of all Kinds of Motor, Sail Row, and Life Boats Also Lighters, Lorchas, Launches, Scows, etc. All Kinds of Iron Works 200 Tons Slip way

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E timate

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Furnished on all Phases c.f hipbuilding and Repairing L 'QUIRES SOLI ITED

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1". O. Box 1244

Manila, P . I.

Tel. 2-16-60

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S. Arm,-

. Launch rt)IcCO. "'ILLE" L'nder Repairing

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TTIE RLTILDERS OF PHILIPPINE COMMERCE --.---~------.-.---

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St. francis' Home Compliments

ST. FRANCIS'S HOME is a dormitory located in Sampaloc, 572, Leg[1,r da St., which is about the center of the principal University of Manila, and conducted by the Franciscan Missionaries • :, of Mary. j

of

Sta. Rita's Academy

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The dormitory has a large ·I,• auto-car to tak'e the students to

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University and parts of the city.

to other

i ST. FRANCIS' HOME is a ·!, Rom2.n Catholic Dormitory, nej

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San RafaeJ Sireel

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MANILA

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verth£less it is epen to 11 sbud: lents, teachers and nul' es regard~ess of creed. Catholic Students must attend Mass en Sundays and Feasts of obligation.

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I~I Saint Catherine's School :

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CARCAR, CEBU

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CO'ndudted by the .Canonesses, Missionaries of Samt Augustme

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All boarders are r:cquired to secure the permission of th'e Mother Directr-ess befor,e going to any place ,exc,ept to the r.egu-

II Courses

lar classes. ,I Foreign languages, painting, " music and other special classes are also oUel',ed to boarders. ' 1:,'1

This Dormitory is open Ilil throughout the yea,r and admits Summer School boarders and:i

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half-boarders.

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, PRIMARY il INTERMEDIATE

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recogni1Jed by the Govern-! ment of the Phi:l'ipp jne Islands :

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SECONDARYGENERA,L, COMMERCIAL LIBERAL ARTS EDUCATION MUSIC COMMERCE

i For further informat~CU1 apply to the : REVEREND MOTHER SUPERIOR ---

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THE B UILDER

OF PH ILIPPI

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: .. •• •. ·•••..·•·••• ··.•... •..·.·.•.. ••.•·•.. ·.-1) :,...... -....... -....•••.•...

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J. M. J. A.

St. Tberesa's COllele

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under the direction of the

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EL COLEGIO DE

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SaD Juand e Let ran : ~

:1 , HA Fon:\IADO .\ TODO.' . : ESO no IBnES Q E no\' :, ON HONnA y pnEZ DE LA : PATR IA. ,,, Iii ,

BelgiIAn Canonessea MiuioDariel of St. Augustine 212, San Maroelino Street, Tel. 2-11-10 Manila, P. I.

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Courses of Study Recogni z'ed by th,e Governm ent Kindergarten for both boys and girls

Primary General Course Intermediate General Cour e Secondary: 1) General Cou' e 2 ) Dome tic Sciepce Co urse Colleg,c of Liberal Arts : Two years for the T itle of As_ sociate in Art (A.A .) F our years for tbe D2gree of Bachelor in Art (B.A.) College of Education: Four year for the Degree of I': B achelor of Science in Edu- : cation (B .. E.) : :,, Home Economics: : Four years for the Degree of :,' I , Bachelor of cience III Home , , Economics ( B. .H .E.) "

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rulegio orr cc cursos completo, d(scie In Prima ria HI " olle~ " 'on cursos d, PI _paraLoria de Du' clio) I \' paraLuria d l\12dicllla. I nstruccion 11 Lngl '8 y seglill 1a norma::; d I "BuJ'cPu of Education", sin de cuidar el '(lst·llano qL 10, Directores de LETl ~AlT jm. g~.n d impurLan -jet y nec€sidacl I~ n FilipinH.,.

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:, :1 ' : A AR JO DE ItELICIOS ~) : : DO 1\11 1 reo' E.-PAN( LE,' ' : :

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cur' de la 1 'Ilgllct cast·cargo de pruf· '()re~ spanole.. EI ingl' s II el H iJ,{h chool y el Departamento de ' legiade' .. Ui bajo I~ dil' 'CCic'1I1 de profesore" americallo COlltl, tack para el dectu . g

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Commerce:

,, ":- :'' P ora m,r/. I nf j1'm r Di,.ig;,·:., :, If C1'et(1 rio "

for the T itle of :' ',, I A~sociate in Commercial : ' cience (A .C. . )

T wo year

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Music: J F our year for th~ Degree of : Bachelor in l\I u ic (B.)!. ) :

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Tel. del 'olegio 1 T t.l. del Direct r 2-2"' -46 P . . B x l , _Ianila

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THE B1..' ILDERS OF PHILIPPINE COMMERCE .:~~.--~ ----~ -. '-~---~---:3:E.:..: ----------;---------_-:-~':..~=-~=- . -.---------- ----.=----=----=-----=----=------: 1

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Memories

of youth fade and

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are gone,

but never changing

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photographs of today become . tomorro s treasures. Keep the

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for a new portraIt .

ezc h year.

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Call

studio

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an appointment. today.

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TRIANGULO STUDIO TEL. 2-20-10

749 RIZAL AVE.

~<:"~===_ .• "nn_________ .;_ ...... _.. ________ 1______ n_______________________ n__n=_='!1 \

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THE HILL - PRODUCTS

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J. B. FELICIANO &.Co., Inc. M~nufactur er s

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arId General Merchants

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SCHOOL and OFFJr.E SUPPPLIES: INK, PASTE, ;VIUCIJ,AGE, RUBBER, STAMP INK, PAPERS, PENCILS, and MARKING INK. HOUSEHOLD SUPPLIES: HAROI ' V.\X, SHOE POLISH, FLOOR "VAX, GIGS-REMOVER ME· TAL POLISH, AUTO POLISH, ETC. We accept C. O. D. orders from the p.l'ovi'nces at r eaSICulble price

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CALL UP PHONE 2-83-67

\VRITT:; FOR INFORMATION

STA. CRUZ, MANILA

173 MARIA CLARA,

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PROMPT SERVICE.

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THE BUILDER~ OF PHILIPPL E COl\1ME~CE

.--------------------------- ... ----------------------- -- ~ ---------- ~~------- .---.- -.--.- -- -.--. -- H M A I~ OFFICE: 543--15 Stc._ Sepulcro, Paw . T el: 5-73-26 and 5-72-52

BRA_ CLf OFFI 'B 1.

ILU,CIl OFFICE :! orner _\ Zl'lll'l'u ga nnd

15 S. Gabri,al, Bmonuo Tel. ~-17- 3 5

"hi zai

Tel.

AY t' IlU0

2- 12-55

ROBLES TRANSPORTATION Freight Ca.rgo Transfer Baggage Furniture etc., And any kind of Hauling

Recharge, r epuir Batter! s & n cwilluing

, . .--------------------------------- ~--~ ---~--~-~--~--~-~--~--~~~--~--~--~~~~-~------------------------ --------, G >n rator ', Al'Il1utu.l''' .

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OLD GO I . . . 0

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The smoothest of all the clgal'ett s. An entil'ely n w blend. A cigarette you can moke fI'om morning to niglit . wi thou t getting a cough. ,:

OLl) G()LD

The Smooth rand B tt l' Cigarette Dx Buncio & Co., Inc. Ofi cina I)H-213 Estero de J3in noo

T lB. 4!J 69 - I!J ~IA

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--- -_ .. _--_ ............. ---- _.................... _- ~: -'Life in NEW MA IL mean happin R , • good h ealth, comi'olt, Ja ~ ting contentm nt. There's no wiser choIC e for your futu}' home. Please come and in peeL. .

~~-;.~--;:;--;-;-;' ...

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34 Echague, Tel. 2-23-40

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JUAN YSMAEL & CO., INC.

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Ianila

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GE0lERAL A ENT. unday and IIol ldays all T el. 6-H7-25 ~~ ---.--.-----

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with world famous

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"e hold a Complete tock of Toilet Requ:. it c of In-oven r eJ)Utations priced to meet to-day' cond ition All that i LE t in Face- nam ,Powder, oap. , P e rfume: etc:, at pric ~ that plea e ~

r=ILIVI~~J AZ~ PER F "C ~I E R I A Whole . Ie & Reta -' Tel. 2-7.)..(j;J . I ---~----------------------------------------------------------------------~ -~~---~- --~ ------ ' 531, Rizal Av e .


'THE

"B UILDli:RS

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PmLll'PINE COMMEnCE

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IO N COLLEGE ·• ASSUMPT COLEGIO DE SENORITAS

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,, Autorizado y reconocido por el GobieTno de las Islas Fi•• lipinas paTa expediT diplomas de segtmda ensenanza , y ceTtijicados de las clases InteTmedia y PTimaTia

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OI~IOIOO POR LAS RR . MM. ASUNCIONISTAS ';

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Se admiten internasJ medio internas y externas. El Colegio de las ASLU1cionistas proporclOna a las jOVl£nes una solida formacion cristiana, y una preparacion exquisita para la vida a que estan destinadas las jovenes de nuest ras buen as c1ases. DIRIGIRSE A LA MADRE SUPERIORA Telefono 5-57-27 Herran 405, Malate.

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Real Colegio de Sant a Isa bel de Manila P rimer Centro D ocente en, Filipinas- 330 Alios de existencia Dirigjdo par las Hijas de la Caridad de S. Vicente de Paul. Aprobado POl' el Gobiel'no para expedir J) jplomas de Seg'unda Ensenanza y Clases l ntermedia y Primaria. Esta aoreditado entre los acreditados y l'ecomendab'le entre los recomendados Colcgios de esta Capital tiende a l doble f in de dar a las jovene" una educacion so\idame'ntc cristiana inst.ru y~ndol as al luismo tiempo en los conc.cimientos y cu1tura social que debe posee:r una j oven bien inst, ulda. Para ambas cosas cuenta el CoLegio de St.a. I sal>el con los elemen'tos neces31rios; competente cuerpo de Profesora, r'3ligic,sas, sew:aroes americanas, y fi lipinas g r adu adas en las Universidades y Escuela Nonnal de Filipinas . De afio en afio, gracias a1 incansahIe celo de quien 10 dirige, se ven prosperaI' en este Establecimiento las Ciencias y las .A.rtes, mereciendo espeSE R EClBEN A L UM NA S I N T ERNA S, 139 General IJuna, Intrall1UTOS,

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cial menci6n el Ingl~s que enseiiado con aci.erto y estudiadc. con aH.n POT las alu:rnpas, hace que estas obtengan muy al,tos promedios en los examenes finales. Tambien la lengua espanola apre'Ild'en con suma facilidad, pues ademas de la hora que diariamente consagran las alumnas a su estudio, el lenguaje mas usado entre elias 'eS el espafiol. EI piano se ensena pc,r los metodos del Conservatorio de Ma'nillia. Reune este Colegio condiciones altamente higienicas: muy espaciosos y bien venti!ados dormitorios para las Ninas, amplias gaJerias, y .extenso jardin para 1'ecreo de las mismas, y todo cuanto es necesario para su bienestar. Ademas cuenta con un nueva yespecioso Dormi,torio exclusivamente pal~a alumnas de las Escuelas del Gobi 'l'no y empleadas en Casas Comerciales. ME DIO-INT ERNA S Y EXTERNAS. lVla~ 1ila, I. F.

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T HE B UILDER ... - - --_ ................ -_ ... .. ... _ ......... - _ ... -_ ..

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OF PIlIL IPPI TE ......

~- - - ~

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0 DIERCE --

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-_ ............ ... ..... .. .... ... ...... --..:...!: .. - - -- - .- ............... --_ ..... ... - _ ........ ... ... - .

PAUL'S INSTITUTION MANILA, P . I .

Conducted by the

I ST ER

OF ST. PA L DE CH RTRE

Cc.urses r ecognized by the Government of the Philippine Llano Th p object of fhis IlIstil'll'ion is fo offll' ff) child~'{ /I (1/1 { ,,0/11111 lotlil .'< for the rombinl/tion of {( MlOrollqh RdilJi!llls E"II,"II ' /I I,.ilh /I rlllll S t of st lIdy in (LcCOrdC01C( with tilt m()st (I/Jpro /'( d 1IL0eh ,'Ie dlU''<1 t :1I1ta/ rndllOds .

The

CllrYiCII!II1/t

incilldc's:

K I NDERGART EN-fer boys and girl . PRI MARY-boys are admitted up to th 2nd grade inclu iv . I T ERMED1ATE, E 0 'DARY OUR E , GE. 'ERAL OUR E. DOMESTI C SC I ENCE COUI SE, CO IMEH. I AL OU R E-fir. t ancl '('cond year. SPE IAL COURSES-Art -Music-Language (Engli h, Fr nch & Jll.lllLh ) ST . PAUL'S DORM ITORY-The n w bui lding \~ith it · healU1 f ul lonullon and it up-to-date furni hing ffu ' a conv ~ l1i Ilt and attraclh' boarding place f .r ~tudent of Unn' rities. For further

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inform~tion

apply to: The Rc\'l "cnd 10th r ProvincIal. 510 l l erran, r.l a la t.e-:P. O. Box 71 5. PE.' 0. ' T H E FIR T OF J

CLAS E

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S;ania ·....

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S;ania Otatalitta Otnl1rgr 211 Anda. W. C, • ______ .. ___ ............... _____ ... • ........ _·· ... __ a ____ .....

Manila -.~

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THE BUILDERS OF PHILIPPINE COM MERCE ii¥'., --=:: ---=:: ---~ ---~ ---~ ---~--~ ---~ ---~ ---~ ---~ ---~ ----~ ---~ ---~ ---~ ---~--~ ---~ ---~ ---~---~ ---~ ---~ ---~ ---~ ----~ ---~--~ ---~ - --~--- . : I I

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Central Lu~on's Lflrgest Private Institution of Learning RECOGNIZED COURSES:

PRI'M ARY INT~RMEDIA TE

HIGH SCHOOL

Authorized Courses: Preparatory

GUAGUA NATIONAL INSTITUT'E Guagua, Pampanga

P. O. Box 3 ~~_~

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_ _ _ _ _ _ • • _ • • _____ w __ • •

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THE BUU~DERS OF PHILIPPINE COMMER E

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English Torpedo Beds Beauty & Comfort Superior Quality at reasonable .prices

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Catalogue upon request

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Write for Free

Particulurs

, Parsons ~()~r1:v!!e Co., Inc. I I:

w.--------.----.--.. -----. ----.. ----... ----.. ---. u . __ u ..= .. __ ... ... u ....= .=-u ....

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THE BUILDE~S OF PHILIPPINE COMMERCE ~------.---------------------------------------------- ------------------------------ ---------:1

••

Would . You slen::l your Wife and Childr,en up in an airplane by themselves

?., IMAGINE YOUTISELF saying to your wife. "Novv dear, get y,~ ''J,Tself an airplan e, and take the chil~.ren for a nice flight to Zamboanga. You don't know how to pilot a plane, but that's a.~\l right. You'll learn by experience. You'll pl )::Ibably run into som3 ~ tO rIns, but you and the kiddies can take care of yourselv·es. " RIDICULOUS! ISN 'T IT ? but that is exactly what you a.re doing today ... drifting 2-long airQlessly . .. pu\~ting aside t he unpleasant th r)lIghts of what would happen to you:r loved ones, jf th e bread winner were suddenly remoVlZd ... and they were leflt to battle akr.1e the cruel winds of poverty and hunger! YOU WOULDN'T DESE~T YOUR FAMILY while you had bleath, of course, ' b'tllt why do Co 'lin de,atl.~? Have you cOJlsidered that time when you MUST I,zave them a lon e? Hav you. prrovided fior their' maintenance whcrn that tim.,; comeS'? PROVIDE TODA Y for that time! Consult u s, and we'll gladly show you how you can make every arrangement so that even after your deal.h, those loved ones may contiI1u e to live in CtomfQrt! A LIFE INSURANCE POLICY taking caI1.~ of every possible contingency including death and old age, wilgl .reli eve you and yours of all futu!'!'! anxietv. TIEMEMBER ... OUR ADVICE AND EXPERIENCE IS AT YOUR SERVICE . . . WHY NOT TALK IT OVER WITH US?

~n!lurante

National mife

<!ro.

HNational iEUe atakes Ituture mriBl1t"

OFFERING :eND OWMENT AND LIFE PLANS EMBODYING DOUBLE IN:Jl!:.vINITY IN f:ASE OF ACCIDENT AL DEATH . .. LIBERAL TOTAL DISABILITY • BENEfi'IT and (lthC'I' (I~' din ary feature8 . FLLL THIS COUPON AND MAlL IT TO US

MIGUEL UNSON, President

A. N. LUZ General Ag("nt N RLionaL Life l1'5l ranre Co. P . O. Box 67G, Manila Sir: Ph'ase .end m <! particular about your policies wiLhout any oblh.:ation on my part.

ARSENIO N. LUZ, Gen. Agent HIPOLITO RARRENENGOA, Assi. tanit General AgI3nt & Agency Manager Office. Regina Bldg'., Escolta and David P. O. Box 676-Mani ,lla. Tel. --General Ag-er:cy: 2-39-07 2-39-08

1 \"as

,

Mr~

il. ...... .. . ... ...... ...... . ....• ..• (To .vn and Provi11('e)

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on

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(year) (month) 1 wOHld Jil~(\ to 'ill" in vt'l~d for P .......... .

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NAME . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . ..........• ADDRESS ... . ........ . . . . . . . . . .. .. . . . . . . ... ,

•••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••• • ••••••••••••••••••••••••• _____ •••• ____ • ______ • _______________ • __ .1


THE BUILDERS OF PHILIPPINE COMMER E ~~ I

.. --.--.--.-----.-----------.. ----.------------.. ---------·------·--·---·------~·-~~---·i • •

I

•I I

II

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I

· BINONDO BAKERY I •

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Chocolate and Coffee Factory s. I

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•••

· . ..:•••

Proprietor

•• I:•

Il:

I

•• •• •• •• •• •• ••

P . de LAPID

·,,

••• •• •

[)4J - - 45 Asuncion, 'i' or.. cl

Manila.

1 : :

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RIZAL .ICE PLANT t=()t:?T U

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A T f) f3 . LAV .

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Pl'oprietol'

•• •

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ICE CREAM and ICE DROPS Our W ('

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pecial t.

ed clean water annalized by th€ Bureau of "Cl. !lee

··••• Prompt el'V}Ce ·i Baclaran, Parafiaque Tel. 2-16-64 •· ..•--------_••_-_ . .... . . ------- ..... __ ...- "" ••-----:- ._---- -- -... -......... • .. . ~ ~

Rizal. -~--=

.:.:... ..: ... ; ............ ,. .. .. -,.."" ..... _...... ''


TIlE BUILDERS OF PHILIPPINE COMMERCE

------- ... _._-----_ ... _------------------------------- -- --- --------- ----------.------------------~

F ' I ~LIPIN AS I

HARDWA RE

Benedicta L. V da. de Muncal

Proprietor

Wholesale & Retail :1

LINE OF . ,~USINESS

il

GENERAL HARDWAR ~ CONSTRUCTION MATEIUALS AGRICULT URAL IMPLEMENTS CEMENT PAINTS AND OILS

\ 1

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),

II

j_ 774 Folgueras, Tondo.

Tiel. 4-G9-22, Manila

~-----------------.-.~-----------~~--------.---------------------------------------------........... -~------ .. -... ------------------.:-. ------;-;-~-.;-;.;;~-;-;~......~~..-;-;.;; ~;, , , For Society people... . . i Such is the kind of dresses we patterned. Rightly fashioned to conform with the latest modes and carefully supervised by experts to please our customers.

... .

·

~.;..-~-'" ...

··:,I

In fact. . . ~ . ~,~l; ___ ) (,~ ~ ~ This does not mean to say that our prices are high. In r eality they are but for anyone to grasp. Only by trying yo.q ~an ~ieve us.

COLLEGIATE':DRESSMAKER i•

,\' ROSARI ~LG. DE CESAS, ,--J. \_~ , Pr~prietor

'"',

·l• 1323 Felix Huertas, Tel. 2-59-81, ·• ·;._-----------------------------_ .-----.---------------------.---- .. --.--- ... .

Manila. -----~-. -----------


T HE B UILDERS OF PHILIPPI E

:--.. _... _............ -... _..... _... ---._... _. --_...------------.-. -

- .=~-

---------"-.-. ----_.. -' .-!I

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III

; f armacia De La Quinta ~I

402 Echague,

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an il a

III

Tel. 2.50.89

!I

·· ··

··• •

· I·~ ·•

Servicio a Domicilio

Iii

y Perfumes variados.

·:• Esmero en el despacho de recetas Articulos de tocador

Ill............. ___ ._........ _______ Ja

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···•• ·· rl ··•• •• ·• •

·.·.1

Buy Philippine Prepared foods \Ve prepare and can bangos in yariou ~tylc~ 'uch as ,r1/lltOIl, /,10111' I ' '. cabeche, s(((ciado, and tiwlI~ ( : tud i .• cs according to the lat e~t m ·thQ!., an I under tl:,z inspect:on and appro\"aJ of the Bureau of Science anJ tJle Bur(:uu of Haith. Ask from your gro::ers for "MABUHA '{" canned f:.) Is or

w~it(·

tu

BULACAN CANNING CO.

~. __~.~~~___~_~:~~~.~ _~~:~~ __ •••.••.•••••• _. _~.~1~. _~~_~=== .~.~. ~ _ .... ~ ~~_~..~~~~__ ~~.~~_ ..., ____ ______ _____ -_-. -·,• ., · .___ .__ ._._a _____ __ . _____ __.. _.. __ ~

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Compliments of

SIONY'S SHOOPPEE (Inf r ont of T. V. T. Bldg. ) Flol'e:ntinu Torre , Sta . Cruz .-.-------------.-----------.----.--------------~-----

l"lanjJ~.

.. -- ~- .. -.. -------------------- ~ -----.-- -- .

, ••

·


··•

THE BUILDERS OF THE PHILIPPI NE COMMERCE

..•

r--.··.-.-.-.-.··--------------.---··----.------------ --------------------------------------------1

i UNIVERSAL DRUGSTOREI :

!,

(Santos Ocampo Incorporated)

:

.1•

A corporation genuinely n a tive - in capital and stocliholae rs, in management and personn e l, and in ideals a~ purposes, which con stit ute its

Program of Activities Eigh teen hoUl"S of activity and labor for the service of the Public.

\

OPEN: From 6 o'clock n th e mornm g, until 12 'clock midnight.

Eighteen ('oll1 p etent pharmacist s of lon g experien ce.

\ \\

ill

·· ··•• ··•••• •

I

GUA RANT EE: Efficient, courteou s and prompt service t o all and at all times.

As a Corporatioll, it is a11 il1stitution that does hOllor to t he CO Ull try and it propos.es to establish the highest standard for the pharmaceutic'al science in the l Philippines. thereby inspiring native dru~ stores to foster and develop such important and indispensable activities, as well as to co-operate with physicians and the government in the promotion of the welfare and health of the ,e ntire community. The SANTO S OCAMPO LABORATORI E S share with other native laboratories the task of endowing the country with medicinal preparations t hat are scientifically appropriate t o local needs, as prompted by the ideals of world-famo us laboratories n ow in the service of mankind .

·· SANTOS OCAMPO LABORATORIES ··• 511 AVENIDA RIZAL 513 ••• •• MANILA, P. 1. •• TElS. 2-62-24; 2-33-32; 2-38-23 2-/9-24 ·••• •

&

~------------------------------------------------------------------------~---- ... -------------~-~-.

:

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THE BUILDERS OF THE

---------------------------------------------------------------------~----·--·--------·--------- l\

SERGIO G. BUENAGUA

Iii

TECHNICAL DIRECTOR

H ,

:!1tllanilu mpgignitlg

~tqonl,

I:

Itnt.

ACADEMY OF DE SIG rI N G A~ D U TTI NG GE~r T LEME.T -\ ~f) L -\ P IES GARME T ( CLASSES DAY , TI GHT) TO, 162 E colta, p, 0, no· 17 0 COME T O ME-and learn the famous Ma tc,r- u tter y 'lern of cutting' and designing of men's Garment, I n a few hort week of con cientiou ,tudy and clo e application und(·!' my persona l tutelage you wi ll be counted among tho 'e who ar' now hulding' lu crative and responsible po ition, Scme gl ad uate' and ,.tudents from othC'r school of this kind in the city have tran f rred to thi' in.titution to furth('}' their knowledge , It is Il'ithill YOllr power to drcidp to daJ!. t(./i n yOIl /('il/ III J.5 11"11 /II /,t 1/('/, L et m ,e help YOIl,

'IS

J Ilctl'C heip(el many at/I(

}'S, 10 fl

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f,t/I/n,

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i.e; the best time, Use it to til best po sible (u(!'fln/aft(' , 1;]}llId,1 1I'IIb lilt ill school, taking [I special bruYlh lip of (L GOllrlle oj lelll,ill[j It syS/11II tI"I/ /"111/1 clt/ting and designillg i)tto a ]ileal/lire ,

Tt-l~ MA~I~ [)~SI~~I~~ 162 E colta,

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Fir t In lippers. Fir t In ho Firt In Durahility Fir:-t In Style & mf rt Fir ·t In the thou~ht of \ rv ho -\\ ea r r, '-

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710-714 1Ia)'a Manila MANUFAGTURER

____ ________________________________________ .. __ .. ____ • ___ .. _________ ~

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T HE BUI LDERS OF P HILIPPINE COMMERCE

,_._._---------------------_._._---------------._._------------._---------------------------------_. : ) ( : • • ,,, ,, ,,

··· ···: ·•

.....

I

. ··, ·••• ··:, ··,,

.........

COMPLIMENTS OF

BEN IP AY O PR ESS AND

PRO O- ENGRAVER S

··•·,,• • ·••

540 Misericordia, Sta. Cruz, Manila

Tel. 2-19-05

j .. \

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(

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THE BUILDERS (IF PHILIPPII TE

......................................................

OMMER E

················· ~· ········-·-····-·- -·· ··· i l

f or discriminating people-- Ii

·

Such is the quality of drcses w

mHlce.

Rightly patterned and cut to conform with the

l~test

fashion, alJ(1 properly sU]Jen is 'ei

by expert, our

craftsman hip ha

our num rous

lomeI' .

Cll

]JI a ed

BUT . .... . thi doe not m

~n,

howeyer, that our pI icc::;

are high. In fact, th Y dre within t Ie " nch of all. Our main purpose

i~

to pI a. e

\' ry-

·· ~i.1

body,

A trial will convince you

LREMEDIOS fASHION-·

I·;

t=AJIlI.l1l

· !;! S~NTA RITA PAMPANGA ; ill:- -.-~~---.--------.----.------.----.- ..-.. ~---.~.~-~~-.-- .-~-.----.---~-.. -------~-- ;


THE BUILDERS OF THE PHILIPPI NE COMMERCE

...• ,. .... '-. _ " ----------_ .. --------_....... _._............... .. ...... ---_ .... ---_ .... .. .. --_ .... ----- ... --_.. •• ••• • ••

••• ,•

·••• • •• ·•••• ·•••• ··•• ••

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We Will

Blow Your Horn Clearly

.. G et

IS OUR SLOGAN AND OUR PRA-CTIGE ,.f

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ROAD- COtJ RTE~ AND

SA ~~f TR~A1~~N (5I·1f~C F0R ,oU-RsR&',e:~.,

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•• •• ••• •• ••

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.... -~---------- -.--------.- .........

--- ----------------------.---------------------... ...

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T H E BUILDERS OF THE PHILI PPI E COMMERCE

11

,:

THE

LEA DIN G S-; 0 R E

'1 1

,:,

WH ERE

:

THE LEA DIN G PEO P .L E BUY WE HA VE VA RIE TY

WO ND ERF UL L

·,,,

OF

I

S ILK S AND ORI ENT AL

· ,, ,,

CUR IOS

11

I:·

BAZ AAR

BRI TIS H IN D I A

·

(Wassiantull ASSOlDUl1 Co.) ,I:

Ii

~\:

121 ESCOLTA

:\

:

_____ !i ----------------_------------____ -- ----------------.!----tl _____________________________-__ ~ _ I =*-" - - -.

'- _._---- ~--~-~ - - -------- - _ . _ - - ~~----~----------------.--------------.---- ---- - --- - -----

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I'. O. Bux:il T el. 4-99 -41' >Ianlla o, Binond Luna, Juan -400 Centra l Office.. Iew York Offic~50 Frankl m St., 'ew York City PE YTOK , Manag r G . S. CORO EL, Sec'y & A 't. .Ianag er Agc.') I • r'J triDirect import er of papers and taUone rie', manufa ctul' '1": r. ann mallllf a:.nd Bookbi s Printer . De\·ice school cJ her publi , butol' ami • (h001 turers of rubber tamp. We carry a compl te line of Office ETAO J.:E1 A supplie s. TIO.', ill i t 0:.11' If you stand for QUAL ITY, ER\,I E and SAT I SFA US. TRY " ROt'A " brand

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A CON \ E NIEN l' ~LA 'E T O S TOP FO R ~ l()rl AND BU 11.-E ' M ~

H L '1',_

SA N FE RN AN DO HOTEL San

F~rnando,

Pamp anga

OPPO SITE THE PROV INCIAL C OY ER

Ampl e

\1E 'T b

' lor

Delici ous Food and a Higb Stand ard Room s, of Servic e and Clean Jiness

ONC E TRIE D AL W A Y S

LI K ED

:


fILIPI\AS I IIr.RIT ,~C.

LIORAR\'

The bUilders of Philippine commerce : a biograph cal record of the lIVes lineage and labors of the men who worked to build the foundallon and structure of Philippine commerce I Roque

..~ T Duon

-----.~

Profile for Filipiniana Online

The Builders of Philippine Commerce, Vol. 1  

The Builders of Philippine Commerce, Vol. 1  

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