__MAIN_TEXT__

Page 1

I

I

EJlled

ruE JAI'ANESE r.ULlTARY ADttUNISTRATION

PRINtED AND PUBL15IIEU

by

llANlLA BINHU:N-SYA


8

I

)


!!!H!-~lnD)fj,~~F:f~l$

)$nlnD)fjI ?

<;" >;f 'II '- -Il-~:l»

) fti~

o~~~~.'-~.~.~.E·»~l$~.'-.

~~~.~.*~~.*.~)~.8~~F:f~~~ ~~I~,-~~~~~~~~~rn~~~~>~~~ rn,~@l~i:U!p~


J>ldHIJp ill e Constabula r y men pass i ll review bef ore til e yra nd s/an fi 111 fr ont of th e L pgislal'i ve Bui.ldilJ !I. liu,ritJ fl the ind epend ence Day ce lebrati on 0 11 October 14, J !J ~3. )'Ollll g nHm 01 spirit suell as these (Lre (L'm ong Ih e l)rille o{ th e Free l'hi./:ippill cs .

INDEPENDENCE PARADE-

1r~

em:

\itIl

~~ "P,

:Ii. fu

Fl

7"

,'1. i .....

-

W:t& J

llfr

A J ~, -?ifiR.~

ifJ:iJjlj-J!lil

'1~' ;f11

fi~3'I: :iftJlt~

' .fit

::''? ;: J

B

Jt iii =

l1ik

k

2ll:

lliX

ij; iRJ +J lit '"/ I!!I

= 'tl: -'< 7:;:t;Jt ~

1lt

1llr8/-+R.

/\

'1 .j~ 1lt 1lt ~

~

<I~

&l. \itIl 'm

.l:l:

\ij<

l1r

~


~~ ~~

J; 0

3:

>

'"~~" 0t'l ~ >-l " '<:....." 0 ~ "" ::2 ""- ;:; -0t ~

~

2

Z

:; '§:

0

0 3

f

~ ..... " ... ~;,;

:-: ;; <;

'~ ~

-<

. 0

'"~'""'" "" - .~

,,'" "> - "> <'>

g

"

~

'0

"'- 00'

;"0==-:"! ~ :::

~.~

=. -

:::."

'0

"'0-" "" U>

C-

o ~

~~ Z

~~ ? '-

"

~

~

" "'"

~

~

"

'"

~.

'..,"

" (~~~*~., o

m~~~~

~'lJa~~'\-~lfalit!'-:!oi-=i'}lim\ltl)lt@ll-;­

>~~-~-=~'-~~~~;~I\lt*~m~@I~

(I:!oil

_\J ~lit!'- i~-,*--=J \It*E'Sm~


&:,

~

I

~

J~l

"I路

I路

-')--

1M

V

7](

1': -t" nil 'J tilt

J1 'Ii B

"')-.

W ilil! 10

ff {I

J..

filt 7

~1 I~

7' 'ifI T

,!J\

7

~

~

*~

~

J;t

Ji:J I ~ ~,

,* "l ~ h~

jfII I:

tt 7-

~i

J;t FUTURE LEADERS IN FINE FORMTh e yOtlng m,en

ch osen to und erg o trai1l111(J in Japan os,

future l eaders of th eir cO'll1l try, r eceived prelim:illory lrahlin o i,n Ma.llila before ,II ei,. departure fo r Nippon. H er e th ey are s ll own (UvillO from a springboard as 1)Ort 01 their 1)/t.y路

siea l nJcolldi lioning be/o r e r ece iving the main part 01 thei r

ins /.ru cti on in

Ni.PP OII,

i


~~~liJlJ~ ;a~.>. 'lr'>' ~'lrlit)

!D~+I I;:m)f o~ .t~I'ili!ft

~'~~7 ~ .t~~J~.P~. ~~~ ••• E~

.~' ~:1({t!<'l!~4.~~'{/'('4iHl-'iilli'~ : ~:!ll'ff (I »\) (\ftil1;",)JJ:~~!D)"'~'>'~"' ) ~~"!li:l~


(~~11l):;JliS\~i=J)"' ", "'l:!;",!7;)

m;o.+ ll :m)f) o~~ '-U 3~'

>l!~!P l+ .> .. '<:Ii

I ) ~S! ",,;t~ ... ~ ,\1"

~~"=rl~'+!:ll:~~ u 'C

U

( I l ~)

. "

>rl;;!

â&#x20AC;˘ 0 '"

'i 'll

. -it~ =l!1ii?


o~ '~3.~~.~"~,~ ,Ill ;:l-:n::;-

~

, ri%:r.*'

••• ~S~~~

U , n U 7 '-frr.:i?'1I~ II

~gi;tt;:3).$':l:~\1"'.'37':l

~

"

2Il

"'T~'l-

~

H:

:n

>JI


represen tati ves from

a ll over 11I e Philippines m('(!tillg al lit e Metropol'i.loll thea tre

pe7ul ellce.

in Mani.la. 011 JUli e 1 8. lor th e nal'iollal COli vel/lion 0/ Ili p noti Qnal service (lssociofioll . TlIese delega tes fi'isplallccl patriotic ardor in 100 rl:i1llj towords lit e (Joa l of Pl/ilippin e IIl (l e ~

KAL l lJ flPI

KALIOAPI RALLY-No. 1.

~~ -t:

~

7)

ij!! --,

iili Jll.i li\

I ,. ~

~

~~J

y

?'

~

q'

*

! -tt

Zi'J

iI'~

tt-

.......

:

~'1

:;{~ Jt. I-

j.

{t ~ *i& :I" :1'\- $Ji fr 1* Jt

bit / '-

1\ B )" ,~~ " :1ÂŁ It'. ~

f'J .\-

), :

;x- Jt 'k IiIJ ~t 3!;i


:t

'"~ "- 0~ 0::: > .::::."::: '-

~~ ~ C'l t'l "> :> ". '" -l

;;;" ~

<:::

~

[

" ".

0

;<l

N

-;; " ,

;;

.~

-~ ~

II>

II>

-l

.~. \?:~. (;:.

M.)W~~'*.uS. ~ *

.. ~~:F II !D ~~ ~

([ I:j::;)

:;;.

t . ~ ;:"f-~? - '* ~~~ ,PM: >r rr<. ). -= ~J


l ending co tton loa

'1'hese yo ung FiUpinas 11IS

at the co tt on fa ctory of the National D eue·

tile Fili pinos.

The in t.e nsi/iecL cultiva tion. 0/ co t ton in the Phi lippiu es , t oge tll e r wi th Ol e

mannfact ure of co tt on. goo dsJ prom ises self-sufficiency i n tllis m.a t erial fat

lop men t Company.

i'm.petIts given to

CIre

PHILIPPINE~-

MORE COTTON FOR THE

~

im

!

I

= -j-

ill!

Jll

bd I

lt

'-'

0

*~Jlt!'~A

.

=a ~

J" iYih Wl !Ii!A ····

~ il!IJ 3 ~

-r

I

~M

1)

1i'~ 7G

R

-\.; !y, It ;1 i '

.",.

5G

'f-


TABLE OF CONTENTS Message of His .Excellency, The Highest Commander of the Imperial Japanese Army In the Philippines at the luncheon party in honor of the representatives of the KALIBAPI and the members of the Preparatory Commission for Philippine Independence, June 20th, the 18th Year of Syowa ... Instructions of His Excellency, the Director-General of tbe Japanese Military Administration, at the fourth opening exercises of the Government Employees Trainlng Instllute, June H, 18th Year of Syowa. _........... . ....................... Speech of the Director-General concerning PbilIpplne Independence, on June 16, 18th Year or yo""a. . ...... ..... .......................... Address by tb Dlreotor-General of Ule Japanese Military Administration at the oath-taklng of former fD mbers of the USAFFEE. ........... . Communiqu~ of the Imperial Japanese Army in tbe Pbllippines, on June 18th, 18t h Year of Syowa Instructions 01 the Director-General of tbe Japanese Military Administration at the tblrd graduation ceremony of tbe Nonnal Instit ute, June 31st, the 18tb Year of Syowa. _....... ............... . ... Speecb of Premier General Hidelti Tozyo at the 82nd Extraordinary Session of the Imperial Diet. ..... Instruction delivered by the Direotor路General of the Japanese MUILa,'y Administration before tbe Con路 fe"ence of Governors, City Mayors, and Senior Cons tabulary Inspectors of the provinces of Mindanao, at Dayao. May 27, 1943. .... ...... . ..... Instructions of tbe Dlrector-General of tbe Japanese Milltary AdmlnistraUon at tbe admission ceremony of tbe fourtb and flftb term trainees of the Normal Institute. August 24th, the 18th Year of Syowa. Instruotions of the Director-General of the Japanese Milltary Administration at tbe mth gradnation ceremony of the Tralnlng Institute for former USAFFE officers and men .. . ..... ... ... ....... Instructions of tbe Dlrector路General of the Military Administration at tbe sixth admission ceremony of ti,e Training Iustilute for former USAFFE officers and men. October 4th, the 18th Year of yo\,"n. ............................ . ............

Ii

iv

viii x

xi xlii

xxiii

xxvi

xxvii

xxviii


Resolution expressing appreciation of the solicitude of the Director-General of the Japanese Military Administration for the Interest and welfare of the FiI!pinos and pledging f ull cooperation with him in his efforts to help the F'iIIplnos to be worthy of the honor of independence. . . ... . ... . .. . .....

xxx

Resolution expressing gratitude for the categorical pledge by the Imperial Japanese Government to grant Philippine Indeplmdence within this year.

xxxi

Approval granted for the formation of the Preparatory Commission for the formation of the Preparatory Commission for Philippine Independence as com· posed of members, selected by the special National Convention of the KALIBAPI. .. . ..... . ........

X>.Ail

Statement: Delegation of Filipinos sent to J apan to observe wartime conditions. Jllne 12, 1943. ..... .

xxxiii

Greetin,!;s of His Excellency, Jorge B. Vargas, Chair· man of the Executive Commiss ion to Lieutenant· General Slgenori Kuroda, New Highest Cornman· del' of the Imperial Japanese Forces in the Philippines, June I, 1943. . ........... ... ...........

xxxv

Statement of is Excellency, Jorge B. Vargas, Chairman of the Executive Commission. .... . ...... . .

x)Dtvi

Statement by Chairman Jorge B. Vargas of the Exe· cutive Commission at the Gratitude Rally at the Luneta, Manila, June 19, 1943. ..................

>."Xxvii

Remarks of gratitude delivered by Chairman Vargas as Kaliba pi President at the luncheon party given by the Highest Commander in honor of KALIBAPI officials and delegates at the Kaiko·Sya, June 20, 1943. ........ . ...... .. . . ........ . ......

xxxbt

Proclamation: Military Law relative to the Punish· ment of persons carrying fire·arms, etc. .......

xxxx

Speech of Acceptance delivered by President·elect Jose P. Laurel before the National Assembly Immediately after his election by that body on September 25, 1943. ........................ ..

xxxxi

One Nation, One Heart, One Republic: speech delivered extemporaneously by Hon. Jose P. Laurel, President of tbe Preparatory Commission for Pbll· ippine Independence, at the Special General Assembly of the KALIBAPI held at tbe Session J:laU of the Legislative Bldg., i\Ianlla, on September 7, 1943. ... .. . ................... .. .. . . ......... xxxxvi Text of Vargas' Proclamatiop (Proclamation No. 19.)

LXIIi


SECTION 1. Affairs

concer'ning

DepaTtment

of

[1Iterior.

Notification 6. Concerning the Nlppongo Teachers' Qualification Examination. . ........ . ...... . . . . SECTION 2. Affairs concerning Department of Finance. Kokuji No.8, concerning I ssuance or new wa,路路 notes .................. . ...... . ... . .. . ...... .. . SECTION 3. Affairs

concer'Pli1lg

Depa.-t?llent

of

Industries.

Kanrei No. 19. Rules prohibiting tbe Removal or Equipment or Sugar Centrals. ................. SECTION 4. Affairs

concerning

tlt e

5

Philippine

Executive Commission.

Executive Order No. 165, trom Executive Order No. 167 to Executive Order o. 182, Executive Orders NO. 201, 210, and 226. .. ...............

6


LIST OF ILLUSTRATIONS 1. Highest Commander Hears Report. 2. PCPI Appointment Ceremony at Kaiko-sya. 3. Japanese-Philippine

Amity

Cemented;

Independ-

ence Assured. 4. Greetings From the Highest Commander. 5. Lieutenant-General Kuroda at Stotsenburg. 6. Premier Tozyo's Second Visit. (1) 7. Premier Tozyo Receives P CPI Members. (2) 8. Before They Sailed. (1) 9. Inspection Party Back. (2) 10. Homage

0

Filipino Hero. (Young Filipino Pension-

ados) (1) 11. Future Leaders in Fine Form. (2) 12. Cultural and Spiritual Rejuvenation. 13. Leaming the Value of Labor. 14. Another Bridge Completed. 15. KALIBAPI Rally. (1) 16. Homage to Rizal at Luneta Park. (2) 17. More Cotton for the Philippines. 18. Dawn of a New Era. 19. Independence Parade. 20. Independence Toast 21. Toast to the Free Philippines.


MESSAGE OF HIS EXCELLENCY, THE HIGHEST COMMANDER OF THE lMPERlAL JAPANESE ARMY IN THE PHILIPPINES (AT THE LUNCHEON PARTY IN HONOR OF REPRESENTATIVES OF THE KALIBAPI AND THE MEMBERS OF THE PREPARATORY COMMISSION FOR PHILIPPINE INDEPEI\T[)ENCE. JUNE 2011.. THE .8th YEAR OF SYOWA) Gentlemen: Mote tha n one year has already elapsed since American Qnd British inlluence in the Philippines collapsed. ]n lhc meanlime. maintaining mutual cooperation you have s ri ven to lead the Filipinos, who were then still poison e by liberalism, in getting rid of the idea of partisan bpposition.

Fortunately, your elIorts have borne fruit in the form of the dissolution of all political parties in the Philippines. You have rendered meritorious service to the cause of the construction of the New Philippines by concentrating all Filipino activities on the unity of the p eople and highly enhancing the noble spirit of service in the interest of all. Now that the Philippines will be accorded the honor of independence with.in this year, th e Preparatory Commission for the Philippine Independence has just been organized. At the same lime, the mission of the Kalibapi has b ecome increasingly important. The Kalibapi represents a people's movement on a large scale dedicated to the cause of the N ew Philippines on the basis of solid unity among social. cultural. and economic circles in the Philippines. In this sense, I earnestly desire that. faithful to 'your self-sacrificing spirit, all of you will further your eHorts, in full concert wilh the principle of service, to demonstrate the real spirit of the Kalibapi so that the aim of the organizal'ion may be satisfactorily attained.


lNSTRUCTIONS OF HIS EXCELLENCY, THE DIRECTOR-GENERAL OF THE JAPANESE MILITARY ADMINISTRATION, AT THE FOURTH OPENING ExERCISES OF THE GOVERNMENT EMPLOYEES TRAINING INSTITUTE, JUNE 141h, THE 181h YEAR OF SYOWA I take great pleasure in addresing the incoming trainees af the Government Employees Training Institute at the fourth opening exercises of this unique institution of spiTitual rejuvenation, I believe it is most opportune that you Imve been seleded from among YOUT colleagues in government employment to enroll in the fourth session of this Institute I'",r the purpose of undergoing physical training and spiri~al re-orientation, at this stage in the evolutionary histotiy of you. country when today, all traces of Anglo-Americlln power and innuence in East Asia have been completely wiped away and a New Order has b een made to prevai l in tllis region of the globe under the b enign aegis and benevolent leadership of the Imperial Japanese Empire, The Philippines is day by day fast approaching U's (foal of atfaining the proud posi !"ion of honor and glory as a trusted member and valuable collabora tor in the concert of Oriental nations. The role played by your officials in the reconstruction of this country is of paramount importance and this is a ll the more reason for the absolute n ecessity of nIl oHicials nnd government employees of the New Philippines to undergo complete and drastic spiri tual and moral rejuvenation. Your responsibilities as incoming

Irainees of this Institute which has b ecn expressly dedicat'ed to the rebirth of a new school of thought and conduct for publi c servants is consequently very weighty and grave.

I Wish to take this opportunity to emphasize upon you the tremendous weight of this huge responsibility

ii


and to impress upon your minds the seriousness of arrivin g at a true estimation of the realities facing th is country. live up to the leUer a nd spirit of the instruclions a nd counsel issued to you by the Superinten . d ent a nd Sta ff of th is Institute and stri ve to the utmos t of your abi lities to fu lfill every a im and objective which the founders of th is Institute hac! in mind when they establis hed Ihis institulion of tra inin g. I am sure you will benefit enormously by yo ur slay here a nd wl,a l is eq ua lly imporla nt. the New Philippines will ma teria lly gain as Ihe result of yo ur individua l and joinl cfforls.

J une t 4th. t 81 h Year of

yowa.

)

iii


SPEECH OF THE DIRECTOR-GENERAL CONCERNING PHILIPPINE INDEPENDENCE ON JUNE 16th. 18th YEAR OF SYOWA. Recognized and accepted leader. of my beloved Filipino people: You have just heard with your own ear. the assurance made by the Illustrious Premier of Japan that the independence of the Philippines will be granted within this year. With this definite statement conceming the time of Philippine independence made by the lIIustrious Premier on the floor of the Imperial Diet, I join you in the happiness that must be your. o hearing that your century-old ambition will become a reality within the next six months. The independence of the Philippine. has been the dream of your forefathers. It was the cherished hope and the .d a l ror which your nalional hero. Dr. Jose Rizal, died. Today. as I repeat the assurance made by the Illustrious Premier, I call to the souls of ,those brave young men who died in Bataan for the same ideal: I call to the memory of the great revolutionary heroes led by Gen. Aguinaldo and others present here; I call to all the cherished hopes. ambitions and undying desires of the millions of Filipino people who have long awaited the coming of independence.

As the Director General of the Japanese Military Administration I am ready to dedicate my life, if necessary, for the attainment of your independence, and I feel greatly overjoyed and wish to offer you my heart-felt congratulation. on this momentous event, the materialization of our common dream and ideal 'w ithin this year. It is a long standing conviction of mine that the independence of a people can be effeeled only through divine intervention. The independence of 18.000,000 Filipinos is not the handiwork of the humble man.

iv


It is Ihe crealion of Heaven ilself. This has been my long standing conviction and as I recall various incidents. trivial

8S

they may seem on th e surface.

which took place here in the Philippines after the declaration of war. I can attribule these incidents to the working of a power and a will for greater than ours.

"Vhen Japan declared war against America and Great Britain. military reasons dictated that the air armada of Ihe Imperial Japanese Forces ny to the American air bases in the Philippines and destroy them in the earliest possible time. At Ihat time. unfortunately. the weather conditions in the morning were

bad and our bombers could not take off from their adva e base. However. events later proved that this was not nn accident. It was divine intervention in favor of the war ohjeclives of Japan and in favor of Ihe .8.000.000 Filipino people because. as it happened. th American air force had expected the Japanese aiT armada to arrive il;1 the morning and they had taken to the air reconnoitering. waiting for the expected attock Due to this bad weather. the Japanese Air Force could not take off. so. in the meantime. the American planes had to come down to refuel and just at that particular moment airplanes of the Imperial Japanese Forces swooped down on Clarke Field and the air base in Iba. Zambales and completely annihila ted. at the first phase of the Grenter East Asin War. the air force of the much vaunted American Army. If this is not divine intervention. gent lemen. what can be divine intervention?

nel then we hnve the eoming of the lIlustrious Premier of Japnn to the Philippines. In the midst of this gigantic war when he leads the destinies not only of the '00.000.000 people of Japan but also of the one billion people of East Asia. the Illustrious Premier decided to come persoonlly 10 the Philippines. leaving the capita l for five or six clays.

of

He arrived like a bright star of hope in Ihe ;"idst 0 people who have been disillusioned many limes

v


in the past and you have seen and have participated yourselves in this unique and spontaneous ovation

given by the Filiprno people to the Premier of Japan. I Wish to point out to you that at tha t particular time of the year. the weather condition in the Phil. ippines was far from being the b est for flying. But it so happened that from the day the Premier took off from Japan to the day he took off from Manila for Japan the w eather conditions happened to be ideal. M en cannot rule w eather conditions nor can m en even forecast w ith any degree of accuracy the

flying conditions over a long period of time. The comi ng of P remier Genera l Hideki Tozyo to the Philippines and tl,e conviction tha t he form ed by his coming are grea t steps (orward towards the culm i· tion o( Phili ppine independence. So I say. in the dep t \ of a ll my religious belief. that the independence of the P hilippines unde the sponsorship and active cooperalion of J apan is a fac t attested to by D ivi ne Providence a nd tha t it was left by Divine W ill for a n Orien al coun try like Japan to sponsor the in· dependence of another .oriental conn try like the Phil · ippines. 'ton may have possib ly obtained indepen. dence from the Americans but we not only dou bt the OCG u rcn ce but we question very much whether yon could have ma in ta ined that independence for a great length of time. The independence of the Philippines must be maintai ned: and the granting a nd maintenance of Philippine independence is left by Divine Will to the people of the J apanese Empi re. Th,e in dependence of the Philippines is a ma Uer completely in th e hands of Divinity. I say that the independence of this country ma terializing within s ix mon ths and sooner

if

conditions warrant, is again

in the hands of th e D estin y steering the fa te of man · kind. At this mom ent I wish to call upon every single individual composing the ,8.000.000 Filipinos tha t it is now within their power to accelerate the century·

old ambition of their forefathers. the complete inde·

vi


pendence of this country. I appeal mostly to you. lenders of your people. to show within the next six months complete self-efficiency. complete self-abnel1ation and complete self.sacrifice for the interest of the grealer whole. Forget your individualily because today your country requires complete harmony and solidarily as never herelofore seen in these islands. The independence of Ihe Philippines wilhin the next six months wi!! depend 10 a preponderant degree on Ihe unity 01 ellorls and on the inlerest and the complete sell-abnegalion shown by you leaders as weH as by your people in the interest of Ihe entire nation.

I shaH hnve Ihe occasion at a subsequent time to go lurther into the details of what remains to be done in the ",ext si." months. But I wish at this mO(.1ent to command you to this great tnsk. appealing to your sense of ullily and solidarity and the complete abnegalion of yourselves in the i terest 01 the whole. and to congralulate you at the SBme time on this momentous event which is fas t approaching these 5hores~the ndependence of the Philippines which hns been the age.long dream 01 yo ur lorelnthers and of yourselves.

vii


ADDRESS BY THE DIRECTOR-GENERAL OF THE JAPANESE MILITARY ADMINISTRATION AT THE OATH-TAKING OF FORMER MEMBERS OF THE USAFFE.

It gives me great pleasure 10 be present at Ihis solemn oa th-taking ceremon y and witness the sincerity with which you have all sworn to collaborate wholeh eartedly with the Imperial Japanese Army. I shall take advantage of this occasion to give you a few words of advice. hoping that they will serve to guide you in your actions a nd conduct in the future. All of you who took the oa th today were once memo b el's of th e USAFFE and. as such. took up arms and p articipa ted in hostilities against the Imperial J apan se Army. In the cou rse of ba ttle. many of you were cap tu red and in terned as pris oners of w ar

b u t wer subseq uently released. due to sickness and other reasons. the tn agnani m ou~ a nd unhea rd 路of treatment of p ovisional release. You were a llowed to go home to Ii.,e wi th your famllies even w hi le hostilities were still in progress. The rest of you were separated From yo ur companies and remained in hidin g until qui te recently. H owever. the Imperial J apa nese A rm y is today form a lly granting to you the status of regularly released prisoners of war. to enjoy from this date on. complete ease of mind and freedom of aelion similar to those enjoyed by your other comrades. This act of magna nimity and benevolence is Ihe direct outcome of the wishes of His E xcellency. the C om. mander-in-Chief of the Imperial J apanese Forces in the Philippines. and is a further manifes ta tion of the fac t that the Imperial Japanese Army's foremost concern is the ra pid rejuvenalion of the N ew Philippines and the speedy return of normalcy to the lives of the peaceful inhabitants of these Islands. Your other comrades-in-arms. who were g ra nted

release a fter having gone through the regolar course of instruc tion and training, are now actively parti-

viii


cipating. heart and soul. at the foremost ~anks of the people. in rebuilding the New Philippines. Some of them are serving in lonely posts under the most difficult and trying circumstances. happy in the thought that through their self-sacrifiCing service. their country may be able to advance one step closer to the goal of independence. The Imperial Japanese Army has but one request to make of you who have taken the oath today. Assume likewise your positions at the head of the column and make of yourselves shining examples to the masses of the people. with the same indomitable spirit that you have shown in other limes of your country's need. PartiCipate energetically and actively in maintaining domestic peace and order; help establish economic self-sufficien cy among your people; and. finally. hasten and give impetus 10 the process of reorientation which your c unlry is now undergoing. The independence of the Philippines is now witin your rench: the day and llour of its final ael ievement lie entirely in the ha ds of the present gen alion. The Im peria l Japanese rmy asks nothing of you in return for its present act of magnanimity in granting your release. except th a~ yo u ded icate yourselves to Ihe common cause of achieving the independence of the Philippines "in Ihe shortes~ possible lime." 1 close my instruclions to you with the sincere wish that you may all have every success in I-he future . J have every confidence that you will all de"ote yourselves unstinledly, and wilh ulter disregard 10 personal sacrifices. to the noble cause which is your greatest inherilance from your fore fathers nnd which hislory has deslined should be carried into triumphant achieveme nt in your own generation. and through your own eHorls. with the aclive collaboraHon of Ihe Imperial Japanese rmy.

March 16th. 18th Year of Syowa.

ix


COMMUNIQUE OF THE IMPERIAL JAPANESE ARMY IN THE PHILIPPINES. ON JUNE 18th. THE 18th YEAR OF SYOWA "In accordance with the recent pronouncement of Premier General Hideki Tozyo at the 82nd ExtTaordinary Session of the Imperial Diet. that th e Philippines will be granted independence in the course of the current year. and based upon subsequent instrucHons received from the Imperial Japanese Government. th e Highes t Commander of the Imperial Japan ese Army in the Philippines has just issued an order to the Kalibapi for the immedi a te formation of a PREPARATORY COMMISSION FOR PHIUPPINE INDEPENDENCE to b e composed of represen tatives of th. Filipino people,"

)

x


INSTRUCTIONS OF THE DIRECTOR-GENERAL OF THE MIUT ARY ADMINISTRATION AT THE THIRD GRADUATION CEREMONY OF THE NORMAL INSTITUTE. JUNE 31St. THE 18th YEAR OF SYOWA

It is a great pleasure to address a few words to you on Ihis momentous day of the third graduaHon ceremony of the Normal Institute. Your four months of strenuous training in the Institute has been finally crowned wilh glory and honor as evidenced by your graduation loday. I wish, thcrerore. to convey to you my heartiest con路 gralulations for your wondetful accomplishments and brilliant achievements during the short period of training in the Insmute and to express my fervent hope Ihat you future aclivities in ,the field of edueaHon would contribule something tangible in the spiritual reawakening of Ihe youths of the country and to the establishmen~ of a new orde. in the Philippines. With Ihe independence of your country having been assured. the establishment of the New Philippines based on a solid foundalion ball, spiritually and morally so as to be a worthy member of the Greater East Asia CoProsperity Sphere. is of uhaost concem and importance.

The golden way of bUilding Up the New Philippines lies in the materialization of Ihe tbree essential principles for the early attainment of Philippine independence which I enumerated before. as follows: (,) TI,e complele restoration of peace and order; (2) the economic rehabilitation Ihrough the rapid reconstruction and renovation of the economic structure to the end Ihat Ihe Philippines will reach the status of economic self-sufficiency: h) the re-orientation of the people spiritua lly and morally with the object of regaining the true Oriental soul to serve as Ihe spiritual foundation of Ihe New Philippines. The establishment of the New Philippines based on a solid foundation both materially and spiritually can

xi


be fostered and promoted through education alone: nnd for this reason. the basic principles of education in the Philippines as se t forth in Military O .. der No. 2. issued by the Commande.r -in-ChieI of the Imperial Japanese Forces in 194'2, are conveying morc and more a newer meaning and significance at this moment.

It is apparent tha t the success of the reconstruction of the N ew Pll ilippines lies in the thorough fulfillment of the said basic principles o[ education. Upon your sboulders. therefore. as educators. is developed a high responsibility o[ trust. In conclusion. it is my sincere desire that you

would fulfill unselfishly the mission entrusted to you and that you would strive forward and exert your ut11\ost effort towards the complete realization of the aforementioned fundam ental principles of education and the teaching of Nippongo as a connecting link among the co-members of the Greater East Asia CoProsperity Sphere and th us li->e up to the e.'Cpectation and wis es of the New Philil1pines. June 3.st, the . 8th Year of S)'owa.

xii


SPEECH

OF

PREMIER GENERAf. HlDEKl

TOZYO AT THE 82nd EXTRAORDINARY SESSION OF THE IMPERlAf. DIET "I al11 profoundly moved by 'the most gracious Imperial Rescript which His M a jes ty. the Emperor. w as pleased to grant to us specia lly a t the opening ceremom' o f the Di et today, In loyal obedience to the August \Vill of Our Sovereign it is my firm int ention, toge ther wilh you gentlemen, to e.xcrt our uhnost cHorts in ,路he performance of our important 'wartime dulies a nd for the speedy attainment of the object of ti,e war a nd thereby se t His Majesty's mind at rcst. "A year and II ha ll have elapsed since the outbreak of the war of G reater East Asia, Under the August Virtue f His Majesty the officers and men of the Imperial apanes forces occupied and arc holding fast to w ide baltle areas. They are now extending lhe war result by destroying the enemy, fighting against disco CSt enduring extremCj hea t and cold. brD\'ing wind and siorm and over-coming all kinds of difficulties, "\ Vith you I wish to give our heartfelt thanks to th e insuperably loya l and brave officers a nd men for their constant toils as well as their skillful planning and galla nt fightin g, To achieve these victories many brave fighting men, as shield for Our Sovereign, perished on the baltlefi eld and are now enshrined as the gua rdi a n god of our la nd. "Especially su"lime is the death in action of the Commander-in-Chief of the Combined Fleet, Admiral lsoroku Yamamoto on th e foremost front in the south nnd the heroic end to Commander Yasuyo Yamazaki and th-e officers and men under him on the islond of Allu which have strongly moved the hearts of our people, "Thinking of the many loyal brave officers and men who sacririced themselves for th e e ternal cause of loya lty anel patriotism and who have p erformed such heroic deeds. th e re is none among the entire

xiii


people of Japnn who will not be determined to rise and follow in the footseps of these heroes. "None of u s will fni[ to strengthen anew his determination not to cease fighting until the enemy is completely defeated. ' On[y b ecnuse there were such h eroes nnd those tha t follow them nre we assured of final victory in the present wnr. "Recalling together with you the great and d istinguished services of the [ate Fleet Admirn[ Isoroku Yamamoto and other loyal and brave officers and men who have died. I w ish to express our sincere sorrow nnd pled ge nt tile same time thnt we shall dedicate ourselves to the task of defenting our enemies and thus answer to the [oyn[ spirits of these fall en h eroes. I wish a lso at this opportunity to pray with you. gentlemen. for the speedy recovery of the wounded and sick officers and men nnd the early nrriva[ f the day w hen they will see service agai n. On the other hand I wish to tender my expression of our he tfelt sympnthy to the fnmilies of those w ho hnve died on the bntt[efie[d. "Now under the August Virtue of H is M ajesty. our stra tegic position

which

insures victory in Grea t~

er East A sia is being strengthened day by day w ith the vast resources of the region being rapidly converted into OUT fi gh ti ng power. This developmen t on our par t in Grenter East Asin is one tha t sea ls the Fa te of our enemies. "Alarmed by the rapidity of the developmen t of our position. the United States and Grent Britain nre a ttempting' to check or obstruct it at all cost. They increasingly show signs of mnking counter-offensives by mobilizing their entire materin[ Forces which nre their sole relinnce. " But these are things which Jnpan has natumlly foreseen. S eizing the opportunity of such counteroffensives of the enemies. the Imperial Japanese Forces are meeting them wherever they come. Our forces are not only inflicting telling blows on them but are also developing new methods to deFeat them. In fact the Imperia[ forces are now carrying out

xiv


grand-scale operations in China. In the region along the Burmese-Indian fronti er and in the Pacilic they deal increasingly severe blows to the enemy. Thus the 'war situation becomes increasingly lense and the

hattles which repeatedly take place are more grim and terrific. "TI\C lime has just arrived when 100,000,000 of our

people. firmly holding their posit'ion of sure victory. should fully demonslTate the real merit of their spirit of loyalty and patriotism with inflexible faith in ultimate victory that grows as national dangers increase-a strong point in the tradition of our nation. 10 the prescnt circumstances such as those described above. lei us not overlook the painful and precarious situation which confron ts the Anglo-Saxon countries

and which they are trying by all means to hide. "Our n~tion wi ll fi ght out this war of will power and wi n this war of pcrscrverance

by

put-ting forth

all our errorts until that day wheh our adversaries aTC

brought

0

subm.ission.

"The present tTend in Greater East Asia revea ls that the confidence of the countries and people of this region in Japan as well as their sincere and vo luntary cooperntion with us for the succe路ssful prosecution of the war arc becom mg stTongcr day by

dny. Having recen tly vi Heel China. Manchoukuo and th e Philippines nnd haVing had opportunities to witncs personally actual conditions o n the spot and cnrr)' on frank exchanges of views and opinion wHh

the principal leaders there. I have been furth er strengthened in my conviction regarding this point.

"IT GOES W1THOUT SAYlNG THAT IT IS JAP N'S IMMUTABLE POLICY TO FREE GREATER EAST ASIA PERMANEr\TTLY FROM THE GE-LONG ANGLO-SAXON DO~I1NATIO 1 D RESTORE THIS REGION TO ITS NATURAL AND PROPER CONDITION. VAR10US MEASURES WI-llCH JAPAN HAS TAKEN HAVE ALL BEEN IN PERFECT CONSISTENCY VvITH THIS FUNDAMENTAL POLICY.

xv


"With the passing of a year and a half since the outbreak of the war the entire Greater East Asia, thoroughly understanding the real intention of Japan, is fully convinced that there cannot be an emancipaUon of Greater East Asia without the complete victory of Japan and that there can be 'no happiness for these peoples without the inauguraUon of a new era in Greater East Asia. This, indeed, is a matter for congratulation for the whole of Greater East Asia. In view of such a situation. the government. in res路 ponse to the enthusiastic cooperation of these peoples, is considering at this Ume the initiation of further measures.

"Let me state frankly the views of Manchoukuo that the country regards Japan as a kindred nation and, with His Majesty, tbe Emperor of Manchoukuo personally setting examples to his people. the cooperation of the whole naUon in complete unity toward Japan in both material and spiritual spheres is very great. The cordiality of friendship that binds Japan and Manchoukuo leaves nothing to be desired. Japan intends to respond increasingly to this trust of Manchoukuo and put forth more and more effort for__th~ latter's steady development. "As for China. the government and people. under the spirited guidance of President Wang Ching-wei. hearUly responded to our sincere atUtude and are cooperaUng with us in the spirit of the Sino路Japanese joint declaraUon. marching steadily forward toward the attainment of the common objective. China. which suffered for many years owing to the ambitions of Anglo-Saxon countries for world domination. is at last free. She is now striving hard to strengthen herself: and by joining forces with Japan she is ready to contribute her enormous powers as a completely independent notion toward the establishment of a new era in Greater East Asia. "Thus the ideal of Chino for the Chinese. for the realizaUon of which the Chinese people aspired for many decades in the past is being steadily accom路 plished. The fact that of late a number of influential


leaders like General Pang Ping-hsun. Sun Tien-ying and Jun Tzu-heng. one a fter another. are leaving the C hungking regime to join President Wang is a natural development attendant upon the rebirth of China. Such a vigorous rise in the development of China. indeed. is a source of genuine gratification for China h erself. for Asia and lor the entire world. On our part we heartily felicita te the rise of China and we are determ ined more than ever to ass ist her by all means available. In this spirit we intend to make fundamental revisions in the treaty between Japan and China with a view to enha ncing further the active cooperation between the two countries. "Turning to Thailand we find that country. having disGjlrded all her intricate relations of long standing with the United States and Great Britain . bravely joined fa te w ith Japan. Under the lea dership of Prime Iiinis ter Phibun Songgra m she is marching va liantly and vigorously forward. surmounting numerous diffi Ities in the way. for which I wish to pay my profounH J:espec ts. In promoting closer collaboration with Thailand we are fil'l11ly resolved to extend her our utmost cooperation in t ~e military. economic and political field.. Furthermore. I wish to declare h ere that Japan. considering the aspiration of that nation and being solicitous for the further advancement of tha t country. is prepared to a fford her new cooperation. "As regarding Burma. we .... ccived in oar capital as you know Chief Administrator Dr. Ba Maung in M arch. this year. to whom I conveyed the decision of our gove.m ment. That we could see clearly the earnest determination of the Chief Administrator and other leaders in regard to the independence of Burma and her cooperation to prosecute successfully in the present war is a fact of which you . ge ntlemen. are well aware. "'t is grdti'fying to note that a preparatory commision for independence was organized on May 5. and the necessary preparations for independence arc steadily progressing. It is my confident expectation that

xvii


these preparations will be completed in II very short time a nd the glorious day of historic importance will soon arrive.

"WITH REGARD TO THE PHILIPPINES JORGE B. VARGAS. CHAIRMAN OF THE EXECUTIVE COMMISSION. AND OTHER LEADERS ARE EARNESTLY DEVOTING THEfR BEST EFFORTS TOWARD THE RECONSTRUCTION OF THE ISLANDS AS WELL AS TOWARD COOPERATION WITH JAPAN FOR THE PROSECUTION OF THE WAR. WHILE THE PEOPLE IN GENERAL WHO HAVE COME TO UNDERSTAND OUR TRUE INTENTIONS ARE EXTENDING US POSITIVE SERVICE. "QUR ATIITIJDE REGARDING THE INDEPENDENCE Or THE PHILIPPINES HAS ALREADY BEEN CLARIFIED IN OUR REPEATED PRONOUNCEMENTS IN THE PAST. AT THI~ JUNCTURE WE WISH TO GO A STEP FU.R'fHBR AND DECLARE THAT WE WILL ACCORD THE HONOR OF INDEPENDENCE TO THE PHILIPPINES IN THE COURSE OF THE CURRENT YEAR. "THE PEOPLE OF THE PI-llLIPPINES. WHO HAD BEEN T0ILING UNDER THE CRAFTY AMERICAN RULE AND WHO HAVE LONG BEEN V]OLENTLY CHASING AFTER THE MIRAGE OF INDEPENDENCE. ARE NOW TO ATTAIN lliEIR LONG-CHERISHED ASPIRATION WITHIN LESS THAN TWO YEARS OF THE OUTBREAK OF THE PRESENT WAR. WE CAN WELL IMAGINE THE FEELING OF GRATIFICATION ON THE PART OF THE FILIPINO PEOPLE. THIS. INDEED IS A MATTER FOR SINCERE CONGRATULATION FOR THE PHILIPPINES IN PARTICULAR AND FOR GREATER EAST ASIA IN GENERAL." "TI,e n a tive populations of Malai. Sumatra. Djawa. Borneo . Celebes and other places under Japanese military administration are assiduously extending

xviii


their cooperation toward Japan. Even in the midst o[ the war they have been liberated and accorded educational and cultural blessings under the sympathetic gUidance o[ Japanese authorities so that they are now enjoying a life of hope and happiness never experienced in the past. It is. I believe. a matter or hearty congratulation [or the Indonesian people. It is our intention to go further and. in pursuance of the aspirations of the natives, we will take measures step by step envisaging the participation of the native populations in the government to an extent commensumte with tho degree of their ability in the course o[ the year. In particular we intend to realize this state of affairs as early as possihle in Ojawa in view o[ the advanced conditions o[ the island and in response to the desire o[ t-he people there.

"Pw (or French Indo-China. French authorities there. ar doing well uncler the rather comolicated and difficult situation. J apan intends to elfect an ever closer cooperation with French Indo-China in accordance \ Ihe Japan-French protocol concerning the joint defense o[ French Tndo-China. "In this way the lireat ideal which inspired the [ounding o[ {he Japanese Empire that all countries and peoples should enjoy peace a nd security is being s teadily realized throughout the region of Greater East Asia. A brilliant dawn Ims thus broken over the pe~ples in this qua.ter o[ the globe who have suffered [or many yeays [rom the exploitation of other countries.

'it"

"In contrast with d, e s teady and viliorous development aohieved by all countries and peoples of Asia, India. is still going throu gh a terrible ordeal in the process or attaining complete independence under Britain's ruthless oppression. "For this plight o[ India 1 feel a deep sympathy and indignation. J apan is firmly resolved to exhaust all means in order to help and eliminate [rom India Anglo-Saxon influences which aTe the enemy of the Indian people and enable India to aUain full independence in the true sense of the tenn.

xix


"I confidently look to the day which I know will soon come when the ardent widespread desires of the India n people will be fulfilled and they will rega in freedom and prosp erity . "Turning to the European situation. we see G erma ny. Italy and their a llies marching ahead toward ultimate victory and tightening their alignment with J apan ever more closely. 'firmly believe in the success of the magnificent prosecution of the war by G ermany. Italy and their allies by virtue of their impregnable position which has a lready been secured and the inflexible leadership which is assured of victory. "Japa n pledges to fight through to common victory shoulder-to-shoulder with G ermany. Italy and their alh"s by drawing closer together and mutually extending aid and assistance. "Our enemies the Anglo-Saxon countries are making the end justify the meaDS. They are disturbing peace everywhere in the world. endeavouring to force ,:,eutraI powers in to the War. After they induced other nations into the war. they will make it a point to let the latter bear the brunt of fighting. avoiding sacrifices on their part as much as possible. However. once the situation takes an adverse tam. they do not hesitate to forsake their allies and their past pledges and promises. They used to profess their stand for the proteotion of the independence of smaller states. But they now made a complete voIteface advoca ting hegemon y by the great powers They have no scruples nor a.e they ashamed to seek ease and effort for themselves at the sacrifice of others. '" take this opportunity to pay my respects to tbose nations who firmly maintain their neutra lity in the face of Anglo-American intrigues. " Amicable relations a re being maintained between Japan and those countries. It is hoped tha t these friendly bonds will be drawn still closer. "The situations at home and abroad certainly are not without difficulties. Under the current situation,

xx


the 100.000.000 people of Japan have renewed their will to fight it out in order to discharge their duties as worthy subjects of His Majesly. They have given their pledge to prosecute the war with all thoir might to a saccessful conclusion hy sharing the determination of the officers and men of the gallant Imperial forces on the hattlefields. At this importa nt juncture. the !tovemment is seein!t to it that this renewed pledge is fully carried out. "In "rder to prosecute this great war to a glorious termination hy winning " ictories on the hattlefields and succeeding in construction. the government is de~ termined to surmount all ohstacles whether at home or abroad. "Fortunately our industrial production has been remarkably improved and expanded since the later part of last year. The government will furth er reinforce the war structure with the wholehearted cooperation of the people and concentrate all the efforts of the nation as the augmentation of fightin g power. "It is for this purpose that the government petitioned the Throne ~o convoke the present extraordinary ses.ion of the Diet and submitted the hudget and hills relating to tte readjustment of enterprises and emerIlenoy increase in the production of food. "The proposed readjustment of enterprises is intended to make the entire nation contrihute to the augmentation of fighting powe.r hy ex tending the principle of the past readjustment of enterprises and executing a thorough-going readjustment in every department of industry. "The concerted cHort of the entire nation is absolutely necessary for the smooth execulion of this plan. "All p eople are urged. therefore. to apprecia te Ihe government's intentions and cooperale with the government positively by completing the readjustment this month. if possible. hy placi ng the ri ght man in the right place so as to enahle each 10 give full play to his ahiliti~...

..

xxi


"The measure under contemplation will entail the defrayment of several billions of yen. 11,e yen [or the disposing o[ funds for the readjustment of enterprises has been submitted to the Diet. "The entire Japanese people. who have already been endeavouring to increase savings and economize in consumption. are requested to redouble their eHorts to check the floating purchasing power and preserve national economic order. "It is hardly necessary to mention that the government is taking all possible measures with regard to food which is necessary for safeguarding national livelihood during wartime. At the present stage of war. however. particularly strenuous efforts must be put forth for attaining seff-sufficiency in food by paying oonsideration to all contingencies. In line with this policy. the government intends to eHect an epochal inorease in the production o[ rice. wheat. potatoes. and their foodstuffs wil-h a view to placing the matter of food supplies in a m st reassuring position in these cr"tiqa l times. "While cpnductina administration in the most efficient manner. the government intends to march forward toward fin al victory by suspending or abandoning all activilies h aving no direct bearing upon the prosecution of the wa. and mobilizing both the government and the people for wa r pro.luction. " It is in line with this policy tha t the government has d ecided not to hold elections for prefe ctural assemblies this year and submilted n legislation bill relati ng to it. " It is my earnest d esire that you. aentfemen. understanding the governmen t's intentions I have just stated. will d eliberate over and speedily approve the budget and legislations bills submitted by the government

xxii


INSTRUCTIONS DELNERED BY THE DlRECT.OR-GENERAL OF THE JAPANESE MILITARY ADMINISTRATION BEFORE THE CONFERENCE OF GOVERNORS. CITY MA YORS. AND SENIOR CONSTAB-

ULARY INSPECTORS OF THE PROVINCES OF MINDANAO AT DAVAO. MAY 27. 1943. I take great pleasure in addressing this Convention or Governors. City Mayors and Senior Constabulary Inspectors of the provinces of Mindanao.

It should be indeed a matter of great pride and rejoicing for all the p eoples of East Asia that. today in this re ion of the globe. the invincible might of Nippon has successfully and conclusively exterminated every tra of century-old Anglo-American oppression and domination of Oriental peoples and Asia is once again the free and liberated Asia or Asiatics. As to the Philippi es. a glo~ious future awaits her. un der the protection and with the active cooperation of Nippon. and upon the aggressive fulfillm ent of her natural role as a member of the co路prosperity sphere. the long awaited independence of this country and her p~ople w ill be realized at the earlie.t possible time. This fundamental policy of J apan with regard to Philippine independence has been consistent and unchanged and only recently several hundred thousand Filipinos assembled at the Luneta were overwhelmed upon hearing with their own ears. the personal declaration of His E.xcellency. Premier General Hideki Tozyo of Japan. who reiterated in Manila his clear and unmistakable assurance of Japan's des ire and even eagerness or carrying out this promise of independence. Under the circumstances. it is positively detrimental to the early attainment of Philippine independence that there should still exist. here in Mindanao. remnants of misguided and misinformed people who continue to prey upon their own countrymen and work

xxiii


depredations on distant and defenseless barrios. It is especially regrettable because the time is now ripe and the golden opportunity as olearly expressed by His Excellency. the Premier. who stated tha t Japan is not only willing but even eager to give independence to the Philippines if the Filipinos give further proof that Iltey are cooperating 100% with Japan . There can be no question today that these isolated bands of guerrillas and ruffians should be branded as public enemies and traitors to the cause of Philippine independence and as such , forcibly and speedily eliminated from your midst if the peaceful inhabitants of this island, who constitute the greater majority, ate to build tor themselves a nd tl,.ir posterity a country of peace and plenty. At the same time, it is also recognized that not all of these recalcitrant people are absolutely beyond hope of salvation and for this reason, the policy of enli~' tenm ellt and education is advocated hand in hand wrth the policy of force and annihilation. TI,is humane nd magnanimous polio/ of the Imperial Japanase Fa ces even against thde bands of guerrillas and rurrian;; emanate from the same high principles which guided the High Command in the campaigns in Bataan when, in spite of the fact that it had aU the means within its power to completely annihilate ,the USAFFE forces to the last man, His Excellency, the Commander-in-Chief of the Imperial Japanese E.xpeditionary Forces to the Philippines, held back this tremendons striking power becanse the opposing forces in Bataan consisted primarily of Filipino youths, and it was not our purpose to Filipino soldiers since Japan had come to the Philippines for the express purpose of lihera Hng these Islands from the chains of American domination and to help ,the Filipinos set np their own independent naHon.

kin

I have previously outlined to all Filipinos the three essential requirements for the attainment of Philippine independence. They are first, the speedy restoration of peace and order through the initiative and enterprise of the Filipino themselves: second, the early establishment of a self-sufficient economic structure for the

xxiv


Philippines and third. the spiritua l a nd intellectual reorientation a nd rejuvenation of the Filipinos Dnd their return to the Orienta l fold . 1 also pointed out that the most imp ortant factors towards early a ttainment of in .. dependence WA S po Hive action and ta ngible accomplishments. I wis h to reitera te my advice to the Filipino people and to slTes5 aga in the param ount importance of res toring complete peace a nd order a t the earlies t date because without peace a nd order there can be no bas is rOT security and prospe rity for the masses of people. I enjoin you to res tore peace and order ol'hcn visc you ca n never a tt a in I-he honor of inde pe nden ce and with this fa ct in mind. to redouble your eHorts under the gUida nce of the Director of the Minda nao B ran ch of the J apanese Mi litary Administration , towa rds the accom plishment of this primary 06jecti"e. In til quire fir

fulfillment of th is resp onsibility you will redetermination and grea t will-power.

You

will b e called upon to take your posiHons at the ve ry h ead of yo r peopl e a nd lend them by personal examples of cou a ge, enterprise. a nd self-sacrifice. Your responsibilities a re heavy a nd g ve but I know you

will not rail yourselves or your country. His E xcellency. the Commander-in-Chief. has repea t'cdly expressed his genuine love and concern for the .8 million Filipino people. You yourselves are the objects of his complete tTUs t and confiden ce. 1. therefore. ca ll upon all leaders of Minda nao ,to ta ke into full account the realities \~ith which the Philippines nre con [ron ted to survey accura tely. with a clear eye to the future. the history-making developments which hnve already ta ken place or are fBst developing in international events Bnd with deep knowledge a nd firm conv iclion derived from serious refl ec tions upon the great historical trend of the times. give your helirt and soul to the ca use of Philippine independence which was never so close to materia li za tion that it is today. [vlay ~7th . â&#x20AC;˘8 th Year of Syow a

XX\'


INSTRUCTIONS OF THE DIRECTOR-GENERAL OF THE JAPANESE MlLlTARY ADMINISTRATION AT THE ADMISSION CEREMONY OF THE FOURTH AND FIFTH TERM TRAINEES OF THE NORMAL INSTITUTE. AUGUST 24th. THE L8th YEAR OF SYOWA. It is a great pleasure for me to address you on the occasion of your adm ission in lo this Normal Instilute as the fourth and fifth term lra inees. A yea r has passed since this Institute was established with a view to reform ing the edu cation in the Philippines a n d train in g teachers of the J apanese la nguage. The teachers who have received training h ere numher abou~ 600. They are now in the forefront f the education al work in the Philippines. and I a m very satisfied with th splendid services they ~ re renderi-ng at the ir posts.

1t

is no t too much

to say that the renova tion of Philippine education is a t p esent originating fronl this Institute. Sud, laudable achie vements of the o~fici al s and graduates of this Inst\tute show that the Filipino people can regai n their Oriental virtues, and swiftly rid themselves of the Anglo-American influences. I am confid ent. therefore. of t-he reform of the Philippines. d estined as she is to be a n integral member of the Greater East Asia Co-Prosperity Sphere. The day will not be far off when the Philippines wi ll glory in h er independence. You are being adm itted into this Institute a t this importa nt moment. for the purpose of studying the J apanese la nguage a nd fo rming a fair and accnrate idea abo ut the situation in East Asia and the world. You have been chosen as pioneers to give a new

orienta tion to the ed ucation in the Philippines. It is a privilege and honor for you. and I congratula te you from the bo'ttom of my heart. I request. at the same time. that you will vigorously proceed to accomplish the spiritual renovation of the Philippines as befitting a fre e and independent nation. with no less zeal and energy than your predecessors.

xxvi


INSTRUCTION OF THE DIRECTOR-GENERAL OF THE JAPANESE MILITARY ADMINISTRATION AT THE FIFTH GRADUATION CEREMONY OF THE TRAINING INSTITUTE OF FORMER USAFFE OFFICERS AND MEN. It is indeed a great pleasure to de liver a few words of instructions on this signiFicant occasion of the graduation ceremonies of the fifth term of the Institute for Former U snffe M en. During the short period of three weeks' training in the Institute. you have constantl y obeyed the in51-ructions and commands o[ your in struclors and have successfully fulfill ed the requiremenls of the course. th u being crowned with the glory of gradua tion today. On this oCGasion. [ ,v ish to express my since rest congralula tion for Ihe b ..illiant results of your training in tl e Ins liLule. and I co not but give words of blessin qpon Ille bright ful re that lies ahead of you. Now th'lt every preparal"ion for the establishment of tlte N ew Philippines has steadily been mode. it is not long b efore your cherished dream of an indep endent Philippines w ill soon see Us realization. On Ihis memorable occas ion. of her glorious history. you arc going to form the bock-bone of the New Philippines. In view of the ample ability that you have shown during tlt e tra ining period in the In stitute , it is my conviction IIUlt you will five up to our hie-It expectations. nol withstanding the responsibilities which arc now e ntrus ted Lo you. It is my earnest desire Ihot. wilh the firm faith and convic tion that you hQ,~e acquired in th e Tnst ilute. you will have a perfect understanding 01 Ihe new siluation in EasL Asia., exert oUtmos t effort with nil might and inlelligence. a nd render conslont and e-nduring services for lit e estahlishment th e New Philippines as an organic unit of Ihe Greater East Asia Co-prosperily Sphere.

or

Sept. 271h. the 18th year of Syowa.

xxvii


INSTRUCTIONS OF THE DIRECTOR-GENERAL OF THE MILITARY ADMINISTRATION AT THE SIXTH ADMISSION CEREMONY OF THE TRAINING INSTITUTE FOR FORMER USAFFE OFFICERS AND MEN. OCTOBER 4th, THE 18th YEAR OF SYOWA

It is a pleasure for me to address you on the occasion of the six th admission ceremony at the Institute. You have taken the oath of allegiance to the Commander-in,-Chief of the Japanese Forces in the Philippines. You have entered a new life with high spiris, and faithfully obeyed the directions of the Philip,?ine authorities. '(ou have di.5covered a faith and p 'de in the fact that you are Orienta ls-that you are Filip inos, who are about to attain freedom and inde endence. and will ake no orders from other nalio s in the future. Th"s you have qua lified yourselves to be admitted into this Institute. I am very gratified with this and I congratulate you from the bottom or my heart. You can see for yourselves. if you have a sane sense and dear conscience. the actual events taking

place in East Asia. You must have realized that the Anglo-American innuences have been rooted out and exterminated in East Asia. a nd firm foundations have been laid for the construction of a new order on the basis of morality ander the leadership of Japan . Your own country, the Philippines. is expected to be one of the star players in the Greater East Asia Co-Prosperity Sphere. The inauguration of the Republic of the Philippines is close at hand. It will be a matll'r of a few days. since the preparations foo independence have b een completed, thanks to the unswervin g determination of your leaders and the whole-hearted cooperation of your people. At this historic moment you are about to enter lhis

Institute to receive training. which will enable you

xxviii


in the future to perform honornble duties in the service of your country and people. You foul/ht against us, and you killed our people, until you were defeated. But you foul/ht w ell. and you were brave: you thought tha t you were doing your duty for the defense of yo ur country, a lthough, you must have realized . you were utterly misguided by the Americans. Now you must think of your fathers and grandfathers who fought and died for the independence of your country. They did not shed their b lood for the benefit of other nations. but for the glory of the Philippines. 'vVhat I expect of you is that you will use your bravery and sense of duty for ri ghtful purposes. wl<ich you must learn and realize by fa ithfully followin g the orders of your instru<;tors a t this Inslilute.

J

xxix


r

RESOLUTION EXPRESSING APPRECIATION OF THE SOLICITUDE OF THE DlRECTORGENERAL OF THE JAPANESE MILITAR'Y ADMINlSTRA TION FOR THE INTEREST AND WELFARE OF THE FILIPINOS AND PLEDGING FULL COOPERATION WITH HIM IN HIS EFFORTS TO HELP THE FILIPINOS TO BE WORTHY OF THE HONOR OF INDEPENDENCE. WHEREAS. His Excellency. Director-General 01 the Japanese Military Administration. has always shown special sol~citude lor the interest and wellare of l'l;.e people of the Philipp ines; WHEREAS. he has definitely demonsLTated this solicitude in preparing the Fifipinos lor their independence; WI-lER fri end and

S. he has been a sincere and constant rbtector of .the KAIf3API from the inci-

piency of its organization;

BE IT. THEREFORE. RESOLVED that the SPECIAL NATIONAL CONVENTION of the KAUBAPI express. as it hereby expresses. its deep and sincere appreciation of the solicitude of the Director-General of th e Japanese Military AdminisLTation for the interes t and welfare of the people of the P,hilippines; AND BE IT FURTHER RESOLVED that the SPECIAL NATIONAL CONVENTION of the KALTBAPI pledges its full cooperation to His E:<cellency. the Director-General. in Ilis great lask of helping an independent Philippines to be a worthy member 01 the Greater East Asia Co-Prosperity Sphere, Done in the Cily of Manila. Philippines. lhis 191h day of June. '943,

xxx


RESOLUTION EXPRESSING GRATITUDE FOR THE CATEGORICAL PLEDGE BY THE IMPERIAL JAPANESE GOVERNMENT TO GRANT PHILIPPINE INDEPENDENCE WITHIN THIS ,YEAR. WHEREAS. the Illustrious Premier of J a pa n. G enera l Hideki Tozyo. made the solemn pronouncement b efore the Imperial Diet on its 82nd extraordinary session lhat Japa n "will accord the honor of independence to the Philippines in the course of the current year:

WHE~EAS. the gra nt of independence "in the course of the current year" would b e the fruition of th", immemoria l a nd unbroken struggle of tl,.. Filipinos (or freedom and independence; and WHEREAS. it is blessed and glorious that the honor of independence of the Ph ilippines. Oriental geographicaQy a nd ra cia lly. shoul be b estowed by a n Oriental ~wer ;

NOW. EREFORE. BE IT RESOLVED. nat the SPEC L NATIONAL CONVENTION of the KALIBAPL (Association for S ervice to the N ew Philippines) express, 8S it hereby expresses, its pro roundest gra titude to Ihe Imperia l J apanese Government for the grant of PI>ilippine independence within this year; BE IT ALSO RESOLVED. TI,a t the KALIBAPl show

in the

concrete its

s incere apprecial"ion

by

strengthening the unification of .the people. by securing comple te peace and orde r. by lahoring towards economic selF-sufficiency, and by haste ning our spiritual re-

generation; a nd thus make the independent Philippines a worthy member of I路he Grea ler Eas t Asi a Co-Prosperity Sphere; and BE IT FINALLY RESOLYEO. Tha t the KALIBAPI affirm. as it hereby a ffirm s. ils determina tion to collaborate full y with J ap a n in the esta blishment of a new order

or

justi ce. peace, and prosperity in Greater

East Asia and the world. Done in the City of M a nila. Philippines. this 19th day of June. '943.

xxxi


APPROVAL GRANTED FOR THE FORMATION OF THE PREPARATORY COMMISSION FOR PHILIPPINE INDEPENDENCE AS COMPOSED OF MEM_ BERS SELECTED BY THE SPECIAL NATIONAL CONVENTION OF THE KALlBAPI Approval is h ereby granted to .the fonnation of the Preparatory Commission for Philippine Independence ns composed of the follOWing members selected by the Special National Convention of the KALIBAP!. The Commission is authorized to proceed imme. diately with the preparatory work for independence. President of the Commission: HON. JOSE P . LAUREL First V ice-President : Hon. R omon Avanceiia Second Vi ce-President: !;Ion. Benigno S. Aquino M e~bers:

H n. Han. Hon. Han. H on. H an. H on. H on. H on. Hon . Hon . Hon. Hon. Hon. Hon. Hon. Hon. June '9.â&#x20AC;˘ 81h

Jorge B. Vargas Antonio de las Alas T eofilo Sison Rafael Alanan Claro M . Recto Quintin P aredes Jose Yulo Emilio Aguinaldo Miguel Unson Camilo Osias Vicente Madrigal Manuel C. Briones Emiliano Tria Tirona Manuel Ro:<as P edro Sabido A laoyn Alonlo Sultan Sa Rnmain M elecio Arranz Year of S yowa. HlCHEST COMMANDER THE IMPERIAL JAPANESE FORCES IN THE PJ-OLIPPlNES

xxxii


STATEMENT: DELEGATION OF FILIPINOS SENT TO JAPAN TO OBSERVE NIPPON CONDITIONS AT W ARTIME. JUNE 12.

'943

In order that the leaders of the various regions und er Nippon control may better understand the Nippon Empire nnd the Ni ppon people and thus furth er the construction of the Greater East Asia Co-Prosperily Sphere and the cooperation of the indige nes of the various areas. th e Im,perial Japanese G overnment has decided to dispatch various lenders from the respective areas in order to inspect Nippon conditions. In consonance with this plan . the J a pa nese Military Administration in the Philippines undertOOk n careful seleclion of a section of the "front line" Filipino leaders 'n order to dispatch them to Japan with this end in view at the expense of the military administ"ra路 li on. A delegn ion. the names of the members of which nTe publish d below. were fina lly chosen and dispa tched to Japa n . The members of the pa rty nrc a ll leaders in the fi rs t line of creating a N ew Phifippines. They a ll coopernted with Japa n ever since the a rriva l of the Nippon forces In the Philippines. They h ave nchieved much as ci.ty and provincial adm inistrators. leaders of the Constabulary. leaders of the agricultura l a nd commereial administration. edu cators. nnd officials of the Ka libap i. TI,ey a re men of such caliber tha t it may b e expected that they will contri b ute much toward the spiritua l. ideological. administrative. industrial. and techn ical ph ases of the crea tion of n N ew Philippines on their return. The group is under the lendership of members of the Japan ese Military Administration. Leon G . Guinto. M ayoT of th e City of Maniln is the head of the delegation. nnd Pio Duran. Director

xxxiii


of the Bureau of General Affairs of Ihe Kalibapi is the deputy head. The Military Administration intends to dispatch a second delegation 10 Japan a t an appropriate time. FILIPINO DELEGATION t.

2.

3. 4. 5.

6. 7.

B. 9.

Leon G. Guinto. M ayor of Manila. Pio Duran. Di reclor. Bureau of G eneral Affairs. Kalibapi. Hilarion S. Silayan. Director of Plant lnduslry. Cornelio Balmaceda. Director of Commerce and Industry. Emilio Rustia . Governor of Bulacan. Simeon D . Salonga. Governor of Balaan. Ratrocinio Valenzuela. Dean of the College of Pharmacy. U . P. Pr dencio Langcauon. Assistant Direct"or of Public Instruction. Dani Salcedo. Assistanl Director of Private Education

10. It.

12.

13.

14. 15.

16. 17.

lB. 19.

A lberto Ramos. S econd Assislant Director of the Constabulary. Felino Neri. S ecretary to the President of the Kalibapi. Cecilio Putong. Su~erintendent of City Schools. Manila. Nemesio B. Mendiola. Superintendent of Research Bureau of Plant Industry. Elias Dioquino. Second Class IDlpector. Bureau of Constabulary. Jose E. Desiderio. Chief of Secret S ervice. Metropolitan Constabulary. Arturo M . Tolentino. Supervisor for Northern Luzon. Kalibapi. Alfredo M. Santos. Fourth Class Inspector. instTuctor. Constabulary Academy. Jose Francia. Supervisor. Youth Movement. Kalibapi. Vicente J. Guzman. newspaperman. Manila Sinbun-Sya.

xxxiv


GREETINGS OF HIS EXCELLENCY. JORGE B. VARGAS. CHAIRMA N OF THE EXECUTIVE COMMISSION. TO GENERAL SIGENORI K U ROD A. NEW COMMANDER-INCHIEF OF THE IMPERIAL JAPANESE FORCES IN THE PHILIPPINES. JUNE. 1s t. 1943. Your E xcellency: In the name of the Filipino people a nd the Philippine Executive C ommission. I w is h to extend to Your Excellency " sincere w elcome. Your Excellen<"y's a rrival in the Philippines comes a t the most Quspic ibus time, following as it does th e unprecedented visit to this country of the Illustrious Premier of the Great Japanese Empire. Genera l Hideki Tozyo. a nd thar of Minister Kazuo Aoki of Greater East Asia Affa irs. Like their visits. you r assomplion of the post of Commander-in-Chief of the Imperial J apa nese Forces in the Philipp ines will encoura ge th e whole Filipino people to render more ac l'ive. unreserved. nnd spontaneous coopera ti on with Ja pan in order to insure the complete victory of J apa n in this sacred wa r. the esta blishment of the G rea ter East Asia Co-Prosperity Sphere under the leadership of the Great Japanese Empire. and the a ttainment of the honor of independence. our cherish ed na tional ideal. wh ich. as Premier T ozyo has a nnounced severa l times. may b e gra nted to the Philippines in th e shortest possible time. Your Excellency: In pledging to yo u our undivided loya lty. a nd in placi n g ourselves unconditionaJI y unde r your wi se direction and guida nce. w e wi sh to assure you th at w e will do everything in our power to make your administration ÂŁl comple te success and to help Japan accomplish her sacred mission in East As ia.

xxxv


STATEMENT OF HIS EXCELLENCY JORGE B. VARGAS, CHAIRMAN OF THE EXECUTIVE COMMISSION

This is the happiest day in the history of the Filipino people. ,"Vords cannot express oar profound emotions. W e are completely overwhelmed by the declaration of Premier Tozyo that J apa n "will accord the honor of independen ce to the Philippines in the course of the current year." Japan 's sincere, noble and unselfish love for the Fi lipinos, now displayed bel'ond doubt in the grant of our independence wilhout delay, conditions, or evasionsf evokes our spontaneous. unreserved, and absolute loya lty. W e stand wil路h J a pan in joy and in suffering. \n I?eace and in war. \Ye are more than happy to pi, ce the totality of our material and spiritual resources t the disposal a nd call of Japan to complete the triumph of the Asian peoples over the AngloAmerleans. No Filipino worthy of the name can now stand in the way of our march to freedom without branding himself as the betrayer of the loftiest ideals of our mce and na tion. No Filipino worthy of the name can des ire the re turn of American domination without convicting himself of treason and dis loyalty to the N ew a nd Free Philippines that is sure to arise this very year.

On this day I pray Divine Providen ce to ma ke us worthy of the freedom that our ancestors dreamed of and died for in the night a nd that will surely be ours now through the unparalleled idea lism of the great Japanese Empire, unequalled throughout th o world and in all history in nobility and power. Manila, June .6, '943

x..'l.xvi


STATEMENT BY CHAIRMAN JORGE B. VARGAS OF THE EXEC UTIVE COMMISSION AT THE GRATITUDE RALLY AT THE LUNETA, M A NILA , JUNE '9, 1943 F ellow countrymen : Today, in the words of Dr, J ose Ri zal. our b eloved motherla nd the Philippines b eholds ... .. . . . que 81 cieJo se colora "y a l fin anuncia eI dia ITas lobra go capuz",

It is filtin g and proper tha t we should meet to voice our overwhe lmin g jo y a t the coming of our independence on lhis day commemorati ng the biTth of Dr. Jose J{izal, for the day also approaches for the birth of that [yee lind happy Philippines of which h e dreamed in those words : "!liis su,efios cuando s p en as muchacho a dolescente mis suefios cuando jove n ya lie 0 de v igor fueron eI 'erte un di a, joya de l mar de Oriente: secas los ncgras ajos. seen In tcrsa frente. sin ce il o. s~n 8rrugas. sin munchas de rubor." Now Riza l's dreams have come true. TIlis very year w e sha ll receive the blessin gs a nd the glories of independence hom the ge nerous hands of the G reat Japanese Empire.

When J a pan , drawing her sword in defense of her rights. des troyed t路he Am erica n regime in our country, we were completely a t her mercy. W e had no ri ght to ask for our inde pende nce because we w ere misled inlo opposin g th e imp erial Japan.ese F OTces and w ere afterwa rds ab a ndon ed by those who misled us. But J a pan , laying aside the sword of the conqueror extended to us the helping ha nd of a solicitous elderbrother to uplift us a nd guide us to our proper p lace in the family of Orienta l na tions. Withou t equivocat-ion or evas ion. w ithout delay or doubt. spontaneously and 'wilh sincere solic itude. Japa n promised OUT independence from the very first. And now sh e h as declared lhat the promise will be fulfilled this very year.

xxxvii


We. the Filipinos. will repay Japa n with th e loyalty of comrades and brothers. 1 am sure that J a pan will never regret her generosity to the Filipinos. A free and independent Philippines will forever stand united in fate with J apan. in joy and in suffering. in peace nnd in war. In this shining hour of our history, we ra ise OUT thanks to Divine Providence for sending to these shores in our da rkest houT. the mighty and mltgnanimous Empire of Japan. We thank Divine Providence for sending Japan to protect us when we were ahan ... doned. to enlighten us when we were in error, to guide us when we were lost. to uplift us when we we were disiIlusroncd. and now to bestow upon our people the generous a nd spontaneous gift of liberty. the undying dream of Rizal. the b est and the noblest boon tha t any people can give or receive.

May H eaven bless and re,,,ard the Great Japanese ErqpiTe1 May H1 ave n b estow eterna l happiness upon the brave soldiers of Nippon who have given th eir lives in this Sacred War to drive away the English. the Americans. and the Dutch from Greater East Asia and who thereby have made it possible for the Filipino people to realize th eir supreme national ideal through the unselfish intervention of the Great Japanese Empire. the tTue L eader and Protectm of all Oriental peoples1 May Divine Providence crown with complete victory the valiant ex ploits of the brave warriors of Nippon who are s till carrying on the titanic struggle for the liberation of the oppressed peoples of East Asia and for the es tablishm ent of the Greater E as t Asia CoProsperity Sphere l May God grant that the independence freely and graciously b estowed upon u s by Japan. we shall hereafter know how to hold a nd to maintain with dignity and honor! Manila. June 19. '943.

xxxviii


REMARKS OF GRATITUDE DELIVERED BY CHAIRMAN VARGAS AS 1V\LlBAPI PRESIDENT AT THE LUNCHEON PARTY GIVEN BY THE HIGHEST COMMANDER IN HONOR OF KA LIBAPI OFFICIALS AND DELEGATES AT THE 1VVKO-SY A JUNE ~o lh , '943. You r E.~ccll enci es, G entlemen : As the Philippines enters the threshold of independ(> nce w ith th e [orma ti on th e Preparatory Commission for Philippine Independence, I wish to take advanlaae of this auspi c ious occasion Lo express, in beha lf of the officia ls of the KAUB A P] and the delegates to the KALm API N a tiona l Conventi on , the !?rofound gratitude of the whole Filipino people for the importa nt role played J;,y the Imperi a l J a panese Forces in liberating t-he Philippines from American domina tion nnd in preparing cr for the honor of inde penden ce. The peopl of the pl, ilippin. > are fortun a te to h ave the wise a d far-si ghted l ea de~s hit> of the Imperi a l J a pa nese Army in the Philil'pines, esp ecially durin g the period of transilion beMeen now a nd the grant of Philippine i ndepende nce w ithin th e current y ear. In the short time tha t he has b een with us, G eneral Kuroda has won the love. resped. and admiration of the Filipinos. R epresentin g as he does the benevol ent a nd mag nanimous Empire of Japan. th e true liberator and natural lender of a ll O rienta l peoples. G eneral Kuroda's s tay here will always b e associa ted with this glorious period in th e hi s l-ory of Ollf country. Your Excellencies : In the name of the KALmAP! and of t-h. Philippine E xecutive C ommission. ! reitera te the pledge of unfese rved loya lty a nd unstinted cooperation of the Filipino p eople with the Great Japanese Empire in this Sacred VI/or for the liberation of the oppressed peoples o[ E as t Asia from tl.e self-seekin g rul es of the English. the A mericans, nnd the Dutch and in the esta blishmen t a nd preserva tion of the Greater Eas t A sia Co-Pros perity Sphere.

or

xxxix


PROCLAMATION MILITARY LAW RELATIVE TO THE PUNISHMENT OF PERSONS CARRYING FIRE-ARMS. ETC. "Effective immediately. any person or persons found carrying fire-arms andlor explosives without justifiable reasons shall . in accordance with military law. be punished with death or severe penalty. "Any person or persons found in the company of those m ention ed in the foregoin g paragraph with knowledge of the circumstances or who are found carrying any other deadly weapon shall be subjected to the same punishmen ~ as afo rementioned. "Any person or persons. in possession of the above

m entioned weapons. who report themselves to the proper authorities b efore having made use of such weapons shall be exempted from the aforementioned punishmen~ " July 17. 1943.

HIGHEST COMMANDER THE IMPERIAL JAPANESE ARlYIY

IN THE PHILIPPINES

xxxx


SPEECH OF ACCEPTANCE DELIVERED BY PRESIDENT-ELECT lOSE P. LAUREL BEFORE THE NATIONAL ASSEMBLY IMMEDIATELY AFTER HIS ELECTION BY THAT BODY ON SEfYf'EMBER 25th. 1943路

_ _ ....-i_I

M emhers of the National Assemhly. F ellow-Citizens. Ladies and G entlemen : J have rece ived wil l, deep emotion th e notiJication transmitted to me by th e Committee appointed by this august body advising me of my election as President of t'he impending R. epublic of the Philippines. I would not he hllman If I did not come here to express to you. Members of the N a tional Asse'1'bly. my profound gratitude and everlasting appreciatjon for the con fidence that you have shown in elec t""!! me to this higl~ position. Mr. Speaker. I understa nd th a t you personally nominated me to th is position. and that you expressed yo rself in terms so glowing that I find no words to thank you for your very kind words of endorsement and recomme ndation. Nor can 1 find words adequate to express m y gratitude to th e Members of the National A ssembly for unanimously accept'in g your nomination. The unanimity of the choice makes me doubly npprecial-ive. th e more so because I have never aspired to this pos ition. and because I know that the position of President of the R.epublic of the PhiliPI)ines is the most precio us gift within the power of our peo ple to confe r upon n citizen. This consciousness makes me, Mr. Speaker and G entlemen. bow in a ll humility 10 our people whom you represent and who have elevated you to this august body. and to Goel that He may in His infinite 'wisdom give me v ision. gUidance. and determination not to falt er in the hour of need. TIlis leg islature is th e first leg is la lure in th e history of our country thai shall be sove re ign. It is true that forty-five years ago we uccecded in establishing the First Philippine Republic und er the

xxxxi


Constitution adopted at the Ba rasoa in Church. But as everybody knows. tha t R epublic w as so shortlived tha t. w e did not even have a cha nce t路o organize the N a tional Assembly provided for iT} the M a lolos Constitution. During the Am erican regime. it is true tha t gra dual steps w ere ta ken to give the Filipinos ever. inGreasing concessions in the exercise of legisla ti ve p ower. But as everybody also knows. the first legis la t~i ve authority created was the Philippine Commission integrated by a majority of American mem路 b ers. When in 1907 w e orga nized the Philippine Assembly in pursu a n ce or the provisions of the Philippine B ill or Act of Congress of July t. '902 . w e . were p ermitted . it is true. to organize a bra nch of he legisla tive department of the government electele! b y the F ilipinos. Bu t as everybody knows. the Philippine A ssembly cons tituted the lower bra nch of the legisla ti ve department; over a nd above tha t popula r body w as the Philipp'ne Commission then composed a lso of a majority of Am eri cans. The legisla tive 'lower granted to h e Filipinos by the Act of Con gress of , 902 was, therefore. in reality subo rdina ted to the Philippine Commission comp osed o f a majority of American ciHzens.

Wh en in ' 9 . 6 the Jones L aw was en ac ted and the Fi lipinos were p ermi.tted to organize the Philipp in e Sena te as the upper cha mber of the legisla tive d epartm ent. it seemed then tha t the whole legisla tive power of our government had b een placed in the h a nds of Filipinos. a nd th a t w e could legisla te freely a nd w ithout a ny limita tion. Th a t was not true n everthe less. b ecau se a lthough the Philippine Legisla tore w as composed of the Philippine S enate and the H ouse of R epresenta tives. this body could not legislate on certa in ma tters vita l to the interes ts of th e Fili pino p eople. W e could not legisla te on ma tters perta ining to public la nds; we could not legisla te on minera l la nds a nd forests : we could not legisla te on currency and coinage. on immigration and tariff. a nd on exports and imports without the approval of

xxxxii


the President of the United Slates. In addition. w e w ere obliged to report all the acts of our Iegisl. ture to the Congress of the United S ta tes which ha d reo served Ihe power to disapprove a ny ac t promulga ted by tha t Legisla ture. Later on. the Congress of the United S ta tes enacted the H a re. H ewes-Cutti ng Law. and la ter the T ydin gsMcDuffie Independence Law p ermitting the Filipinos to a dopt a C onstituti on for the Commonwea lth of the Philippines. If you examine tha t law and if you examine the Commonwea lth C onstitution, particularly the Ordinan ce ap pended to th a t Consti tution. you will find tha t the legisla tive power under the C ommonwealth was restTicted and limited. b eca e w e could n ot legislate on tariff a nd immigration. n currency and coinage. on exports a nd imports wi thou the approva l of the P resident of the United States. You will also remember that under the T ydings-M e uffie Law. whrch W incorpora t'ed as an Ordinance a ppended to our Constitution . all t,he a cts of the legis a lure under the Commonwea lth had to be repor ted to the Congress of the United States whi ch retained the power. 8S usual. to determine whether ou, legislature had acted within the limits prOVided in the Ordinance ,appended to the C onstitution. "jolating none of the res trictions. limitations and reservations provided therein. Now. gentlemen . this is a different legislature, Whereas in the past our legislature w as limited and restyicled by the limita tions of the sovereign pow er. you are a sovereign legislature. You can legislat'c on anythin g and everything under th~ sun without fear of h eing checked and disapproved by a sovereign power. Another reason why I a m happy today is precisely the rcn li.zaHon tha t a sovereign legis la ture of Filipinos has elected me to this h igh position . G entlemen. you have h een assembled here for a specific purpose w hich yo u have accom plished : namely. to organize yourselves into a N ational Assembly a nd to elect yo ur Speaker and other officers.

xxxxili


This yo u have done by e lecting my fri end a nd colleague. the Honorabl e Aquino. a man o f undoubted patriotism. when Ihe hislor)' of the Philippines is s lond pre-eminent amo ng those who their coun try w ell.

dislinguls llcd Benigno S . whose nam e, written. will have served

Th e R epublia of Ihe Philippin es has nol as ye l b oen orga nized. 11'e Military Adminislralion still has 10 be termina ted . W e shall have to inaugurate th e R epublic of the Philippinos wit h a ppropriate eeremonies. I shall ha ve 10 be inducted into office and ta ke my oalh of alLegiance to my people. After a ll this has b een done. it s ha ll b e m y duty a nd privilege e ith er to a ddress you personally or 10 send YQU a rOTmal messag em bodying m y rccommendaI-io s on the leg isla ti ve m easures Ih a L need 10 be e naeled by this Honorable body in order to solve the probLem s facin g ou~ people. For Ihis reason . I shall not touc h upon any s U~H,ffs tions or recommendaHans wr,.路d, J shall make ab Ih e appropriate lime. All tha L d esire to sayan Lhis occasion is 10 remind you once more tha t yow a rc a sovereign legisla ture : tha,t yo u aTe free men a nd the only woman member or Ihis a u gust body a free woman : Iha L as you arc rTee. yo u may act free ly in the service of our p eople: and that the Ch icf Executive of the nation shall also be free a nd sha ll discharge h is fun ctions freely and untrammeled in the same way Iha l you a re expected to discharge your:s. You. G e ntlemen. as l'-1embers of Ihe National Assombl y ilnd I as President of th e independent R epublic of the Philippines sha ll a ll ael freely. but w e s haH converge on one poin!. W e may. in Ihe course of our associaUon. ofFicial in character. dif. . fer in our view s. but we ca nnot disagree in one thing. we cannot be di vided in o ne thing. w e ca nnol slray from Ih e Irodden pa ll, blazed b efore us by our a n ces to r~-w e mus t serve our people loya ll y a nd fRi lhfully. \Ne musl com'erge. Ih ere fo re. on Illat po in t: we must have our peop le's 路w e lfare al hear t; w e must build our country aod reconslru l

xxxxiv


it in th e midst of tile m ise ry and de vas tati on w rought by th e war : w e mus t safeguard our people. feed . doth e and -helt er them : we mus t do anythin g a nd everything in our power to re li eve th eir suffe rings. W e must be on our guard against obstruc ti o ns a ris in g from politi cal differen ces a nd di sensions. W e mus t unite our people. W e nlus t guard agains t abuse of power. for there is no dtade l that w e can erect against a.buse or mis governme nl. W e must be determined 10 se rve our people to th e bitl-e r end. gi vin g th em. if necessar)'. th e last' drop of our blood so tlla t路 they may be happy and conte nted.

Armed with this determ ination . Mr. Speaker a nd G entlemen . I h."e no fear. I do not doubt th a t all Filipinbs . including tho e sulf hiding in th e moun tRins wllo enterl-ain .some doubts rega rding our future. wilJ come down to help us in the work th a t we have to do. For I do not believe tha~ there is any Filipino who will be hostilt;- to our gove rnment which is stabhshed under a Cons titution drafted nnd appro ed by the best minds of th e nation : I do not believe tl, ot th e re can be an y Filipino w ho will oppose 0 government intended fo r Filipinos Rnd run by Filipinos. Will. this de terminalion . w e ma y look bac k on the pas t and bless th e memory of our g reat hero es and marlyrs who made possible the es tablishment or this Republi c. With this d etermination you Dnd I will meet the problems of the day wilh confident courage and with loyalty to our people. consoled by th e knowledge that God in His infinite wisdom never abandons a nation that longs to h e free. and wi ll soon be rree. nnd once free. is de termined to mRkc il s freedom endure foreve r. Mr. Speaker and G entlemen . in all hum ilit y I accept路 my e lection at your hands. and from thi s lime ollward. J place myself completely. absolutely a nd unselrishl y at th e disposa l of our pcopl 路 w hom w e !'nu I se rve a t a ll co s!.

xxxxv


ONE NATION, ONE HEART, ONE REPUBLIC" Your Excellency. Director-General Aquino. DistingUished Colleagues in the Executive Commission. Esteemed Colleagues in the Preparatory Commission For Philippine Independence. Gentlemen of the Constitutional Convention called for the purpose of ra ti fy ing or rejecting of the Constitution , Fellow C itizens and Friends: Before everything else. I des ire to express to you. Your E.xcellency. my d eep apprecia tion of your kindn ess in Favorin g m e with the laudatory remarks that yo u made this moming in intToducing my poor self . .Those remarks. I take it. were a tribute to the warm Friendship which you' entertain towards me and the still warmer fri en cGhip and respect which I hold towards you; and for that reason I a m the more thrilled a t the opportunity which I have today t o address a Few words to the m embers of this convention. The PHilippines came under the possession of the Great Empire of Japan as a result of the Greater East Asia W a r launched by tha t Empire to bring about the hberatio n not only of the Filipinos but of RII the peoples of Greater East Asia. Even while Corregidor and Bataan still stood. the great statesmen of J apan and the grea t military leaders of that great Empire announced to the Filipinos and to the world tl,at the Imperial Japa nese Army had come to the Philippines not to fight the Filipinos but to liberate them from Occidental domination. and that wha t was true in the case of th e Philippines was true in the case of other peoples of Greater East Asia. G eneral Tozyo 's Announcemeryls At the outset. our people were reluctant to belie,'e that a nnouncement. Th ereaft er. the Illustrious Premier of Japan. General Hidcki Tozyo. in a speech before the Imperia l Diet. announced to the world again 路Speech delivered extemporaneously by Hon. Jose P. LaureJ, President of the Preparatory Commission for Philippine Independence. at the Special General As.sembly of the KALlBAP!. held at the Session Halt oC the Lcsrislative Bldg., Manila. on September 7, 1!l4S.

xxxxvi


thnt the purpose of J a pan's coming to the Pltilippines wo.s not to conquer the Filipinos nor to secure terri·

toria l gains: that it was the intenlion of Japan to grant the Filipino. their independence in the . hortest possible time. That announcement was subsequently reiterated by him in a speech b efore .the same Diet and when the Premier came on an oHicinI visit to the Philippines. he announced at a public demonstTa· tion held on the Luneta. form ally a nd in a most elo· quent and vehement manner. that the Philippine. was to be granted her independence. and that declara tion was followed shortly a[temvards wilh an oHicial statement tha t independen~e WBS to be gran ted to the F ilipinos 'within this year. Re~on [or Filipinos' Hesitation

Even then. I must be fTank to say in all sincerity. the Filipinos were hesitant to believe in those promises. b ecause of their past experience. especially during the pan ish regime that las ted more than threehundred y~a"". f:'ilipino patriot. here and Filipino reform ers in Spain hod fought and had sacrificed much in order to secure libera l reforms, and there was a time when the Filipinos though t that the Spanish Government was ready to grant morc liberal reforms to the Philippine •. particularly at the time of the promulgation o[ the Moura Law in , 895: however. as many o[ u. still remember with bitterness. tha t Moura Law which was intended to give the Filipinos greater participation in the administration of their aHairs. aI ... though approved by .the Spanish Ministry of the Colonies. was never actually put into eHect in the Philippines. And when the Americans came, notwith. standing an oHicinI announcement of their au thorities that they had come to liberate the Filipinos from the domination and exploitation of Spain . notwithstanding our repeated attempt. subsequently to make them carry out their promise. and in spite of our vigorous campaigns for independence here and in the United Stute •. they continued to withhold sovereignty from our hand.. Actual independence. the forma l

xxxxvii


turning ove r of sovere ignty. was ne ve r gran Led by the U nit ed S tat'es to the Filipinos. notwithstanding her re peated promises. It was not. th erefore . strange that even a rter the announcement of independence ill a categorical a nd forceful manner by h er highesl pokesman . tl.e Filipinos were relu cta nt to b elieve that Jap a n. in such a short time. and notwithstanding the fact that th e world w a r has not as yet termin1\ted . would. wi.thin this year. grant the Filipinos the ir ind ependen ce.-that which Spain fail ed to grant to the Filipinos in three hundred years . that which Am erica fail ed 10 grant to th e, Filipinos in forty years. It was. and it seemed . unbelievable that a brother Oriental nation Ii~ Japan could grant Philippin e independence w ithin two years. (Applause)

PCRI's Speedy Work It was t hrollgh the ins trum entality of t'\,e KALlBAPI tha the members of the Preparaiory Commission w ere chosen and appointed on June 20th this year. The first n eeting of the Preparatory Commission. if I remember orrectly. w a s held three days after its organiza tion un er the able leadership of Ihe venerable man of th e Philippines. Don Ramon Avancefia ; Rnd now in a period of less than two months afler the organization of the different committees.-a p eriod in which t he distinguished members of the Preparatory Com mission re ndered concenLrated s tudy and reriection ........ w e w ere finally able to draft a constitution; and it is that consLilut-ion which . in a fonnal Idl e r. in my capacity as President of th e Preparatory Commission. I have humbly submilted t'o you. gentlemen of this C onvention . for your consideration and for your approval or ratification or rejeclion . 1 wish to say. at this juncture. that our people may lac k confiden ce in the President of the Preparatory Commission: our people may e nt ertain som e doubt os to the palriotism of the man selected. perhaps accide ntally and perhaps unfortunately. to head the Preparatory Commission : perhaps some of our p opJe rna )' not believe in th e wisdom or in 'the patriotism of my humbl e se lf. but f am sure that as you see these other

xxxxviii


or

me,nbrr th e Prepara tory Commis ion sca led be fore )'ou. wi lh Don Ramon va nCC lla he re. wi th C hief Justi ce.:' Jose Yulo th ere. wi lh Gen. Em ili o gu in a ldo, w ith rVlr. Tirana. w ith 1' 1r. Arranz, w ith Sultnn Sa R a-

main. w ill. Don l'vli gu I Unson. wi th Don Quinlin Paredes nnd Don C laro 1'1. Recio. Ih e form er President of th e Cons titut iona l Conven ti on that drahed

Ihe Com monwea lth Consliluli on. Do"; Rafael A lunan. Don Teofilo ison. Don An tonio d las A las. Mr. Osias and a lso II .. Execuli ve Secrelary of tha i Com-

or

miss ion .- you may daub!, I say, th e patriotism th e Pre-s ide nl lite Prepa,ralory Com miss ion. but you can-

or

nol doubl Ih e patriotism o( C hairman Va rgas. of Di路 reclor-Gene ra l Aq uino a nd o f th ese gentlemen 1 have jlL"tt pOinted. out to you who. ] know . are w illin g to

gi"" lI ,ei r last drop of blood for the sake of the 1'10lh erlan d. Apl)l.lIs~) Tribule 10 /clfJ o,,,ese Flag Th is fl ag (indicat in g .the Japanese fl ag) is a grea t flag. II is a fl ag Ih at should be venerated by all Filipinos s ince i~ symbulizes th e unse lri sh a llempl o f a

grea t Orien al people to liberate not路 only th e Filipinos but a ll ,Ih ol her p eo ples of Easl Asia. But. much as we I, ono Ihat flog , muc h

8S

we are indebted

1'0

the

flag of Ihe Ri ing Sun. my peopl . yo u a nd I. wo uld like to see in Ihis place our own F ilipino nag-Ih e n ag of II ,. Sun a nd S t.",-whieh symbolizes a ll that is good a nd a ll th a i is grea t in our Il islQry as a people.

(Applause) ApprovC'. Gen tle men. tllis c路onsl ilulion. Lha l w e may our own ri ng. Ih (' fl og w here yotl find the blood Riznl Rnd th e grea t sacrifices of other marlyrs of th e Phi lippine ause of independe nce as we ll as the IHWC

or

purity of purpose of the youthful hero es w l,o died in Bntnan and Corregidor. Approve th at constitution bc~ caus(" il is an inslrumcn.lalily placed in our hands so lI' a l Wf;' may have a n opporluniJy 10 go ern ourselves. run Ollr a ffairs. ha'Tc our own ri ng. a nd enjoy rco l.

comp lele and abso lut e independence.

( 1>plause)

I hove issued a form al slal路em(>: nl co ntaining th e r('asons

wll kh

in my opinion should be {'o nsi d<'Tcd in

xxxxix


connection with the approval of the Constitution for the Republic of the Philippines. After a very elaborate and masterly exposition of His Excellency. Ihe Chairman of the E.xecutive Commission, of the merits of that constitution, I shall not take up your time in repeating what he has stated and in repeating what I have already wrjtten in that statement. But, if you please, I would like, in a brief manner and in a general way, to give you an exposition of what I consider is the philosophy of that inslTUment. I will not say that this constitution is a n instTUment that can be placed side by side with the best written constitutions of the world, because it would not be becoming on my part to say so , being the president 01 the body that prepared the constitu ti on. I shall not point to the Constitution as a consUtution that can stand the test 01 logic, of symmetry, of logical arrangement. because, similarly, it would be immodest on my part to do so. But I will say that it is the best constitution that we could prep re or fas hion under the circumstances and realities th t conl'ront u s duri n g these days. Rig /d to Freedom Divi ne

r w ill

now call you r a ttention to someth ing new in

this Constitution wh ich you will lind right in the Preamble. Alter invoking the aid of Divine Providen ce, trusting in the faith that Providence does not abandon a people true a nd loyal to their ideals, we proclaim the independence of the Philippines. So righ.! there in the Preamble of the Consti tution, you have the procla mation o~ independence of our country: and, in this connection, some of you may want an explanation

for this unique procedure. " Why," you may ask, "are the gentlemen 01 the Prepara tory Commission procla iming the independence of the Philippines belore it has been granted to us?" My reply is : 11,e philosophy of the Preparatory Commission, which is the philosophy of our people, is that the right of the people to become independent and free is a diviRe right: it is a gift that comes from high above the heavens and it is not a man-made right to be granted or withheld by any power on earth. (Applause) And we desired by

L


this Constitution. to announce to the world that we won t to b e free and independent. because we w~n t to be true to the hallowed memory of our a ncestors and our heroes. (Applause ) Constitution 's R epublican CTlaracte, Next is the republican character of our governm ent. Contrary. it is said . to the ideo logy of the Great Empire of Japan; contrary. it is said. 10 conte mporary trends of politicol though t. we h ave provided for a government by th e people. a government whose re presenta ti ves are c hosen by the people, a gove rnment whose powers are exercised by those elected by the people. My reply to Ihis is: This Constiution has been prepared by Filipinos for Filipinos: and I know it is not th e inten t-jon or the purpose of Japan to prepare a cons titution and impose it u pon the Filipino people" that if Japan is sincere in her purpose, as I believe he is. ill granting Ihe Filipinos true and real indep e nd~nce. J apan should permit Ihe Filipinos to adopt a c ns tilution tha t is resp nsive to their needs. to their I ra iUans. to lheil'! idea l:;. 1"0 th eir hislory, to

th eir idiosy cracies. and to their aspira tions. (Ap_ plause) A nd so you have a conslitution thaI is rep ublican in characler. and while some of our people may doubt as to ,whe ther it is reaUy republican in cha racler, because or th e manner by w hich we select our representa ti ves to the L egislature. because of the manner by which the President of Ihe Republic is elcotcci. gentlemen. my re ply Lo that is ......... nnd you hnow it yourse-Ivesthat it is not possible nowadays to nppeal to the people direct ly: it is not possible nowadays to hold direct popular e lect ions in th e munic ipaiiLi es and in th e provinces. Many of us cannot even go to some places without exposing ourselves to serious physical and personal dangers, Direcl popula r election a t this time might be good in theory, but, as the Chairman has said. and as 1 have sa id in my s ta tement. in facing a given situation. in formula ting a la w tha t is calculated to serve th e paramount and supreme interes ts of our people. it is not theory but actuality Iha t should die-

Li


lale Ih e means. And Ih e facl is that at Ihis lime we ca ll only organize the Legis la ture. We can only Jed the Presiden t in th e manner that we have provided for in this consti tution . And you. gentlemen of the Conven.tion, who have come here from the dirferent parts of our urchipelago. you kn.ow in your inner sehTes thaI a d-irect eJeclion is not only inadvisable but is practically impossible at this time. Cen ler of Polilical Gr~uily Another fea ture of this Constttution which has also been touched upon by ijis Excellency. the Chairman of the Executive Commission. is the centralization of power. th e con centra tion of responsibility, the crea l ion of a cente r of political !!ravity as I have charact erized i l in onc of my previous statements. We have provi deH for cen l-ralizalion of power, not because it- is our idea or our purpose to cre'lte a dictatorship hcre. When it com es to the a tual a ministration of the affairs of government, I wanl 10 ten you gentlemen that it is not so much a rnp(lel'" of consti.tutio';'nl laws as it is a matter of th e men called u(>on to disqharll'e thc puhlic functions and exercise the powers of the state. You can have Ihe lnoÂť1 democm tic constitution in the world and yel' ha vc a di etator at the hend of that government. On the other hand. you may have a constitution apparenlly vesting dictatoria l powers in the Pres ident and yet it is possible to have the most democra ti c regime undeJ'1 thai cons Htution.

No ST'ifl,ing of R aspon sibiTilies The fundamenta l reason and n ecessity for th e crea lion of a polit-jcal center of gravity under the Republi c is IhaL. in any rorm of f;!'ovemmenl,.......and this is especia lly true in an emer(!ency. in a naHonaI crisi --there must be a man respons ible for the security of th e s late. there must be a man with Adequate powers to face any given s ituation and meet the problem of the nation. There must b e no shifting of responsibility; there must be no evasion o f responsibility: and if a government is to be a real government a nd a scienlifi c (ton' rnment th e re mus t be DO Iwo centers or political gra v ity bul one.

Lii


TIleS.

Ar. Do ),s

or Co urage

\V. ha ve a lso depa rl ed from tI, e Iheory of modern cons titutions with te ference to c hecks and ba la nces. These a re not days to c heck th e Executi ve: these a re no l days 10 check Ihe Legislal u re; Ihese a re no t days 10 check Ihe S upreme C ourt. Th ese are nol days for mutual suspicion and mutua l checkin g. These arc days o f aclion : th ese a re days of res pons ibility; th ese nre days o f coura ge: tll cse are days o f determination ; th ese arc da ys of life 0'· dealh . (A ppla use) A nd so . wh e n the re is a conrli ct be l-w een th e pow ers of govern",cnt. w he n th ere is a conflict be tween the Legislature anel th e E:lCccu Uve. th e Executive must pr~va il sin r(' it is th e political cent er o f gravity. a nd II is i th e res ponsibility to face th e situa ti on . His vc to . • lthough susceptible of b, ing overridd en the fiTst time by a Iwo-Ihirds vole of Ih e N a lional Assembly. is fin a l Ihe second time. an d Ihe meaSUTe or Ihe bill so ve toed ca nnot be consid ered in the samf session. The power of a ppointment is lodged in th e 'Executive to be exe r· ciscd with Ihe a d vice of Ihe members of his Cab inet. TIlcre will no lo nger be any ommiss ion on A ppoin tments o r an y portion of dlC Legislalure to check or harass or C\'en a nnul .th e E xec utive. His is the respon sibility; his musl be th e power. a nd his mus t be Ihe authority to check up on and select th e men wh om he ca n trust to surround him . advise him and carry out th e run ction s o f administra tion. While. on th e other ha nd. w e re ta in th e powe r of rhe Supreme Court to declare a law un ons titution a /. it is th e philosophy of thi s C onstituti o n th a t w he n a law is enacted by th e Legisla ture. a pproved by Ihe President_a nd ··by Ih . President ·· includes a pproval of th e members o f his Ca bine t and perhaps th e members of his Counc il of S la te-il is th e philosophy of th is C on tit"lion th. t th e Sup re me C ourl sha ll respec t th e jud gment of Ihe oth n two d epnrl m nl s of th e governmen t. not on ly or 111(' Leg islati vC' a nd th e Execut ive bUI o r th e members of th e Exec ulives Cabinet and Ih e members of his Co unci l or ~ tnlt.'. And tha i is w hy. w hile recogniz in g

,h.

Liii


as a matter of pri';ciple the independence of the judiciary as a necessary safeguard of individual rights,_ those rights that are indispensable to .the happiness of the individual. which he must have so that he may b e happy and relatively contented,-we require in this Constitution tha t b efore .the Supreme Court can ever deolare a law unconstitutional. it must b e by the unanimous vote of all its members. Power fo Impea拢h Presiden! R egarding impeachment which perhaps some of you may say has no place 'in the Constitution at such times of emergency, we have nevertheless inserted a provision therein covering the m.atter in order Lo demon路 strate to our pople that in an extreme case, such as disloy,alty of the President .to the c ountry; in case of treason, or of bribery" or of culpable violation of the Constitution. and serious crimes, the Nalional Assembly shall have the power. by a two-thirds vote, to impeach the resident and the Supreme Court shall pass judgment u~on the culpability or innocence oE the offici al impeached,

Obligations of Citizens There is also a new feature which you will find in the Bill of Rights of this Censtitution but which you will not find in the Commonwealth Constitution and even in the Constitution of the United Sta tes and other constitutions patterned after .that of the United States. Our Bill of Rights commences will, an enumeration of the obli gations and duties of the citizens. More important than rights, or just as important as rights , are duties a nd obligations, especiaIly during these hectic days of war and suffering of our people. Our people should have the fact impressed in their minds and in their hearts that they have duties to perform as well as rights to be enjoyed and so, while this Constitution, as I have said, specifies constitutional rights, it is its philosophy that the duties of citizens are as paramount and as important as the rights granted to the individual citizen.

Liv


Conservalioll

0/

National Resources

The conservation of natuTal resources has been a paramount concern of the Members of the Preparatory Commission because it concerns the happiness of our people; because everybody knows that our enduring stability depends upon the conservation of the heritage of our nation and of our people. upon the realization of the fac t that the national p atrimony does not even belong to us. the Filipinos of this generation; that our natural resources, OUT mines, our potential energies belong to generations yet unborn; that the Filipinos of thi s generation arc mere usuFructuaries of the national wealth. And that. therefore. we would not be loyal .to our peaRle; w e would not be true to the I!' a\ldat~ of those who have have gone before us; our fathers and our ancestors would rise in the ir graves and ulter accusations aga~nst us jf we were to permit the alienation or th e ruinous e~ploitation of our natura) resources. (Applause) OUT

Cards on the Table

Gentlemen. examine the prOVISions pertaining to natural resources and you will find that the provisions rrom our previous Constitution have remained intact. with only one modification whioh you should note carefully because I do not wont any member of the Convention to vote without being fully aware of that change. Will, the same stipulations. word for word. not even a single comma eliminated or altered. the provisions remain identical with those of the Commonwealth Constitution wilh but one modification. i. e .â&#x20AC;˘ with .the transitory provisiotl that as Japan is waging this war, as Japan is occupying many enemy properties such as mines belonging to Am erica. as Japan needs war materials in order to prosecut-e this war. as we are enabled to establish Philippine independence itself because of the magnanimity of Japan. we say that the Philippine R epublic may enter into any agreement with any foreign nation in connection with the utilization of our natural resources, suhject to liquida~ lion anel aeljustment after the termination of the World

LV


W ar. In Ihi con necl ion. let me say tlois: T o merit fa ir treatm ent from Japan. as we have merit ed. we should lay ou r ca rds on ti, e lable: we cannot b e i n.sincere ;n Ollr purpose; w e canno t be decepti ve in o u r me l hod or procedure. It may be tha t ma n y of our people do n ot understa nd the funda menta l purpose of the G rea ler East Asia VVa r: it may b e Iha t some o f Ihem b elieve th a t this w a r is b eing waged ultim a lely a nd in reality for Ih e territorial aggra ndizeme nt a nd increase of the powe r o f Japan. But w e cannot . procla im our independence without the acquiescence o f J a pa n : we oannot pretend, to b efri end J a pa n. tell her by wo rd o f mou th in b eau tiful speeches th a I we believe in co- prosperity. tha t we believe in th e fundamenta l purpose of this wa r 10 libera te Asia tic peoples. a nd ,hen. w h en Ihe time comes w h en J a pa n says: Gi ve us cop per: give us iron: gi ve us ma nganese. w e sh a ll n o~ be able to give her a ny of th ese thi ngs beca use by our Con sli tut ion . we h ave closed the door 10 them. e would then have prevent ed J apa n from w innin g this war n Ohviths ta nding o ur pro tes ta ti o n o f friendship a pd coopera tion. If our people a dopt th is a ttitude a nd preFer to be insincere in dealing w ith J a 路 pa n . Ihe 1\1embers of the Preparatory Commission would ra lher face the music. assume Iheu responsibilities accordin g to Ihei r own li ghts. a nd telf you Ihot Ihe M embers of th e Prepa ralory C ommission would not b e a pa rty to any insincere dea l. a nd wo uld b e willing 10 a n sw er for Ihe a elion they have la ken. Tha t is. I b eli eve. th e m a nly a ttitude of people wh o a re w illing a nd are d etermined 10 be froe.

WI,ere R eal Independence Is Found But. G entlemen. it is not b eca use of th ~ inlrinsic merits of tllis Conslituli on tha t I beg of yo u 10 a pprove it: it is no t beca use Ih is C ons titut ion is the b est. in our opin io n. tha t could be fas hi oned unde r the ci rcum sta nces: it is not- beca.use this Cons tit ution was prepared b y men w hose pa trio tism nnd w isdom 1 hopc our p eople w ill not cha llen ge. On lhe o th .. " a nd. G enllemen of th e C onve nt ion. if )"ou are app{O\'ing this C onstituti on because you bel ieve th At rea l

Lvi


independence is there. lhal you th ink its mere pro"i'S ions ma. ke inde pendence fac tua l. that" nothing more need be do ne in order for us. th e Filipino people. to enjo y comple le inde pe nde nce. you are m ista ken-disap prove this Constituti on. No constitution of a ny co untr)' in th e w orld is self-sufficient for ,t hat purpose. nd neither will this Constitution of itself and by itsdf a lone give our people the reality of independence. Real inde pe nde nce to become a liv ing fact. mus t h e found in th e heart and in the soul of every Filipino. and not in the in ert phrases of constitutional provi sions; it must be found in th e courage. in th e determination. and. if necessary. in. th e blood of Filipinos w ho a rc determin ed to make independence real. That is wh y I appeal Lo your patrio tism. G entle men a nd fe llow c@ untrymen a nd brethren. to approve this Co.nstilution ,lot me re ly on th e bas is o f it s intrins ic merits . I w ant, you lo conside r ond ponder three reasons w hy you should a pprove this C onstitution. First. it s m y humble opinion ha l this C onstitu tion js a means y , ... hi ell w e th e Filipinos can comple te ly ass ume th e powers of 'government. rUD a gove rnmenl of our own and adm iniste r ou" own affairs without th e J apanese Military -police. without miTita ry garrisons , without th e interve ntion any fore ign govern ment. ( pplause ) SQ. if you wanl that even to happen , if you want suc h a 路state of things Lo materialize. if for no other reason. approve this Constitution. G en 路 !le me n. Approve it. so ,haL w e LIle Filipinos may im mediate ly adminis ter the a erairs our own govern -

or

or

mf'nt.

WI,a! Kind of Inclapendence noLlH~r reDson . I know that som e of you a rc SPC4 culating as 10 wha t kind of independence we El re going to have. I have ta lked to some of th e members of "lis Conve ntion . I know thnt our people arc asking th e sam l' ques tion day in a nd day Qut ; wh at kind of independen ce is it going to be? It路 will not be >ea l independence. some frankly aver. And th ey a llege tlmt th e Pres ident . with _II th e m embers of his Cabi -

Lvii


net and of ,the Council of Stale, as well a. the membets of the L<!gislature will make up nothing but a puppet government. to be dictaled to by Japan. to have no teal power. to do what it is told to do. TI,ey say all .this. in spite of the fact that we have not actually received ou~ independence yet. But. if you approve this Constitulion. then you have approved the Constitution for the Republic of the Philippines which has to be established as an independent country. The approval of this Constitution. therefore, is. in my opinion, an opportunity orfered to our people to tes l. to determine and to appraise the kind of independence Japan is giving us.

. . . Depends Upon Filipinos Themselves ,

I

"(he reality of Philippine independence. although dependent upon many Caetors. depends largely. 路[ think upon tl,e Filipinos ,themselves. Why? Probably in less than one month, or withi" a monlh or so we sha ll hav our independence. VVe are determ ined to have a truly independent Phi lippines. a real Republic of ,the Philippines; and yet. if many of our countrymen persist in living in the mountains. in engaging in guerrilla warfare, in disturbing pence and order. then the Government of the Republic. because oC the insufficiency of our Constabulary forces. may be compelled to ask the Japanese Govo.rnment to keep the military garrisons at their present stations in the different provinces oC the Philippines. And with such garrisons here and there. what sort of independence would we have? But. then. how could we do otherwise? The President of the Republic. or the Government of the Philippines cannot, and should not. take the risk of being overlhrown. W e cannot just tell the garrisons, with bravado. " Please. get out of here," and then expose the state to grave dangers. Until such time tis local Constabulary Corces shall be strong enough to control any situation, or condjtions of peace

and order become satisfactory . the Government of t he R epublic will have 10 avail itself of the ass is lance of the J apanese Military garrisons, In such a situation,

Lviii


independence. I admit. would be unreal. but. I ask. "Who has made that independen ce unreal?" The Filipinos themselves.

N eed for Union. S elf-sufficiency The J a pan ese should not be blamed for the behavior of OUT countrymen who persist in their efforts to disturb the peace. prevent the sow ing nnd culti vation of food crops. paralyze commerce and indusrries : the Filipinos themselves are to blame. If after we have esta blished our own government. large numbers of intelligent Filipinos should sti ll remain indifferent._ as they are-silting in a comer, murmuring against those of us who are in the Government. carrying on a destructive whispering camllaigo against those who ore doinll their best to make independence real. then there would be no real unity among the Filipinos ; and. without a comr.act and united people. independence can not be rea. Again. I ask. in such a case. who makes independen ce unreal ? The Fili~inos themselves. H. on the otl\,er hand. instead of criticising those who have been j ailed upon to help in this great .task of nation-building. these hitherto p assive countrymen of ours should come forward and tender th eir goodwill and cooperation and assist us in the cons truction of a N ew Philippines. then we would h ave at least one powerful factor for the realization of tTue independence. But. if because of disorders. or of disqui~t and disrractiolls !hat arise from disunity. farmers are compelled to "bandon the land. and we cannot produce enough ri ce. a nd prime commodities and other essentials of life. then there would not only be the da nger of hunger a n d starva tion in our country. but the R epublic of the Philippines would b e constrai ned t'O ask J ap a n a nd other Oriental countries to help us and give us rice. to give us rood. In such a circumstance. our independence would be. indeed. hollow a nd worthless. for political independence without economic selÂŁ-suÂŁficiency is beg. gary a nd subservience. A nd for the las t time. I ask. who would ha ve b een responsible for su ch a mock independence? The Filipinos themselves.

Lix


AU up to Filipinos I have mentioned these inescapable dilemmas of our Republic and the alternative solutions to them . to prove to you that .the question of the reality of Philippine independence not only as to its completeness and its absolute character but also as to its stability will depend in a great measure upon the Filipinos themselves. If we succeed in forming a compact and united Philippines. if we do our best to erect here the foundations of a lasting and enduring republic, if we can be true not only by word of mouth. but with our hearts and by actual acts and deeds. to the resolve of making our independence real: if we are united as a people. and. in the event that we discover that this independence is not real but Japan only wants to convert he Philippine Republic into a mere puppet. each and e'~ery Filipino man. woman and child would be wilhng to die or to prevent such degrada tion of our statehood. then. the reality of independence is ours. (Applause~

Duty

of Tllis

Generatibn

I know. <Shairman Vargas knows. Director-General Aquino knows. I am sure the Members of the Executive Commission knows. and the Members of the Preparatory Commission know.-we all know ..... that we can no longer make .t he Philippines a great and powerful country in this generation. in our generation. But we may have a great purpose in mind. we may have a divine hope burning steadily in the depth and solitude of our souls. We say we cannot make this country a great and powerful country during our lifetime. because we know .that one who has lived more than fifty years cannot live for another fifty. That is especially true in the case of Don Ramon Avancefia and General Emilio Aguinaldo. The duty of this generation. my friends. is perhaps not so much to make the Philippines a great and powerful country. The duty of .this generation is to save the Filipino race. to tide our country over to better Hmes, and give succeeding generations a cha nce to make this our Philippines

LX


the great ond powerful country that we drea m it to be. (Applause )

For Ille DuraHon

0/

Ihe War

The war is still raging. When it will termina te. you do not know. and I do not know. Four years a nd more have ela psed wi th .the Allies trying to batter down and defeat G erman y. The Allies have not su cceeded ye t. After defeating G ermany. how lon g will it take the A llies to bring their wa r w ith Japa n to a decisive end? Assuming tha t it .tokes the Allies six years to defeat G erma ny. it is reasonable to assume thot it will take (our years or more to finish the war with J a pan. Let us say six more years will ela pse b efore the conclusion of .the war. Wha tever betide. I b elieve the fate of the Philippin es wi ll h e determined by the treaty of pea ce a t the conclusion of this war. The problem of the Filipinos, in the meanwhile, is to decide anti determine what attilnde they should adopt for the dUTlItion of tha t war. By implication, certain decis ions

or outs have

to be tenta tive. Eve n our C ons-

titution, as you will no tice, is ,transitory. And as you will see, many provisions of it would not have b een incorporated in normal times. In nannal times our people would probab ly prefer a constilntion different from this one.

One NaHon , One

Hea~l. One

Republic

Be that as it may, I have told you my reasons for voting for this Conslitution : first, it is a means by which w e can run a gove rnment

by

and for ourselves.

It is an opportunity that w e must seize. The second reason is, that it is an opportunity for us to find oul what J~pa n is really going to do as regards the independence of the Phi lippines once the R~public of the Philippines is established. And the ConsUlntion is an instrumenta lity for settin g up tha t independence. nd the third reason is: II we should find the independence so established not only complete a nd absolute but also real and substantiol: if we should fin d tha t our people a re happy under this Constitu tion ond under our own governmenl; if w e should find Japan's

Lxi


intentions towards the Filipinos genuine, sincere and nohle, then approval of this Constitution would have given us the Filipinos our Republic of tbe Philippines. We shall have heen permitted to carve out our own destiny and occupy a place in the concert of free nations of the world, which we could not do unless we were independent. For these reasons, Gentlemen, I make this plea to you , realizing the difficulties of our labors hut true to the memory of our ancestors and the faiths that hid us go on and on, and on, if necessary to the hitter end, I ask you, Gentlemen of tltis Convention, to approve this Constitution. so that we may have one Gountr-y... one nation, one nag, one heart. and one republic of the Philippines. (Pr<>longed Appl~use)

Lxii


TEXT OF VARGAS' PROCLAMATION PROCLAMATION NO. 19 CALLING UPON ALL FILIPINOS, PARTICULARLY THE RESIDENTS OF THE CITY OF MANILA, TO PARTICIPATE IN THE GRATITUDE RALLY TO BE HELD AT THE NEW LUNETA IN THE AFTERNOON OF JUNE 19, 1943, FOR THE PURPOSE OF MANIFESTING THE PROFOUND GRATITUDE OF THE FILIPINO PEOPLE FOR THE DEFINITE ASSURANCE OF THE GRANT OF INDEPE~DENCE TO THE PHILIPPINES IN THE COURSE OF THE CURRENT YEAR Al'{D REITERATING THEIR DETERMINATION TO COLLABORATE WITH JAPAN. WHERMS, the independence of the Philippines is, as it has alwa s been, the supreme aspiration of the Filipino people; WHEREAS, the Imperial Japanese Government, through His Excellency, Premier General Hideki Tozyo, has definitely assured the grant of independence to the Philipp~nes in the course of the current year; and WHEREAS, it is fitting and proper that the Filipino people avail themselves of the auspicious occasion of the birthday anniversary of their national hero, Dr. Jose Rizal, on June 19, 1943, to manifest their gratitude to the Great Japanese Empire for this benevolent act; Now, Therefore, by virtue of the authority vested in me as Head of the Central Administrative Organization by Order No.1 of the Commander-in-Chief of the Imperial Japanese Forces in the Philippines, particularly the residents of the city of Manila, to convene at the New Luneta punctually at 4 :30 o'clock in the afternoon of June 19, 1943, and participate in the Gratitude Rally to be held there for the purpose of expressing the profound gratitude of the Filipino people for the definite assurance of the grant of independence to the Philippines in the course of the current year and reiterating their determination to collaborate with Japan actively, unreservedly and spontaneously in the successful prose-

Lxiii


cution of the Greater East Asia War and in the establishment of the Greater East Asia Co-Prosperity Sphere. The Commissioner of the Interior and the Vice-President and Director General of the Kalibapi shall make the necessary arrangements for the participation of the officials and employees of the government and the general public in the sRid rally. Done in the City of Manila, Philippines, this 17th day of June, 1943.

LXiv


SECTION

1. Affairs ConceTning Department

of the Interim' June 9, 1943 NOTIFICATION NO. 6 CONCERNING THE NIPPONGO TEACHERS' QUALIFICATION EXAMINATION The Director-General of the Japanese Military Administration has given the Nippongo Teachers' Qualification Committee an order to give the Nippongo Teachers' Qualifical ion Examination to the followin g: (1) Grade of the Examination Junior Nippongo Teacher's Qualification Examination (2) Date 0 the E xamination June 16th and 17th, 1943 D ij'ec t ol'-Gen!lral of th e J apanese M i lita,路y A dministra t ion

June 8, 1943 A NNOU NCE~J EN T

CON CERNING THE TEACHERS' QUA LIFICATION EXAMINATION The Junior Nippongo Teach ers' Qualification examination will be given by the Nippongo Teacher s' Qualification Committee according to the following : 1. Date ( a ) 9 :00 A.M.-12 :00 noon, June 16, 1943

Written Examination ( b ) 9:00 A.M.-June 17, 1943

Oral and Physical Examination [1]


2. Place Nippongo Kyooin Yoosei Zyo Vigan, Ilocos Sur 3. Subjects (a) Basic Principles of Education (b) Nippongo Reading; Writing; Translating Nippongo into English; English into Nippongo; Grammar; and Dictation. (c) Method of Teaching The examinations in items (b) and (c) shall be taken from the "Hanasi Kotoba" I, II and III. 4. Physical Examination 5. Requirements for admission Those who have completed at least the high school or equivalent course and have never been sentenced to detention, imprisonment, confinement or any severer punishment. 6. Certifica es The JUDlor Nippongo TeaQhers' Certificates shall be issued by Director-General of the Japanese Military Administration to the successful candidates in accordance with the Kanrei No. 15, Article 2. 7. Procedure of Application (1 ) Application The written application must be presented at the Western Sub-branch Office of the Japanese Administration by June 12, personally or by mail. (2) Examination Fee (a) Two pesos shall be charged as examination fee. The applicant can send a money order for two pesos, in case the application is sent by mail. (b) The fee of two pesos may be paid in cash at the office in case the application is presented personally. (3) Application Form

[2]


Date Application Form Sir: I have the honour to apply to take the Junior Qualification Examination for the Nippongo Teachers' Certificate. Yours respectfully,

Director-General of the Japanese Military Administration Information 1. Date of bi rth ; 2. Nationality; 3. Academic

Career; 4. Occupational career (4) Attached Documents The written application should be accompanied by a copy of the diploma or the certificate of a high school or its equivalent. (5) Cautions on the Examination 1. The applicant should be present at the examination room by 9 :00 A.M., June 16 and 17.

2. The applicant should follow the examiners directions. 3. The one who applied by mail should obtain an examination card at the office. 4. The examinees are not allowed to bring anything except pens, pencils, erasers and knives. 5. Any examinee who is found by the examiners as unqualified for the examination shall not be permitted to take the examination. If this discovery is made during the progress or after the examination, the papers will be cancelled.

Ni ppongo Teachers' Qualification Committee

[3]


SECTION

2. Affai1's Concerning Department

of Finance KOKUJI NO.8 CONCERNING ISSUANCE OF NEW WAR-NOTES IS HEREBY ENACTED AS ATTACHED HEREWITH. This 18th day of July, 1943. Director-General, Japanese Military Administration KOKUJI NO.8

CONCERNING ISSUANCE OF NEW WAR-NOTES. The Imperial Japanese Government will issue the new peso war-notes of fresh design in denomination of ten, five and one-peso each. The genel'al public is hereby requested to note the followings: 1. Like the peso war-notes already issued and being circulated among the public, the new war-notes of fresh design will be issued by the Imperial Japanese Government and the said Government takes full responsibility for the circulation thereof. Consequently they shall have the fullest confidence in their monetary function . The general public, therefore, shall use them without slightest fear of any sort. 2. The war-notes already issued will neither be suspended of, nor be withdrawn from, their circulation on account of issuance of the new war-notes, but both of them will be circulated exactly at the same value. Accordingly, both of them can be used by the public in making payments of any kinds. 3. The regulations concerning usage of the war-notes proclaimed on the 3rd of January, 1942, shall be applied to the new war-notes. 4. The new war-notes will be issued on and after August 1st, 1943.

[4]


SECTION

3. Affain Concerning Depa11,ment of Industries

KANREI NO. 19 RULES PROHIBITING THE REMOVAL OF EQUIPMENT OF SUGAR CENTRALS ARTICLE I

No one shall sell, donate, exchange, rent or otherwise dispose of, under any title, rails constructed by sugar centrals, or locomotives, freight cars, machineries or any other equipment belonging to sugar centrals, or transfer the possession thereof without the approval of the Director-General of the Japanese Military Administration. ARTICLE II

Anyone who violates the regulation prescribed in the next preceding Article shall be punished by imprisonment of not more than three years or a tine of not more than ten thousand pesos (1'10,000); Provided, however, that in case the appraised value of the property concerned amounts to more than ten thousand pesos (1'10,000), the amount of fine shall not be more than three times of said appraised value. July 8 ,1943. D i1'ecto1'-Geneml JapOIYtese Milita,路y Adm,inistmtion

[5]


SECTION

4. Affai?'s Concerning the Philippine

Executive Commission. OFFICE OF THE CHAIRMAN OF THE EXECUTIVE COMMISSION MALACAi'lAN PALACE

BY THE CHAIRMAN OF THE EXECUTIVE COMMISSION EXECUTIVE ORDER NO. 165 PROVIDING RULES FOR THE USE OF POSTAGE STAMPS AND POSTAL CARDS OFFICIALLY SURCHARGED WITH THE JAPANESE CHARAGTERS ~ ~ AND THE LETTERS "K.P." (MEANING "KAGAMITANG PAMPAMAHALAAN" OR OFFICIAL BUSINESS) AND PENALTY FOR VIOLATION THEREOF. Pursuant to the authority conferred upon me as Head of the Central Administrative Organization by Order No.1 in connection with Order No.3 of the Commanderin-Chief of the Imperial Japanese Forces in the Philippines, and upon the recommendation of the Executive Commission, it is hereby provided thalr1. Postage stamps and postal cards officially surcharged with the Japanese characters ~ ~ and the letters uK.P." (meaning "Kagamitang Pampamahalaan" or official business) shall be used only in payment of postage on, or in connection with, official mails of government offices and judicial courts, including governmentowned and controlled corporations, which mails must be plainly marked with the words "Official Mail" or "Kagamitang Pampamahalaan" and the name of the department, bureau, office, branch, instrumentality, agency, court, or official sending them. 2. Any person who shall knowingly and wilfully make use of such officially surcharged uK.P." postage stamps or postal cards for posting private mail in any post office, shall be punished by a fine of not more than two [6]


hundred pesos or by imprisonment for not mOl'e than six months, or both, 3, This Order shall take effect upon its approval. Done in the City of Manila, Philippines, this 16th day of June, 1943, (Sgd ,) JORGE B, VARGAS

Chairman of the Executive Commission ApPROVED by the Director General of the Japanese Military Administration on June 16, 1943, EXECUTIVE ORDER NO, 167 AMENDING PARAGRAPH 2 OF EXECUTIVE ORDER NO, 40, DATED MAY 14, 1942, SO AS TO ALLOW AN EXTENSlON OF NOT TO EXCEED ONE AGRICULTURAL YEAR FOR THE CULTIVATION OF IDLE PUBLIC AND PRIVATE LANDS, Pursuant to the authority conferred upon me as Head of the Central Administrative Organization by Order No, 1 in connection with Order No, 3 of the Commanderin-Chief of the Imperial Japanese Forces in the Philippines, and upon the recommendation of the Executive Commission, paragraph 2 of Executive Order No, 40, dated May 14, 1942, is hereby amended to read as follows: "2, That it shall be the duty of all city and municipal mayors to distribute uncultivated public lands within their respective jurisdictions among the citizens thereof preferably to those who are unemployed in order to enable them to plant food crops therein for a period of one agricultural year: Provided, That, if in order to compensate those to whom vacant land may be given in accordance herewith for the initial expense of clearing the land or making certain improvements, it is necessary to extend the time beyond one agricultural year, extension of the contract for not to exceed one additional agricultural year may be au-

[7]


thorized in the discretion of the city or municipal mayor concerned." Done in the City of Manila. Philippines, this 19th day of June, 1943. (Sgd.) JORGE B. VARGAS Chai1'7natn of the Executive Commissi01I

ApPROVED by the Director General of the Japanese Military Administration on June 19, 1943.

EXECU'1'IVE ORDER NO. 168 AUTHORiZING THE BUREAU OF SCIENCE TO COLLECT CHARGES FOR WORK DONE AND FOR THE USE OF ITS LABORATORY FACILITIES. Pursuant to the authority conferred upon me as Head of the Centra~ Administrative Organization by Order No.1 in connection with Order No.3 of the Commanderin-Chief of the Imperial Japanese Forces in the Philippines, it is hereby ordeJled that: SECTION 1. The Bureau of Science is authorized to collect charges for work done and for the use of its laboratory facilities, the amount of which shall be determined by the Director of the Bureau with the approval of the Oommissioner of Agriculture and Commerce. SEC. 2. Such provisions of existing laws or regulations as are inconsistent with the provisions of this Executive Order are hereby revoked or modified accordingly. SEC. 3. The collection of charges. as authorized herein, shall commence as of the date of approval of this Order by the Commander-in-Chief of the Imperial Japanese Forces in the Phmppines. However. in the case of charges to be collected from private persons or en-

[8]


tities it shall be permiss ible to co mmence retroactively as of April I, 1943. Done in the City of Ma nila, Philippines, this 21st day of June, 1943. (Sgd. ) JORGE B. VARGAS Chai1'lnan of the Exeoutive Co'ntmission ApPROVED by the Commander-in-Chief of the Imperi al Japanese Forces in the Philippines on June 21, 1943.

EXECUTIVE ORDER NO. 169 AUTHORIZING THE COMl\IIISSIONER OF AGRICULTURE AND COMMERCE TO FIX THE MAXIMUM PRICES OF BANGOS FRY AND FINGERLINGS AND THE BUREAU OF FORESTRY AND FISHEfW TO PURCHASE AND DISTRIBUTE THE S ME. Pursuant to the authority conDerred upon me as Head of the Central Administrative Organization by Order No, 1 in' connection with Order No , 3 of the Commanderin-Chief of the Imperial Japanese Forces in the Philippines, and upon the recommendation of the Executive Commission, it is herehy ordered thatSECTION L The Commissioner of Agriculture and Commerce is hereby authorized to fix, from time to time, the maximum prices of haiigos fry and fingerlings in accordance with the provisions of Executive Order No. 157, dated May 18, 1943, which shall apply to the sale and purchase of baiigos fry and fingerlings in so far as the same may he practicable: P,1Ovided, howevel', That until the Commissioner of Agriculture and Commerce shall ti.x otherwise tn accordance herewi th, the maximum prices of bafigos fry and fingerlings shall he as fixed in Executive Order No. 154, dated May 11, 1943. SEC. 2, The Bureau of Forestry and Fishery is hereby authorized to purchase from baiigos fry concessionaires nnd handlers alI bafigos fry and fingerlings at the of-

[9]


ficially fixed prices. The said bureau shall be authorized to effect an equitable distribution of baiigos fry and fingerlings and to distribute the same to fishpond owners and operators at cost plus a surcharge not to exceed five per cent. All concessionaires and handlers of baiigos fry and fingerlings are directed to deliver and sell all baiigos fry and fingerlings to the Bureau of Forestry and Fishery at such places as may be designated by the Director of Forestry and Fishery. SEC. 3. Such provisions of Executive Order No. 154, dated May 11, 1943, and of all other orders, rules, regulations, circulars and instructions, or parts thereof, as may be inconsistent with the provisions of this Order, are hereby revoked. SEC. 4. Any violation of the provisions of Section 2 of this Order shall be subject to a fine of not to exceed two hundred pesos or imprisonment not to exceed six months, or both, which shall be wilo30ut prejudice to any administrative action that may be taken by the Bureau of F<>restry and Fishel:)' and the confiscation of the fish and fingerlings involved in the violation. SEC. 5. This Order shall take effect upon its approval. Done in the City of Manila, Philippines, this 21st day of June, 1943. (Sgd.) JORGE B. VARGAS Chai1man of the Ercecutive Commission ApPROVED by the Director General of the Japanese Military Administration on June 19, 1943. EXECUTIVE ORDER NO. 170 GRANTING, IN SPECIFIC CASES, A MINIMUM PAY OF THREE HUNDRED SIXTY PESOS PER ANNUM TO PROVINCIAL, CITY OR MUNICIPAL EMPLOYEES OCCUPYING POSITIONS ALLOCATED TO GRADE TEN. Pursuant to the authority conferred upon me as Head of the Central Administrative Organization by Order

[10]


No.1 in connection with Order No.3 of tbe Commanderin-Chief of tbe Impel'ial Japanese Forces in the Pbilippines, and upon the recommendation of the Executive Commission, it is hereby ordered thatSECTION 1. The provisions of Executive Order No. 13 01" any other order to the contrary notwithstanding, any employee of the provincial, city or municipal go\"ernments occupying a position allocated to Grade 10. and actually receiving less than 1'360.00 per annum. may be granted a minimum pay of P360.00 per annum if he falls under either of the following conditions : (a) If the employee is married and is supporting" family wherein nO other member is earning an)' other income from any employment or occupation whatsoever; (b) TJ the employee is single and is the only menlls of support of the family to wbich he belongs. SEC. 2. Before an employee is granted the benefits of this Order, he must subscribe to and subm it an affidavit stating,: (a.) For the married employee-(1) Tha he is legally married and is living witIl. and supporting, his family; (2) The name of his spouse and the names alid ages of his legitimate children and other dependents; (3) That 110 other member of his household is earning an income from any employment or occupation whatsoever. (b) For the unmarried employee-(1) That he is living with, and is the only means of support of, h is family; (2) The names and nges of his dependents and their relation to him. SEC. 3. The provisions of this Order shall be applicable only to the employees of provinces, cities, and municipalities which may bave funds available to bear the additional expenses incurred. Done in the City of Manila, Philippines, this 28th

[11]


day of June, 1943. ( gd. J JORGE B. Choi,'tIw 'Y! (If th e

VARGAS

E~' ectlti1,e

Com1nissifl"n

ApPROVED by the Director General of the Japanese Military Administration on June 28, 1943.

EXECUTIVE ORDER NO . 171 PROVIDING FOR THE ESCHEAT OF UNCLAIMED DORMANT ACCOUNTS IN THE PHILIPPINE POSTAL SAVINGS BANK WITHOUT COURT PROCEEDINGS AND UNDER CERTAIN CONDITIONS, AND FOR SUCH PURPOSE, AMENDING SECTIONS 1993 AND 2002 OF THE REVISED ADMlNISTRATIVE CODE AND REPEALING SECTION 2002-A OF' SAID CODE . Pursuant ~the a uthority con ~erred upon me a Head of the Cent ra Administrative Organization by Order No. 1 in connectio wit h Or der No.3 of the Commander-inChief of the Imperial J apanese Forces in the Philippines, and upon recommendation of the Executive Commission, it is hereby ordered thatSECTION 1. Section 1993 of the Revised Administrative Code is hereby amended to r ead as follows: "Sec. 1993. (}uu1'anty to depositoT8 .-The Government guarantees to return to each depositor all money, with interest accrued thereon, deposited by him in the bank in accordance with law, except deposits which have been declared dormant and escheated to the said bank in pursuance of section two thousand and two of this Code." SEC. 2. Section 2002 of the Revised Administrath e Code, as amended by Commonwealth Acts Nos. 198 lmd 394, is hereby further amended to read as follows: "Sec. 2002. D01'1 nant acc01lnts.-The Commissioner of Public Works and Communications, upon r ecommendation of t he Director of Communications.

[12]


hall dedar" lill\ bank account dormant when there has been no deposit, withdrawal, or other transaction at the request of the depositor for ten years after the end of the fiscal year in which the last transaction in the account was made, or for ten years after stipulation period named in the applicntion when the account was opened. "Immediately following the declaration by the Commissioner of Public Works and Communications, as above provided. the Director of Communications shall cause to be sent by registered mail a notice to the depositor affected, at his last known place of residence or business address. to the effect that his account has become dormant and that it shall be automatically escheated to the bnnk as part of the earnings thereof if, within the period of one hundred and twenty days from the date of the notice, he shall fail to submit his claim thereon to the Central Office of the bank nt Manila. If no an weI' is received at the expiration of ninety days from the date of th e notice, the Director of Communi~tions shaH also cause to be posted at the lobbies of the Manila Post Office and every other post office in the PhjJippines where said account and others similarly affected were opened. a list arranged in alphabetical order, of the depositors in whose names said accounts are carried in the books of the Bank, and said list shall. amon/! other things, contaiu: "(a.) The name and last known place of resi dence 01' business address of the depositor, and the name of his beneficiary, if one has been nominated. "(b) The amount of his deposit including accrued interest thereon. "(c) The date when the person in whose favor the deposit stands died, if known. or the date when he made his last deposit or withdrawal. "At the expiration of thirty days from the time the list hereinabove referred to is posted. the D irector of Communications shall furnish the Commissioner of Public Works and CommuniC<'ltion~ with the revised list of outstanding dormant accounts to be prepared in the Aame manner as hereinabove indicated with . ta tements of the post-

[13]


masters concerned certifying the dates and places of postil!g of the original list and the said Commissioner shall, after determining that such deposits are dormant and unclaimed, declare the sam.e escheated to the bank without court proceedings, any provisions of existing law to the contrary notwithstanding, and said deposits shall thereafter become a part of the earnings of the banlc" SEC. 3. Section 2002-A of the Revised Administrative Code, as inserted in said Code by Act No. 4260 and as amended by Commonwealth Act No. 394, is hereby repealed. SEC. 4. In case of deposits made before the enforcement of this Order, the same procedure provided in Section 2002 of the Revised Administrative Code as amended by Section 2 hereof shall also be followed. SEC. 5. This Order shall take effect upon its approval. Done in the City of Manila, Philippines, this 29th day of June, 1943, (Sgd.) JORGE B. VARGAS Chai'''YItan of the ExeC1.!tive Com'mission by the Director General of the Japanese Military Administration on June 29, 1943.

APPROVED

EXECUTIVE ORDER NO. 172 VESTING IN THE DEPARTMENT OF PUBLIC WORKS AND COMMUNICATIONS THE AUTHORITY TO PLACE SURVEYING MARKS ON EITHER PUBLIC OR PRIVATE PROPERTY IN CONNECTION WITH TRIANGULATION, LEVELING, BASE LINE MEASUREMENTS, TOPOGRAPHIC SURVEY AND HYDROGRAPHIC SURVEY OF THE PHILIPPINES. Pursuant to the authority conferred upon me as Head of the Central Administrative Organization by Order No.1 in connection with Order No.3 of the Commanderin-Chief of the Imperial Japanese Forces in the Pbilip[14]


pines, and upon the recommendation of the Executive Commission, it is hereby ordered thatSECTION 1. Triangulation mark, bench mark, surveying tower, surveying pile and surveying flag shall be generally called or known as surveying marks in this Executive Order. SEC. 2. The Department of Public Works and Communications shall have authority to place surveying mark on either public or private property in connection with triangulation, leveling, base line measurements, topographic survey and hydrographic survey of the Philippines, or to remove any obstruction thereto. pl'ovided, however, that the lawful owner shall be paid the reasonable value of the property thus removed. SEC. 3. When it is necessary to place triangulation mark Qr bench mark on private property, the Department of. Publi Works and Communications may purchase the needed portion of said property, except ill case the lawful wner voluntarily donates or leases perpetually and free of rent the said porbion of property. SEC. 4. When surveying tower or surveyin g pile is placed on private property, the Department of Public Works and Communications sh,aIl pay the following l'ents, except ill case the lawful owner voluntarily leases the same free of rent: (1) Residential lots-rent to be reasonable in consideration of the current rent. (2) Fields, salt-fields, mine-lands and rice-fields- annual rent of PO.IO per square meter. (3) Other property-annual rent of PO.05 pel' square meter. SEC. 5. Any official or employee charged with surveying duties shall, in the placing of surveying marks. be permitted to enter public or private lands: P1路ovided. however, That when entering a private residential lot. he shall have notified in advance the occupant of the said property. In all cases, the official 01' employee concerned shall carry with him a certificate attesting to his official status. SEC. 6, In case it is necessary, the official 01' employee concerned shall exercise police powers or ask the aid of the constabulary or police fOl'ce in the perform~

(15)


ance of his duty prescl'ibed in the preceding Section 6. SEC. 7. Any person who willfully or maliciously interferes with the making of any survey by the Department of Public Works and Communications, or with the placing of any sUl'\-e~'ing marks, or who defaces, destroys, remove or alters them or their location, shall be punished by imprisonment of not more than six months or by a fine not e.'(ceeding five hundred pesos, 01' both. in the discretion of the COUI路t. SEC. 8. Section !l6, Article VII, of Executive Order No.4, dated February 6, 1942, as amended by Executive Order No. 144, dated April 5, 1943, is hereby further amended to read as follows: "Sec. 46. The Department of Public Works and Communications shall perform its functions under the executive authority of the Commissioner of Public Works alld Communications who shall have ex cutive supervision and administrative cOlltrol ove!' the Bureau of Huhlic Works, Bureau of Communications, Bureau of Public Services, and the Metro~litall Waterworks Office. "It s all have supervisiqn and control of lighthouses, uoys, beacons, navigation marlcs and their appurtenances, which shall now or in the future he placed under the jurisdiction and control of the government; the general survey of lands and waterways within the Philippines; and the collection and distribution of geographic data for the general mapping of the Philippines and hydrographic information valuable to navigating crafts." SEC. 9. This Order shall take effect UpOll its approval. Done in the City of Manila. Philippines, this 2nd day (Of Julv. 194R. (Sgd.) JORGE B. VARGAS Clwi,-mn'/'/ of the E~pcutille Commission ApPROVED by the Commander-in-Chief of the Imperial Japanese Forces ill the Philippines on .J'lly 2, J 943. EXECUTIVE ORDER NO. 173 CREATING THE BUREAU OF INFORMATION AND

[16]


PUBLIC SECURITY TO PROMOTE THE ESTABLISHMENT OF PEACE AND ORDER IN THE PHILIPPINES. Pursuant to the authority conferred upon me as Head of the Central Administrative Organization hy Order No.1 in connection with Order No.3 of the Commanderin-Chief of the Imperial Japanese Forces in the Philippines, and upon the recommendation of the Executive Commi sion, it is hereby ordered that: 1. For the purpose of extending cooperation firmly and effectively to the peace and pacification activities of the Imperial Japanese Forces in the Philippines, and in order to promote the establishment of peace and order in the Philippines, a Bureau of Information and Public Security is herebY' created under the administrative supervision and control of the Commissioner of the Interior. 2. The Bureau of Information and Public Security shall have one Director and one Assistant Director and such other technical and subordinate personnel as may be provided fOl路 in the corresponding budget and appointed in accordance with civil service laws, rules and regulations. 3. The Bureau of Information and Public Security which shall have jurisdiction over al\ thE' provinces and cities in lhe Philippines, shall have the following functions: (a) To disseminate proper and accurate information and develop a more intelligent and enlightened public opinion on the New Order with a view to bringing about the early restoration of peace lIud order throughout the Philippines; (b) To study and devise ways and means "hirh will be helpful in promoting the activities of the Central Pacification Committee with particular reference to the urgent lleed of reestablishing immediately complete peace and order; (c) To compile and furnish such information to the public as the Commissioner of the Interior may direct from time to time as circumstances may require: and

[17]


(d) To perform such other duties as pertain to research and information on pacification and public security. 4. Upon the request of the Commissioner of the Interior and with the approval of the Chairman of the Executive Commission, for the thoroughness of the propaganda of enlightenment of both officials and civilians, and the necessary measures to maintain peace and order in the Philippines, a conference of the officials concerned may be called for the purpose of coordinating the activities of the Bureau of Information and Public Security with those of the other government offices with a view to avoiding duplication of work. Done in the City of Manila, Philippines, this 3rd day of ,July, 1943. (Sgd.) JORGE B. VARGAS Ohai1'man ot the Executive Commission ApPROVED py the Commander-in-Chief of the Imperial Japanese orces in the Philippines on Jul~' 3, 943.

EXECUTIVE ORDER NO. 174 FIXING A UNIFORM SCHEDULE OF RATES FOR THE USE OR HIRE OF GARAGE (G) CARS AND TRUCKS (TG) AUTHORIZED TO CARRY FREIGHT OR COMMODITIES. Pursuant to the authority' conferred upon me as Head of the Central Administrative Organization by Order No.1 in connection with Order No.3 of the Commanderin-Chief of the Imperial Japanese Forces in the Philippines, and upon the recommendation of the Executive Commission, the following rules and regulations prescribing a uniform schedule of rates for the use or hire of garage (G) cars and trucks (TG) authorized to carry freight or commodities, are hereby adopted for observance by operators, shippers and the general public: Rates

t01' gamge (G) cars

SECTION 1. The rates for the use or hire of garage (G) cars shall be by the hours, as follows: [18]


For the first 30 minutes ........ P1.76 For the fiirst 46 minutes ...... .. 2.60 For the first whole hour and every hour thereafter ............... 3.26 The time over the first hour shall be computed on 16 minute units chargeable in proportion to the rates prescribed in this section. Rates

tOl'

tniCks ( TG )

2. The rates for the use 01' hire of trucks (TG) authorized to carry freight 01' commodities shall be b) the hour, as follows: SEC.

Truck of 1* 'rruck of over Truck of over ton capacity 1'h ton but not more than 3 3 ton capacity or less ton capacity For the tlrst 30 minuteS For the first 45 minutes For the tlrst whole hour and every hour thereafter

P2.25

1'3.00

P3.75

1'3,00

P .00

PO.OO

po.OO

P6.25

,I. 1'3.75

The t ime over the first hour shall be computed on 15 minute units chargeable in proportion to the rates prescribed in this section. SEC. 3. When owing to local circumstances the rates prescribed in the foregoing sections cannot be enforced. the provincial governor 01' city mayor shall be permitted to fix special rates upon due authorization by the Commissioner of Public Works and Communications. Genel'al Pl'ovisions 4. (a) 'l'he radius of distances over which the rates above specified will apply shall be 20 kilometerR from the center of the locality in which the operation is conducted. For instance, in the case of the City of Manila, the center shall be from Plaza Sta. Cruz. The time service shall be counted from the time the car or tl'llck leaves the garage of the operator until the time SEC.

[19]


it is released by the charterer or person hiring it: P rovided, That the delay on the way due to engine trouble or any cause not to be attributable to the fault of the passenger 01' charterer or to any defect in the freight shall not be counted in the payment of such charges. (b) Beyond 20 kilometers, the round trip with passengers or freight shall also be charged at the rates mentioned in Sections 1, 2 and 3 of this Order: Provided, That if the car or truck is released by the charterer at its destination outside the zone of 20 kilometer radius, the return trip will be charged at one-half of the rates above referred to . (c) The maximum distance, from the center of a locality to a point outs\de the zone with a radius of 20 kilometers, over which garage cars and trucks are authorized to operate shall be 50 kilometers one way: Provided, That in the case of trips to a point outside the zone of, operation longer than 50 kilometers one way, authorization must be secured from the respective provincial 01' city engineer of each province or .city, who have been designated representatives of the Director of Public S I路vices in the provinces and cities under Executive Older No. 108, dated November 28, 1942, excepting in the City of Manila and in the province of Rizal where the authorization must be secured from the Director of Public Services. Rules govern ing the granting of special trip permits will be issued by the Director of Public Services. SEC. 5. The rates provided herein for garage cars and trucks shall apply to continuous time of not more than ten hours. For time in excess of ten hours, an additional charge of 25 % of the basic charge shall be made. SEC. 6. The transportation service contemplated in Sections 1, 2 and 3 of this Order shall be understood to include one driver free of charge. If additional men are requested by the charterer, the charge shall be at the following rates: (a) For the first ten hours there shall be ~n additional charge per man not to exceed PO.15 per hour. (b) For the time over the first ten hours there shall be an additional charge per man of PO.20 per hour.

Penal P,路ovision SEC. 7. Any violation of the provisions of this Order

[20]


shall subject the offendel' to suffer imprisonment of not more than six months or to pay a fine of not more than two hundred pesos, or both, in the discretion of the court, and in addition, to the cancellation of the permit to operate the car or truck. Effecti'Vity

SEC. 8. This Order shall take effect on July 15, 1943. Done in the City of Manila, Philippines, this 7th day of July, 1943. (Sgd.) JORGE B. VMtGAS Chair'man of the Executi1'e Cnr'lIIvission ApPROVED by the Director General of the J apa,nese Military Administration on July 7, 1943. EXEOUTiVE ORDER NO. 175 ESTABLlSHlIf NT, OPERAT10N AND MAIN1'ENANCE OF A FIDELITY INSUMNCE FUND. Pursuant to the authority conferred upon me as Head of the Central Administrative Organization by Order No.1 in counection with Order No.3 of the Commanderin-Chief of the !Imperial Japanese Forces in the Philippines, and upon the recommendation of the Executive Commission, the following rules and regulations governing the establishment, maintenance and operation of a Fidelity Insurance Fund are hereby promulgated: SECTION 1. PO'Sons bonClaJble iln i1Le fidelity funds.Every officer, agent, and employee of the Central Administrative Organs and Judicial COUl路tS, provincial, city and municipal governments, or of the companies or corporations the majority of the stock of which is held by the Central Administrative Organization shall, whenever the nature of the duties performed by such officer, agent, or employee permits or ]'equires the custody of funds or property for wh ich he is accountable, be deemed a bondable officer; and except as otherwise provided, every such person sha ll be bonded, or bondable, and his fidelity insured. in accordance with the provisions of this Order. {21]


SEC. 2. Administmtive l路egulations.--The administrative regulations necessary for carrying into effect the provisions of this Order relative to the fidelity fund and insurance of government officers therein shall be prescribed by the National Treasurer with the approval of the Commissioner of F inance. SEC. 3. Pm'sons bondable in di8cTetion of A1tditor Ge1J,eml and Di"ect01' of the Budget.-The fidelity of the following officers shall be insured in the fidelity fund only when the Auditor General and Director of the Budget shall in his discretion so direct: (a) Officers accountable to others who are primarily accountable. (b) Officers who perform their services gratuitously. not being employed in some other governmental capacity with r~umeration. (c) Officers whose accountability is in an amount less than five hundred pesos. SEC. 4. Amm~nt of insumnce--How fia;ed.-The Auditor General nd Director of th,e Budget shall fix the amounts of i~surance to be carried on the bonded officers and employees and shall keep a record of all officers and employees insured in the fidelity fund. SEC. 5 .

Extent of liability and conditions of insurance.

-An officer whose fidelity is insured under the provisions hereof shall, from the moment he assumes the duties of office. be considered bonded to the Philippine Executive Commission for the benefit of whom it may concern, for the faithful performance of all duties now or hereafter imposed by law upon him and for the faithful accounting for all public funds and public property coming into his possession. custody. or control by appropriation, collection, transfer. 01' otherwise. as well as for the lawful payment. disbursement. expenditure. or transfer of all such public funds or property in his possession or custody or under his control as an accountable or responsible officer. SEC. 6. Notification 01 ofliem"8 accession to bondable oftice--National T"easurer's "eeord of bonded 01lieel路s.-The chief of a Bureau or Office to which any bonded position pertains shall, upon the appointment or lawful accession of any person thereto. at once notify

[22]


the National Treasurer. Similar notification shall be given in case of any change or vacancy occurring in such position. In the provinces this duty shall be performed by the provincial treasurers for all bonded positions under both the provincial and municipal governments separately or jointly; in cities incorporated under special charters the duty shall be performed by the mayor thereof. Such notification shall be in such form and contain such information as the National Treasurer shall require. Upon receiving notification, the National Treasurer ' hall place the name of the officer so certified upon a record of bonded officers to be kept by him and shall notify the chief of Bureau or head of Office of such action. SEC, 7. Unsafe -risks-Hoto dealt with by Chairman of the E wecutive Com,~ni8sion.-When a person insured or about to be insured in said f und is not in the judgment of the Auditor General and Director of the Budget, or National Treasurer, a safe and conservative risk, owing to his character, associatio)lS, or habits, the facts shall be repo ted to the Commissioner of Finance, who, if he disappro es the risk, shall recommend to the Ohairman of the Executive Commission or to the proper Head of Department the removal or relief of the officer of such duties as require insurance. SEC. 8. Detel'mination of p"e1niuln J"ates--Collecti01I of pl路elniu-m.-The National Treasurer, with the approval of the Commiss ioner of Finance, shall fix, and may from time to time change, the uniform annual rate of premium chargeable for insurance under this Order. However, for the duration of the present emergency, the annual rate of premium shall not exceed one-fifth of one per centum. Premiums shall be due and payable semi-almually in advance, and shall be collected by the National Treasurer. SEC. 9. Pa1/1nent of pnmtiwm..-The bureau, office province, municipality, or other branch of the Government to which the officer insured pertains shall pay the whole premium on his bond. When an official is acting in a bonded capacity for two or more governmental units the premium on his bond shall be paid by

[23]


the respective units served iu such proportion and in such manner as the Auditor General and Director of the Budget shall determine. SEC. 10. Comtitution and maintenance of fidelity fund.-The fidelity fund shall be constituted and main-

tained as a permanent reimbursable fund at an amount not in excess of one hundred thousand pesos and shall consist of all moneys that heretofore have been or should have been lawfully covered into the fidelity fund and of its own future accretions resulting either from premiums, profits on investments, or payments made to replace shortages, losses or defalcations of any sort. But any excess over the limit of one hundred thousand pesos shall revert to the general funds. SEC. 11. Application and use of fidelity fund--Dete'I"minatiQn and payment of los8.-The fidelity fund shall

be available for the purpose of replacing defalcations, shortages, and unrelieved losses in the accounts of bonded of:(icers, for the payment of fees and costs incident to civil proceedings brought against them to recover sums ~aid on their account from said fund, and for the payment of such Elltpenses of administration and operation of the fidelity fund as may be incurred in carrying out the provisions of this Order. In case the total claims payable from the fidelity fund shall at any time exceed the capital and net earning pertaining thereto, the amount necessary to cover such deficit shall be advanced from the unappropriated surplus of the Central Administrative Organization until such time as the ovel'draft shall have been off et by the future net earnings of the fund, SEC. 12. Adjudication and payment of clai1l!$.-Any

and all claims against the fidelity fund shall be made or forwarded to the Auditor General and Director of the Budget together with the evidence relating thereto, and if he shall recommend payment of the same, or a part thereof, and such recommendation shall receive the approval of the Commissioner of Finance, the same shall be a legal claim against the fidelity fund and shall be paid, but not otherwise. SEC. 13. Payment of 1088 occasioned to private partt' by dereliction of bonded officel路.-When any person

whosoever suffers loss in money or property entrusted

[24]


to an officer insured in the fidelity fund who receives such money or property by. virtue of his official position, the head of the Bureau or Office concerned and the Auditor General and Director of the Budget may, after ascertaining and fixing the amount of the loss, recommend that such loss be paid out of the fidelity fund, and the same shall be so paid upon approval by the Commissioner of Finance, as in other cases. SEC. 14. Liability of office1' prima1ily accountable a 8 affected by insu1'ance of subordinate.-When a person accountable to another who is primarily accountable is insured in the fidelity fund and a loss chargeable to that fund occurs by reason of the dereliction of the former. the bond of the officer primaril)' accountable sball answer for the excess of the Joss over such insurance: Provided, That if the loss is a ttributable to the fault or neglig,ence of the officer primarily accountable, the said office).' shall be liable personally to the Government for the whoJe or any part of the amount paid from the fidelity fund on account of the loss which cannot be recovered from the defaulting subordinate. SEC. 15. Sucb provisions of existing laws, rules and regulations as are in conflict with the provisions of this Executive Order are hereby repealed or modified accordingly. SEC. 16. This Order shall take effect upon approval. Done in the City of Manila, Philippines. this 9th day of July. 1943. (Sgd.) JORGE B. VARGAS Chairman of the E"ecutive Com'lllissi01l

ApPROVED by the Director General of the Japanese Military Administration on .Tuly 9. 1943. EXECUTIVE ORDER NO. 176 AMENDING ITEMS B-I(3)-15, 16, 17. 18, AND 103 OF EXECUTIVE ORDER NO. 153, DATED MAY 13,1943, BY INCREASING THE RATES OF AL路 LOWANCES FOR CLOTHTNG AND SUBSTS-

[25]


TENCE OF NON-COMMISSIONED PERSONNEL AND ENLISTED MEN OF THE BUREAU OF CONST ABULARY. Pursuant to the authority conferred upon me as Head of the Central Administrative Organization by Order No.1 in connection with Order No.3 of the Commanderin-Chief of the Imperial Japanese Forces in the Philippines, and upon the recommendation of the Executive Commission, it is hereby ordered that-SECTION 1. Items B-I(3)-15, 16, 17, 18, and 103 of Executive Order No. 153, dated May 13, 1943, are here路 by amended to read as follows: "15. Initial clothing allowance of eight thousand two hundred non-commissioned personnel at P60 P 492,000.00 '16. Subsistence allowance of eleven thousand four hundred thirty-five enlisted men at PO.75 per day . . . . . . . . . . . . 2,245,584.00 "17. Clothing allowance of four thousand one hundred eighty-nine non-commissioned personnel at P12 per month . . . . . . . . . . . 603,216.00 "18. Clothing allowance of seven thousand two hundred forty-six non-commissioned personnel at P7 per month . . . . . . . . . . . 335,299.00 "103. Less-savings to be made in items for salaries and wages (538,099.00)" authorized for the bepartment . . SEC. 2. This Order shall take effect as of April I, 1943. Done in the City of Manila, Philippines, trus 17th day of July, 1943. (Sgd.) JORGE B. VARGAS Chai1"1llan of the Exectltive Commission

ApPROVED by the Director General of the Japanese Military Administration on July 17, 1943.

(26)


EXECUTIVE ORDER NO. 177 PROVIDING FOR THE APPORTIONMENT OF EXPENSES FOR THE MAINTENANCE OF COURTS OF FIRST INSTANCE. Pursuant to the authority conferred upon me as Head of the Central Administrative Organization by Order roo 1 in connection with Order No.3 of the Commanderin-Chief of the Imperial Japanese Forces in the PhjJjppines, and upon the recommendation of the Executive Commission, it is hereby ordered thatSECTION 1. All expenses incident to the repair, operation and custody of the court house, or court rooms and court offices of a COUl路t of first instance, and the cost of equipment and supplies for such court, includin g the necessary books and stationery, shall be borne by the provi,nce concerned: Provided, That in case a chartered city is located within the geographical houndaries of a province and is under the territorial jurisdiction of the Court. of First Instance of the latter, such expenses shall be apportioned between th e province and city concerned, using as basis the latest census of population of said province and city. Similar expenses of the Court of First Instance of the City of Manila shall be borne by the City of Manila. SEC. 2. This Order shall take effect on July 17, 1943. Done in the City of Manila, Philippines, this 17th day of July, 1943. (Sgd.) JORGE B. VARGAS Chail''IIta?t of the Executive Contmission

ApPROVED by the Director General of the Japanese Military Administration on July 17, 1943. EXECUTIVE ORDER NO. 178 REQUIRING PROFESSIONAL DRIVER'S LICENSEE TO PLACE HIS THUMB MARK ON THE LICENSE ISSUED IN HIS FAVOR, IN THE ABSENCE OF HIS PHOTOGRAPH, AND AMEND-

[27]


ING FOR THIS PURPOSE SECTION 6 OF EXECUTIVE ORDER NO. 145. Pursuant to the authority conferred upon me as Head of the Central Administrative Organ ization by Order No.1 in connection with Order No.3 of the Commanderin-Chief of the Imperial Japanese Forces in tbe Philippines, and upon the recommendation of the Executive Commission, it is her eby ordered thatSECTION 1. Section 6 of Executive Order No. 145 dated April 8, 1943, is hereby amended to read as follows: "Sec. 6. Each applicant for a professiona l driver's license sball present three copies of a recent and recogn izable photograph of said applicant, one-incl! square in size, provided that in the absence of a photograph, t he license to be issued shall be thumb-marked by the licensee. The applicant sha I also present a medical certificate on his normal 'ght and hearin g i'ssued by the medical officer of the Bureau of Public Services, or by any physician in the government service, or by any licensed medical practitioneJ; approved by the Director of Public Services." SEC. 2. This Order shall take effect as of July 1, 1943. Done in the City of Manila, Philippines, this 17th day of July, 1943. (Sgd. ) JORGE B. VARGAS Chailman of the Ereecutive C01nmission ApPROVED by the Director General of the Japanese Military Administration on July 17, 1943. EXECUTIVE ORDER NO. 179 ABOLISHING THE EXAMINATION FEES PAYABLE BY BANKING INSTITUTIONS AND MUTUAL BUILDING AND LOAN ASSOCIATIONS UNDER SECTION SIXTEEN HUNDRED AND THIRTY-SEVEN OF THE REVISED ADMINISTRATIVE CODE, AS AMENDED. Pursuant to the authority conferred upon me as Head

[28]


of the Central Adminis trative Organization by Order No.1 in connection with Order No.3 of the Commanderin-Chief of the Imperial Japanese Forces in the Philippines, and upon the recommendation of the Executive Commjssion, it is herehy ordered thatSECTION 1. The third paragraph of section sixteen hundred and thirtv-seven of the Revised Administrative Code, as amended: which provides for the payment of examination fees by bankin g institutions and mutual building and loan associations, is hereby repealed. SEC. 2. This OI'der shall take effect upon its approval. Done in the City of Manila, Philippines. this 19th day of July, 1943. (Sgd.) JORGE B. VARGAS Cha,i " )}1(Ln of th e E xec'utive C01nmission

ApPROVED by 1!he Director General OD the Japane~ Military Adlni11ist 'ation on July 19, 1943. E ECDTIVE ORDER NO. 180 LIMITING THE APPLICATION OF THE TAX ON DEPOSITS IN BANKS TO DEPOSITS IN CURRENT ACCOUNT. Pursuant to the authority conferred upon me as Head of the Central Administrative Organization by Order No.1 in connection with Ordel' No.3 of the Commanderin-Chief of the Imperial Japanese Forces in the Philippines, and upon the recommendation of the Executive Commission, this order limiting the application of the tax on deposits in banks to deposits in current account is hereby promulgated: SECTION 1. Application of the tax on d~08its in banks li?ni ted to d~08it8 in CU?'1'ent account.-The tax of oneeighteenth of one pel' centum imposed upon the average amount of deposits of money in banks, for each month. by sub-section (b) of section 249. Chapter I. Title VIn . of the National Intel'Oal Revenue Code (Commonwealth Aot No. 466), shall be collected onl~- on deposits in current account subject to payment hy check 01' draft.

[29]


SEC. 2. Ett ectivi ty.~This Order shall apply to deposits in banks existing 01' received on and after J anuary I , 1943. Done in the City of Manila, Philippines, this 19th day of July, 1943. (Sgd. ) JORGE B. VARGAS Chai1-man ot the Executive Commission ApPROVED by the Director General of the Japanese Military Administration on July 19, 1943. EXECUTIVE ORDER NO. 181 PROVIDING FOR SALARY DIFFERENTIALS FOR EMPLOYEES IN THE CENTRAL ADMINISTRATIV~ORGANIZATION AND JUDICIAL COURTS RECEIVING SALARIES OR WAGES OF ONE HUNDRED PESOS OR LESS PER MONTH; APPROPRi,{\TING THE l'jECESSARY FUNDS THEREFOR FOR THE PERIOD FROM JULY FIRST TO DECEMBER THIRTY-FIRST, NINETEEN HUNDRED AND FORTY-THREE; AND AUTHORIZING THE PROVINCES, CITIES, AND MUNICIPALITIES, AND CORPORATIONS OWNED OR CONTROLLED BY THE GOVERNMENT TO PROVIDE FOR SIMILAR SALARY DIFFERENTIALS IN SO FAR AS THE CONDITION OF THEIR FINANCES MAY PERMIT. Pursuant to the authority confel'red upon me as Head of the Central Administrative Organization by Order No.1 in connection with Order No.3 of the Commanderin-Chief of the Imperial Japanese Forces in the Philippines and, upon the recommendation of the Executive Commission, it is hel'eby ordered that-SECTION 1. The payment of salary differentials to employees of the Central Administrative Organization and Judicial Courts receiving salaries of one hundred pesos 01' less per month, including those paid on the daily basis but whose employment is continuous in nature, is hereby authorized as follows:

[30]


(a) Those recelvmg salaries or wages at the rates of thirty pesos or less per month, a differential of fifteen pesos (1'15) each per month; (b) Those receiving more than thirty pesos but not more than eighty pesos pel' month , a differential of ten pesos (rIO) eaclt pel' month; and (c) Those receiving from over eighty to one hundred pesos per month, a differential of five pesos (P5) each pel' mon th ; Provided, That an employee paid from two or more sources shall be paid salary differential corresponding to the total compensation actually received by him, said differential to be chargeable proportionately against the entities that pay his total compensaion; and Provided, Further, That the salary differential to he paid to inmates of hospitals, sanatoria, leprosaria and other similar in titutions employed therein at compensations not exceedinl\' fifteen pesos (1'15 ) per month shall be equal to the salary actually received by each. SEC. 2. The sum of Three Million Two Hundred Thousand Pesos 'P3,200,OOO.OO) , or so much thereof as may be necessary, is hereby allotted from tbe Contingent Fund provide~ in Executive Order No. 153, as amended . SEC. 3. Provinces, chartered cities, and municipalities, and corporations owned 01' controlled by the Government are authorized to provide for similar salary differentials for their respective employees in so far as the condition of their finances may permit . SEC. 4. This Order shall be effect ive during the period from July I , to December 31, 1943. Done in the City of Manila, Philippines, this 21st day of July, 1943. (Sgd. ) JORGE B. VARGAS Chai1'1nan of the E xecutive Coml1tission ApPROVED by the Director General of the .Japanese Military Administration on July 21, 1943.

EXECUTIVE ORDER NO. 182 AMENDING SECTIONS I, 2, 3, 4, 5 AND 10 OF EXECUTIVE ORDER NO. 108, DATED NOVEMBER

[31]


28, 1942, SO A TO CHANGE THE PHRASES "BUREAU OF TRANSPORTATION" AND "DIRECTOR OF TRANSPORTATION" TO "BUREAU OF PUBLIC SERVICES" AND "DIRECTOR OF PUBLIC SERVICES," RESPECTIVELY; TO ELIMINATE THE PROVISION REGARDING MOTOR TRUCKS UNDER THE "S" AND "TH" DENOMINATION; TO ALLOW THE OWNERS OF MOTOR VEHICLES WHO SUBSTITUTB THEIR MOTOR VEHICLES WITH OTHERS OR WHO REGISTER THE SAME FOR THE FIRST TIME AFTER THE REGISTRATION PERIOD PROVIDED FOR, PAY ONLY THE PROPORTIONATE FEE CORR,ESPONDING TO THE UNEXPIRED PERIOD OF THE QUARTER OR SEMESTER IN WHICH THEY REGISTER ; AND TO PROPERLY DESCRIBE THE STICKER SYMBOL. Pursuant,. to the authority conferred upon me as Head of the Cent ral Administrative Organization by Order No. 1 in connection with Order No. 3 of the Commanderin-Chief of the Imperial Japanese Forces in the Philippines, and upon the recommendation of the Executive Commission, it is hereby ordered thatSECTION 1. Sections 1, 2, 3, 4, 5 and 10 of Executive Order No. 108, dated November 28, 1942, are hereby amended to read as follows: "Section 1. All owners of motor vehicles in the Philippines who are granted permits to operate motor vehicles by the Military Administration as provided in Administrative Ordinance No. 9 as amended by Administrative Ordinance No. 14, are l路equired to register the same with the respective District or City Engi neer of each pI路ovince or chartered city who are hereby designated representatives of the Director of Public Services in the provinces and cities and to pay the fees fixed in thi s Order to the Provincial or City Treasurer, as the case may be, except in the City of Manila and in the province of Rizal where registration and payment shall be made with the Bureau of Public Services."

[32]


"Sec. 2. Except as otherwise specifically provided herein, the following annual registration fees of motor vehicles shall be collected: (A) Private alito11!obiles (1) Five-passenger capacity or less,

Fees

per annum, payable by semester . P120.00 ( I-a) For five-passenger cars of phy-

sicians, per annum, payable by semester . . . . . . 60.00 (2) Six to eight-passenger capacity, per annum, payable by semester. 240.00 (3) When the passenger capacity exceeds eight, the veh icle will be classified as bus or truck and char ged accol路dingly. (B) Autocalesas and gamge ca?路s 1) One to five-passenger capacity, per annum, payable by seme~ter 120.00 (2) Six to eigbt-passen ger capacity, per annum, payable by semester 240.00 (3) When tbe passenger capacity exce d eight, the vehicles will be classified as bus or truck and charged accordingly. ( e) Moto?路 tJrucks (1) Private trucks (T) . . . . . . 0.04 per kilogram, per annum,路 based upon the gross weight of the truck, payable by semester. (I-a) Trailers of any classification 0.04 operated for private use (T) . . per kilogram, per annum, based upon the gross weigbt of the trailer, payable by semester. (2) Trucks for hire (TG ) . . . . . Twice that of "T," payable quarterly. (2-a.) Trailers of any classification 0.08 operated for hire (TG) . . . . per kilogram, per annum, based upon the gross weight of the trailer, payable by semester. (8) Passenger buses for hire (TPU) Twice that of "T" payable quarterly.

[33)


(4) Undertaker or funeral cal' (U) that of "T" payable quarterly.

Twice

(D) M ot01'cycles and 1ltOtOI' 8cootel'8

(1) Three passengers or less, per annum . . . . . . . . . . . 36.00 (2) Motor cycles or motor scooters for more than three passengers will be considered as automobiles and charged accordingly. (E) When cel路tificate of public ' convenience is I'equired

In the case of TPU, autocalesas, garage cars, and TG, a certificate of public convenience must first be secured from the Bureau of Public Services before any motor vehicle can be re istered under any of such classifications." "Sec. 3. 'rhe following fees shall be charged for identification plates: (A) For each number plate for identification of any vehicle . . . . . . . P 1.00 (B) For each number plate for identification purposes in connection with temporary permits issued in Manila by the Military Administration or the Bureau of Public Services . . . . . . . 1.00 (C) For one "Agent" plate for use of automobile dealers duly registered . . . 10.00 "Sec. 4. Payment of registration fees must be made: On or before December 31st for the first quarter or first semester of the ensuing year. On or before March 31st for the second quarter. On or before June 30th for the third quarter or second semester. On 01' before September 30th for the fourth quarter.

[34]


P)'ovided, however, That if any application for first registration or substitution of any motor vehicle is made after the date of any quarter or semestral registration herein fixed, the fee for said registration shall be an amount equivalent to the registration fee for the unexpired period of said quarter or semester, as the case may be: Pl路ovided. IU1路the)路, That fraction of a month shall be considered as equivalent to one month. "Sec. 5. The following fees shall be charged for operation of motor vehicles under temporary permits issued by the Bureau of Public Services: (A) For temporary use of automobiles per day, plus cost of plates. (B) For temporary use of trucks . . . per day, plu,s cost of plates."

P1.00 2.00

"Sec. 10. The following terms shall bear the meaning indicated herein: (A) I:ermit---A permit is the authority issued by the M.,ilitary Administration indicating the conditions for operation of any motor vehicle, and consists of a sticker symbol and a certificate of operation. (B) Sticlce)'-A stickel' symbol bears the stamp of the Military Administration with a blue circle in the middle bearing Japanese characters which specify the authority and nature of the operation and use. If issued in Manila. it bears the signature of the Director of Public Services. (C) Ce?路tijicate of operatiOl1r-A certificate of operation indicates the permit number. cal' number. type of vehicle. the corresponding motor nUDlbel'. the name of the owner or administrator. hi s address and nationality. the use authorized. the period of the permit and the date of issuance thereof. It has the stamp of the Military Administration and bears the signature of the Director of Public Services. if issued in Manila." SEC. 2. ElfectivitV.-This Order shaH take effect upon its approval. [35]


Done in the

Cit~路

of )Ian il a. Philippines, this 21st day

of July. 1943.

(Sgd .) JORGE B. VARGAS Cltail'man of the Executive Com1nission ApPROVED by the Director General of the Japanese Military Admini stration on Ju ly 21, 1943.

EXECUTIVE ORDER NO. 201 PROVIDING FOR THE ELECTION OF DELEGATES TO THE NATIONAL ASSEMBLY OF THE REPUBLIC OF THE PHILIPPINES, APPROPRIATING FUNDS THEREFOR, AND FOR OTHER PURPOSES. Pursuant. to the authority conferred upon rue as Head of the Cen4'al Administrative Organization by Order No. 1 in connection with Order No.3 of the Commanderin-Chief of the Imperial Japanese Forces in the Philippines and in accordance with the provisions of the Constitution of the Republic of the Philippines, it is hereby ordered, upon the recommendation of the Executive Commission, that-SECTION 1. The election of delegates to the First National Assembly of the Republic of the Philippines shall be held on September 20, 1943, in the provincial and city government office buildings. SEC. 2. All officers and members of duly organized provincial, municipal, municipal district, city, and city district, committees of the "KAPISANAN SA PAGLILINGKOD SA BAGONG PILIPINAS" shall have the right to vote in the said election. The officers and members of provincial, municipal, and municipal district committees shall vote for the delegates from the provinces; and those of city and city district committees, for delegates from the cities. SEC. 3. Candidates for the office of delegate to the National Assembly must be registered with the secretary of the provincial or city committee, as the case may be,

[36]


by means of a cel路tificate of candidacy, duly sworn to, stating the name, residence and post-office address of the candidate and that he is el igible for election. The certificate of candidacy may be presented by the candidate himself or by a group of not less than five quali fied electors, and must be fi led not later than the day prior to the day of election. SEC. 4. All duly qua lified provincial or city electors shall convene promptly at 9 o'clock a.m., on the day of the election, at their respective provincial 01' city government office buildings, upon call by the chairman, 01'. in his absence, by the vice-cbairman of the provincial or city comm ittee. Said chairman or vice-chairman shall be the president of the election, while the secretary of the provincial or city committee shall act as the secretary thereof. SEC. 5. Immediately after the opening of the meetin g, the regist l' of electors shall be prepared by the secretary from the lists furnished by the chai rmen of all the committees. Each chairman shall furnish the list of the membe 's of the committee of the province, city, city district, ~unicipality 01' municipal district presided over by him in triplicate, duly signed by him and certified to as correct by the secretary. After the names of all electors are entered in the register, the names appearing therein shall be announced by the sect'etary, to give opportunity for the inclusion of the name of any elector qualified to vote in the election, or the exclusion therefrom of the name of such elector as is not qualified to vote. Any elector shall have the ri ght to propose the inclusion or exclusion of any name. stating briefly the grounds thereof. The president, after hearing the chairman of the committee concerned. shall have the power to decide any matter for lhe inclusion or exclusion of the name of any elector. He shall also have the power to decide all other matters not herein otherwise provided for. The secretary. hall keep a record of the minutes of all the proceedings, i_ncluding those for the inclusion or exclusion of names of electors. and shall, in addition, act generally as the poll clerk of the election. The president shall, however. have the powel' to appoint such as~istantB a. he mny deem neceSRa l路~'.

[37)


SEC. 6. The head of the provincial 01' city committee shall provide, at public expense, a suitable ballot box, such voting booths as may be necessary at the rate of one for every fifty qualified electors, and the necessary number of ballots for the election. Ballots shall be uniform and shall bear at the back the signature of the president and the secretary. SEC. 7. Every registered candidate shall be entitled to a watcher designated in writing by him or by those who signed his certificate of candidacy. Three copies of the appointment shall be filed with and received by the secretary of the provincial 01' city committee, as the case may be, on the day pr ior to the election. The watcher shall have the right to witness and inform himself of the proceedings, to take notes of what he may see or hear, register a protest against any irregularity which he believes may have been committed, and read the ballots after they shall have been read by the presid'ng officer, without touching them; but he shall not talk with anyone in such a manner as to interrupt the \pl1oceedings, except in the exercise of the right granted \lim herein. SEC. 8. Upon the completion of the register of electors, the president of the election shall declare the meeting ready for the election. Thereupon the voting shall proceed as follows: As his name is called, every elector shall approach the poll clerk, receive a blank ballot, retire to one of the unoccupied booths and, in not more than three minutes, write the name of only one candidate, fold his ballot twice toward the bottom, and deposit the same in the ballot box. This procedure shall be followed uninterruptedly until all qualified electors present shall have cast their votes. No elector shall be allowed to vote more than onee. SEC. 9. If an elector shall spoil or deface his ballot in such a way that it can no longer be used, he shall surrender it to the poll clerk who shall publicly cancel it and gi ve the elector another one. SEC. 10. It shall be unlawful to solicit votes or campaign for 01' against any candidate on the day of the election. SEC. 11. Only election officers. watchers, the deputy

[38]


of the Director-General of the "KAPISANAN SA PAGLILINGKOD SA BAGONG PILIPINAS" and persons entitled to vote, shall be allowed within the polling place. The president of the election shall have full authority to keep order within the polling place and its environs and to enforce obedience to his lawful orders and to the provisions of this Executive Order. Any person who shall refuse to obey the lawful commands of the president, or shall observe a disorderly conduct and thus interrupt or disturb the proceedings, may he arrested and taken into custody until the adjournment of the meeting, upon order of the president; but such order shall not he so executed as to prevent the person so taken into custody from exercising his right to vote. Such order shall be executed by any peace officer to whom it may be directed, but if none shall be present, by any other person deputed by the pl'esiding officer. SEC. 12. As soon as the voting is finished, and in the immediate presence of the watchers, the poll clerk shall count the ballots found in the ballot box, without unfolding them or exposing their contents, except so far as to ascertain that each ballot is single, and shall compare the number of ballots in the box with the number of electors who voted. If there are excess ballots, they shall be replaced in the box, shall be thoroughly mingled therein and the poll clerk, without seeing the ballots and with his back to the box, shall publicly draw out as many ballots as may be equal to such excess and, without unfolding them, place them in a package which shall be marked "EXCESS BALLOTS," shall be sealed and signed by the president, the poll clerk and the watchers, and replaced in the hox with the other ballots and their contents shall not be read in the counting of votes. If in the course of this examination, any ballots shall be found folded together in such manner that they must have been so folded before they were deposited in the box, they shall be placed in the package for excess ballots hereinbefore mentioned. The ballots shall then be read publicly by the president one by one while the poll clerk records the number of votes received by each candidate on a blackboard provided for the purpose, each time by means of a vertical line. except every fifth vote of the same candidate which

[39]


shall be noted with a djagonal line. The ballots shall then be replaced in the box. The electors shall not adjourn or postpone or delay the count until it shall be fully completed. SEC. 13. A ballot should be counted whenever it expresse the intention of the elector with reasonable certainty. SEC. 14. Immediately after the count, the president shall orally and publicly announce the total number of vote received by each one of the candidates and shall declare the candidate receiving the highest number of votes elected delegate to the National Assembly. In case two or more candidates receive the same number of votes, said candjdates shall draw lots in the presence of the president, the poll clerk, the watchers, and such electors as may then be present, and the president shall thereafter publicly announce the l'esult of the draw, A written statement containing the name of the delegateelect and the number of votes received by him shall be signed in triplicate by the president and attested to by the poll clel' The name of the delegate-elect shall also be transmitte by telegram to the President and to the Director-Gene al of the Association. SEC, 15. Before leaving the polling place, the poll clerk shall prepare and sign in triplicate the minutes of the meeting, stating when the meeting was called to order and by whom, when the lists of electors were read, the petitions for inclusion or exclusion fi led and the corresponding resolutions of the chair, the names of the candidates and their respeetive watchers, the number and nature of protests filed by particular watchers, when the voting commenced and when it ended, the number of ballots available for use in the election, the number of ballots distributed, the number of unused, spoiled and excess ballots, if any, and the number of electors who cast their votes. SEC. 16. Before adjournment, the original copy of tbe lists of voters, of the president's statement and of the minutes of the meeting, shall be deposited in the ballot box, which shall be delivered for safe-keeping to the Senior Inspeetor of the Constabulary, who shall sign a receipt therefor and keep the box and its contents in his possession. in a secure place and under his respon-

[40]


sibilHy, for a period of three months, unless they are the subject of an election contest or of an official investigation by competent authority. One copy each of the lists of voters, of the statement and of the minutes shall be sent by messenger 01' by registered mail to the Pres ident and to the Director-General of the "KAPISA路 NAN SA PAGLILINGKOD SA BAGONG PILIPINAS." SEC. 17. The Bureau of Communications shall receive and transmit, without delay and free of charge, all reports and documents relating to the election provided for herein. SEC. 18. The delegates to the National Assembly elected in accordance with thi El!;ecutive Order shall be proclaimed as elected by the Chairman of the Executive Commission, in his capacity as President of the "KAPISANAN SA PAGLILINGKOD SA BAGONG PILIPI路 NAS." SEC. 19. The Director-General of the "KAPISANAN SA PAGLILINGKOD SA BAGONG PILIPINAS" shall have immedi te supervision over provincial, municipal and city offic als of the Association in the performance of their duties relative to the election provided for herein and may suspend and, with the previous approval of .the President of the Association, may remove recalcitrant officers and appoint temporary substitutes, request the aid of the Solicitor-General, fiscals and other prosecuting officers, and of peace officers, and designate one deputy for each province and city to secure an orderly, free and honest election. Each deputy shall be entitled to a per diem of ten pesos, plus actual expenses in going to and returning from his station. SEC. 20. A t least twenty printed copies of this Executive Order in English 01' Tagalog shall be furnished every provincial, municipal, municipal district, city and city district committee, of the "KAPISANAN SA PAGLILINGKOD SA BAGONG PILIPINAS," at least two days prior to the election. SEC. 21. Anyone found guilty of the malicious violation of any provision of this Executive Order shall be punished with imprisonment for not less than one year nor more than six years and shall be further sentenced to suffer disqualification to hold a public office ancl deprivation of the rllrht of suffrage foJ' not less than one

[41]


year nor more than ten years, and to pay the costs. If the one responsible be an entity, its president or chief, the officials and employees of the same performing duties connected with the offense committed, and its members who may be principals, accomplices, or accessories, shall be responsible; and the responsible entity shall, in addition, be sentenced, after a criminal action has been instituted against it and its legal representative duly summoned by means of notice or by publication, to a fine of not less than one nor more than twenty thousand pesos. SEC. 22. The sum of five hundred thousand pesos, or so much thereof as may be necessary, is appropriated out of any funds in the Nat ional Treasury not otherwise appropriated for the expenses of the election herein provided. SEC. 23. This Order shall take effect upon its approval by; the Commander-in-Chief of the Imperial Japanese Forces in the Philippines. Done in the City of Manila, Philippines, this 9th day of September 1943. (Sgd.) JORGE lB. VARGAS Chai 1"'1nan of the E x ecutive Commission ApPROVED by the Commander-in-Chief of the Imperial Japanese Forces in the Philippines on September 9, 1943. EXECUTIVE ORDER NO. 210 ON THE CONTROL OF THE DISTRIBUTION OF PRIME COMMODITIES. Pursuant to the authority conferred upon me as Head of the Central Administrative Organization by Order No.1 in connection with Order No.3 of the Commanderin-Chief of the Imperial Japanese Forces in the Philippines, and upon the recommendation of the Executive Commission, it is hereby ordered thatCHAPTER I-REGULATIONS, OFFENSES AND PENALTIES SECTION 1. The purpose of this Order shall be to ad-

[42]


just the distribution of prime commodities in order to stabilize the livelihood of the people. SEC. 2. For the purpose stated in Section 1, the Commissioner of Agriculture and Commerce is hereby authorized: (a) To designate the commodities (hereinafter refelTed to as "prime commodities") to which the provisions of this Order shall apply; (b) To order the formation or organization of, or to designate, the organizations, whether natural or juridical person (hereinafter referred to as "control organization") which shall be in charge of controlling the distribution of prime commodities and to authorize such control ol'ganizations to pur,chase and distribute prime commodities and to take such other measures as may be necessary; (c) TQ issue such orders to these control organizations as may be necessary for controlling the distribution of prime commodities ; and (d) To designate the prime commodities for the distribution of which ration t ickets shall be required, the regions whera the ration-ticket system shall be enforced and the person who shall issue and distribute such ration tickets. SEC. 3. The measures taken by the Commissioner of Agriculture and Commerce pursuant to the provisions of paragr aphs (a), (b), and (d) of the next preceding section shall be published and advertised in a suitable manner so as to give notice thereof to as many persons as may be practicable. SEC. 4. The Commissioner of Agriculture and Commerce may, whenever necessary for the enforcement of control measures regarding the distribution of prime commodities, require any public official or private person, whether natural or juridical, to submit pertinent data and information, and may cause to be made at all reasonable hours searches and examinations of factories, shops, warehouses 01' establishments of persons habitually engaged in the production, manufacture and importation or sale of prime commodities, inquiries as to their methods of, or the conditions surrounding, the production, manufacture, importation and distribution of such commodities, and their quan tity of stock there-

[43]


of; and inspection of their accounting books and other papers and articles used in the business or trade. Such orders shall be executed by the public official 01' the official of any control organization duly accredited who shall exhibit certificates of identification and authority before making the inspection, search, examination or inquiry. SEC. 5. After the control organizations are formed and organized 01' designated, no one except the control organizations 01' the persons designated by said organizations shall habitually engage in the purchase, sale 01' transfer of prime commodities 01' act as agent, broker or intermediary in the purchase, sale or transfer such commodities 01' keep 01' conceal such commodities for the purpose of their sale 01' transfer unless authorized by the Commissioner of Agriculture and Commerce. SEC. 6. No producer, manufacturer or importer of prime commodities shall sell 01' transfer such commodities except- to the cont~'ol organizations concerned: p)'ovided, however, That those who have been given a permission by ~he said control organization shall be exempted therefrom. No producer, manufacturer 01' importer of prime commodities shall )!:eep 01' conceal such commodities for the purpose of selling or transfel'l'ing them to persons other than the control organizations concerned nor refuse to sell such commodities to such control organizations. No person who is habitually engaged in the sale of prime commodities shall directly buy 01' acquire such commodities from persons other than the control organizations concerned: Provided, howe vel', That those who have been given a permission by the said control organizations shall be exempted therefrom. No other person shall directly buy 01' acquire in any means prime commodities from the producer, manufacturer 01' im'porter of such commodities: Provided, howevel', That those who have been given a permission by the said control organizations shall be exempted therefrom, The prohibition contained in the first and third paragraphs of this section shall apply to contracts already perfected on the date the prime commodities involved have been designated as such by the Commissioner of Agriculture and Commerce, if such contracts have not

[44]


as yet been consummated by the delivery of the commodities involved. SEC. 7. No one shall bring in 01' take out of any province or chartered city prime commodities except in any of the follo\ving cases: (a) When such commodities, in moderate quantity. are for the personal use of the carrier and his immediate family; (b) When such commodities are provided with an invoice or a certificate issued therefor by any of the control organizations; 01' (e) In localities where there is no such control organization, when such commodities are provided with an invoice or a certificate issued therefor by the Provincial Govel'l1or, the Mayor of the chartered city concel'l1ed 01' any organization designated by the Commissioner of Agricu)ture and Commerce. SEC. 8. The following acts are also prohibited: (a) Selling or transferring prime commodities hy any person Who is habitually engaged in the sale of such commodities or buyin g or acquiring them from such person unless in exchange of the corresponding points in a ration ticket in the regions where the ration ticket system is enforced. (b) Selling or transferring ration tickets issued to any person, or buying from or accepting them from slIch person, unless to 01' from members of his immediate family. The provisions of th is Section shall not apply to the acts of control organizatiuns or to cases excepted by the Commissioner of Agriculture and Commerce before the act is committed. SEC. 9. Any person who violates the provisions of Sections 5, 6 and 7 of this Order shall, upon conviction, be punished by imprisonment not exceeding five years or by a fine not exceeding fifty thousand pesos, 01' both, in the discretion of the court, with subsidiary imprisonment in case of insolvency: Pl'ovided, however, That any person who violates the provision of the third paragraph of Section 6 without any intention of obtaining profit thereby shall be punished by imprisonment not exceeding six months 01' by a fine not exceeding one

[45]


thousand pesos, or both, in the discretion of the court, with subsidiary imprisonment in case of insolvency. Any commodity involved in the offense shall be subject to confiscation. In case confiscation cannot be made according to the provisions of the Revised Penal Code, because of the intervening rights of persons acting in good faith, the offender may be required to forfeit to the Government a sum equivalent to the value of the commodities involved. SEC. 10. Any person who violates the provisions of Section 8 of this Order shall upon conviction be punished by impl;sonment not exceeding six months or by a fine not exceeding one thousand pesos, or both, in the discretion of the court, with subsidiary imprisonment in case of insolvency. The same penalty shall be imposed upon any person who reFuses to obey the orders of the Commissioner of Agriculture and Commerce under Section 4 of this Order 01' who resists or disturbs the inspections, examinations, searches, and inqui 'ies conducted in aceordance with said se tion; and without rejudice in t he latter case, to any criminal responsibility for assault, resistance or disob ed ience to authorities or their agents under the Revised Penal Code. SEC. 11. Violations of this Order by the managers, r epresentati ves, directors, agents or employees of any natural or juridical person in the interest of the latter shall render sa id natural 01' juridical person amenable to the pecuniary penalties corresponding to the offense, without prejudice to the imposition of the proper pena lty, either pe];sonal or pecuniary or both upon the manageI', representative, director, agent or employee. SEC. 12. Several successive acts in violation of the provisions of this Order if committed in such close proximity to each other as to warrant the conclusion that they are impelled by a single criminal intent, shall be regarded as constituting only a single offense. SEC. 13. This Order shall not apply to transactions conducted by the Imperial Japanese Army and Navy. CHAPTER II-PROCEDURE SEC. 14. Offenses defined in the proviso paragraph 1 of Section 9, and those defined in Section 10 of this

[46)


Order shall be triable in the municipal or justice of the peace courts of the locality. Offenses defined under paragraph 1 of Section 9, except the proviso, shall be triable in the Court of First Instance of the province or city. SEC. 15. The provisions of Sections 14, 15, 16, 17, 18. 19, 20, 21, 22, 23, 24 and 25 of Chapter II-"Procedure" of Executive Order No. 157 " On Price Control of Commodities," insofar as they may be applicable, sha ll apply to proceedings for offenses committed under this Order. In case commodities confiscated under this Order are prime commodities, they shall be sold to the control organizations at reasonable prices. FIN AL PROVISIONS SEC. 16. This Order shall take effect on the date of its proI\lulgation: P"ovided, howeve,', That the Commissioner of Agriculture and Commerce shall fix separately the date wpen the provisions of Sections 5 and 6 of this Order shall be enforced and the regions where said provisions shall be enforced. The ration- icket ystem enfor ed in the City of Manila before the promulgation of this Order shall be considered to have heen adopted under this Order. Done in the City of Manila, Philippines, this 20th day of September, 1943. (Sgd.) JORGE B. VARGAS Chai,..,nan of the Executive Com,nissio1t ApPROVED by the Director General of the Japanese Military Administration on September 20, 1943. EXECUTIVE ORDER NO. '226 REGULATING THE POSSESSION OF "FIREARMS" AND "AMMUNITION"; KEEPING, SALE, ISSUANCE AND DISPOSITION THEREOF AND PROVIDING LICENSE FEES THEREFOR. Pursuant to the authority conferred upon me as Head of the Central Administrative Organization by Order

[47]


No.1 in connection with Order No.3 of the Commanderin-Chief of the Imperial Japanese Forces in the Philippines, and upon the recommendation of the Executive Commission, the following regulations are hereby prescribed governing the keeping, sale, issuance and disposition of firearms and ammunition and providing license fees therefor: ARTICLE I-GENERAL PROVISIONS SECTION 1. "Fi1'ea1'?n" dejined.-"Firearm," 01' "Arm" as herein used, includes rifles, muskets, carbines, shotguns, revolvers, pistols, all deadly weapons from which a bullet, ball, shot, shell, or other missiles may be discharged by means of gun powder or other explosive, and all explosives (including all lethal instruments such as hand grenades, bombs, etc., and industrial explosives). The term also includes ail' rifles, except such as being of smal~ caliber and limited range are used as toys. The barrel of any firearm shall be considered a complete fireal'm for all the purposes hereof. SEC. 2. "Ammunition" dejined.-"Ammunition" shall include pistol revolver, and rifle cartridges and shotgun shells of any escription, caliber and gauge. SEC. 3. F01'?'~S and 1'egulations to be p1'escribed by the Com'missionm' of the Interio,路.-The Commissioner of the Interior shall prescribe such forms and promulgate such regulations as he shall deem necessary for the proper enforcement of this Order. ARTICLE II-POSSESSION AND VERIFICATION OF FIREARMS AND AMMUNITION SEC. 4. Unlawful manufacture or possession of /irem'ms, pa1'ts of ji1'ea1'?ns, 01' ammunition.-Save as allowable under this Order, it shall be unlawful for any person to manufacture or possess any firearm, detached parts of firearm or ammunition therefor. SEC. 5. Exception as to ji1'ea1'1nS and ammunition used by peace office1路s.-This Order shall not apply to firearms and ammunition regularly and lawfully issued to officers and members of the Constabulary, agents or trainees of the Constabulary, guards of the Bureau of Prisons, city or municipal police, and provincial jail guards, when such firearms are in the possession of

[48]


such offic ials and public agents for use in the performance of their officia l duties. SEC. 6. Special pennit /01' possession 0/ u,,'ms by civil employ ees.-With the approval of the Chairman of the Executive Commiss ion, the Director of Constabulary may, under such terms and conditions as he maY prescribe and the Chairman may approve, issue a special permit to any public official 01' employee to possess firearms and ammunition necessary for personal protection in the performance of hi s duties as certified by the nead of the department concerned. SEC. 7. License 1'eql{i1'ed /01' individual /ceeping of u,,'m8 /01' pe1'sona! use; sec:U1'ity to be given.-Any person desiring to possess one 01' more firearms for personal protection or for other lawful purposes, and ammunition thereof, shall make application for a license to possess such firearm or firearms or ammunition stating the reasons why h e needs such firearm 01' firearms as hereinafter provided. Upon making such application, and before receiving the license, the applicant shall, for the purpose 0 security, make a cash deposit in the Postal Savings Bank l' in the Philippine National Bank in the sum of fifty pesos for each firearm for which the license is to be issued, and shall indorse the certificate of deposit therefor to the National Treasurer. SEC. 8. Mode 0/ making wpplicu,tion and acting upon the sa,m e.-A n application for a personal license to possess firearms and ammunition, as herein provided for, made by a resident of the City of Manila, shall be directed to the Mayor of said City, whose duty it shall be to forward the application to the Director of Constabulary with his recommendation and that of the Metropolitan Constabulary Commander. Applications made by residents of a province 01' city shall be directed to the Governor 01' Mayor of the same, who shan forward them with his recommendation and that of the Senior Inspector to the Director of Constabulary. Subject to sucb general restrictions as the Chairman of the Executive Commission may prescribe from time to time, the Director of Constabulary may approve 01' disapprove such applications. The Director of Constabulary upon receiving and approving the certificate of deposit duly indorsed to the

[49]


order of the National Treasurer, shall issue the license and transmit the license to the applicant, thru the Provincial 01' City Treasurer concerned who shall delivel' the license to the licensee upon payment of the necessary fee. The Director of Constabulary shall file the certificate of deposit in his office. It shall be the duty of all officials and employees through whom applications for licenses to possess firearms are transmitted to expedite the same. The Director of Constabulary shall render reports to the Chairman of the Executive Commission of the licenses issued by him. SEC. 9. Rest1ictions on issuance of license.-No license shaH be issued to: (a) persons less than 21 years of age; (b) persons having criminal records or bad conduct and antecedents; (0) and all other persons considered unsuitable as holders of licenses. SEC. 10. D~t1'ation of personal Ucense.-A personal firearms license shall continue in force until the death or legal disability of the licensee, unless prior thereto, the license all be surrendere by him or revoked as provided her in. SEC. 11. Change of domicile by licensee.-When a person holdin g a valid license for the possession of any firearm or firearms and the ammunition therefor shall change his domicile from one city or province to another, he shall, within ten days thereafter, notify the Director of Constabulary, of such change by registered mail, or he shall notify the senior inspector of the province or city in which he takes up his new domicile, or the Metropolitan Constabulary Commander, as the case may be, and the said senior inspector or the Metropolitan Constabulary Commander, as the case may be, shall transmit such information to the Director of Constabulary. . SEB. 12. Govemment custodian for arms and antmunition.-The Bureau of Constabulary is the Government custodian for firearms and ammunitioI!. All firearms and ammunition found, taken up, seized, or confiscated except those belonging to the Imperial Japanese Army or Navy and those held under authority granted by the Director of Constabulary shaH be transferred and delivered to the designated custodian.

[50]


SEC. 13. Sun'ellder of a1'ms upon tennination of lithe revocation of any license or the termination thereof for any cause aH arms and ammunition in the possession of the licensee and covered by such license shall be placed in the custody of the Bureau of Constabulary. SEC. 14. SU1"/,e/lde1' of firea1'7ns upon death 01' disability of the licensee.-Upon the death or legal disability of the holder of a firearm license, it shall be the duty of the nearest relative, legal representative, or other person who shall knowingly come into possession of such firearms or ammunition, forthwith to deliver the same to the senior inspector in the province or to the Director of Constabulary in Manila, and such firearms and ammunition shall be retained by the officer pending :he issuance of a license. therefor in accordance with law. SEC. 15. Abandoned a1'ms and arnm.u nition.-Any firearm or ammunition deposited in the custody of the Bureau of Constabulary pursuant to any provision of this Order shall be deemed to have been abandoned to the Government by th owner unless he or his authorized representative shaH reclaim the same within t\VO years from the time they were deposited with the Bureau of Constabulary; and it shall in no case be incumbent upon the Bureau of Constabulary to retain custody longer than two yeal's, except under such regulations as shall be prescribed with reference thereto. Abandoned arms and ammunition shall be disposed of in such manner as shall be prescribed by the Commissioner of the Interior. SEC. 16. Anmlal Inspection of fi1'ea1'1ltS held unde1' license.-The Director of Constabulary, shall issue instructions to the senior inspectors of the different provinces and cities to verify once each year, all arms in the possession of persons holding licenses and to make due report of such verification to the Director of Constabulary of any violation of the terms of the license or of the law!!, rules, or regulations relating to the possession of firearms or ammunition, and they shall indorse on each license that they have made such verification, with the date thereof. The Metropolitan Constabulary Commander of the City of Manila shall make a similar verification and report to the Director of CeliS e.-Upon

[51]


Constabulary, notin g on each li cense the da le of the verification made by him. SEC. '17. Duties of holder of ji?路eanl1 s.-lt shall be the duty of any person holding a license to possess firearms 01' ammunition to help in the maintenance of peace and order. It sha ll also be hi s duty to exhibit such license whenever called upon to do so by a Provincial Governor, or by a provincial officer acting under written order of the Provincial Governor, by the City Mayor, by a peace officer acting under a written order of the City Mayor, by an officer of the Bureau of Constabulary, or by a member of the Constabulary acting under orders or pursuant to regulation. ARTICLE III-REVOCATION OF LICENSES AND SURRENDER OF SECURITY SEC. 18. Revocation of fi?'eanns licellse.-Any firearm license or licenses may be revoked at any time by the Director of Con&tabulary or by order of the Chairman of the Executive Commission. SEC. 19. SUT1'ender of certi ficate of cleposit.-When a firearm license expires or is revoked or sUl'l'endered, and all the arms or ammunition held thereunder are accounted for a\ld disposed of according to law, the licensee's certificate of deposit shall be surrendered by the Director of Constabulary upon satisfactory proof of compliance with the laws and regulations relative to the use of firearms. ARTICLE IV-LOSS OF FIREARMS AND FOREFEITURE OF SECURITY SEC. 20. Forfeitu?'e of oel路tificate of deposit.-Where a certificate of deposit has been used as security and the licensee fails to comply with any provision of this Order or of the regulations pursuant thereto, or with the terms of his license, or fails to have forthcoming upon proper demand the firearm covered by his license, whether lost through accident 01' otherwise, the Director of Constabulary shall, upon satisfactory proof of such fact, forward the certificate of deposit to the National Treasurer for collection. The amount thereof when collected shall be deposited to the credit of general funds. SEC. 21. Refund, wpon l'ecovel'Y of lost fireann.-When a lost fir~arm is recovered by the owner or by an agent

[52]


of the law th rou gh indication of the owner, reimbursement shall be made for a ny sum colIected by forfeitu路re of his deposi t. SEC. 22. Remissio n of liability of l oss of fireanns.The Chairman of the Executive Commission, in his discretion, may relieve from liability of his bank deposit any person losing a firearm for which he had a proper license, upon the presentation of satisfactory proof showin g that said firearm was destroyed or lost beyond reasonable chance of recovery by any person, and throu gh no fault or negligence on the part of the person holding the license. ARTICLE V-LICENSE FEES SEC. 23. F ees .-Any person who owns or possesses a license for firearm as herein provided, shall pay the following initial and annual fees: For each firearm held on license: Il,1itial fee . . . P20.00 Annual fee . . 5.00 SEC. 24. Collection and d'ispositlion of jees.-The fees herein provided shall be collected by the Director of Customs and Internal Revenue under such rules and regulations as said Director and the Director of Constabulary may pl'escribe, with the approval of the respective Department Commissioners. The proceeds of the collection of such fees shall accrue to the Central Adrrunistrative Organization. ARTICLE VI-SUPPLEMENTARY PROVISIONS SEC. 25. The cZeposi tinl1 of fi"ecwnts or anlllnunition by holdel's thel'eof not desi"o?ls of fu,路the,路 possession.Those persons who, although actually in possession of firearms or ammunition, regardless of whether or not such possession may be lawful according to laws existent prior to the promulgation of this Order, do not wish to obtain special permits or licenses in accordance with fhe provisions of Sections 6 and 7 of this Order, and are desirous of surrendering the said firearms or ammunition shall deliver the same, in the case of the City of lIIanila to the Mayor of that City, and in other places to the provincial governor or city mayor concerned, by taking a procedure similar to that prescribed in Section

[53]


8 of this Order. The aforementioned officials shall forward the deposited firearms or ammunition to the Director of Constabulary. In this case the ownership of the firearms or ammunition shall continue to rest with the depositor and the office in charge shall issue to the depositor a certificate of deposit, make the necessary registrations and shall be charged with securely safeguarding the deposited articles. All persons not taking the above procedure shall be regarded as unlawful possessors and shall be punishable in accordance with the provisions of this Order. Firearms or ammunit~on in the possession of persons who, not wishing to deposit said articles in accordance with the foregoing procedure, are desirous of disposal by the sale thereof shall, upon the filing of applications by the interested parties, be purchased by the Government in accordance with Paragraph 5(g) of Administrative Order No. 31, of May 21, 1943. The Government may arrange for the transfer of such firearms or ammunition surrendered for disposal to any person to wlif,lm a special permit or license has been duly issued but w 0 does not as yet possess the firearm or ammunition permitted. The details o~ the procedure in this case shall, in the City of Manila, be handled by the Mayor of that City. and in other places, by the provincial governor or city mayor concerned. The afore-mentioned officials shall take due action after applying for and obtaining from the Director of Constabulary the requisite approval. VII-PENAL PROVISIONS Failure of personaL 1'epresentat:ive of deceased licensee to surrender fi1路ea1'1n.-When a holder of any firearm license shall die or become subject to legal disability and any of his relatives, 01' his legal repl'esentatives, or any other person shall knowingly come into possession of any firearm or ammunition covered by such license, such person, upon failure to deliver the same to the Director of Constabulary tn Manila or to the senior inspector in the city or province, shall be punished by a fine not exceeding five hundred pesos or by imprisonment not exceeding six months, or by both, in the discretion of the court. ARTICLE

SEC. 26.

[54]


SEC. 27. Un/awful possession.-Any person who manufactures or possesses any firearm, parts of firearms, or ammunition therefor, in violation of any provision of this Order, shall, upon conviction by a court of competent jurisdiction, be punished by imprisonment for a period not less than six years and not more than twelve years and fine not exceeding two thousand pesos. A conviction under this section shall carry with it the forfeiture of the prohibited article or articles to the Govermnent, and shall be without prejudice to the punishment of the offender under military laws. SEC. 28. Loss of anns by membe,·s of the Constabula,·y and police force, guard{; of the Burea?! of P,·isms, provincial jail guard, and civil e?nployees with special pe,·ntits.-Any member of the Constabulary and police force, any guard of the Bureau of Prisons, any pl·ovincial jail guard or any public official or employee who has been issued a special permit who, through neglect or other unjustifiable reason, shall lose any firearm for which he is responsible, shall b dismissed from office and shall be punished by a fine of not more than five hundred pesos or by imprisonment for not more than one year, or both, in the discretion of the court. SEC. 29. Failure to pay jees.-The fees provided herein are due and payable on the date the license to possess the firearm and ammunition is issued and on each annivel·sary thereof, and failure to pay said fees within sixty days after they have become due and payable shall render the person in arrears liable to a surcharge of 25% of the regular fees unpaid. When a licensee fails to pay the fees within one hundred twenty days from the date they become due and payable, the remedy by distraint shall be followed. The firearm shall be confiscated and the license revoked. SEC. 30. This Order shall take effect from the date of promulgation. Done in the City of Manila, PhiHppines, this 12th day (If October, 1943. (Sgd.) JORGE B. VARGAS Chairman of the Exec1!tive C01mnission ApPROVED by the Director General of the Japanese Military Administration on October 11, 1943. [55]


I

)


~

~

~

~

5E:

!WI

~

~~

JUu

f.lf /\

~

JrJ:

'"

"" i2S pR

A

m ~ ft --

z.

/{

=.

7

.

17"

;It

R

v

IT ~-

1t ~

ii1

v

+

~

'7

'ill!

Ilfl

:7

~

Wr

ilP:

*

~

.an.

1Lll 1!fi iii!: m i [

iiI!-

rus

-t: =6

:7

-:Ii ~

-r -==-0 IlfI Il!l=

~

I

v A

y

/'-r ".

c:*

+ Fl

+

/\ 8

'& IT

• ~

*¥G ,.-.,

~

-r ~

'-"


p

~ Ifr';

M!

3l.. Ifr'; j\

J1tb

1/!!t

~

;.-

OJ

41-

~

/~

~

Ei

+ ~

IUl

*JIl: .ill!

p~

ii

'IIi

'il'l

ill

ffi

1li

~

~Fl

~OO

1P-*'"

Ii!

*Ii! *Ii! *E2: *E2: *1 E2:E2:

11

W

"J;;

~

~

*

"$

~

:A

-f(

)1-

~ ~

.s

:iii!

:ilL iBc

~B

15

f.E

~~

JIl:

!l!

DU

Ell

-Mi

!$.

ill!

"!Ii:

ilt

m

~

DB

IIH

fD -,-

;Z.

~

.ftl:

L

'7

/

lit

;ffi

;:JJ

-t ;.-

~

A

1m :A

.i\

)1-

~

~ -I:;

-fit /

~

-,-

ft

-I:;

BIl

B

:A

) 1-

f'F '7

/

;;<.

m /

(J;:;

Fl

'*tt

;;i;.:

ii'fJ

!!

ii

ft

*

:ill ll1r

ng

<l~ ~

41-

7, )1-

;f.!l

+

i\

~

11;

~#

;Z.

/';

-1-

AU

~

ft /

B

'"~ ;Z. '7

1iffi ft

iFic

15

~

~ )1-

~

1t

p

Ifc;

~

Ifc;

3l..

m i'l; ~ :A

~

'iii!

'PJ!

f/B

15

)1-

I-

-'E-

11;

1jl:

!i-

/

3l..

iBc

:A

;Z.

~

'7

-;t

M! :iii!

j\l 11;

;.-

1ft

~

ft

-r

ti

r»l

.(1R

ll\;

II!

.if

~

;.-

/

~

*1iffi4lft

IijJ ,;,-

&:.

15

i'l; ~

l-

i;;

;IT

:A

~

)1-

=

:A

-'E-

lJi

11 ffl

;Z.

~

~

fl ,;,-

-r -r

fl

ft

28

;m

15 ft

-r

fl

ll\;

-'E/

:m:

)1-

:A

m

p

f.i

i'l;

:e: E2:

.Jt: /

.fi!! /

F fit

) 1-

ti

ti ,;,-

~ )1-

:A

/

,;,-

m

15

~

~

ft

/

;@;

11;

~ 4jl:

11l ;;<.

/

l1ll

)1-

1!.t

~

<I>

'jJ

~

~~

m ;.-

;.-

~

:m:

m ;.-

Ifr';

'7

;it

-Y<

1)

-'E/

~

(1R

.s fi!

;7i

;it A

Q(t

r'i

~

3:- j:1i f! :W-

*Ii!

'f4l:

~

~ /

;.-

i'l; ~

7i<

M!

'7

3l..

~ ~

M; jt

flt

7i<


;>I<: -1;-

1:t I1fl I

;ffJ

11;

-1-

fit

J:. I

lS!c tJ

6t< ~1'

;fn

~

&10

11; f,\!:

-\-

-I-

iI.

FJ El

:III! -fit v

Z.

IHc

:JJ!Ii

~

A

11;

'7

ft 7

jl.

'"' 05

)1-

flI

lIS

il. ~

1»1 !Dl A

~Il\

'V"

~

~

~

,:tt

'"

JlI]

~

'"? IIfl

-1-

A

ft -1jl.

jl. ~

&10

f4t ~ r;

!

M! 05

~ {'It / ,

-1~ On n

lP

111: i8c -g

I

.1p.

;\If

FJ

"

-1;-

AI!;

)1-

1-

= ia

:/

'7

JIiIJ

-1;~

-1-

!Dl

ft ~

8

11-

Ill]

A

"

iIiIJ

tt

:!iii;

Wl

,It

8

'"?

"V

)1-

Z.

.fill

.A

Af!;

ft

I

~

7"

05

-'EI

jiI!

;ff

'"

i'.l<

'm

)1-

I

.fill I

i'.l< iji! :$

lIL iIX 1;-

If!1_ ""~

'7

~

V

~

'"? )1-

~

)1-

-'EI

!ijl

~

:!iii;

7"

F

~ ~

'" aa 7"

MI i'.l< 3l

05

'm jiI!

I

I

A

11;

:!iii;

)1-

:$

~

V

'?"

'" "

~

Z.

f~

)1-

IT

,," lit iIiIJ ;It iIX -g -1;- I I .fill f:I.

~

I

ft ;II;

-'EI

'7

H1r

ill

)1-

A

::l

rmA

~

W: }W

'"

~

'm iJ> )1-g Ali

27

71'

F

I

!f;jf

A

-g

.fill

A

If!

r.u

A

~

;It

A

ffI

Ilil /±l

~

ft

:!iii;

Ilil

~

;II;

" Z.

)~

-Et,

;It 71'

ffI '6;

~

A

~

Y:.

I

-'E-

Ill]

F<O

? I

'7

'7 ~

~

7

"

J.;l

Z.

~

f&

ft M<

r

;>I<: 11; :DI'ti

r; IT

8

11; :JJ!Ii

II.

U

til

'" 7"

*

A

-'E-

7'"

'm

jiI!

"

~

" ;ffl

+

11;

~

7"

'7

11;

Af!;

;It

J1-

:DI'ti

-1;-

'iff

$

ft

;fn

*

II !l tt

ft

lIS

~ Pk ~

I M; ~ ~ ~ i !it .fill :4a AA ~ lifr Ilil lifr ;>I<: 11; 8 ;>I<: -'IiY:. fie I ~ MI tID: M!; fiil I v fie M ~ /±l 'Jl: ~ A Af!; 11; A 'm 3t ~ fJj !it 1XIi )~ Pk A )1- m-g Af!; ~ = IT ;It -Et j:I:; I !l Z. Ii:, ::lp rm *HI :!iii; = A !tIl ;;Ie '7 tlii )1-

I

~

~I-

,,~

'7

-g

;It

'7

"'M-

'u

~

11;

~

V

~

<n:

'?"

)1-

Ali ill I

-g :'It I

:!iii; A

l;!Il }l: I

1sll. -fl1: ft

~I!!

{ti.

ft

~

:!iii;

:t.E V ffI flI 'm 'St g!.

1J~

A

I

~

'"


S

/'

~

*Ml ~

lIB

;ffJ

l1lt ~

I?Jl

P'l 4\-

11

M.,

~it

M.;

!il!

9J

5C ~

1Kfr

:tt:

:ilL iac

H

tt

)\

A

&f-

J1-

F:I

llX f& =

-I-

fijJ

/\

A

s

133 lR

) 1-

1'f 1£ )

ili1

~

)

1&

3t

-i-

-t

~

~

;J;t:

~ A

--L /~

,

----L.

m:

~

;Jt

lili

tm

$ ~A

/

iBl:

Wi )

m

.I

-;-

:I;j

)\

!»X iBl:

-t

~

)\

ill}]

1Pi

)

J1-

1t

• '7

J.;,I.

V

)L-

H

fj-

r,.

7J

~

*

-/-

:J..

~b~

ft!: mi ~m

*JJl

A

III!

iFJc

!iilf.

1J!;

tI

ifii *4

;Jt /

J!,

Jv

l1li

J.;,I.

r

~

til

A

Jj

/

ifii *4

~

=

~ A

,

{!l

'"

~

W!i iBl:

If)( 1&

~ {j{ ~

.:::.

/

J!,

rm

1i J.;,I.

{j!{ ~

26

~iJ

lib W-

)1-

=\>

-=.

:m

.J:I:

~

m

mi Wl

~

~

'7

"

+ 1L

t,ff

1* A

~ ~

~

S

~ WI IHl

-t:

JIlL

~ :liffi ~

F:I

tit

fiiI

~

&f-

-\!: Jt.

'7 ~ ? ~F -if

I

;{'p

iYf OJ

~

*»f

rrg

~

M

@

)

C!'<

r&

f*

{/Ii )

tl

~

:K

:r A JI-

tifr

'E-

f*

Z.

)

'7

~

tS.

~

::It

ilt

3t

'"

;Jt

=

&. ~ JI-

'" )

'#

t!; ~ '7

~

~

r

JI-

J.;,I. )

Wi

~

3t

fJ 7. ::1

~

'7 {~


~ T

Z. '7 ~ A

" ."

~

~

-I:;

r.

* * ~

m * if!il. /

r l-

Ii " II

4W

'"

nR

1m A

)L-

~

~ $

RM

~

* if!il. ~ -"

Wd

JlI]

S

"~

3't

'7 :Jj{Ji

:I!t

IT

Jl!,

ta

,

~ B ""

7k

;J:l: /

1'!1j

&f. fl S '7

PC A

Z.

~

Ii

" """

i\

&p vq fl

i:l-

/

~

-'-

."

ilC 4i

j$. I'jJ

A

1*

• JJt

~

~

1i

*'

."

"'-1-II lIft

}W

'rn"

A

~

fa

:a: l' ~

-"

~

'fJI!. t~ ~

J!

{~

tI-

'7 ~

~

A

."

)~

:t\I if:!c

4W

fr lit

~

'ill-

~

'"

OR

~

jjij ~

~

~7 il~

lJi

!i!:

ill

'iii/

{f!

El

l!tt

=

~l ~

'7

"jj~

~

T ~ j!E

ml

)t-

'7

."

!1

~ ~

T

!1

)~

A

)~

itt-

"."

'E-

:;t:

/

....If

~

!1

3=:.

~ ~

!t ~

Ijuj

~

."

)'(

~

-; , OR ~ II!! -; 1f. Ifl J:t: J:t: :ilL ilL J:t: .It 7k :t\I :ilL *t'! &iJ a if:!c if:!c IJb a !I'.'f if:!c if:!c 1fir Mi iJJ( !it !it #ii 1tJ: ~ !it !it "I!ru ift ~ ~ 4!~ ~ ~ ~ 'I!Il l' "a' 3{r ~ ~ rn '\r "n M tt 'fJI!. m 'I!Il ~ 1!f: 'fJI!. ~ ~ ~ rn if:!c ~ 'I!Il Ji\l 'I!Il 'I!Il tEe 1!f: Ji\l Ifl 1!f: 1!f: ) L- ~ 1!f: II[ -ll: ~ 7t " /, {f! PlT ." Ii: If.

i~

f.f

f:f.

",

,

'A

~ }lIj

-a-

ttl! A )~

ill! A I!\!

25

/

jll y

lllj

*' '-'


o1o/J PQ

"

m

it

#

~

~

lifr

f.t

re.

3t

"

nn

I'iI' .=

*

~

i!F

.<;)=

::If

5fi

*1ftr -li

'7 V

?

~

~

'7

pJi"

~

"& 'fttI f.'J

" '7 tu -I!

/

I!WJ

tu

1'1: -g Je. 7!A ~

1'1: '7 ~

'"

!I

"$I.

}~

-g Je.

t.r

;l-

T

I!WJ

~

9

3t

I' jj,¥/,

i!l

1t-

re.

'7

'" " '" A

~

*

nn

fr lit

...,

~,

~ 7

A

~

1Ifr

1~

*f'j

'7

it

/±\ l!Il

,11:

m-

1'1

ft ---.. ~ft ~

'7 J,;l. T ~

RJ3 A }~

E

... '

JlL

if!{

ff it !If;: .g'fttI

*5E /

.J..

~

Je.

'" "'"

'7

/

m rrA :;J

~

'7 ~~

iY' ...' ~

-If:

~

~

l!!!

"/i!C

'fttI f.'J

III

frI-

/

~

lit ~

1R-

t/ T

}~

'1r

Z

1I11

l!Il OO

JlJll ttl'!

Je.

T ~

3'11!

'7

A

.., }~

" -\<

~~

'" '"Jjl -" '"

'* 1R-

'7

RJ3

A

7-

24

~ /

V T

rrm:'7

fr lit

;(. )~

1T;:

i:\!! ffl -V

~

~

o1o/J nQ

'"

• frI-

-g Je. '7

i

4m

'"

nn

Z

~

T

'7 jjI

!If;:

Je.

A

l!fr = -If: m: -g /±\ 1Ifr

;I-

III

"'"

lji

it

m -

'7 ~

.g'fttI -/::

~

}~

*

*it

/

"

-E/

)~

1tll

'7

/

" '"? '" ill '" 1Ifr

/

m.

"

Il:!

if!{

;j'l;

1k

:t£ ;(.

-r

-C

1iJj

nn

"" }W

A

-g Je. ?E

7!A

Si,

trl'

~t

:tl!

-If:

~ ~ jjI

~X

~ ~

/±\

1.T

it '/iJ!.

1*

"

<ll-

*1tll

"'"

o1o/J nn

Jm

9

A

5fi

"

I§l

3'11!

[BJ

;fE

~

'fttI

&ffit

i).R ~

-"

T ~

11:

T ~

::;;

-g 1M' !i!" '7 JlJll 1fit ttl'!

~

*1R-

if!{

I!WJ

=

t.r

A

= tu

'1 t~

m:

~

nQ /

~

*f'j

'fttI f.'J

/

~

m RJ3

iit

::l1E

'7

W.

"

/

J¥!.

U

$i-

li X<:.

'"

l!L

5t

'"

~

o1o/J nn

PJ[

"'"

Nt

'"/±\

ff-

*

~

.<;)=

!If;:

~

1if

~ '7

w.:

tu trl'

"

o1o/J nn

lit

/

JlJll

~ -;-

/

nn

~ ~

~

j.

;j'l;

~

Je.

~

} I-

}I-

'"

~ ~

-j1-

}~

:;J

{l!

f'r it

I!WJ

/

/±\

'*-r '7

"

/

JlJll '7

it

/

;j'l;

'T

}~

m

o1o/J pn

"

'"

r'

"

/±\

o1o/J nn

"

1'1

it it ~ -g i!t Je. '7

JlJll

jjI

'"

1.T

~

if!{

\if it ~ !If;: i!f ,g. '7 'fttI ~

/

~

)W ::1t

'11

'fttI Jill

'7 ~

tl

ft A Z

:!R ;t; ;(.

"'"


I:P;

=;1

-,-01'1 '"

C

~

'"

,\;%;

~

~

~

U

no

9i:

m '"dl }L-

~

"'"

m

',II iIX

ft lit

~

;It

:if{.

~

."

ti"

:a:

/

'ill: :&.

~

.g:

~

,g.

ffi EB

~

y

lil:

'"

1*

illi

A

'a' 4'!Il

m

-t:tL

A

4'!Il

+t;

~

"

00

1:1:1

*ill

~

~

7.k

.fl!!. +t; /

~

1* 'n'

~

~

/

ro

Jll!.

» ~ I!il

'"7'"

a

an

l' JI!

31.. A

~

"

00

III

~

/

'"

/

~

9

= ~

1*

'"

4'!Il

"

ffl

~ ~ 1~

C -9<:.

'7

~

y

4'!Il

00

00

z.. "/ '7 7'

1:1:1

"

~

~

*ill

Wi

~

f!I}:

'"

~

«Ii

'7

A

:JI;

A

/

}~

f~,

if

1!{ 7.k

'7

'l2'

~

'7

j.

i!l!E

/

Wi ~ A

~.

}~

1:1:1

"

'" :Lt

~ /

h-~

til(. 7.k Jt /

.fl!!. 4'!Il

/

I:H

JIX

~

1:1:1

ffl 1fir

Wi

~ ~ /

%

<)l: ~

/

~

l'

'7

rR:

\iG

~

A

m:

~

:"/

23

PTr 'l2'

"

00

'7

1* 'i'l' ~

~

/

~

ffi Ji. /

Pjf 'tl'

*

-,-m l\ ~

~ nn "

fr

at

l' JI!

"

no 1:1:1

*ill

~

'7

}L-

y

~ 00

dl

/

}L-

C

-"F-

/

~I-

~ /

m l~

"'-

7'"

l1'.!

~

~

I)

/

$

~

r>J1"

:f;t

'lC

if: '7

5e }~

.Fo

;j!f

'& tJ'\

-t

A

~

~

-9<:.

~ -I-

;It

'7

"'f

~

'7

3l..

~

"'"

£:

ft

~

'"

PTr

ffll R:

:If,}

IIJj~

A ~

',r

~

~ II.Q

""'-

=;1

~

I'

/

III

/

~ ~

;/

/It§

:Jl:

l'

~

~

A

1* ii 'if #

4'!Il

'"

~

}~

;If

~ 7

~

~

"E-

;If

z..

OJ

-,-~

}~

~

34

'7

"E/

~

"

M lJt

an /

"

00

no

/

f!IJ

49-lI

'tl'

J!j.

IT

/ "E-

-m

~

aa

~ 'Ii!(

*13

'7

III

'& iA

~

1ft ~

;If

'7 ~

'" m

~

/

;It

~

it 1lt

A

.fl!!.

£

ll:

'*A'-

/

~

~ ;It

ilL

=;1

{I!_

7'"

iH-

~

/

~

"" ~ :Ii'!:

Jf:!c

/

flt ale

II'f

'" z..

ffll

ffll R:

~ no J& <P /

~

U

l' JI!

Ill!

W.

:jt

A

}~

-,-

~

'"

7k .!k.

"* JYr"'/'"

"

~

~

JV

/ "E/

A

1i

~

no

1$

-,-

y dl

~

q~

fr

l' JI!

l'

r

"

00

~r

lI! A

"' 1ifl. /

~

ff

J;l /

~

III =

~

'dl"


~

'7

jlL il&

*ilt

!!&.

,'ml jill

.m;;<.

*i'l $I

~

%J e

rni £

;Jt I

NT .1M

-g "!I! 7lt..

~

PIT '& 5}

~

~

'fit 'iii-g "!I!

~

5}

%J

"E'

J'o

I

'="

~

Jfl

:I:!t

'7

"

!!&.

.;r

;t{I-

'"

~

} t-

31..

'ml I rni 31..

-£ I

~

>¥f

'*

WII· pIT '7 Jfl ~ T

I ~

." %J

"

D"

!:I:I

~l

.lit

~ ~

7-

.til

!Jf

f,il

~

ill .lit

~ e n"

%J e

!:I:I

'7 ~&-

e

"0

I

at

'7 V

7~

Ml

*i'l

*"Iff=

~

}t-

~'

}t-

ill

OJ

'7 ~

'7 ~ 7-

~

'%

~

00

A

00

jg

*i'l '7

}t-

~

'"" "

1ifr

{jt {;o '7 ~

tr :til. on " '7

%J

"

no

~

-&. .J;l WI' r -g Fol

"!I! v '-'

iifJ

Jj![ I

mf

~ :g;(

.;r

:?f

}t,.

fII!

?5C

'\'-

::;

J[:J(

t& 7

oft ;;<.

" :;..

"". ,jt ,PI

* " tr '7 ~

!I ~

.r.

lW

~ '7 ~

~

22

}t-

I ~.

~

"I

'7

1jl:

:lit

00

!:I:I

*i'l

;;<.

*i'l

e

:II

,r.

$.

I

~

~

Z.

il&

5} ~

!:I:I *I'l

*'if

it

=

no

fIl

'7

;;<.

!:I:I

;;r-

7

}t-

:ilL

I»l

I»l

~ ~ J'o

t& ~ 7-

I

~

r; ;;<.

I

!:I:I

'7 5}

;;<.

"E'

&.

fjJ

DO

-if

~ f:jJ

:;m:

7

t.

~

I

!Jf

'" ~

~.

::z

%J e

~

"ffl' llt -g

I

tt

A

~

:a-

"

~ jlJ

9

V

}t-

~ DO

I

fj<.

.;3

1-

}t-

!I

'7

!:I:I

7lt..

;;<.

7

III

Jj![

iifr

}t-

-g "!I! )W

~

'-'

}t-

f:jJ '7

-g

::z

~

I

m:

" 'Ii""

00

A

.;r

V

{jt {;o

~

~

;Jt

*I'l

,

-1-

;7

1&

I

'ffi

~

7-

%J e I

ff:

v

'7 {jt -t"

J[:J(

""!:I:I

~

,~

Jil

.A

31..

"E'

.r.

~

"0

-g "!I! ....... oft

'7

~

t

%J e

~

-g

;Jt

I

*~ ;;<;

at

.lit

:/

""

'7

"0

Z. '7 {jt

-r

j,

ffll

" m: f9J

tl-\)

~

;;<.

~

'"

~

.;r

:?f I!IJ

~ '7

i'F

-I<

;Jt

~

I

'ffi -I-

9 !I

* ~ I

}t-

{Mj 11M' ~

~F

9 i!ili %J {Iti

-if

v

DO " ~ %J I't 31.. no " llt .r. '7 -g 5C !:I:I "!I! m *I'l

.......

'7

%J !Jf

"

;;<.

}t-

;;<.

::z

!:I:I

}t-

~

~

.lit

'\'-

'7 ~

no

fl '7

'"

at -g "!I!

~

-I-

~ ;It.

~ ~

*

}t-

{jt {;o T

on "

e

""

7<

"

DO

'It a-l-g "!I! 31..

~ 7'-

~

"

00

~

ff:

.r.

7

%J

}t-

"

nD

I.l:\

*I'l it pIT % I

-g "!I! I

* ~

it ;;<.

m " f£ ~

~


;j}

II!l v

m ~ ;;<.

-

* m *f£ Jjt

i8c

~

$

:qr i8c fit

tI-

.J:t ~ ""'.f}!-

~,

~ ~

1fi

rr:

~ ~ ~ -(::

~~

~

J:t.

hi.

rrg

f?li :iii-

l]r

Il'J

irt

;fP

;fp

¥!J c

IlQ

ilt

-\.;

+

•• ft

6p

m

t:l

1f.

B

F1

/

WJ ITt

~1~

F!

/\ B

~

lib JIL

A

~

~ c

•• ill

=;

5Y: IT

~ Jt-

td

*t~

m ;;<.

-" )II]

=;

---: v

7"

/:11

'!fir 4\-

*'

~ A Jt-

:t ~ j\'i

.jt / ~

6ffit

~

*

-9""-

l±l MI.J

1~ {i~

~ pq

B

f*

"V

NT

~ nn

~

=;

fr

/

i&

"\l[

~

/

;}t-

&p

~

--1-

~

is-

;fp

IIll

,~ Jt-

-t-

---:

v

~m

"

nR

/

1r ;]1-

B 3[

I±l

fit

Jt-

v

~

=;

fA

IT y

~

M

!lll

'7 J;l

&f=; J;l

top

B =; J;l

fit

Il'd ;fP

-I:1f-

B

"V

t~ ~

~ ~

'"

Jt'E/

.!F-

m wr *f£ ~r ~

J![

"J fj!!

!fl

'"

11I

iIX

~

$ /

-1* 'l1

a

;;<.

J~

¥!J .1'. v

5Il[

"1I

~

JfJ(

v

7"

Jt-

7

-"

F!

irt

~

/

'" = :.It

---:

it

~

1i:

~

~ 7

fJl,

/

'" m JJ(

Jt-

;{fj

-l:;

F!

== 13

rn

:qr !fl

'&

~

'if i1!: :Z

/

=;

~

••"/

i\J!.

:Z

1i

¥!J

IItl

i\

ffl

B:

:.It

~

i'/.c

Jjl:

i8c

Jt-

J:t.

'f

;tll!;

i\

V

J:t.

Ill! ~

:ilL !fl 'f

i\

jili

m fM

111: IT

'"

+

-1i\

F!

IHI j@;-

ft

~

7

~

&p

111:

I1!l

7 t~

F!

I-

~

~

A UIl

i

•• m

~

m m * c ~ c

11l:

.R

7

iJJ

¥!J

~

+t: /

ill!.

.ft, ~

m ;;<.

Jt-

-!l!l

-"

/

l]r

111 il!i

iIX

1t

7

;!,

=; Z<

ilt

= ;;<.

Jt-

;;<.

21


.l!:.

*

I:l

1;-

~

lIB

~

~

/'

;fP

j\

-1-

~

i\ ~ IlQ

J'I

s 3 v

m

"*Jt;tff'lm i!fiH -,

J:t

u

~

Jllj

~Si'i:{PJ

11!

¥jl lIV I rHfl~

iflc

!ii!i:

n:

J1, oX·

'1m

1i:J:t ~!id

;t

1ilIi

IT A

1f.

• 1t: '7

'"'7 f9. "

t/

~

= ~ ~

7 J;l. 7-

9

fifE

j[:I

~

* * lX: fj I

~

IEl

A

-I!:

)1-

:7

'€/

)1-

-j-

'€-

)~

V

I

(J'; 7-

T

Ji1;

1tl.

m

9 V 7-

A

~ rj{

it 1lL

m

A

z7

'€-

~

I

m A

"f- " ...-

"'"

m

~

)~

~

"'T ~-

te

Fol

*'IffI¥l

jJL

is( /(<f

"f)W; ......

/

~

~l

m

t.f>

m

* 3

9 ';it

9 ;It

IT

I

"f-

A

j1i

;;<

"'"')

"'/

-If:

Jjl:

~

~

~

:7

7-

"'T

liJf

"f!j

1BI

IT ~

:7 ?

:If,:

'ii:

"'T ~

;/

~ ~

IT

m

I~'

:m " *-S 9i: it ~

l\f ~

,

7 ~

fL )

, ~

Jl:

iilE illi

;...

~n

\

20

I

m

"f-

~ ~

1tl. if:Ic

J:t ~ I

9i: it 1\1

m

*-s

*'Iff I!1Jj is(

/{<f

ffr

at

~

1tt

ffl :m =¥ !!!! IT "'/ / 1Vm 11 " "f1~ 1B1 "'" "'" .=. oft :ta.It 1m ~ "f-

A

~

7 ~

7n"

A

;...

~

A

Ji1;

3i

IL.

/ ,

J:t

t£. )

iill

1#;

:&.

ftf


'x \of,

!r ?' )~

~

ii Iti )j

""" '"

~

A/

'l'-

ft

r'(\ ~ ~

!iii

J:t

&:.

I-

;Ji.. ~

Jill

m jC,. A

"

"

"""

/>

IJ!. ~

=

*t'l

Ais?ill .' [' -1"-

~

**t'l ~

*t'l

'7 ~

*t'l

~

z'7

is?ill

" m ;6 A. ;t

iil1 1lfr ~ )1-

"

fit.

W

'7

~ JJ:j(

'7

Tti

jC,. <

m

~ /

1!f :it 1f.

"

~ "<j-

1i

5}; ~ "<j-

1i $l~

/

:it

im

!it A

-l1: A

'7

A

1ft

)v

IT

/\ ~

f!!l Jl

:fiI1

/

1'F

~ ~

m

1i {Ili

B

m )\1]

fi

If. /

jifi

!it A

f:¥>' nn.

% ~

~

*41-

3C

.f;j'

I1ll

""

;fa

)1-

-f-

~

i\

~

&f.. f!!l FJ

m

/

~.

~

it<.

Z.

1ft A-

)1-

'7

1\;(

*fl #

1T&

l\X

m

J:t

~

fi

""

)\1]

=

11'

~

is-

Itt it

"

~

19

'"9

*fl

oK-

iBc

ill:

B

~

td :tIL

EI

1iJl. 5t

=

*fl

;l'j; ~

/

)v

¥\l

Wi

l\X 41-

=

?;t

:IXfi

B

iBc

:it

~ ~

~

*fl

FJ

!ill,:

oft

!it

~.

l\X 4I-

f!!l

td W-

m

/

Itt im

/\

5tl

.f;j-

-f-

*m

oft

~ ~

/\ ~

" kPl'""""

fIl

1i

~

"

og

~

~

ag fIl -f-

J:t

~

)1-

l\X 41-

4i'

tilJ

l-

A

?'

~

1T

JJ:j(

A-

'7 ~

~ ~

m

m

*?ill-i!f

!iii

lib

~

'7 ~

~

)~

W

~ ~

J:t

4i' :lim

*t'l

15 I»l

~ ~

oft

A-

/

~5l:

*t'l

~

;If

;Ji.. ~

i

~ JJ:j( ~

itt :tli :it

oft rsie !11

'7

1ft A-

" m

.2K::

~ f-j.

{Ili

tt

oft

lei

~

A.

A

'"


~

.):l: I

~

41'7 ~

'r ?

)1-

-g

re?

) 1-

I

~ ~ '7

Illl

1l!.

,:o,g_

." -g

{;j.

~

A

1l!. $

J!t

Wl '.'7Bo

'7

~

~

*Pl

-'"

*Pl I

BTl

~

*i'l

~ ~

I

7

~

'"v

'7 -=:ro

~

J!t

BTl

A

'7

'"

~

3

9

~

Z

'7

:tAfi :fj A

JE -r

)1-

iili f.{

il!

~

~

5t

:m.

m

-'"

.!I I]

'7 ~

i!ilc

~ ~

I

~

;tfl

.!;.l

Wi"

~

I

~

~li ~

-g

tt

'r

~ Jjj(

-'"

{l

~

~ :jIjI "-

-r

Jjj(

.ffi1,

-r

I

~ :jIjI

18

'EI

it

liB

{j{

~

~

~ '7

%t

{l

'lilt

I

9

I

?

~

re-

'):i

~

&:

it

Ii

:;J

'7

W.

1*

"-

&:

7

/'

A

:&

~I-

'ji

1*

-g

~~

-r

!

-t

'if;

'7 .);J.

)1-

fill

A )1-

I ~

~

liB

7X.

-r

-'"

tt

11t

"?

A

~ )1-

:u:

41-

~I-

~

<fi-

I

B

3

*.

!I

>Jl: #

A

ft

)1-

7X. *Pl #

~ ijl

'7 ~

~

-\!!

i

~

,=.

Jjj(

) \.

f:Jl

*'itil'

;M-

~

~

T

iI!

~

~

%J ~ 1't' itt I

) 1-

'7

*<fl{j{

~

fiI?i

Z

I

I

j\

V

~

'E-

m

~

~

'l

'7 ~ Jjj(

~

Ut

#

~

ft

~

1G

1*

9

1*

*fl .,..

#

~ A

V

{j{

m -

I ~ I-

~

A

Wl

'7

fa! Itl]

~ *i'l

/ '

=

B

~

:tJ

~

~

~

it

~ ~

l\

Illl

I

~

tM

~

:f't

v

#

fou

\Itt

=

~

7X. *Pl #

&f-

V

." -g

A

+

A

...:-

-'"

Il!l

11(

*i'l

)1-

~ ~

/'

i

-If

A

*41-

A

ft

'7

~ 1*

7X.

~

15-

-\!!

~

m

#

M'l

I

5F

Z

j/ll

~ ~

:fiji

V

~

1i

;Ji

:fiji

liIJ

~

~ ~

:;IJ

/'

~ :jljl

iii

'fii

if(

¥;J

A

;M-

3

{!l.

3

1M

V ~

9

ttil'

:;J'

J:: &:.

'7 ~

BTl 7X.

~

~ T

it 'r ~

~

IJJ

ffl f1li

)1-

}I-

I

:1-&

¥;J

~

1't'

~ :jIjI

V

!E ;K }I-

"*1t 7X. 7'

'E-

I


~

;;<.

~

it;

!iii!

ii

'7 -V'

~

*1t

)v

It.

~

III

:ill: ~ i6c

-'E-

e.

.I\%: $

'7

If!

JE

A

til T

t4t.

"

Q,.

1f1:

ill

lIi1J

~

~~

~

:ftI\

It. 1.1~

~ '7 ~

tt v Jf-

ft

!'II v 1;\1

;.r-

JE T

It.

~

4f

"* ;;<.

-'

v

I'B

~

-1i\

Il!l .fl B

*

ill'

iliU

it!!. If(jj

ji.'g,

~

til

A It.

5J'

~

III

~

~

~-

~

-,"If

~

!ijl

rtt

v

I

&'

~ i&

-r

)v

~ ~

%

v

-1-

;It:

13

m

I

m! '7

1.'£

t:n

~

;!£i

Wi

#

~

1'* JjX

%

Ii.

-t

}\ ~

#

$

J;J,

=>

j/iIJ

~

~

:ill: i6c

V

~ ~ ~ I

4rriI!

;It:

~

YJi'.

-' '1

v

~

J1l!. I

lJl!J

JI: ffl

'7

J!I{

I

'7

J!

~ '7 j&;

~ -" 'JI-

'" iIti

* * * *

)1.-

~

*

lit if

v

~

~

j:(

III

~

,.

"if-

iii-

~D

1f1:

I ~(jj

;fIl

tfi. '7

*

~ ~

%

~

~

'7

DB

-t::; ~

~ ~

~

J;J,

-'~

-1 -

~

*

1P

(i;::

1P 17

7-

DB

-1-t::; ~ 1)1: ~

&f-

m: '7

k& T

~

%

lifT

A

;&.

(i;::

iIti &frtt

iili

JlK

%

m:

~

&f-

m:

5J' 3

V ;Z '7

im !'II ;;<.

'7

m

q~

3?:

1lL ilX

i.: &'

~

1!ii :/

11IJ

i6c

JA ~

=>

lliiJ

11!

?

,.,

=

I

~

It.

fl

rot

lifT 5} I ijiji

B

a

i9J

~

It.

v

Il!l

m

lit ~ v 1ft

it!!.

3t

m

ft

I

:ftI\

it

V

5-

fi!(

3

~

5J'

~

~

~

Ii

fIi !t:t

I

m

III

~ ij!!

It.

$

~

~

lliiJ

J\k

I

Il!l ~~ ~ ~

lifT

lJi

III

-\<:

J;J,

-'

r.

JlL

i6c .I\%:

-I-

i.: ;;<.

~

'7

;;<.

I

ttl

~

~

'7

B

Jll 'ill %

~ ~

m.

~

5t

T

~

~

ffl

~

;It

V

~

;&.

,j1.,

v I

!t:t JlK

J[

V

j\

m

;fIl

~

*f1t

'7 ~

5J' !tilt

jJ;fc ~ DB

~

'7

A

"It.

7-

M fA if ~

:ill: i6c "ff

#

;;<.

-'

v

~ ~

r.

~

Q,.

ill 'l't

~

~

tt v

~ j\

5t 1iII. I ill 5t

~i-

~ ~ '7

J;J, 7-

fill

!JJt

m! '7

m v *11lv


*

,we

4l-

ffiU III

lIB

~

+ /\

&f. I!!! ~

*-F.I s

*:ilL"'l 4l-

~n

'7

i\

*

+

lIiiI

~ ~ ~ ~ ~

~tt

&f.

)1.1]

'"9

::<.

;Z.

)v

'7

1'1' 1£

fj

/

::<.

~

? )1.-

if'{ ;f§.

~

~

'tt

lM

~

~ ~

ti

'"9

~

v

1f-

5} /

'1iII

il' '7

i\i!t ~ ::<.

iifr

ilt it =

M'l # ::<.

~

itt

v

lifT

Wl:

4JIl

'7

Q,.

/

til 'J!f:

til

~ ~

~ '7 jI1lt

/

~ ::<.

~

)1.-

~ '7 :J2;f ~

If(jj ~ ~ "...

v

~

?

/

JI.-

)1,.

r

-f-

~ ~

~

9';):t; .I

/

;Il

-I:;

4JIl

'7

Q,.

lit

~.

It ::<.

'jl( ~

~

ft

)1.-

v

~

&f.

M.

I1t. /

If(jj

~ ~

tJt

/

'* /

Wl: r

Wi]

~

::<.

'7

)1.-

*

,lift

*,\\'.

il' :/ 7-

a

A

~ J I,.

?

/

f~

5i!. ::<.

)v

.J;,l

r

Z

'7

ti

16

3t

.,...

f~

i!,\ ;l£ 9'-

::<.

~

1lf -i!f

II{ ~ /

.f1!l

)1.-

/

ill

oWl ~

1* l!f. i6c

!I: :lifE ..I:. mI'

*1t

-l<

/

'7

j!t fj

11n]

11i\1

v ?

;ttl!

JL-

I»l

m ::<.

M .g. '" '-<1'

iii 1ft r ......

..

/

V

~

7-

m

l!L is':

ll$(

~

if!: /,

~

1* / I»l !!:! )v

a:

11-

I!!!

=

?

1fir 4l-

~

1* 71,

D

v

~

~

)1.-

~ :/

3t

~ ~

i\ ~

~

~

::If

/

/

181

!!:!

-'E-

.,...

"

~

~

5i!.

O~

/

1r.

"

00

~

oWl

;>:

::<.

oWl

~

fit

~

/

v

~

i6c

~

~

'7

til

r '7 ~~

;J;S

#

1f-

/'

V

/

A

=>

q!l

:fi:

5i!.

fi iifr

*4l£ 3£

liIi

)v

1fir

~

:lifE

)j(g

11-Ii '7

'7 ~

5i!.

v 3t

7-

'7

a

1ft

*

:M

ra9

'7

4l-

/

v

~

IH1

1*

~

~

1'f

Ji.

£ 3£

ti

I!!!

~

l&l

M il'

r

lIB

m /

~

J1=>

r-

r

v

7-

lI! i6c

~ ~ .I

~ f!JlJ

!!JtI

~ I

jlj A

~

J!& 7} ?tf -~~ 7..

It..-

itt

~

::If 3t

I5t'.

~

M il' It v

llift fl ~

-t: 5]}t


~

m:

~

-fl. ~-* =. 5:;:

"*

~ ~

m: 1m ;iE

~

....... /,

m

~

~

tl! ~ it on '" ;Ii

;;r1f;

;f:U ~~ 7-

~

"*

7-

.=.

)v

ff<

fLf

/

(J:: ~

)~

::1

~

"7 ~ ~

ilf, .J.. )~

~

"'" ~

-i!f '7

tit

~

WI

Ifl: ~

:ilL iIX

!if lllI =

m iii 7-

....::

'"

(J::

~

~

II-

I1il

;(ip

-I-

~

ill; ~

j\

fiit *1fi: s

1~i ~ ~

* 1lJ:

'/"

00

'iij

~

l!!l

FJ

s

11-

J\! i'1i %

~

*Pi =

f»1

3l

~

*!L it :ilL

m:

llfJ

lID

*~ MI. it *Pi

-It

~

til: ~

iii /

;!& $i!

~ ~ ~

*Pi

-It

~

~11

ilX

!if :ft

}~

1'1'

lifl

S?i

~

~ ~

/

00

'7 ~

U

j.

/

*Pi 1t

~

1fir

:&

/

~

'7

HiT Mit ~

Z

'" t!i

1fir

*

~

ill!

1IC.

v

~.

~

'" ~

tt

)1-

~

a:

m:

~

::r

'7 ~~

/

J\!

)~

;;t:

}~

it

-Ii 7

3l

'7

~ *Pi

'7 ;W;

l'

*Pi

-It

/

;It

i'1i

~

.fQ

'"/

OQ

llt iIX

S

/

'"

9

~

:lftI fit

~

fill

n 7-

)1-

* 3l

;It /

J!'.

~ '7

m W 7-

..

)~

%

f,~

~

7-

Z

mm

5t

....::

~

~ ~~

7-

'7

7-

lW'

-It

A

m

1.11

"'

S?i

3l

tN

'"

I!Q

~ ~

/

~

fill

~

)~

~ ~

$

i!&

r;{

ff.llJ Wi

...."',0' ~.

~

~ -t;

3l

+ -t; s

~.

m:

~

*1l it

=

.(J(

lJl

15

}I-

!l! i:21

*4t

)~

;{ill

'"/

'"

-r

I1il

III 1:: ..y

+

ti

~,

JJ{

;It ?

i\

FJ

111

tt

'" ~

~

;jf

')

;It

*-s

:!Ie.

*:ill.m 4t 'G"

:JfIJ '7 ~ 7-


!i1t 1& ~ ~

m

*

~

~

~

-E:r

.,.

~

it;

1<

111 15-

'fin

~ ~ ~ jl

1!f -t

.A J!.-

$I.

~

~

ill ~~ -- 111 1m ¢I::J

*'il'!i'

'*' m:

ms mM

~

jl

gj

9 ~

4"1E

3l

/

*,J

'iii

J:!ll.

lli

!Iil

~ ;;<,

Ell -r

l'

*JJt

~

;;<,

~ ~

f4t

Ji.

ti.

~

~ jl

"*

ili\: IQ

y 1ft iBc

00

~

j!f

;fl!.

3

9

0Vl

{iff

s

s

;>\I:: os;: 00

"*.g-..lit Ill!

-;K" ~ -;/

7r-

s

~t-

~

m

¥J; 1;lf

=

;;<,

[ffi

}t-

;p "'" 1E

9

;t-

m -I-

'*' "'!>'" m: }t-

7

ij! ~

'7

* os;:

3

fj

m 1;11

;;<,

*- .g-.

it ~ <tW

s

'7 ~ ~

=

f* 3

'1'

M

/

'"~ '7 ~~ ;K

~ T

Ii ;li/~

~

","

B

A

1AA

-:J-

Wi

,

.{

~ ;;<,

7 /

14

l!1AA

1l

~

~

ili\:

~

.g-. ;fl!.

*w"*:!'.Iie.

J,W; '7 ~

? }~

'"

",c

'*' m: -'I'

*

-r

Ll 'tf:

*

s

'!I"l< 00

~

;MI-

'"~ 'I'-

i, k

5E.

~ ~

~"

't7J

~

j!f

*

s

~

%

~

? )~

"'"

"'

'7

v

«II

7"-

1"l!-

i1'l

~

B ill

B

'7

~

;li-

R)j

~

tlf '7

-l!f

...'

».

~

til

B t-f\ .Ii

/

;;<,

i-=i:

~

}t-

'"'

~"

"'?" ;I'!t

B

fIIi

}~

~

7~

Jl

*'il'!i'

" "'!>'"

ffl

~

~

.-.:

~

/

A

3!:

, ia

~

IX

:

:/

}t-

%1J

m:

~

~

"'~

Ji.,

}~

}t-

~ r-

~

Ii ~

s =

!!I

~

#

/

~~

tlll ~ 7

",:;

..1:.

~

~


~

.ft JlX Jlt 'f}J

1p

~ J{Ij

tI:l

M:

~

if1.

B

~

'"" <P

i%Jt

~

~&

~

'-'

mil

«Ii 13

;;I<:

-",

"

~ ~

~ ~

:Jf 1M

m

~ ~

!fi

~

cj!: ~

!/

'"!/

J~

~

3t

J~

~

-,

'"7-

-1

~ ~

17

, fJJ ~

E1 ;;I<:

1l!f ~

J§I

A

~ ~

;M-

3t

[i

-1-

-=l

~

I J"

.3t

flil

flil

A

;<.

!J(

'"'"

1:.

fit

1:. I

I J"

L

'1

8! ''It t!t

~

-It :t&

.Ij, I

~ ~ /

13

'1

7

~

;;I<:

W ;;I<:

~

L

~

==

7k..

B

2f 1Vil.

3

!it

~

'1

.Ij,

I

flfl

~

17

t&

17

iF.f

-;

-1

-1

-, B

~

v

J§I

-1-

~)II

7,

**lift

~

m:

I

v

l!!l

~~

it

~

a::

.it

~

45

t.1!

,Ej

1!l:.

1\l: ilX

~ ~

E1

))j(

~

7-

ft 1ilf

A

i$

~ ~

"

:JL

-,

~

a

".

~

:II'!:

l!!l

t.1!

aJj

1:.

r4

/

!J(

~

<;:

h

ill'

:jliJ ~ .Ij,

jilJ

~

-,

I

L

I

"~ ;jt/l.

)!iii t'i

L

3t _ Jl-

JK

I "*$ ll1'

>f-

-1

Ili,lj

"v

ID!

~

J~

:t&

ill'

v

q&

7,

!J(

&.

~ ~

if-

A.

;y"

if-

1lfr :JL iF.f

~

== -;

,

7~

'1

rdl

,

;;t '1

~

til

13

3

~ J{Ij -jg:

~ ji

'1

~

~ ;<.

1't

3&:

'"

jft 'i3:; J:t

J§I

~ ~

;<.

I

'ij'g~

a::

-{

tI:l

45 '1

If<

E1

~

.s1J

tb

~

liD Wi: ~

:;p: lJl


~

13 4iIIll' fJJ ;;Ie 11( lit 1iiB 'Vl IT ~ 7k 'IJ:

v

:lib P.IT

7k..

;<.

Wl

7k..

.p

~

I:l

J~

ro

iill /

13 ;;Ie ""-

'" ~ ji\ ~

S

;;Ie ""-

'" ~

;jt6. ~

1l. .t.n

1l

~

",

-1,

iiJI

13 ;!c

::::'-'

.p

~ 1Ji: ~ 'Bi 1m ~ fA1j jj 13 1Ji: ;;Ie ;!c lit 13

~

ji\

~ \lit

;!c

B

~ l* Ijj W

llit

illi /

13 ;;Ie

~

1l. Vl(l:;:

~

~

ti)

~

El.

aJ1( Z. '7

P.IT

v

IIll

~-

jfp

~

T

~,

J:I::

-1-

;t

:iP-

~p

=

~

fl;t

A )~

=, ~

im

15

~

l'

,

-1,

13

~

"~

~

~

;;Ie

1Ji: 15

;!c 13

-r

7

:JL Fl

r

1iJ

'7

IT 1m

IT

m

~

~,

v

$.

;t

mt ~ 1i.. 1f 1Ji: / , ~

7k

5i!.

?

1i.. l\1I ยฃ Z.

",

i\

,

y

\lit IU1

=

~ T

:t~

13

*1Il

iIX 'Blf. Ml

Ii

ti. 1'f

)~

Wl

'fJJ ~ ~

a

~

~c.

~~

...(

lUI

(l.:

5i!.

lit 5F ~

.

;<.

-;

",

-r

~ '7

~

~ ~

j1 ~

:ti

1l+

~

5i!.

5i!.

.p

~

tt-

-;

;vJ ~

13 ;;Ie

\lit

~ ~ Ijj

IIll

:f.Il

-1j\

,:p

i*

:JL Fl

Iii\:

-I13,

~ .lยงl

~

~

';J!\

;!c

Ijj

-

~

-I-

J::

W-

13

.p

llit

r

1{f '7

fX

~

v

12

~

1l WI\

'* ,Ii.IT ,....,

11:/

7

L.

~{

:7

m

y

r"

v A

'-'


-; ~I-

7'

5t

~

5

~

?;-

Q

"1

2-

.. 'J:

,iii;

~

~)

"-

~

)t..

-~

lid -J

.-.:.

1\1-

'"' $~

:4!

§ ~ ~

~

Q ,Ui

wn

if

'7

~ ~ f,j\

~f>

'c

j~ y

'"

?

1:: /

(;I;:

~

~

W

" ~

~

of

,

I~

~rr

UH fli \1\

;1'L

H \\H

If-

ilfJ

It

i,\

'7

* ~

m

~

n

..J;

lj: ,jill

~!

5E.

, -...

;/

v

-I:.;

1p JL

!t1

"I

fI

"""

'"

~ ~ '7

...

" ,Eo

~ I

rn

"11

.J:I:

lid

J]L

iic

8

*"'" .0

~

}t.. ~-

~

* 5:£i.

on

j'f

ffii ft '7 T

~

rp

~ Jj!

."

Z. ~

[iii

1::

f£ lit.

J;A

~

EI

5E.

~

3l

llj

I

lfl

til

y

~

""' J»."

iJ.

'fll'i

11

?

T ~ ~

4-

7k.

J!&

'l

~

IT

~

"M"

~ -\-

'fJJ

J.,

1W: :?;-

n.

'l

"/

M" ~

-I-

(;I;: V b(§ -ll:

'7 ~ 1f~

~

*

L.

It..

%

~

\

~

If:

It..

\-

111

fi;

/

'l

~

ffil

fiii

~

~

~

lR!

~

3l

;m

rp

?

T

A

~

'7

!iilE

'7 ~ ~

~

/, 7-

IX

!l

J\!(

'fjJ

8!

"*

.!e

1t

?

'l

.0

#

;t..

)t..

~

{

l\~

?

ofi£

:J:

-{

7

l!Il

"'J

.

~ B

III

-:r

,

?

B

J.,

-l<

,~

WJ

"y

f.I£

fay

lilt

1:: I

iE!c

~

7

.:p;

D.

~

t~

't..

o'il\

1flJ ;; v

1'l"-

/

)(-

-Ii

6tt

.tJ.

G

M

'n;

3t

-;

~

~

a7E

n

~

)F

m -I5J}t

A

7;;t;

Q 3-11 'l

/F

1£ I

IT ~ T

.::.

1)

1m

//

.7-. Itft~

-L-

;XI

.1;(:

G:

I

11;

13

?l&

*

~


11;

~

~

-if ~ 7-

D.

D. *4 @j

•m IITi

t'

~

/

:it

~

~

:fit /:lI 7,

*4

'"

J:l: A

.It

til

iIX

&it

:.vifX

'~

~

1/

$

X

~

Ja

~

~

'l\l\ § /:lI All ~

,on

7

~

JJ:. J1L

Ji

7-

1f-

3t

? I

~

}l-

:l'tl;

Ii?: 'l\l\

m

:tt

1f

7'I-

.It

.-{

1r

~

&:.

~

§

~

7

~

I

/'j

:tII£ iii

I

~

ni

:if( ifX

~

-,

~

J:l:

~* /iii /:lI

El

~ IIi

, ""'1-

'l\l\ g ;;< 1<. 'l\l\

;f.t

~

~

?

til

...

11

il'f

m&

B

'l\l\

JIi:

il ~ £Ii:. ~ 1p .f; 1!E /Jl~ /'j JJIJ

I

L

::J

g ~ ;;< .lit.

jL

:Ii,

l~

,.

~~

I

A

:..-

'l\l\ I 8 ~ ;;< .0:3i: ~. 'l\l\

'$

r:

-I'

'7

/iii -\!l'

A

fj

7-

;t

II!J

7-

III ,f,

.It

:-

~t

'l\l\

~

~

:Ji

~

~

~

.,.

B

~.

5.

~

j)

~

~ JI[

I

-1B

/'j

"1

t(:

R

11l. :.1.1=-

R

*ii: pO

~

:Wi

/'j

.,. '1&

I'! lit

~ ~

'it

lJ(

El

L

R

i\l':. 3t PJ3 ..!f Iii!

:fJJ tit

.,...

iH(

pc,

4-

,t(

S

"

~

It !i:: tJf.

"

f£ tJf.

?;

J-.

-It JH::

"

I ~!

iIA

tf; {t

'"

.1;,/,

f&

10


4-

:tjJ

IIH

rfH

fIl -I'

fIl -I'

i\ ~

1f:.

,Ej

ij

J-

11-

,

~ ~

lIS fIl

Jift Zk. M

*

i\

~ ~

$t

ij

Illl

~

lR

fl\;

1m

V

A

f\

1i!li IT

R -{

*".

ttl

~

B: '7

i$

L

If.

~ ~

~

::<.

Q-

11

'~

'\'

iii

,

.

'Jl:

~

"

'f-

.(l,}

Zk. ,

5. tlit

,;...

)~

U!.

!If:

-I-

we.

S

;)j ;r..

'r

~

-'i:

-I'

)~

,:

11-

,

\.-

I'

Qll

rij(

B

!R ~ ~ m iIli 1i

j(

1J€:

i'! 1J€:

/

1'1

~

EO

~

~ IlQ ~

~

.~

-I'

iii\: &

-;,-

i'!

B

iii

fj

I'

j(

1'1

/

7

J,

~

r1!

It

l'

'7

~ "l

mJ

;il.

n

+ ;J;J

~

n'

:/

:/

'7

')I

l0: tli IT

~

;If '7

;;;' 1fT

J\

9

B

;II ;'

P

;'£

JOC

J\

1f,

;Z.

~'

+

m:

!C.'

t:: I

~

')I

If' ;Ii

Uti fIl

B

1'1

')'

ti;

~

:Iii

IIff

-1-

~

B

'7

Q'

'7

:jJ

71 1-

;4-

7.

B

.

;f; ~

It

*15

,Ej

+

~

;J."

j(

¥

!

It;

~

~

i\

~

f-t:

-{

W

11(:(

fIl -I-

~

~k

~ ~ ~ .=.

iii\:

El

-{

~

tQ

I' T

.-fBi lin

~

B

Illl

om: nn ~

* • I

~

i\

J:

*

8

nB it

+

A

8

{<})

r

{l

:Iii

.. <

,,<

;;;-

iii


'7

Pili

Pili

\lit

" ~

Wl

" :t£

fj

13

NT ..... '7

m :iIr iBr.

~

i\

*iit"'" J!t ;flI. *t&:

+

&f-I:;

f:I

-

'B1l

j[

'B1l

rJr

:tE

:til!

+

jL

i

!Ii'.

~

v

J!t -W

A

/~

m

'7

13

.~

~

tQ

-'2:

+

13

PO

J!t

9

fj

f:I

~e.

'i7.J

I1B

~

iiffi

~

'*Pili

!

I1t

:<$:

W

'"

/~

Ilil'

.ru!.

+ p,

B

13 ;;I<:

lie.

jf~

B:

fj

li.

I1B

~

4"flll:

D.

V

T

\Ii

= ~

lit

13

ilif(

;¥6-

j,i

t&: !Ii'.

I1B

IIG

,

J!t iI:

~

~

+

.i\

i\

.<¥-

&f-

j\

JL

I1B

:j;j',

pJr

~

+

7ft..

Wl

i\ jp i\

13 \l'(,

-1-

~

B T

,

--j-

)1-

,r-

...

:/

..{

1-'

:HI v

~

13 J:t

,

;)i

g,

;;<.

:ilL

"f-

l::'

~

I

1P

1P

i8c

!NIl 8

~

-t:

!ire

~

A

# 4-

Ji!. iii\: B

~

li. iC

~

'7

'"

B

* ,Q

'l£

J!t

tQ

9

~ ~

ft

ff

~

13

Pili

J!t

-'2:

'7

v

,;,-

A

T :pj ~

13 ;;I<:

111 ...

t:1

~

Jv

f:I

~

Jj

,=f:I

L).:. r:J

fjfiJ

~

.{

.tf::.

.::;.

~

.

w.r. $

~ ~

13 ;;I<:

+ D.

iij:

H· iit J!t

*

;¥6~

B

* iiffi

on

I 1!$ ~

-

!&Bl A Jv

flf:

i!r ~ ~

11. ~~


£;~

-til.

'fJJ Jt

§:-

:if(:

~

~c.

~

:f!l

A

ilX

A

!1!t

iI&

~

~

:1'

b:J

:Iff:l

~

ji

I!ilj

~

;:I' "F-i

"t

~

>l"f

!2f

~

'k

w:

iii

*W fI.t

fJ

~ ~

~

r~

y

U:\ /

rtf

~

AA

Fl.

~

f5t

!Br:

7;

:m:

~lit

~tIli

/:!:l

:.ll:

'7

U~

tit:

7;

~~

51:.

[!€

fl

+ 8

§:

£X;

.>i!

/'

'it

Jl:

51!. 1M:

8

>l"f

/

tI;:

J1t

~

~

~

y

fi'il

I!ilj

/:!:l

i~ ~

1i, :l;I: ~

;;1 y

;;f

.IE /

IT

~

T

7,

J" ::J

I' '1 1~ oK

~

~ ;M'

;lit

~

:t~

-:

11

j',}

~ i!4

~

.J.

~!\fi

-;1-

WJ

-1

I

7 /

7;

~ '7

~

-iri

J"

ilil;

ltv.

~ ~

Q

~.

'7

,{

i@

y

~

;lil: §.

1/

'M' ~

~

/

'~ R

:~:

iY'

~

~{, jz

." -,

{if

/

ij: ~ "'!{~

-1 A

l' I

:;}r

J"

f~

1P.i'

'7

)(

m 7.

~

Lr-

iL

iJl[

~

~

ill!:

'.

~ :I!'. o/l

y

it

~

/H ii1i

~7-

~

'>t

y

7.

rm.

r: y

Foil

J1t

J;J..

J-. /

M!

:t~ /

i!p ;r~

~

7

UJl

-iM'

1lfi

7

R

J:

/

~

1Ii~

'* /

;ii\:

~

~ ~

1m'

z.. pJ< HJl

ji

;..

I}

/

:Ii

Jv

Il

:lit .\-.

¥I-

:tlIi \li'

,

)5'

J;J..

~

'H

J>:R


-; '-'

~ \IX \iii: IQ ~ Tf .I iiJI\ iR: i:'I

:q: 13

3C

* -:0 tl'

Jti -{

" '" ;<.

'-'

~ 5t

0/

1i: ~

t!!i

1lil 1:1:\ ~

p)j'

m

+ /: + -I:;

Wi

:m

+

*..... *"'" .Iil ilf: '*

;fIl

13

R

J\

~f-

/"

R

~i'.

1~

13

~

ta

• ~ 1)

:m

n13

*"'".i'< PO

~ ;t:;

~

15-

;JfIj

J:

,;.-

IJ1.

;WI~ )~

1l'

m: "

~

J'Jf

-!;l

if AA Jli!

1-

Fol

.1

~

:I

J,;J,

D. J:

.El

*i

~

;f;t.

7r-

;/

=

-I!

:7

v

~ }v 0>

:;.

" !:;. 4;~

-)-

.1

-( ;<.

?

1 }v

¥

L

"J

i!F

~

"J

i!F

~

,;.-

~

~

,;.-

>7

}v

}v

Off

% 3Z

'\'-

-M'

-, .-"

,;"

-,

+

7' ~

..-(

tit

=

3Z

?

:Ii ~

I;!<

;<.

1 )I-

6

~ ~ ~ ~

IQ

*llif

"J

1i.

~ ~

;I$:

~

=

IJil ;<.

)~

#

;<.

,;.-

~

-14-

'-'

lit

~

tIi

~

1)

P1!

~

Iii:

:Ii!Ii fJ

~

II

13

pO

pO

\IX

~ 5t

IQ

~

13

13 ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~

&Il

~

\!iI: \!iI: IQ

13

liir JL

4l!ll: :VJ

If!l

1.t

5t lit D. D. 4 I!jij if! :Jf :iZ-.

'/

.I\.

:Ii!Ii fJ Wl

fIr

'"

}~

+

mt 1f-

~

~)11

~

~

t' ~

~

~

,It

~

~ ~

7:l:

~

IQ

*'m

~

If..

]i;t

13

3C

;;t

M

~

13

iii'.

iJ

' 71'

3C

~

uH ;fIl

~ &f/"

;/'11 !O 71'

~

~'f-

:J;I}

m t'

~

JIX

D

~

~

5t

, ~

)~

~

J'Jf ~ 7'

Z "J

ft 7

~

'"

-,

-r ,;.-

'" .' L

-~

It! r ~ '7

\IX ~

;:;

!It

~

?:l<


~

5E. f& '7

ug ;fn

+ i\

*

-\!

FJ

V A

:tL

*

PI's 5E. ~

~

EI

1(

!i§

:m

.Ii

fr

i!f

fJJ

~. jij:

~ /,

til 3t '!l1l :llt

~

~

-L.-

$

9fJj

.m.

~

5E.

!k

it?

jl

*

:C: ;r.:

jF

~

IT Wl R

1If:i ;f.II

+

i\

!

/'

~

,EJ

+

,

/'

-i-l:;

S

, J;I: I

i;ll. fi(

JS !l!1f

*

~

'ij\

!ffi!i - PiIi

)l-

* 5E.

V

7

;It

~

"

/

)1-

V

Jill

1ll!. I

ng

I

'7 lOC ;f&

'7

7

rmA

~ l'

)1-

I

*4tlIB

·(If

<If.

'I'

-, pi

1jL

-1-

jij: 'nLfr

1f-.

4t~

FJ

~

'" :z.'7

~ ~ ti)(

~

5E. \liI:

:f5t

* I

~

cli

~

a:

~

'7

~tf

i\

EI

JS

-'ill'

i\

-l~

5

-e-

jfin

)l-

~

fl1l.

~

IIlJ

*

pi

-I-

'7

lilt !it Jil

;f.II

~

Z.

ft

A JI-

!fif L.

\1[',

EI

A

)l-

=

/

1m

jIf

IJJ IT 4t- til '7 *BI 3t f1 )tl] m 'liB

~

*li

&.

f£JJ JiJt

I

1*

~

/

il!l:

8M

S :J;i:

"'

~

~

~

~,

pq

ilit It

*ilt

~

m

flf!

'*

~:z

1:1

Jv

~

~

i

7'l< Yi; 11: lltr If:lc AA< 4t= Ji'; 'ii'i I ij[; til tj]: ~ 3t ~ ~ is tl\l 7lit ;l'l; a;rv jij: I 7'l<

A

.Ii

i

.if{

1m

*11:

.;j';

'liB ~

1'*

~

.=.

EI

:,p; 'Iff

.,- m '7

~I-

l1!l

:/

J:t

~

B iBr

EI

!£ \1[', i!1i' ;ffi it 11'" .~ Jia ~ ~ ti>.

-¥ IT

Ill]

FJ

Fl R!i l!L

"* f;i

~

~ j§

"Vffi

r.

fJ "-

;;<.

V


Ii 'r, lji

;E iil~

7,

:7

~

"

,"

T

r

;/

:7

'l

'/ T

!I

~i"

I

,1\

",

," II

:/

;1-

-,"

,t;

¥

" PI,

t--

, I1IJ

'7

'"L

Iii

r

,"

7, h

,-

"

:-

;/

1~

,

]i

:.::l

'7

~

*$

/'

* go

go'"

..,

r

+

~

i\

1L

1:,t ;tf;l -;'01; A

ttl!. ~ /

ft

:nt

f1f

V

/

I I-

'E' /

1M V

*

1t /

:;t A ..JI-

,.

::l

pi

-r

I1iJ

Y1< ~

Ifl

i'J;; 3t

'7 ~

~

lI-

i'J;;

P

~ /

YR 9

-m

pi ~ /

<Jr. }i§ 1i' tfl /

I

"

it !l:

-YR

ft

A

~

}V

1if

+

~

~

-t-

1\: iL /

J5 ft

~ )(

-'l! H

~ ~

+

Ii

i5i . " ~

J:t

~

~

~

jL

W.

!II. [rij

Wi % ~ ~

*

i\

*

""

BJt ~

;1C

l\f,

I,

1ft

"

cp

p

$

'""'

"

IIjj 7-

)l.

'7

'1'

111

-..

;;"

:.?"

'7 'E-

..

7'

)1-

T

;.-

;/

)l

/

T

@

p

I±l 51:

5'1', ;t

ti

r ;/

if

T

r

7' Jl

JJl

7" ~

;f. /I'

.:=.

$

7,

,:

'..."

0

go

~

l\f,

1m

+

A

Ii

a

:j!;

4

~ ~

+ . \:;

a

,


-{ I'

;;>

/.

rli -7"

*-

T

-l:

;;>

L

-V-

:/

.."

.."

;;>

1\'i

.:;:

-iT

7-

I'

t.-

-1-

-(

:/

" -': " -rli

-y-

Y {I

T

7'

11

I~

)L-

'.

y

7.

>Iqij

'.

If

7'

lL-

,.

IL-

:r.-

=l

'L-

T

;;>

7.

Y

"]-

7-

,

~

"f' ,j~

}L-

/.

7'

"

)~

j\,

T

Ji.

*MM!

-j-

'*'

~ ~ [if,

\Ill

IL -j-

!E

I1Y

~

jfj

$

±

-L;

I

f;~

-;-

:!E

~

.*T

t:

I-'

It.-

to

..,. :.--

,I' I'

r

Iii

IL-

)i

~

:J; jJ\'

~

-,"

cj-

."

';-

L 7' ~

;t.

"11 .-1

-v

;.

,.

~Ir

a

"

7. ,~

,..

ft'

7.

:..-'"

V

lilT

-\-

-\'

jfj

Jt !!:t

ok.

*a\

.ijl, I

X fl·

'f;~

-L; ~

-r

tit

~ I

'I-

7'

.l:l:

I1!l

0

-t~

/'

~J

:-

T

y

'7

)~ ~t

:t:.

~!~

Y

)t.-

7.

-I-

'7

,..1)

m

7'

-I"

:J.'

7::

:.-

;;>

{I

7.

. ,-

eti

'7

;.;

:;:

-l:

!t-

i\

"

*

7-

!5-\

liP.

I~ .-

7-

-{

T j~

Ji

,Ii

:/

-iT

;1-

,

;;>

to

-{

HI

r

;;>

7'

*

-,-

~

3

~

!t-

M

.,-

)\

jL

'it

!IIi

* ~


"!I y

:i'i'I ,.::

m

>I<

'7

,"

m :Jj

J

'7

A

;jJ

--r

.i.!

:i'N

!I

:Jj

A

Y

to

'7

1::" IJ

to

7'

7~

Il!J

~:

~

~

...

y

-1

HI

9

'J

... '

:/ '/

!I

7"

:;

-'f

IIIJ :/

1" ~

7 ;;t

, '"

7'

:;

7'

7~

~

,/,

I

::r:

~

,

)~

:to

to

:;

Il!J

..,. r

v

\j;)

\SJ

~

'7

:;

'"

+

+

;t;

~

~

'7

"A

'7

ji'\

) 1-

f'7

V

-i :,.-

-v

7

T

..,.V

:;..-

J

7'

::I

V

'J1[

7'

~

.,

'"

4!:

m -',

'7

Il!J

7" 5;1, ;;t

*-

*'7. j-

~

~f ~ ~

-<r

..,.

'7

)~

m 11-" p

V

;;t

?

r

"\'

'7

m "!i"

'.i T

-',

':; 11-

-'f 11-

J~

~,

"

'7 :;

::I"

v ;-

11J;t

:;

lib

T

*~

/~

+ j\

2

'l\lI

"":7-

!/"

to

::

&h

j\

*-!j! jf<

~

:ll

-v

J

Illl

.It

+j\

~

..,.

m

~ j\

l!J;\-

~ ~

,~

",'

t#! W

Ji

~

"?

4!:

:;

~

-t

a

..,.

:;

7

!I

+

;t;

1!11.

!/ -\"

+

;t;

-I:;

W -!t! ~

+

-I:;

~


!r

1)

411

T ~~

v

}"

111

v

'/ y

T

m ;JJ

T T

y

;;-

7

i7

V

}l;;<.

'l'-

T

t-

7

:IJ 7

::.-

1!IJ

;;<.

-I:;

B lIB t£i ;f:iJ ~ T

¥

~ ~

""

~ /

~

y

r,

1I!l

~

fnl

." :/

.it

1!IJ

lf

tb

I!!l

+ ii

~

"it. -i

" -i ttl

;I-

~ ~

i

;m .fi:

llifc

,

1liJ

'-'

ms

~

A

v :/

'/

1'"

:fil

",

7'

'"7

-7

:lj

'I'iT

}l-

Y

'" 1!IJ

}l,

~

,.

'7

V

;;<.

;;-

'"

1:::

1-

1

m

;;<.

l!7

'"

;t

A

fnl

fnl

-/

mJ 1*

~

"

0.:.

;;<.

;;-

~!!

m ~ .1 .It $ ~

-l:(

iii

~

p

"

~

'7

~

Fnl

@

."

'ij[

'7

7

:/

HIT

~~

+- ~ ii.

1i

+

/\

~ 1p 1; fit ~

'MI

'" ,"

1:::

T

'" ~

ttl

-\r y

1"

~

!r

fnl

.. "

Y

~.

PIT

·Ii·

-1-

Ii.

~

;{:r

j-

t;

-t:It,

"

1&

"JI. 1

~

*

II


~-:-.: ~~...

n JiJf t~ I

llIIiI 'J

~

"7~ fQ

- f-

~ ~

tt

'\

&fi\

fl

7 Q

~

lie. -;,

'" --,

"* Jlt I!!iI 1/

-IT

.,

7:

~

*

n

IYf

/

iii

-r V

&'

~

V'

:ffi

~

Ii 8

*it:"'" 7G

=

;g iI!i v J:t

t;,

~

itt

.I£:

~ ~ fl!j ~ jf:

Jifr M

I

I

]3_

~

~

9

*E

!iJt

*

!JI..

OJ

*-

1M ;rt

'"

iii

Il-

I

~

tttJ

!\';

-r

E8 ~

~

$I. '7 ~ ~~ -I!:

-tf

~

~n

I

JJ(

A.

~

I

~ ~

'l

--,

l-

{7

v 'f~~

~

$I. ~

11r. I jI

;tf

I-

7-

I

~

A

'7

'f!P

11r.

~

~

'7

Iii iii.

1.k ill :* iJit iP.~

'l

--, /"

'7

" ';; l'

--, t: Iv ~

1fir lifT tttJ ~

• :00

~

:/

OJ

Iiil

~

PJl -l<:

'1 ~

9

A /

.,

'-

iWT

~

'7 T

/

JI.

T-

ik

$ t1il jI

~:

.

of>

IT

tr

*=

'-

f;!t

9

'7-

-I!:

'7

~

tt !Ie

m ~

t:t

If. K.t

'E-

'-

iIt

/

:/

t' '7,

OJ

~

..--,'

lli

JR IIJ

T '7

:i!It

,r-

I '-

iJt:

--, A

I}

% I Jilt Jfn.

;J

..'

7'

I

JI-

:/

PJl

A

'f-

-l<:

'7

§l

II-

OJ

~

'Ii 1P-JJIJ T

A

-r

~

I

II-

'7 Q

I!!iI 13: til

iiiljl ~ '7

jJ ;;(

Q

:/

-j-

-e:- L

116;

I

~

7-1-

~

"$L

:lL.

-l<:

'7

I-::!

~ I

-1 T

/

tttJ

~i.i

11-

;t

.-.: ~ ~

;It

'-

Ii,

IL.-

;-

I

7,

t:

-..

;It

~

11! Iiil

'if

;1J

SI

*= PJl

m

T

I

:

JJ( !\';

{ft.

m

~

'7 ~n

I]' !Ie 1r III 11'< fIi m .ft- tl T

1/

11r.

~

~ ~_ ..-: -;-~ "-c~ ~::::::1

.m

v

fia-

T

'7

9

'E--

';; ~

11r. ~

L.

I

-ifj~

--, 7-

"7-

,

'1-j-

v

:/

*JR

'7

~

'"

I

r I


....

-

~lf

.t:~~ '1-

I}

'r 0

,

J'

-J\i: .!lli

'ale '1'> /

:dli liC

/

ty. iil\ '7

'A' -l!:

;K

.Ii IliJ it: /

,j;tI.

~n

Pi .t-

1l

'--~---'-

M

-;

!l!;

~n

jJb

4C_

±

illi

!If

-r

T

*!iii

II~n

/

!If

'7

;§i

/

j'.li

lli JL i!I! 1!IJ

~

Iii1l

::iJ

rJl

*M

ij;/I #, '7

~n

!If El"l

IT

i'i!t 3f-

111

9

1i~

II-

VI

7111< /

'7

J!:

I t-

;It:

;It!:

Ji!g

~ ~

/

"*lI:'*' I

!\" ~

II

:R!iii

II".]

!If Ill!

~ /

~ ~

!{S. ~

~n

1t r..l

~

!If ~

-'.f.

tIt it!: /

jill f~ I It

~

~

/

~

m 9

9

!lI: Hi

1'$

7

._-

r

7

~

1l'

!fit

iii!:

:y~

'7

:n If

I!".J

l§lj

5Ii

'"

Iv

90

;gt

fl.i

lI'8

.~

13

lEt

/

~

:A~

!7

%'1

-r

ii\ll I'M l?!1

:y-

!7

%

-,

" J't

10' Iv L..

I

lli JL,

JiJi

1: 11 -..........--

'7 .f~ y

.A

Iv

,

"'\"

JV

1!IJ

!?li

J:t

'\" '7

bb I

lJi.

~~

;2;

t::

,.

$

II

Jil.l/

ff"l Ii

~

?

T

~

= ,1\ A

JL 7k.

:IIlli

r.Jl

*-

1:: "!k

I t-

I

II':

ill!

*'"ill

Ii ~

*

f1

-----~I]

m iL IYt

JUt

;Il<

~

y

)1-

,-

f>fr

:r

Ji!g ~

m.

I

-r

~

~

IliJ

:I/ii

mt fq]

ifii

-r

jjj[

7"

:m

II-

a

*C

/

-l)'

:::--

~

/

~

~

m m~

y

II-

'/

jt

1i!I:

3'1ll

-r

!1!1

iii:

!b IX §ij 9t

'7 om

:ul.

II-

7

3?:

m

i& -r

~

JtIl1

~.

.R:

1§i

~ ~

"-

:r

I"

If'( I-

II-

1/( M

'Iff iii

v

"E-

Jl.

.--.~~

FI

y

A

}I1t1~

~.~

I

!7

3l

/

IT

'7

1)

~

II-

Jf

iJi.

9 ';1

!I± 19

'"

II-

.

,.. . -. m

~

;It

....

..,..-::.:.::...~

....:::-:'413


iI:i iJc

m ;:<. 0

)J '7 j$ Q:

'"I ) 1-

ik

%l: '7 6'(f ~ ;:<.

)1

-.:/ -;1-

IIf{

f!1

+l\ ~

r:. }j

+

:it 8

Y0


.

~~~

'1i:

,

roo

]!

@:

*-

i!1!

V

*:sa jE =

il!: J'/..

jj\'f

MI ~

<A

"'~"

~

~

2

.l:t.

I1b '7

V

7-

*-

~

l1搂

tr

~

)~

V

:*

.iE

..E!.

/

~

'/

:sa I!l

>f-

m

m I路

:;lE

MI J!!

0 lIt

l p jji$

iii lIl: '7

;!l;. '7 ~

141

i:ft

)1.-

V

"E-

"-

.!;I.

/

)~

7'

!I

~.

Z

$

D

~

OOi

/

"-

I'

JT

;f;ii

.It

m,

l,

*If! ~

~

2

'7

I1f

~

j]'

* f!(;

,\j "-

gij.

J:I.;

1L ~

"-

*'

'"

&lJ

)1-

1f路

1i !all j)-

;jjl

!I

:l7'

)"

;;j;;

T

~

V

II!.~

~ ~

-j,

)t-

I

'Ii\'

-If

...

to '7

JIlt

+

~

l!Ii -r :~

-"

.It

/!II{

t1'-

T

tf..'

/

'7

*~.

tit

IiJlI

-1<

p).

1f.~

~

)t-

~

Ul!

.Jv

6f.

Iff

iI1'<

i\

/

ific

*I':I

~ ~

ij,jl

V ~ gij.

~

v '7

V

~

*'Ii\' .t;tr. :!l }Ii;

;~

~

*B

'7 ~

I

1L

-t::

)t-

lib ~

Pfj '7 ~

'7

* [@

-j-

-t::

1't

I

;0

~

2

I1f

f!(;

3it

it:.&

Ii:

Ii:.

l:t

;l-

rm

.l:t.

=

;Jl

*B

t1ii

:m

~

*'Ii\'

V ~

li1~ )1-

ifF A

t<

~

tai

*If!

6ji.

/

.I:l:

[WI ~ '7 ~

T

T

)1-

1l9:

*

-j-

'7

13

Ott

)~

MI

JW MI .!;I.

-;);.

tit

,.

)1-

l'

~

.

1ir

:i\l; /

..E!. :It!! / :!l

"-

*-

B "" /

'7

$

&lJ

)~

.!;I.

i卤 I?lI ~

1)~

V

~ !(ff

'7 V

ff

fiJI

'7 ~

'7

"EI

V

<1' ~l!.i

1L I

~

fi. '7 ~

f;'i! "-

~ ~

I

II ~

fiI

*

if ik ~


". )1-

I'

:/

!1

~

y

"

7' '7

".

y

A

'7

.... -{ y

)

--.:

j.

v

11t: I'


-v

" It.

x ~

~

7

."

t:

;b

~

x

>t-

~

"

-1!:

~

Jf

~

-I!:

;/

}I-

T

:..--

/

"

'"

,y

-v

T -1

I

r

I

7'

7j

9

}I-

T

~

9

*.,." '"

,..9

It.

,..

~ :.'

,y

'/

7

:..--

'"

,..

T

9

.-(

:;

:;

7

7

:..--

"

7

!7

:..-7

.,.:f

"

...{

v -7

}I-

I'

'"

.-(

~

}I-

,..

7

T

A

!7

.,.

~

:..--

V

It.

;;-

A

T

7

)

'"


......,;~---.:g~... ~ . .-.........

,.....~ ":""-+:~~

i:

J;;I.

-c

.J:t

0

~

j\

0

~

mil T

11<

;t-

)1,-

7

-1'

"

~

Mil

~

j\

-N:

~

j\

11<

-R:

-J!l:

-I!:

j\

:7

"

'E-

:,..-

/'

tl'

}I,-

/

:/

:Il 7,

~

0

~

'/

'"

0

'";;<. /

I

li

t.r

iti

.It

-1-

~ '"$I..

if!

!1I1

f\

Wd ;f1l

1p

r. fJ

/,T

'c)

:,..-

)1,-

1-

"jj

1lL -J&

'\t

ij!I

~

.J:t Cd

Q

1L

«Ii

-

Tb.

:7

-I!:

"7 "\'"

~

~

~

"~

-I" 8

£

fMI

~

.-

~

j@j ~~

-g-

-t1

i:

-18 -1-

1iJ L-

Wr

jl

j[\

/.]I

II~

.J:t

Cd

~

I1k:

~

ft

(t ~ It]'

-

~ tt fib

RM

~

.A

1L

Ie

f»I

-r

fill! 4!If jll ~

JV

oft

i

Jib

1&

Q tjI.J ~1i ~

*fr

p.a

~

"<

~

M1

~

IC

-r -c

Ifl

1fir

-It

tc

tt..

t.

~o

~

tc Q

Ii..

lie, If) ~" C""t...~"-"':::'~

rhi ~ iI 11


foJi' T '7 ~

* 'f.F A

::J

17

~

)~

"7

/

WI -l<

F-I If/:.

'"

£

0

'I'-

M' lEE

~

I1f.l ;fIl

+j\

T )~

l'i: if:

&f-

Iff, '7

I'l -t: A

~

-l:;

B

ft:Y

T <!j!:

?t:

;!Ii;

l1li!

,J:r '7

J:t t:,

Jji i8(

if;;

~fjI(

~

$

v

liIS

j;J-r

fIJ

'B*'

~

ll\l :Iir:

/

~

JII.

['1!\ 7 )~


. ~ ,.

*7-

}1-

}1-

IJ;\'

1i:.

"E-

WI

'i/

/

? ;t£

7 YO

ltlf

=r

PJr <P

{~

*~ ~

~ -\<

'i/

il'&

D~ '7

4-

7-

11.: 5-

~)II

**pJf /

~

:f£ '1 ~

7

'i/

lUX

/

It 7

~

Wr .It. Jfb

lID

ill

Wr .It.

lll't

Jlli

/

m /

'jJ

7-

*." Ji\(;

1ih

11.:

~

5-

117

ft !l\1

m ffl

=

!\lJi :JJ

I;j /:1:1

* /

~

W. '1 ~

I~

=r

ltlf

}1-

=

at£

!t

k

'i/

li1f

WI

7 Yo

k

/

~

9i } 1-

::J

1k

'"

;7

IW

Jlt /

Y

;;;(

:&

1K

ltlf

~

}v

~

*-

A

v

=r

Y 0

B

Wr .It. ~

" i±

@11

§'#

M

*

~

tr ~ /

7-

Y I-

RlIl

JiJf

~

lEI

~

* :it /

'"

IT -\<

~

}1-

~ "-

:R: ?

~lIl

~

pit ~

ill /

@ §' jfj

7-

'"

}W

*

~

Jilt

'1

~~

'7

&

Jilt

* *

;It

"E-

/

~

B

~

I~

7-

~)I\

?

~

}1-

*

~

5-

}1-

}1-

m IJ;\'

::J

'" *7-

=

~

J1t

}1-

I-

."

{!Ii :JJ

~

IfJ\

~ I-

1/

-l}'

Yo

=r

.J;l

:!1!i ~

il#

:lll:

:JJ

'"

m

/

Ji\(;

Jl:

m 7-

1.J

::r• pJf WI '7 ~

§'#

ff:

a

IX

}1-

~

iJJ

~

=r

1K

/

t:.

}1-

~ ~li

$.

~ ~&'i/

lJJ

/

'1

5-

k

~ ~

*

Y

~

§'#

i*

3

il#

*

~

l1e

15 9

~

m =r =

* ?'

} t.

'1 ~~ ~

}t.

'i/

pJf ~ /

1k /

i'fil

~ ~

$

Wi Jt fiIi

~

"I ~

tt 11 ~

¥j

m -

-

~

7"

)V


"ti i/J11 5f;= A 0

~

'1

m!

* -t:

"" ::l

~

'1

WI -t: 3 0

~

""!7

Ji1'i

*

~

i/JII

l* Ji)f

jf!l

-Ii\

1f.

+ ~

t!lI B

'1 ~

7 /

'It

iDt

1'11'

/

g£ :I-

"$I.

@

1m

*-

lI'lf T 1i:

'1

B "" '1 ~ :m il&

1i'f

:iIt

"" ~

A )1-

/

~ 7"

~ ~

1fit '1

~

•"" ?£ "jJ

'/ /

r&.

~

WI

""

'1

7'

&i

m

*

.l:t

""/

'7

""7'" '" ~

.l:t

tb

tb

m

jJL

iJ!c i%:

)1-

/

'1

~ :I-

~

Ji)f

:;t:

WI /

~

11 r~

.~~-~.

~

~..::;;.

"7

il

0


~T.ii

- -=--=...:: '1

JI.

~

i§.

.l:t

It '1

v9

1if

Jlt

;;<.

/

*JI(

J~

1Il:

]I!:

iFIf =f-

~

Ii:. 'Jl-

=A

41-

-I!:

*

J~

*

li

~

?

~

~

9

?-

$

ffi

'li'i

'7

~

li ::.-

1II 'ii.J 4t -g

5~

It

M

-r

1J

tt

lEi

~

~

JI.

'0;

m

~

~

~

l'

!Ii:

~~

.l:t

;;<.

'fi!

::.-

~

J L-

'J 5-

5-

-I!:

ill;

'7

*'Ire

v-

~

~ ~ '7

*13

/

Jl.

!l~

III

..., A

/

*1Ji:

iJT.

J~

;f

=f-

;0$:

::.7

0

A

~

/

5~

~

-r

j$

JL-

/

;Jl

~ ;;<.

~

:1m ~

1'*

Mti "$L

ll!l!:

* ~

is

~

~

Jlt

6:J /

<P

*-El

E

~

::..1iJ.

ID/( '1

tf 7

1-

"Wi

;0$: El ~

:7t

* .l:t 1/L .l:t A ~~

"*ill! ~)II

Ni' ~

r. !ill A

JiJf :it '7 ~

'li'i

JL-

'"?

Jl.

;0$:

/

JI-

v-

III

~ ~

'7

~ "$L

;E

" *

ft

/

/

;0$:

5-

'0;

.l:t

r

~

~

JiJf

'1 J;I.

9

I1h 115

il!

~ ~

fi.\

ij!! {IIi

~J1I

A

5jjL

/ {:£

'/ 5-

~

I=f-

ft

is-

'7 ;>::

=

Jl( j$ /

m ii$ '1

tE t!i ::.-

5-

.l:t

-I!:

~

f:11

'/

ill; /

ill;

iff I9ll

/

Jilt

HI! ::.-

=

::.?

;0$: ~

?

JIj

i&

~

)/

/

tb =A ;f!J ~

'1

Iiil

1l

~

~ l' ~ ~ ~ /

ill; ~

;f

~

IJJ

/

;1&

IW fill

/

~

JiJf ;;<.

JL:l

~

~

-r 9 ? JI.

'* /

FJ;

r

~ /

~~

W.

n

::.4-

'JlJlt

-I!:

'7

=

tJ'0

• i~ J'"

~

W-::

~

M It r A ~JII Jm ~

~

""

~JII ~

m ~

~

/~

ffil A m J:\

-~ 7

,.,J ~~ ~ ~~ ~~.::::::::aF_.,.... ....-

,.


JJB '1'0

+ i\

<If. 7L ,EJ

+ -t; 8


...

~~--

~

IfjI§

at

:lit

lIf

1J v-

:it v-

4-

J;l

!/

7-

*kill!

*-

~

*-

*

li ;J1< ~ 11m /

fa. ~ V-

7-

T

~)I\

Jifr

~

~

m l& ~

iIi.t ~

:/

~ 7-

*

Wl

l~

EJ'!.

4-

JIi

-\' ~

Ii"J

*-j]V

\F.f Wl

A

Jifr T '7

~ 7-, ~

~~

:/

/'

-i< V-

~ A a

iii T

ffi

$

JL "T

~

;Jl

*

li /

~ ~ rL~

~

!;f

'1 ~ ~

)~

A

~

lW!

,t:'

fflll

~

m

9 ~o\!

= [ijl

)~

A

"E-

A

;t

E:

*kill!

3f I±\

:Ii

~

Jt

Wl

~

~

7

~ V-

lill\

/

7-

-Yt

A.

fi[

iii

-j-

!/

9a

{~

iIIi

nr '<

~ '1

:iI!l V-

7

/

If>

iii T

~

~

r~

.:r-

~

jj

§l

?

/

)~

?ll' ;m

'1 .\l!,

r. 3l

iii T ;H

:I7-

lIT: ~

~

~II\

~

Jifr

~

7-

;It

~ 7-

U

/

7F

:/

~

V-

~

?

A a

J~

1i1l 1J

Jtt /

S:j ~~ .• ..1ttL ~~

• n* E

'1 ~ '.T

/

tIf!

lIf

T

kill!

I~

1't

~ 7-

/ ~)I\

m

:I~

~ ~

Jt 3

* *

'<

~

'1

Jt

~

'1

!WI

~

Jt Cb

'<

:::J

A a

~

J~

/

Jt

~

~::.~

WI

lill\

~

Jifr

j!L

Jifr

J;l

J:t A

=*

;JJ'

* ~II\

~

;JJ

;It

-i<

J~

13

]V

V-

9

'7

'& 1J

~

:I?

~

)~

R: !/

'*1?

iii

'1

~

~ V-

,

:t~

it

If

T '"

fij

r

~JII '1'

JC

*i !t A *I

~ ~JII ~i

JiJi

tfJ 11 1m

1it'a

't /

i!/.

/

~ to

lIfr

Jifr

~

• )1/

\F.f

~ 7-

iii T

-

**Jiff ~ 7" IEl

/ l;ff

-j-

JOC

A

*1M *7 i i& rofl * ft ~ .:mt

Jifr J\1>:

T

~ :Ii

'7

iii T

f~

~-,.


~

~.,

li ~ ~

~

~

'1'-

EI

IEl IJt. ~

/

m ?

"

~..:

l'

v

~

J:If

T

"7

ill(

~

/

J;l.

Ii \ill:

T

~

-l!:

~

:It.

;;

~

v

1i B

~

::J

~

B

1X ~

Ie., ~

jj\i

m ,;,~

;Qi

"7 :lI!o Wl lit

*'" 'llii:

-r

)1-

7

~ j\\ ~ "7 {>$:

.,..9

*11,;,-

'"

J;l.

)1.-

lIl:

~

M

ff

*~ 7

o

T

ill: *C /

1fi

;l!(f ?

,;,-

'" 0

Mf T

)~

~ ~

-r '1

1t ~ 7 ~

If;. Ji)f ~

IE! /

~

{lI!;

.i ~

,;,-

"'1'- m

T

7

~

7

9 0

*7 * 9

~ ?

'"

)~

7

itt

~

~,

?

~

if:!c

'"

)~

Jiif

T

)~

+

t:,

llJl ll=lf

~'ff

)~

ih

J:t

l'

'j!{

J:t

i\

-r

4-

)~

'1'~

DR ffl

lIE

~

ll=lf T

~

/

"'1'-'"

·Wt

~

~Ji

*ffi1

t&: "7

{lI!;

~

/

)~

11 lit U\!

Ml ?

)~

~

fill

iFIf

=

!1

Jl:. .,..

7

*¥i

....

Jiif

I}l1 ~ /

ft,

= a

"7

m

~

T

/

lifT

-l!:

",

,'W-

jIfi "7

gp

~

;It

Jtl

/

*W

'"

)1.-

/

~

II'l

=

~

"f-

If;.

Nr ::J

T

~.

ri

jll:

~ "7 {£:

Iml

i1!t

M; "7

'i!I:

/

/

'9"

ilii J:: 51: illi *I1l

i'fiJ

J:t lid /

til!

4-

,;,-

:!I

~

1*

:!m

~

)~

IJI.

7

¥-l:

7

B

1fi

Xi:

'<

If;. /

~

rot

;It /

~ .I "7

~ ~

\till

/ ~

"7 lJ( ;t:

'/ '/

"7

'7

)t ?

)1-

)~

7

*~

7

w: jll1

"'1'-

~

P "7 fj jfin

/ ~

9

*m:

:/

~

lit

t:,

~

p'

/

If;.

/

.,..9

'" 0

Mf T J:t ~

B

,;,-

Ji;';

illl

T

~ ~

'"

9

.,..

7.1'

'"

~

0

fill

=

p

*J:t *;; t:, ~ Wi If;. llE Jiif / .p Jtl

/

ff o\t<

'"

-r

/

;;

*Ii .g-

m 7"/

~

J:t &i1

~

J:t

'"

)~

-'£;-

0

"7

"7

nil Ii!.

7

RIi llE MI / llE ~ {fiJ; «Ii

1fir

)~

7

'F

$

{iii ;Ii

)t.r

,'W-

)1.-

/

'm: {i1J -r ~

"'1'-

'"

*-r

1ifIj

tt .,.. /

ill Ii

,;,-

,;,-

.p

~

1f;r

ffi'

if

J::

~

~,

-;'

""

Wi

n.

;It

7

-m-

'/

"'"

;f. T

;Z. ;Ii

7

i1t /

/

J!If

IiliJ

,;,-

j\\

/

7

~

trt I&!

*

~

mil /

U

*

""

/

Jl!

r

-'£;-

~

If;.

ffE

IIi

.Ill

" w

J:t Iii1

~ ~

~

~

'1'-

)~

'!1. g;, !1

)~

liT

~

%l "7

!!ill

/

7

~

9

EI

'"

**JEEI

.,.. 0

~ ~

-"3!IE: ..., :;M!


.... ~.':::::.~ ~ ....... ,*

'!l-

till

~

'/

A

-7' -!:;

)~

=f

'Mi

;;(if

'Mi /

!.'h

,w.

V I V

IiI5

/

~

If fit

,\!!,

3

7

V

/

V)1.-

.I:t

&b

b'I.

r

/

1l!B

7' I V

.... A 0

~

l% "7 A

"

*'"

rL

)1.-

7-

illi.

*?Ii::

V

/

~

"7

lfjIJ

....

Jt

~

A

:,,-

6

7G

~

• il!i

!1

ilX

'"

"

i'tl

'Jl

Nr

:mt

:rt

g

JlJl:

"7 ~

7' I

9

....

~

.I:t U1J

~ * / ,

/

/

iii.'.

M 3=:.

$

A

!1

)~

'""l- *f}( B ~

9

*

.I:t

!1

U1J

lIJl:

""

It ~

*il* /

~Il:

~ /

r

/

m

~

n!fi

7'

/

T

~

/

-I<

)1.-

~ ~

:,,-

~

""

:J.> / ~B-

"7

~

iEX Nij

;7

q~

/

~

V

'll;

)~

:If,: 7-

V

~

:it

IiI5

3

]I[

E[ .?

"*

**

W;

~ A

II! I

'JL

il

]I[

B

.I:t

]I[

:/

-I<

fA..

1&

f!,

*

n

:If-

7-

~

!1

I*l

~

"7 T

"..

*

)1.-

ilk

0

or

n

:/

Jt

~

I !I.

7

;!;p

V

'/I{

7'

liE

:If,:

/

) 1.-

/

:/

~

1IiI!

)~

3

~ ~

)1.-

Jl;:

J!i\

EE

fit

;7

17

)W V

r!lt

~

O'!

;Jt.

Wi

~

"7 ~

~

:/

7-

~ ~

~

fit

$11

)1.-

m

~~....;.J~~.-;J.;.:

9

lib

l%

ffi.

~~

Nr /

~ fj -I<

:/

;7

!1

'" *1JI:

)1.)1.-

)1.-

1

~.

:* 1JI:

j[

me

9

]iff

ti?:

11

/

:/

E

/

PITt ~

1fl

~

~~

"7 l:lI!;

9

T

~)II

)v

1ii:

~

~

;7

v-

!1

" II'!f T / 3

17

r

~JJ) ~

1!l:

!1 -{

-

1R -7

JV

~

.!, ~

V

....

*-

A

*1IiI!

J!Ji M

~ :/

~ ~

I1& :A:

'"

/

11

ma

J9j

Yi\il

~

-I<

1m

/,

ffl .I:t

1W

~

tl

3

JIj(

15 !t

0

]I[

~4IE- - -~ ~ ~_~~ ~

/

......

~~~-= ~:...-~


.-,-:

---

...;::::-- -.-

~=-~ --.:::::...=--,., ~--:-=-::::

lit J;,J. T ~JlI

=>

路7

~

~

]li

7

;;<.

3l!<

iN

}~

~

:;Jl<

ill:: !/-

itIf T

lE

~

5F

T

~

.Il:

;;<.

;;t;

-r 0

.... 0

I-

I

+ i\ ~f

i\

J'l -I路

\!!l B

~

:)j

~

7t:

'J.'{i.

:Ifl

m'N

g;

m

7

'7 -tf

*\1-1!:

}~

;/

I

~ ;;<.

lll!I ag fn

]j{

Al ~

!go

/J

0

~ =>

~

7 J;,J. T

Mil

ft J:t t'<J

illf T :)j

7t:

~ ~ ~

I

J:t 拢l,

:ilL i8c

i%:

ji:t

~

I

7"

tJ!i iiI\!

:1i1l

~

}t-

PX

'ft

l!f =

lM

jjJ;

'"'7 v

;/

C::!!

~

~

~-~

"v

:.y;. Wi

" I

~ =

iI$i

ll9: I

mJ/. 11:

.,.,


~:::..1ii!'"i '

.It

b:J

:)j

~

11.

&it /

:ll! ~

JIll

;;Ie

fi.\

~ ~

~

~ !{If.

:it

7~

~

i#f 7 /

';I

"'\'"E-

B

/

7

llK

)~

:€; jj!(

'7

'7

lI!!E

0

IIJI: ::..-

ilf T

~

Jlt

1iJ

)~

/ /

l\l:

*-r

.It

&it

~

11 /

~

~

1;tI!

ffi ;;t:

r

~ .l§t

'7

,

!Jt

7~

~ ~

;11 ;;t:

.!;J.

/ilIJ

*:!Ji:

}W

-r

.It

/

~ .l§t

90

!Jt

r

J;t

lid

~

W

J'I. /

\lil!

7

IF.F

"E-

;;t:

,

ji'ff

.

:Ill!

~

7-

tr

~

}I{

*-

/

)i-

;JIl:

~

.... * ,Q

'7 ~

<!1! ~

:If

fl:.

IE!

J;t

~

/

J1iJ

'\'-

m

}I{

!l

)~

j1

'It A

m

m ~

9

!l

"'\'-

)i-

;;Ie

.It

/

Wi

~

::a

IJi

~

)~

jt

~

W ill

~ ;;<.

Pli'

$

B

NT -r

* ".. oQ

~

B

~

/

)~

90

~ ~

I!!!

Wl

~

7ft.

.Ill

'!if; :Ii

/

j!Jl

fi

~

~ ~

'7 ~ ~

7-

;;Ie

Pli'

T

!-

* *

~

13:

li

B

~

~III

Pli' ~

1fi

'/ /

~

~ ~

/

~

i;iI!

A

1f

11.

* }W

IiiJ

~

~

Jlt

~)II

v

M

7-,

'7

/

J~

!l

~

"E-

;;<.

9

)~

~

7

tr

)~

il'r'I

5F

Wi

A S

W !Wi

Jt..

'7 ~

t-J

~ ;;<.

'9"

)~

..,

4f

Pli'

~ ~

"II-

~.

~)II

1i1l 1!E '7

~

/

~

/

/

'7

W'* ,1;'*4 ! ;;'*f¢. d. .i,' b-

~ /

ill<:

11. '7

Jt

/

A

Jili'

:a:;

j\

-

tx

7

~

~ ~ ~JII /},,;

i6(

~ lIIl

• rmJ '7

IT -t: '7

) i)~

~

9

Pli'

tl /

7-

'9"

v.!.l

JE

ill

'7

~JII

19i ~ [lQ

lJJ ~

lk

~

,p 11

!tH 1: A 1Yf

7'

)i-

tr <¥ '/

/

WI 1f

/

'7

IUl

~4

~)II

!l "'= ~


~

7

~ -I!

:7

~

-I!

V

/

*

"J5

v

t*

!/

/

'7

~

""

}v

'lk ~

-7

T

~

7i

~

"J5

~

iI<

-'e

~

if /

4lI

iSc ~

t ~

*'7

-q>

.t<1:

,;...

* t

~

7"

n

WI

""

[ij]

}I-

ill

If!f

B

¥

g

&=.

iI<

/

.l:t

IJ'

-Yt

?

I

~

""

:f:i

fiIi

I

.... tt

3fi.!

~ ~

'ill

~ '7

1I 71"

J:

? :7

~

!/

II-

-'e

~

~

JI-

,;...

7

~

~

-i-1:: B

JI::I

-r ?

* ~

~I

.t\1;

'"

q,

~ ~

lib

"""

*

$I.

*316

li

jJ[

....

~

M!

/'

<¥-

.l:t

7 Y

,;... :I-

~ '7 l{i. 10

7 y 0

/

-7

~

llf-

i\

PJ3

.-f

3t

/

§O

-i-

~

}I-'e

:7

lIS :fIJ

1f.

'7 ~

?

v

~ /

.l:t

t:. /

~

&=.

I

II-

~

'"

ill

"

'7

ill

B

:I:

'" '7

7

JI-'e

/ ~

,;...

,

~

.l:t

&b Ii IDt /

~ :I-

m

m 11-

v ?

}I-

316 $I. I

-Yt ~

JlI! ?

.l:t

g, 71"

*'f'7

11l J/ 7"

i!Il }l-

~

'7

Z. v

;;(

;ffi

1f.

7!lt


" ~':::-:_";;:'-:""*, _::::::"":'::::~':::::=:'~:::::::;"11!!: ~-~

~

fro

"4 11 ..{

.tt<

KRI

11=-

..{

,Co,

;Ji ft~

*\1-

{PI

~t;;

='

t-l 7-

JE 7t

:!it ~

i'£

%1: '7

~J11

~ ffr

~

~

~

.I;l

r

;JJ

:7

'r"

<P /

~ .R; ~

'ft

rR9 /

15 iIii

T

/

7-

4-

1ik

='

;;<.

)1.-

..{

;K-

~

I1J

/

/

7' I

ill. ;Ii\:

m "" 7'

9

1;7

I

:7

r .Il!.

0/

t::

1;7

~ ;;<.

)1-

....

....

;;<.

;;<.

:J]

0

:!t

:7

)1.-

k

~

:/

-r '7

JE 7t t'!

if!

....

.

V

Jl(

(,p

0

,Ifi

7'

'l'j]!

I

,-

V

)1-

'Ii' if:

U

15

~

~i '/

iIii 4'1f

v

7-

7-

;J]"

~

-"" In

~

~

:/

7-

11

*-!

7G

;fI.

!til!

"""

~

~-.:::.: ~ -'-!We~." ~ ,,

B

'fI ~jt; liIJ "$I. V

7.......r·

~~ /

~

B

*

ff1

~ ;;<.

)1.-

:/

5K

:fi:

ti

3C

'1;: '7

9

JJl!.

0/

:e<

I

/

-1<

-1f;

7'

/

Jft

;;<.

!U.

/

II iDt

)1.-

4-

"$I. :t$

~

f!f

;r,

~ '7

= ~-~

~

q.ij. -r

/

~

)1.-

'7

..{

4-

/

;et

-If

5K

~

)1.-

;ii

:If!:

v

~

"$I. '7

1lfr i8i

;fif

?

/

ll1f tit

~

*-: JI'

:JJ

'7 if,;

7-

;tE

FoJ

iP.f

ffi! :7 v ?

-j/-

/

'/ /

9

;;<.

fit

.

B

....

til

iii$

;et

4'1f

)t

-.:

Y

m

/F 1iJ

)1.-

)1.-

0/

:7

~

~

~

0

-1<

7'

~

Y

)1.-

;Ji

;;<.

~

-1<

1t f.J.

9

7' I

;;<.

~

;et

?

:7

....

~

'7

3t

Wi

*Jl(

4-

Z.

)1-

fIfl

?X.

7-,

~

/

I

/

7:

)1.-

='

"'E-

7'

N

J;I ~

;Ii

?

i!}.

"'E-

:If!:

t'!

i~

;;<.

"$I.

;et ;Ii

;;<.

~

7-

.... !El

)1.-

~,

~

<P

-;I

..{

......

Jl;l;

lib

jg

7-

m:

/

)1.-

it

7-

/

'7 1,,'<,

~

~;!f

5K

~

I

'7

M Jlf

Jl(

)1.-

7' V

'I'"'E-

/

'7

eX

7-

~

V

I

'7 ~

'l\lf

~

i'fl 11

'7

'"

J;t

I±I

)1.-

~

;m --

;;<.

if

tli

V

tt

/

gil

lFf

~

~

'/

:J] '7

)1.-

k

y

I

~

......

i.!t:

Jjf.

..{

IlII

4l-

~

:7

)1.-

m /

~.

lib

;et

J5

1p '7

;jfl

)1.-

'I'~

* 8!*fI1<P ll1f*

~ ::? 7-

*J;t

i1i: B

/

B

1't llil:

:Ii:

. :Ml

V

"'

~

7J

~ '7

J! 7-

::I

/

m if$:

I

Y

.... ;;<. 0

*1Ji: '7

• iI« V

T

Jlt

5K ~ ~ ~

'7

PiI\

1i!l. V

.e-

'"

~ /

PIt '7

«J. V

;fI.

!0/

I'Rt

te:t

iJt ;ME:

~

'"

) 1.-

*'*"::::::1


.... 51'-

.~

---~ ?

4-

1'" jfr

" +

~

~

!l!i )t,.

:If ;g'7

n

=

~

/

7'7

'1C. /

~

ten

;x-

il

!it

A-

;Ii

~

0

~

/

-c

'" ~

:Jil tI:I

" :!t /

'1i: ftf.

r.r-

/ ~

~

7

-e-

/

~ B

iii ~

!k

"

T ~ '7 ;/

~ AJ~

~

v .I:t

bb

ifJJ ~

*. B

fY:.

liS-

Fl

~

~

/

ill'*

J[

:ijt

5i'.

11?:

~

7" -1 ~

"jj

A0

T ~

31..

jlf,

\!1l

11?:

+

PJl

W

~

11?: T,

M

a/

.ft

J!

4IJ: it

;f5.

v ?' ~

tb: '\'/

i1Jr. B

'iii

*!£ /

~

;m ~ '7 1iJj A-

*v

t:,

1~·

9

7'

1'.t

+

T

1i1r

Jfe, v

B 7 7

~ ~

:1J 7

r:::::::;;

m

.I:t

~

IliI v

0

W

~

/

~

*

~

'7

~

/

1>11

(EJ

-e-

;;m It!l

.I:t

k

'7 f~ T

-"A-

ifl

~

±" ~

A-

)~

~

7

/

7"

l-

7'

jli\ ~

J~

v

~

A-

T

/

'7

* /

;Itt

-e-

Ii.

jill\ ~

;;m lK t~ .ft t'J:

fJ,1

?

9

7

/

'l-

/

7'

:H ',g-

fJ:

'/

'r

"

-e/

51'7 7 T '/ /

fit w.~

~--..-a

B

~

"

/

* '*"

='

*tJ.

T

T,

*1li ;;m

~

?'

"?

~

1fit

~

'7

~

*Iilil v...

1l'i

11?:

ff {~

=

;K

~

:I:lf

~

_____

:'::::_~

*

~

(EJ

~

~ ~

~

r'1

J

'iii

o«i ffi

!:1."<!.

'7

¥

7

'" m ~~ '7

-v

~

7' J~

~ ~

r~

tl

'7 ~

'"

J~

ttl!

• ~ ~

:mt

M

r~JI! ~

ill 8 WI

~ ~

wI! ~~

lifT

~ ~ ~

-

~

7"

IV


4-

B .J;,I.

*Wr

~ / ~ ~

'7

.J;,I. '7

'¥r

:if!i ~

-r

~ ~ /

~ ~

-r

/

Jlt

~

i*

lib

)

/' ~ -r

J.t

m IP,l

~ !7

~

9 /

ll§

fIl

'It

/II

i\

:!f

.-{

+

&f.

li$

-I:;

-\!: A

13

='

.li B

'1

+

~

M

~ ;<.

.It

0

lib

7

'"" 0

1R r.

n

E if '1

7

:IlL

'!7""

is(

~ .......

~

-r/

«; ;ft

1lfr

*'Vi

~

'1

1m

!ill g

D=

;<.

Jv ~

~ I!ii

.1'~t" ~"I'$~ " ~"".1 "': '~ ~

~

~:M


...--:::-+_ 7-

" /' .It

~

JJi.

r

*<P

"'"

1&:

ni

::<.

~ JL-

J:I: j} /

ni "$I. '7 ;n:;

ffl( JL-

.

I~ /

~ ~

v

1f-

"$I. /

~

*i¥f

;;e!;'~

=r/

'j;'] {l-

j.j ~

l'

~

*-r

fjr J:l: ~

JL-

"ill lOt

£ !ill

.!iii

-I<

*1)~

:7

~

~

/

7~

~

:If

~

7J<.

~ r3

~

r3

.Ii

tll. ilIf H ttiJ

v

'" ~ ~

k

;Jt. /

ij!!

;It /

Oi<

'7

. ~

:It1I.

~ /

:!?

to

iiIi

~

/

'7

~

::<.

ffli

ltif

~

JL-

"$I.

......

t>'

7J<.

'/ 'Y

~

1$

T

"l'-

*f.W

JL-

ijljl

/

/

:r.A:

i!Il ;IJ

-r JL-

fJl: llI! '1

~ ~

~

*-B

*:iJr. jl ~

=r

=

fl

'7 ?T

4-

-r

J:I:

1ilJ

~ ::l

V

1'f€ 7

A

r.ll

1& -l!:

:7

v ?

'iff ~

~

Jt

5} '7 1)[ ~ ::<. JL-

'7 ~ JL-

~

v

JL-

JL~.

i! ~

?

.It

:iI!J

IT

m

'7 ~

!it IT

V

~

;;

VO

JLJL-

"'/" :ijl(

.lilt ~

<P

3t ~

Wi a~

=r/ <P

~

,!Ii!

;;.-

......

7-

lllf

t~

V

~

RJI:

1Jii3

"'"

m ;Jt. w.

~

4-

1i!l

*

~

~

=r 'J 7-

,.

~

9

JL-

B '1 iI§!

~

.

::<.

Il# ;1J

7J<.

~ R:3

-r

i1Il

It

.EL

~

/

B

"'/"

Jm

JIfj

=r

:7

v

~

-7

jV

* J:I:

JfC

11\ ~

.., .

ill film

/

,.

lID

r- !t *

'7

'*tl§:

m

7G

~

~JlI

-l!:

11L

M

~

.:mt

~

7F

$

~

if6(

~)II

~

1M-

V

1J

~

rJf

~

*

lllf

~ Jj1(

7-

l]L

-I<

~ ~ ~

i!li

7

'7

~

/

*-B

i$!i:

ti

~ JL-

&:!

:!Ii

B

!II!-

J[ '1

* 1i* :R '!if :it

/

T

v. =

A

if

J;.l

~

m v. III tll

41lll: r.ll 1iX Fol

=r

JfC

r.ll

/ .~

J#j.

,!Ii!

/

*-B

1iX

"'/"

i'El 'J':

~

7~

;;K

JL-

{~

V

~

1'1.\

!1

"I'-

/

.

v

/

1l

;(E

'7

~ T

i!IE~


-J;/J

~ A

o

oS-

J;l T ~J11 ~

il=lf

T-

:a:

""l'

JJ!.

r

/

4lJ:

~

t/,.~

7,

'7 (j[

ii!

F'""9

rt/

M ill'! f.p

)

+ i\

tof1i

JIj '7 jjlij ~

"" ik ?E

FI

if

-1-

.1:1:

-I:;

B

I~

lib

~

:1L /

HiE ~

tJf.J

*-

:q.:: l& ~

;!!짜;

It K.t =

iif 'ill; -I!: ;/ ::l

I' '7


.. .

~

iTL 10-]

4i' ~

.l:!::

lJt

....

~...-~ -=:-~--::

~

f

T

)~

Z.

11£

'i/

~

iF.fc

Jt .l:!::

I

T

'7 ~

OJ '7

I

m

1It 1R

? ~

'7 '!i{

?,

It.>

:Jt

'~"

I

'7

v 3l..

~

T

'i/

-I!

r

A

-\"

[lli

I

;Ii

if: 1i:.

~

~ ~ j5i;

I

~

i\

~

f?i

jj'ff

-I!

7Jl;

a

.

it\; I'JI]

iF.fc ."

l'!f

, :Jt

=f

tli iC.

*-r

ral

~

0

)t-

I

~

'7

ff;

':Ii:

I-

r.R

{/

*-I

1m

':Ii:

is

>J

i!ft

lrk

JI:.

-r

)t~

{/

~

?

'", ii'ii ~

OW

t.!Il

;(;j

~ 0

~J ~

w:

I

itt

'I\'tI

'7

-r

T

iF.fc :;t

A

)1.-

m: '7

11.

T

Nt

T ~ ~

.n

$.I-

g1,

~

:W-

if:

~

"-- -

?

=I

)1.-

9 JIi.J v 'r

0

an

~

~.

~

.l:!::

prj -I! It-

I

v T

-r

m

~

~

,..,--~,..,

JJ!.

r

.l:!::

)t-

'".?,

~

.l:!::

I

~

at'll

'iL .l:!::

&:!

&:!

ffl'<. I

'Iw-

""

~ i}'f

qr

I :pj:

¥I:

~

IffI

La ~1-

z. ;Ii

~

~o

'7

~

Wi.

~ I

'Jt M

j\';

1It I

!!it ?

JI.-

Z.

~

/F i£

5t T

'7

fJl

ilj( 'Y

a

OJ

filii

'7 ~

~ ~

'7

~

!r

'7

~

it .p ? f&

&:!

tm

-r 'ill ;;1(

lHi

iF.fc

~

)t-

:l1;

~

'E'

7'

T

~

ff

3l..

I

:l~

~

~

f?f-

l~

.l:!::

J~

1Jll :ill:

-r

JI

7J<.

~

fj

lilt ''I! ~

':Ii: !is-

~

;f~

I

I

l!t

;(;j ~ ~

~

A

~ A Jt'E'

r

*.Jf/ ,

A

~

-I!

)v

'7

I

~

~

* : '*:-*-

)~

*'1!L

JI:. ;/

~

)t-

)~

li

!r

7J<.

~ ~

r -r I

& :JW 'li'o 1M'

!it.

Jt-

T

WI iii

I

-wi

;/

'T

&:!

f ~ ~J

gO .l:!::

?

'" i3 m )~

i* hd 7J<.

11k it::;

-,T

'" -m

A

ff;

11':

'iL

~ ~

T

f

I

.l:!:: A-

'7

f

\lit{

'7 ~ 'l1-

I

l'i1c:

'E'

-I<

~

I

1e!,

'7 ~

'" '"~ !iti

'E'

{~

'Y

jJ

.Il!.

)t-

~ ~

A

Ir.i

~1li

jfi )t-

'E'

!llf

1I.li liil:

~

)t-

~

~

ii'ii T

'Y

lib

-:;:-~

)t-

7"

l<

- ---:...:

-r

'7

. )t-

i.E

~

$a

-r

~

:ill; I-

~

~

tl

~ ~

~tii

':Ii:

It

11

1!t ~ K& ~~

I

-r

tll

==

I

~

I

~li

~ ~

JT 'iL ;It I

)t-

3!:i. ~ '7

*

~ ~

~

:If T

k

I

~

'1li

-r *l

1{7 ,y

~ '7

iEl

':Ii:

Y,

I

,

4'if

A

I

fR:

~

'7

Wl ~ T

:fi

'l!{ -\"

i2t

7"

:

~ ~ -

m -r ~o

Jt I

)1.-

[lIT. I

i~

rtc

~

r

= 11

~,

I

'v

'7

'7

:;j1:

Off -I< ~

~

II§-

:ta: iJ1 !ill

7'-

:1m ?

..

~

y ~

----:-:~ ~ -- --'


""'- ~-:.....~. .::::::::::..,.-:::..~*' ~

!Ii

I' ,

!ill iii;

)~

)1.-

=

iliff 4f )v

~

-r

9.

1/

m ~ )f'

1i! I

?i.\ ~

1'1;

jj\j

l1ll

7"

4-

)~

,

JIl: 1Il'i

1i ffi

m:

~ I

9

7"

9.

)1.-

~

11.

/J

tiE

!Il

~ 7"

1lt

=

-\<

IE

'7

I

;Ill:

l&

A

-l<

='

~

~

W

t: !'i(

:) .jI}

1:

= ~

I

~

'7

*~

~

;It

)v

I

r '\'-

r:::.::::___ .

9

'fi;

v

)1-

Nt

/

~

jj\j

:II!! llE

A

~

~

T

~

-\!:

~

)v

'1!

"ft!I

.~,

~

"7

I

"7

~

"7

*

-:r

A

I

5E foiJ r

£:

)L-

-r

~

9

T

~ I

~ ~ ~

~

/

~

Ih

;;r.

"7

)1-

___

~~

r

I'

'7

:s;;

-r

l':i

~JIc

1Iff.

IY\. A

fi1

ffi

~ ;/

?' ~

'Jl

j;J: "7

I

t:J 1i'1 ;:11

13

lit

~

=* ~ 1;1.::

;Jt:

JIl:

"*

t*

9

* :!If

'9"

M :3::.

*13

=* 17i

~

)1-

~N

•-

~ 9

/±\

W )W

:iHi

-\!:

tJ!

;b

;/

"7

-r

~

-7

JI/

~

)1-

A

7

~

)1-

)v

I

/

=

~

:II!!

-Yt

IfI

-l<

U

Jill

~

IMl

17

-"'

tal

lIlt

JIl:

t*

fifi

*

it !ill

'7

/

~JII

~ ~

)v

A

-r

~

v

t*

M

!)l"

tr

Tff: if;:

'7

~

~

r

~ ~

fill

-\!:

~

lIlt

£ W

i1!

~ ;/

;f

"7

JIl:

fi.X

1)1:

rP

1/

~

9

.

-r

.• .:4!E::_""

=*13

)1.-

~

1YIi tr

~

)~

~ ~

I

~

"~ 1i:

-\!:

<IF-

3t

I

~

4j

M

17i

"7

JE

*-

..., n

"*

4-

iilT

J:t

6b B

"7

c:, 1t *~ 7 ~

v

* *"?Jt :l!I! J:t

J:t

"7 ~

f-J

~-.":~~

ft

;;::~.--~::. --=

... - ~

.~


..--...,--"--

~:'~--:~

~ "'?"

I

JI.-

"'/ " m I?

JI.-

I

f/

7

-I!:

ji$

7

-'tJI.-

~

'7

:J\< 'ff:J\<

V

li:If

I 'I}

I

j!5

.l:t Ii:,

;ffi

T

I

I

I

V

.l:t

&

D

JI.-

~

.l:t

tb A

li:If

;:g71'

:fT '/ 7

~

fJIl ~

1Iit

r -v;;<

, JIt

;It, I1-

P

;ffi

'jgh

7J

it{tf/

7 I§

~

)t

llll.

~

ill: !/.

£

m;

9'

I?

*

JI.-

;tr.;

Iff !iIO

JI.-

fiJI fi1f.

I

I

~

-sr. Ii!il

~ ?

I-

'7

'fii

~

:Iff>

* B

v

;;\I:

1i'i

~

-if

-I!:

JI.-

~ '7

r"'l

M

y

~

~

::l

~ f/,,~

'7

7,

llt

=

JI.-

)1.-

:m ""

v

"'I" r

ji

I

;;<

'7

ft W.

j!5 ~

)1.-

;g

ifll'

I

I

~

JI.-

1:

~

$

9J

'7 Jl,

~

VIIi

f/

-I!:

=E f/

*

* ~

"'"

~

T

::l

v

I'7

ji

~

l't

"7

:R.

fJIl

*

lit

r

I? I

)1.-

'/

T

/±l

?

~

-r

"'"

-v

I

;;<

I~

7;'

* jJ

'7 I? ~!\i

-sr. il

~

f&

"'"

* ~ I

~

:ill!:

-sr.

fBI·

~ I?

~ ~

;;<

-sr.

f/

JI.-

fr\J

~!li

Iih

j}:\.

/,

;ffi

-::..:

A li:If

71'

~ ~

;I-

;;<

~--~~-

f/

v

"!R:

'7

~

!ill:

~

f/

T

iac

.l:t

~

.{

r

1]i:

y

~

~

B

'7

7

Jl:.

-r

rf:I + A

!i:'' ''i!! ~.J:'",*,~

il

9'

Z.

m

31..

:X

IjjJ

JI.-

f/

I

*

r

7" ~

~

A I?

JI.;;< D

B

;;\I:

«< ~

*=

""~-


~~~-=-~4F:'!¥:' ::k]t""'~""::lll'~~-'=.Jt~~ ~

oj-

!l 7" oj-

:;;

,.

nl\

/

~

~

f,!

*<If-

,.

fnij

""/

:Y

~

~

T :£)1.

~

T ~ oj-

~ /

..{

iF!f ilt

7'

j]'

*1-1"

~ T

;I'l;

v

A

9

;u.

3l.

~ )1.-

/

.It

jJ

/

J

9

-'<

'*' ~

"$I.

:1m fnJ

""

~

~

:m

/

~ "$I.

*

**

A ) 1.-

~.

;I'l;

7Jz B

:<I\: A

rR9

~

;ffi

oj-

9

:Y ~

...4J,

~I

*

:Y

1t

7'

':I

!f jJ

7'

IiiJ

A

~!ij

..(

jJ"

"$I.

)1.-

oj-

~I

*

~

T

'J

ml

oj-

~.

WJ

""/

~

T

A )1.-

-l!:

oj-

jJ

11'

ji

jJ

~ ';I

#<

~

:;; v

.It

lib

...' /

llfr

to

7

PJl

)1.-

'7

... ""

)1.-

'~

:Jl<

/

oj)1.::J

S

*g

f!f

:t.t

13

13

* *

c..~~1C.:L~~_~~ ~

v !f /

/

..,9

~

fi1'7

.,.

~~

E 9

:;;

T J

~ T :jIj:

~ /

PJl

/

Mlf

A

~

~ "$I.

~

jj:!f

~

-,

~ ~ '7 ~

~ )1.-

<If-

/

g

/

:;; v

-l!:

;I'l;

~

-l!:

'7

.It

Ch

PJl

'*'

!iI:

:P.X:

lib

~ "$I.

= ~

-'<

9,

.It

t!<

:Jii:

'6i 9,

~

*&f-

:Y

J

9

:Y

T

...'

nl\

/

J

!t

PJl

~

/

7"

jli '7 ~

A )1.-

*

f3

~

:Y

"7

,w,

A )1.-

'7

/

'7 ]£

!Hl

"7

T

m

*

~ "$I.

~

Wll

~

~

Ch

1m 4J IT

A )1.-

~

.It

7'

A

ti

WI.

il

&"

,\!!.

il

J\ f3

oj)1.-

=I

'7 )1&

/

jj:l

!Hi

/

*W

0

±

IIf

iF!f

,Ej

-I-

7'

~

iii$

lib

~

f3

/

A

9

;ti

~

.It

J

Wl

.,.

~n

9

""/

~ ~

J "7

-l!: y

:Y

7'

/

)1.-

A

;u.

~

il m :t.t JEt /

<it

il-

A )1.-

/

/

Iii,

!t -Fa

A 0

/

~ "$I.

IHl :Y

:jIj: /

~

'2l -l!:

:;;

v ~ )1.-

~

m

1r

-NM

.A

• JV

* lEX ~

1* 11 ;ffi

:mt

4Wl ~

~

j\

-I'

m iF!f

~

1ft

JI.-

~ T

~

PJl

~ oj-

:J)

'J

.It

~

It

Iiit

/ -~~--=-


--

7'

I(;f

7

~'* -e-

)~ 0

~

jl. /

l'li

*• -r v '7 :fj

R Jl:: ::.-,

J~

"

"/

~

J:.

;f!I

-+i\

&p 'f';.

i'I

-+;;, B

::.-,

~

..-(

/

iac

r

~

m !HI ::.-

~

11 '? 7 IT

~

~

ill ::.-

""

v"

'7 T

!HI

iii\! lIf.

""

1;1(

l\I! ~

Dr

-r

J~

:fj

JfX

~ ;0 /

m lr,i! '7 ~

/

in

;/

·k

ii!

.~

'1 ~

II ::.-,

~

T

1>

J~

IT ;llIJ

**

'f'?

0

AA

I§J

i!;l

~ /

1i\

~

-r

~ ~

11

'\'-

'7

"" /

;t;

J~

'7 ~

J~

(;'

v

I!ll

4'

/'

"~

:ji€

/

'7

""

AA

1*

~

..

-'I'-

ill

, <t

::.-

T

)~

jfJc

""

I(;f

/

;7

;fI!-

~

'j

)~

-r 'i fL~

m /

it: :fj

JL

M; ~ ~ '7

J~

pjf

iT!!

~

/

;;<

~ '7

"/

~

)~

7'

;/

~

~

iii\!

Ii', ::.-

'ill

-:J

'7

i?ii

om

'\'-

AA

~

~

~

..-(

;tJ

~

m T

-\I'

)~

/

:.!15

~

I'

~

!.II. fll:

B

;;>(

~

fit

"/ ~

~ '7

/

A

I(;f

JI!

=

;7

Q

~

~

jl.

uH

I(;f

-e-

.R::

T

-tJ'

fat iac

:Ii

1»1

-r

f~ /

'7

,; 11-

-r ~

Jl::

::.-

?'

IJt

-r ;7 -r


-=

..;.,~ ~ ."' ~~~.. ~~-.. ""~ ~'... ~

..{ 0

3l

ru2

7-

-* )1-

~

~ ~

iP.f

;1;;

~ ~

Jl! Wi

!ill

t.!f

:l

/ ~(fi

/

~

~ ~

fli

tli:

l'f. 71< iltIJ ~ JII/I '7

-1* liZ-

A :fJt :tJ /:l:I

:W

-r

3l ~

~

7-,

=

V

:l

f-f

:--'

7

:l

" '7

~

ID?

~

-1-

m /

~

1iJI: /:l:I

I

~ !)If ~

) ]..

3

/

3

~

~IE

~

"E-

ff.

I-

f!f

iT:!{

IFf

;;1'

1'"

#

J"I!;

:l

~

~ ~j

:J1l'

ffi-

tr£ '7

m v 7-

'7

:tJ

-* }t-

, ?i.\

'" 7'

7G

m

~

~

/ "E-

;@

/

~

-r

17

lit

ft! lltt !ft-

:W

lJi}

JI-

;1;"

V

:tJ

?

:An

;I-

17

""" 4- ~

$ ~

~ /

~

llI!

~

lbi J

it

J::

'"

;@

/

~ ~

"'" EI

/

Jil

*!I!f 7}

~

-r

/

}I-

~

ll! {Iii '7 ~

~ ~

17 '7

'"

7-

'ilT W -\!

;I-

:/

I-

/

'ft

1m lit 4~

"*

~ m tr

/

)1-

ll!

-ali ~

r

00:

~

~ ~j

/

m

~

'7

~

ffil,'

'"

7-,

im: '7 ~li

it;

'"

fi '7

.!iiO

j}t

~ ~

, at <IF

* 3

~

;'if

mIi

ilE

:m

I-'

-\!

-r <ft :--'

fill ;;<.

~ ;;<.

)1-

}I-

fie

"E/

7.k.

~

~

/

~l ~

I-

Jl!

*]1

~~ ~

~

g :tJ 3

llI! :tJ

~

/

lIP.\

7-

~ ~

-ali it

3

J,r'

'?"

~ ~

1ft ~ /

i.ll'

'7 jF

-r '"77"

I::

)t-

71<

0

f~

-* }I-

-

if.(

F(.f

'* :fJt* /

3'ji

= I:k: 00

?

7"

~

m -

~,

-r

E

+ '" 5t llX

~

~

)f.

llI! llI! :tJ :tJ / )11ft ~ - ~j\ ilIi

)1-

7

J{;f ;;)"

/

J::

~

1b'Il tl

~ ;;<.

~

llX

~

'7

Jl!

*

. . ..... .

EI 1I: lID "'"

'7

:tJ

-\!

:.::::s::....,

/

IW

ffi'i W lltt i3:. ~~ ~

'"

{Iii

'"?

:Ii!!

ill tit

;;<.

/:l:I

I:k: llI!

¥l:

"E-

~

!II!:

n m m

'7

fut

;;<.

'" ~ ;m ;tot flit ;m /

:tJ

;{fi

'7

W ~ ~ '" '15 W.

?

=

ffi'

'7

".,

) 1-

/

lj!(

0

*-r

~

/

lJi}

~

)t-

;ii

Ji't

"E-

n

17 ~ ~'i

}l

/

/

B

7

J:.

i!)J

)t-

Wl

-r

"E-

-r

v

"E-

:l

7~

iI¥i

.!f!.

V

/

;1;"

IIIl

..{

~

I-

7

:l

V

-r

~

m

~ -\!

i" "7

7

~,

/

-:;

-\!

:l

WJl

} t-

~If.

I-

'"7-

'7

1i'i: :l-

1~~

7-

7"

7

l{ji

7"

7"

-r

fli

'tli:

'"?

-r

/

"""/ -:;

/

'/

~

;;<.

)1-

:j!JJ

..{

~

/

-\!

) t-

~

J{;f

*-/ m :tJ

~

f&

m

&.

-

'7

=-:::. -:::..,_

:l

~

el:I


--rl

~f-

'7

rJl 7;'

'tin

{ill

..

7-

Ii'

'7

4-

WI

JL-

lEI! li!:

A )1-

I

I-

7'

'E-

T

I

J~

7'

'7 ~ !7

V

-r

T

::r

7-

JL-

JI-

I

4-

Ofj;

J~

\if ~ 'E-

~

""1' l-

v

7::r

{t!Ii\! ~,

Mf

li'1i

%

nIl

~,

Jilt v, 'E-

-l!:

"J

~

7::r I

'" *'EJ\l: IL-

I

][

7'

liil!

T )1-

9

JlX !(;f

*

1K

" tlt *7' !/l'} ~

~ ~

::r

~~;

v

lr." l-

1t

~

'"

JL-

'E-

..(

JL-

7-

::r I

~ !7

1l!lt ~

'/i1( ~

'7

*'

r

'T

., 7~

A

:!1< li'f -jIJ~

,

~

v

f,ij' ~

v '7

4-

jl!f.

JiJi:

-j'

9,

'7

j2.

1'5

I

'E-

v

Ii'i'!l

!/'IiJ

m

£L

7-

JfG 7'

'/

7-

..(

itil 1f.

:7 X

''7*'

'$I.

'" P.

.!ll!: 1$ '7

JL-

';I

jijJ

7

i*

l~

'7

1$

v

Ii'i'!l k

v

7-

4-

ti v

;,,;~~ -

-r ¥ I

7' T

hUi

~

'1

, PI1.

J~

1# Fdl ~ -r

m -r )]..

I

100

'7 ifJ\} ';I

7-

-j-

,

~

fI[ ~ I

1~

~

i!¥

I

7{t!\ Ii'i'!l '7 '/

it

*

'tin .R

iililJ '1

IF

I

.It

~

I

:7

&.

I

I

{t!\

'B

'I

I

Wi

*

'7

')'

'f/ ~

)~

~

;;t:

I

I

7-

4-

7

*Ii!!

I-

V

:!1< !7 #i JilJ! 7-

:it $

'E-

I

...

'1i::

::r

~ ~

*

~~~

7~

I~

I

A

/~

v

7-

'7

v

J~

'7 IlJj. 10

7-

~

--:

T

..(

I

100

*

;;t:

!7

or if!!!

I

&:'

V

ll1i1

..,

'tIQ

'l'J:

::r

I

7'

T '7

I

-:T

~

'$I.

l'J[

fU

'I

'IiI-

11-

J~

I-

Jill! B: ~ 9¥

j]

;ffi

'7

4-

~

....

'E-

v

I-

""

';I

7-

?&

'7

)~

7G

*

ill.

~

!7

Wi

J

m

7-,

T

.R:

K&

7-

~ 9

I j' ~

IJW Mi

4!E

v

J~

A

~

I

" 7'

k

5}

100

I

J"

t: "J

:7

100

:iit

t:

'7

¥

::r

7'

*

JT

iii$

'iX.

7-

/'

-r

~

1fi

.Ei!:

V

~

J

Ii'i'!l

liil! "'" 7G

Ii'

-IJ'

~

ro:

ti

A J]"

J~

v

V 7-

!7

t@;

7:

l*

JI-

I

tlI!! '<T- 1t

{til

T

Ijlj f}}

IT

!IliJ

7-

iiiIT

~

~

::r

*-r

'7

~'W :tf5

~

I

if;

I

'!If

Ii'i'!l

~

::r

'fE;

iJ;!{ f(;f

i'fiJ

I

!

~

7-

:7

fir

:!i&

*1VJm 4';I

-r

-l!: )1-

A JL-

Fl

7' T

T

"J

~

i'

7-

I

Jt.-

.J} "J

}

J~

4-

~

lEI!

I

V

"J ~

~

v

lll: ill:

_:-:-..._~~

.-r--~.:.=-~ ~~~ --.. ~

*ffii

ti Ml

'~ "~ o!IiEW


~

41~

'* ~ ~

'iff ~ I'

v

ll# ~

v

~

T

-r

11-

lll1

4-

JI-

q£ ~

/

"E-

~

ill

'f-

~ !9}

~

4ifi'

~

fj

>r

'7 ~

-r

~

3iU

1i

...

{

J\..

I

~

r

"'~ "J

~~

"f-

~ OOL

!t V

;fJ.,

~

fj '7

{~ A J\..

I

7'

"E-

JI-

$/lIJ

*

0

OOL '7

'P$

l!I!I

-I!

~

rJT

*V

~

'7

JIll ;/

If' ~

'7

~

""

J:. IT

Wi' I

jjj! ~\t ~

/f'

!lliJ I

=l'lil

'#/. ::IJ

'Y

... ~ I

~

~ '7

Jt JI-

'"I

"E-

I

7' T ) \.. 0

PJ!

~

iJe M

/

JL

*J.\l:

0

'ft:!!:

-1

'7

'7

;/

~

~.

iii

'7 ;fJ.,

~

~

I

~

""

'iff

~ JI-

-1

~

~ ~ ~

A

mI

1j!(

"E-

U

$:

::l

'*

-r

iI

*!Ii:

7" )10

~ JI-

'* "!R: I

~

T

~

) \..

:I-

;/

IL'

V

J\..

'"9

T -1

J.\l:

!ill

;/

I

r

Ji:

~

;/

~

I

:)J'

I'

'l

~

JR',

for !Ii:

*-;;<. m I

~lii

I

7'

'7

I

~

If! ~

~ ~ I'

';t

I

T

"E-

*tllJ

f):

J:t

t'H

-1

""

;fJ.,

r

0

-r

2(

'9"

T

T

11

';t

V

'7

V

J\..

'l

!t

I

-1

11'

B'* iC<

'7

~

!Ii:

::IJ

A

"E-

,

.Ii

7'

,

V

-\!

~

~

J\..

'7

'/il

13

T

Jill

~~

jj

)1-

'iff Ii

11,

~

I

JI> )

...,

~

'7

~

,

::IJ

J!,

U

JiO

V

!ill

JiO

'7

7'7 ~

~

1f

Ii i:l!i

'7

~

jjj!

V

-'f-

I

;R

'Y 'Y

'7

::l

I

If;!f

1!f ll# V

:ill:

I

I'

-I!

~

~

JI-

T

*J.\l:

~

13

;/

~

*-r

:ill:

~

'l

~

"E-

~

....

I

~

T

;1-

ll#

;JJ

7' T 9,

v

;/

iJC ';5"

[t;]

l~

""

;JJ

I

Wi'

5'-

~

'/

if;U

~ ;iL 7G

;1-

m I

>r

7'

$.

frI;

>r

'if

/

11

I

M

:@;

~

;JJ

/

"E-

~

*If

~ JI-

- ,.;:>;

r

JI-

'Y

~

9 '7

i&.

~ JI-

I

'7

';t

... :

T

lilt ~

~,

mI

$;\f.

13

v

1)

fj

~ ~

11-

~

~ (jI

*

JI-

'7 11' v

~

r

I

7

'7

""

~

'I!f

iiiIt :k. ~

13

.'"

::l

I'

;iL

4-

~ l \.. ~,

T

,

,

I

11 ~

'l

-'f-

V

"E-

tel

';-

T

'/

~

:;!l:

~

III!

'7

J~

~ ~ j(:

~ ~

I

T

~

tit

~.... r.ti~~ ~ '-:"!.4-=""'"";7

~ I!I

JI-

~t

;iL

I'

~

M.

:J:I<

WJ I

-r

:ill:

~ ~ ;JJ 'l

""

~ n}l

J\..

i\IIi

."" 7G tJt go

* ';t

:;.;::r.::. ~ ~~ "'=~~--~ --" ~ ;.J


c:::-.; J;,l

1:.

~

)~ 0

~

7

o:p

'/

)~

,

H;t ~

,.

V

~p

11

'7

/

>' 7;§'Ii

111 7 >' 7'

~

"'/ I

,oft 7 ~~

>'

;;.

,

J~

.l1t: 7 >' 7~ II '/ I

)~

* I

I

"*

;;f

-r

li

.!f-

I

11

~

1i'i -r

)~

'E"

l~

~

::7

X Nt!

7 ~

!@.

.fi1;

.!IO !It

m .: .!IO

-;{{ I

*o:p

1i

~

Jill

YfiJ

=

Iik 'I:!c

~

~

.!IO

1¥-

I

~ ~

I

)~

il:fc

:9c

l'!!\

t

7-

jill 7

'.l V

::7

ffi

I»l A

)~

r.l'

tlI: '1

~

;JI. 7

WI -I<

)~

~

~

~

*:\l!.

*-

Ii1Il

~

!It

~

'fJIl

7

..(

:P

A )~

'E"

I

7 J

;:9(

~

~

7

7)~

* Ii1Il ::7

~

'7

1f

~1l

7-

,.

I

iIilI

'7

.fl!l. ~

fJJt /

r- ,r. = ;f,

3C a~ .~

IlJI:

-l!:

~

.-{

;f;

m ,;-

*.Ii ~.

'J

7"

#.Ii

'E"

~

:ill IG" ;/)

~

)~

Jjjl

fl}[ 1¥7

{F. ~ /

J

$

lWl ~ ';/

j,f! ~ ~

I ~ij(

>' 7-

~

4'-

~

m '1

~

'if

~

,..---..~

..

a}3

)~

A )~

'E" /

J

;b:

7

*

J

::7

)~ 0

~ I

~

7

.l:t

:lJ;

I

)v

lid

~ -;{{

7 jj!; ;;. 7'

*-

1p

J

,

r.

lib

>' 7-

'R<

tM,

IIf,

1J

itt

fit

.I'!!,

I

I

1M

7"

Il,i]

~

'1

i§. a

~

~

~

~J\I ~

)~

*

I

7

-r ::7

~

~

a}3 13

o:p

:iL ~ ~

V

IlJI:

I

r

'*

::7

a

)~

1!L

I

11

)~

'/ 74'-

~

V

I

~ 7

"

)~

)~

-1..

~ >'

.m

.l:t

a

4'-

-r

I

1f.

1f

7-

~

"-

r-

~

$

7

~

ffi-

i'li iEc

=

~

~ ijjt

I

-I<

JIt

'7

i!Ii

*

::7

A

~

I

J! 7

ilt

~

T

r

U :It!!

~

~

v

~

)~

:iIIl

.>t-

7-

{t.

I

~

)~

1f>:

$

'J

V

~

.j-

7"

)~ 0

J

~

I

,

)~

'/

a}3

A

;f, >' -\-

7-

!f;

'E"

.fi1;

'/ /

/

~

7'

..{

;:9(

~

'/

-If

'J

iJX

"-

.Ii

'E"

ii!Ii

~I

7-

tr

~p

31..

/

U

Cb

A

J ft-

v

JI:

I

'7

'7

r

>'

.l:t

'/

-I<

".Ii:

Ii1l

>'

~

~ ~

V

~

1iX

..(

v :/1'

-Ii >' ;;.

J

to

;t}

'1

*-

~

~

*ltil1 li ~

!Wi

J!

*o:p

.l:t

Clt

~~

~

'$I-

*'*

~ ~

J;,l ~-

I

'1

!Ii!


~

~-"""'~

~ ~

.It

7' T

,

-;.7-

gt -f

;fA

Il!€

'**m

T

S -t-

-'~

1i .FJ

7

/\

/

)t-

~

ilt

:tl

:/

if<

&b

)t-

"'E-

"ifF

~

~ "1

iilj', "*

1W :/

T

A

-C: -gJ;,l

T

:g{i

m

1*

~~

A

= i~

:II

;Ii!

/ '<

7'/ /

"'E-

ft

~

~

v

~

.It

/

{lj.

:f.1

~

-t-

Cit illI

T ~

rL fI!! «Ii

~

)t-

*JI(

:l

/

.It

~

~

:i!l!

"1

/

fJ( -"

Ill,

mE

It T

T

~

;at

7'

/

*' /

~

li1i

~

:t:

0

rL

V

)t-

-"

1-

/

m:

m "1

*iii /

th

';I ';I

/

"1

Al

If:

~

:/

"'E-

~

fiil

/

i"t {t. -J-

?'

~

/

-t)t-

ty, ::IJ -t-

:0:

fj\:

/

T

/

A

}t-

~

7'

i~

T

:l

}t-

~

:l

nul

}t-

/

:II

~

t±I

Ii

I-

*

~

'7 -'~

"'E-

:l

:i!l!

::IJ

'7 -f ?' 11;/

~ 1/

~

~ -J-

f,j\ "1

"'"

lilt

~

;:1G

~

:/

,

=

~ :/

V

~

?It

ltiI!

T

]I!

:tl

if

)t*JI( IUl

E

)t-

T

Pot

lM

jljj

~

*1£ Ul

15

A /

m

';I

/

~

liT

H~

iii l!L

:l

7'

IW

-;.-

.m

/

::IJ :/ ,

fiil

~

"1

"'E-

~

/

0

:R:

)t-

q~

if

)t-

-f

"Mf

/

?

T

T

~

7'

k

::IJ

"-

It

~

-it'

T

'7

'*

/

)t-

r~

/

T

it

~

3t

*

i$

? -f ~

)t-

lilt

D: Ii

"1

;ffi ~

4-

~ ~

tk: :0:

W.

fj. ~

fiil Iifl

fiil !il!l

:if!!

)t-

~

A

-C: -g-

A )t-

fiU -t-

iii

"1

Iifl

~

1\111 =

Jli

fiil

**

"'E-

=

1m

J[

.FJ

:W -;.-

Wl :/ ,

7'

V

)t-

!7

/

.{

~

T

"'E-

:0: ti

A

)t-

J!}j

"1

)t-

~

~;!f

.It!,

*

!7

3'G Wl

~

A

1m

~&

A

""7

~ )t-

/

lifl

::IJ

:/

:l

)t-

*PJl )t-

~ t~

7t ilR

)t-

1m

~

!til! ~ -=;:1G

)t-

~

;at

/

If

11-

~

/

ltiI!

if.

~

B

~lii

~ ~~

:i!l!

:/

rL

T

iI'If

jt ~

*JI(

T

Cit

.l;J.

:tl

'J T

,

~

fI;.

115

T

!O

*Ii

v

:fr

/

-C: -g-

7

;:1G

:/ ';I

7'

rL ttl! ffii

~

::IJ

'7

S

~

ttl!

m

:l

?

fi.\

lit fi.\ ~ :/

T

""')t-," :l

*

v

IT

It

~

!jj ~

"1

:/

;f.I.

:/

mE

~

!7 f1{£

,

-;!' ;/


~~-

~ ~

itT

'7 ;/In

N9 Ji!!il /

1~

I

::J

I

1{f .R;

iii /

.00,

I!!t '7

1.1 IL., m ,.

i\iiJ

]I!

9

nili! liM A )l.

iP '7

:illi ;l;/

~

~

;I\: ii';

'" ::J

A

V

)l.

'7

-'E-

1i:

I

-7

~ A

7

) L-

)L-

I

0

9

::J

<P

lJt

<P

~ I

;I-

I-

v

:f/,

:;;

'\"

~ .R; ~ ~

1p I

.fiil

ill

A

±

IN-

~p

m <P

:m

3l

I

~ I

m /

'7

19:

ill: 3i- iF A A ll'I '"'E-

;H

'7

1i "i/

5-

li !:t

ax :m -r7 m it1/( I

)L-

a T .{

tk

/

7

~

II

=*

r.:t

"*

'7

f@

-7

~

'7

iffi

ll[ I

*

J1l:

/

¥-l

~

:ill

5-

<P

)l.

::J

s

~.

m /

~

;/

1{f

::J

"i/

5-

~

, :illi

I

9

*!Ill

0

I

~

r

'7

•,

II

<P

!Ill A I

II I

31l

:m j£

;E Jf(; ~

-7

IIIIi %

"i/

)l.

T

~

)l.

"*?Ii:

;E ~

-sr.. /

!Ill

~ ~

"i/

E

~ "i/

"i/

Ji!!il

5-

'iff lit

5~

Fol /

I§ ~

$:

;E Jf(; J;,l

r-g

.ft!:

I

ill: lM ;I\: ffI- :illi jlltJ "i/ iii 'J !lll

*

I

!Jlf ~

5-

fti

!Ill

*

;tit

ffi

'5

~

.R;

'"

~

111

r

I

7" 0

*f!iI

<P

1{f

/

/

7"

it1/(

)l.

~

I

7"

-7

)l.

7" )l.

fill fit

~

wrr

'7

'7

1Il:

;I\:

-I<

'\"

'7

*

rIi. v ':I

7

"i/

J1l:

II

<P

ll[

~

-ti: iii:

m

ii!\ )l.

Wi ~

~

~ =:

'I I

* .{

T

)l-

7J:: 1.1 '7

'If tI1! -I<

·Co' ;JJ

;:(, 53{<:

)L-

;I\: ~ A

I

5-

7'tf

:Jl<

:IT 1111 :IJJ '7

)l.

i3

1p

"i/

V

if

I1l

~

II 5-

~

'7 "i/

~

;/

;JJ

fl.l

~

~

II

7" )l.

I!!t -'E/' <P <P f!iI Iii ]I!

!iJ/.

~

t~

~

I

']-

'J ':I

II

~

~

~

:}t

'"

)L-

/

4W

t@ '.I /

Wll

~

T

=

;JJ"

:It

7"

'" 1.1 '7

.{

II ;/

~

~

;I\:

5-

lit

11: III

Fol

"*

i'I I

l\'iI

**'7

IlJt V

fill ~1jI /

r

S

~

ffi

~

)l.

-'E/

v

4-

*

~

11-

/

1.1 J1i

:ill?

1{f

.R;

/

m T

)l.

V

S

A

~ 'l!t Jl!: :J5 Wi

,~

,

~

) l.

9,

N9 !Ill /

W-

m /'

.lit

rm

fi.\

/

A

-7

)L-

7 ) L0

~

;JJ"

T .{

I

-7 7 )L-


,..,----

~ ~

~:

lJ;Yj

''/

~

tJIl

=\" if1r;

i1J, ::JJ

100 K;t -1

-r fiil 100

'Iff ~ '1

IFf I

JiJf {lit '1

!I!!\

~

"I ~

$ J::

lIai

~ = ~

J.l! !I

-r

!I -1 i-

~

.I!!. 1fi

n"7

)1-

:JiIB

7

0

t±I

'£-

7:

"/

)1.-

~

"

-r

~

'1

:!It !7 '£-

:!il<

'Iff

i!JI1

r

q.lji ~

'7

*

~,

~ i-

*-r

Iill

~

-7 7"

=\"

ffi

~

-* )1.I

-r

'Iff Ii i-

4-

ll%'

J:: ~-~

fJt Vf ~

~

~

1W -;y

,

B

* I

*JP~

:JiIB

*JIl:

7" )i0

~

*Wi-"'" 7G

)i-

t:i3

7k !A.

'I I

~

~

4B ;;t ;/

-r ,

*-

* IiI!* 1i!I: * !t'JJ ~

1W T !7

~

J,;J.

if# ~ ~

lIai

;t'£I

I

'l'-

-r

~

~

*-

W!

ft '1

'/ I

>t

* ?!.\ I

3

)1-

~

iii rOJ '1

'*

*lliJl.

ll'j!< '7

I

'1

*-

-* )1-

,

"~ )1-

-',

I

~

-r

* ~f-

---....... -

~

"I

.t;;;

~

lJ;Yj

m "7

'7

~

~

*~

J;l:;

IiI!

~

c:,

!I

'1

I

-r

Vi I\,'

)1.-

~

~

,

0

*

!II.

!IJ

JJ!.

m ;rI

...

~

~

-r *~ :* -r :!Ji: 7"

)1.-

ftil

Hfl. I

*l

*-I B

;E;

m

7ft.

7"

'1

m

it

;I-

)1.-

m

::JJ

~

~

)1-

;<.

;<.

tJIl

:/ ~ :;<,

~

11

~J;

9.®

~

'1

i.'if

;fA

-r '£-

WI

jg

T !7

~

;it ~ ~

~

:?

;/

ll'li' 7'

I

r

;/

:;<,

;lin

Mf {lit

'7

)1-

'Iff Jt ?if. ~ 1i!} *!!- iii m .p -r ~ ~

~

::£

=.

~

::JJ

'I'-

If

-

~ I

-r

~

~

*

!

B

'I

'7

I

I

ii'fli

i-

9

Jl.lJ

!7

*-

*1fi

7'"

IWi

:W-

>t ~,

~

I >t

-1 7'"

r

::JJ

A-

lJl.

J,;J.

) 1-

i1J,

;b

4'

~

'1

-r

V

*3i :l'ii

~r

-r

-r

~

a\]

~ ~

~ ~ '1

~

-r liiI! "/ "/

j:tj1 @;

liIlI

m '}J'

~

7-

.R;

~ :;<,

jg. ~ '1 a,?

'£-

!7

*..... /J

~

Mi

-v

-r -r

"I

'}J'

=

:;<,

I

~

I

ffi

$

100

~

~

~

~

'Iff

I

*

~ 9

J

,

)1-

~

)1.-

~:A\J

7"

ID:

~Ui

7"

v

JI( :ill!:

-r

~ ~

0

)1.-

11-

-I"

tr

*-

)1-

*:

-',

!7

-r i/il -1 1iiil: :#( -r

~

lI!e i1i

7e

I

lli[

If

'*4-

-;)'

IDt

*~

'fj

:m

*~i

*

*~

1lt -r -;-

)1-

~

i'!iJ

¥== ~~~

~jI

~

I

j!:

i~

*"'"

;E;

7G

~

= ~

IiI!

~ :;<,

) 1-

if(. ~

!7

:III!

$:

I ~

'1

lik ~

:j;/J: 'l'-

~

-r ~

:a ".

~

=r M:

....,'


~::-

J;l

J:: I

hI!

~ ~

. .::l

I

'J

III .R:

?',

i~ I

lit fi£i. '1

1i3 It ;..W ;f1,

'" )t-

~

;fJ/(

'1 ;lJn

*- '"~ ~

*

;..-

ii,'

-'F-

?-

)1.-

7-

)1.-

I

!lZ.

7'

~

T

I

)t-

~

:w: Jt

1lf\

15 iIii

~ T

?'

7-

/.

*

J¥lI

?

ff\:

4!r15

~

'*

!Ii:

I

7' T )1.-

j.

0

?

'W:

-r

'5 IIll

=

*:7

~ ~

t.l

,f~

f.~

r.~j

. 1ft

-r

?,

JI-

iii

~

W

L.~.A..~ .

I

fit '1

;/)n 7 JI-

3i

" 7'

'<if !ill

~

::I

'7

'1

;..-

f.A

'"j-

.t!:

'"V Jl!

Hfl.

"l'-

v

'1

:ill;

'< i~

j.

T

-'1'JI.-

, JI.tr U ~

---~

M

;tJ1 )J

-';1;:

Jj.

-I!:

I

'"I·

jII..

WI

?J;

;..-

'1 ;f.;

~~

'"

I

~ 'J

t-f

?

rl.i ;..-

)1.-

'*

~

?I

m {f,iJ .IE

'*1Ji: I ~

~ I

I

~

( ~5\

'"

7(

}I.-

*

": ~

?-

I

;:IJ

:Au

I

*1Ji:

7(

'<if ~

)L-

4JJ!

)1.-

~

Til '1

re 1<

&

w.I

'1 ~

~

;:IJ '1

-r

B

}I.-

7'

.ft:..

1i.r/(

T

'\"

9jl

iliil

)1.-

'l't

:~

ftlJ !lZ. Ii'

'E-

7'

7

'7, T

1iP '1 IIl1J

:l

)1.-

I\W

Jirr

'"

~

~

{t. 11-

I

'"

mil

I

~

,

)1.-

~

jJi; 7(

;..-

I'

-r

)1.-

~

)1.-

It

*-

:@

]I.

,tJ)j

'1 ~

v

~,

I

r

I

?-

?-

lii!

Jli.

,Il!.

~

'1

~

±

}I.-

f9 f?\ 7(

iii

~

Cr!I '7 ~a

*

.p

'7

T

)1.-

v

)1.-

~

-r

)1.-

:l

T

J;l 7J)j

7-

~

ti til:

~J

-r

:l

~

'1

JK

~:

;1II

;:IJ {t. 11-

;:IJ

I

#l

-x

I

1il

Ill< JIll

=

~,

Ii

j.

JK

$

I

,

~

'1 ~

4;, f;f

mil

'1

~

'7

-r

;..-

'J

?'

r~

;1II

I

:if!;

iJ;\':

Ii

r,fl

'E-

~

v

'"

'1

f~

iIL\

'7 'I

;H

::I

I-

Jt

'"

-r

r'if

'E-

1ft

'E-

9

~

)1-

I

'/ T

-..

i'l: llil!

!lZ.

jj

lJf.

&.

iii llil! '< II!l!

ill;

J!;

1;11: JI.-

IW

lHi

E

;11n 7

t$

'<

;1m

I

JI-

}I.-

,

~

'7

i~ til)

ii<;

!ll1

.fi';

v )1.-

~,

:tl

I

1"1

tz,

~

;..-

I

11l

*'",

WI "l';..7-

Jj.

IT4f

~r

f!'\

rjc

2f'-

'$I..

I' ~

'Ii!

I

!it{

;!iIJ

~.

Ili'£

~.

W .IE

7J ?

I '#I~

'1

fL~ ~

.1i',

~

i.l JTt

-r

E.

-r }I-

'"

JI.-

I~

.R

'!'

'*1Ji:lilt lii! I

ilt

;g :if!; ;..-

~

~-~~=- ~ ~


tW£:::::-=~r:

9, .".

11

-l}' )L,.

"EI

) L,.

ijfi

/,'

At

1i$ ~m

-;J

v

-j-

1/

:7

-1,

!i!t

I

JJj

±

lli'< '7

Ji1

~ ~

~ I

~t 11

IM11

~

-\!

'7

"EI

:X

tr

;/

'/

:JI

/'

11

7

-\'

I

v /'

.".

-l}'

"'/

)L-

*-

'Jl:.

li

'7

*

~ ~

I

Nf

li'rr 11

*it

z

-7

r * 13

!ll<l

~

11

iil;

PJ 4l-

:No 1r

....

,;

)1-

?& 'V

7"-

Jtl: I

~

:lI\: '7

I

.$

I

)1-

"ifk 1lfr

1ii:

m

!1' =

~A

~

~ J;r

I

)L-

Jt:I:

~

~

±

",4

*;m-

tL-

I ~I

-j-

.iii:

~

~

;j/!f I-

0

~

liii

~

ilfr

1M!

11

t~

lll! -I!

,\!l.

JJ

:IJ!f

it -j)L-

~

I'

,

*l i

~ ~ '7

;pg 1ft

I;'J

lE

1it

~f.

fRo 'V

7

Jj{f

:7

I

*

)L-

/F

liN '7

*

JIll

~

~

'V

J§. I

/'""'\

JJ

T ~

:l1l; '7

r

.It

~

lin

*-j-

T

IJm 1*

'is' ii.\'<

3'd:

3{.

'V

W

:X

"EI

~

tiftf

-1

~

T ~

';I

~

I

I

:No

~

~

r

~

'V

4-

'IIi:

-I>

)L,.

9i iI

~~

A.

~

7

-j-

~

) L-

-1

'V

Jj{f

I

T

-7

:l!

*

;fI,.

" iJ:lf

7 ) L-

,

;f3

"v

~

:7

~

111

*7t

I

JJ ±

:Jl 7

~

JJ ±

5t ;1J y ~

It ~ -I!

I

7 '/ '/

!i':t ~ J;r )L-

~

Jt:I: -j-

~

I

9

!::: 1lL AA'. ~I

:7

~ t!( '7

;fI,.

~

ii~

"

i*

I

~ -j-

~ '7

'7

1$

1%'

'" (

~ ~

T

)L-

~

4-

~

i\i'{ '7

.~,

{Ill

I

-7

~

'V

7

'7

mi.

,,,...~ ~

+

m

-

~

7

JI-'

Jfl

I

~

'V ..(

1/

, 111

~

" '--'

~r(;

;!It

)1-

J

o!i

I

v

.

~ )L,.

;1J

~

J\

tiri ift iii iJi tt ~ JJ

~

~

)L-

-7

~

"t:

./

~ ~

I

'V

v

* ~

J;l,

00.

-j-

:Ij

~

3l€

~,

~ ~

II1\!

'V

:;rr:

~

*-

~

___

:...

~

> '4i""


-c

{7

;t;

JJI\

.;rA 0

iii ~

}~

I

1fit

'"

ili

:x

$

'"

.!j! .~

iJf

-f' i\ ~

-tf

't 'j

II',J, ;f.p

1f

~

& '7 X

rJ.

**

I

0

~

~

n If'll' T

~

I

ilill

ti

&:. I'

'"

7-

= ;Ilf

~

:ill: W '}

~

Ii'! <It }~

11" %

+ 7i

ijf

Wi

m

-I:

a~

T

Jll

,1l[

:IE I

..IE :/

I-

iIi'~

1f. itfr

·1

A

I

$.

'i'Ji

~

W

ill\'

rm

I

I

~ij

1'fi

:>;

~I:

~

~~

Nf !l!I !HI

k

JIX

7-

1lt. O\'f $.

1'J¥.

iIf.

l/

i/l;

I

a~

~~

~III

~

i/l;

/'

!i':

;If..:

!ill

R

~

a~

'7

"Fl

I:J

fIif

1)

-I'

l!!l

=

~

n=j

JE

15'i Ii.

'" '\'-

)~

-t:

;JIg.

'"

~IN

:::J

I' =j

w ~ '" u

T

'it

ilR .~. 7

ii;lf

1i!:

!7

I

:JJ;.

T

V, lit

WI<

I

A

m

I}'l.

~.:::ii~

,

jffl

'"

7-

.l:t

lid

W'

~

k

1'"

* :ali

~

/

tl

~ -j-

)~

tit I'

..y

7~r

~

:* "!R: I

11 r.

:?£

~

B

::E lItJJ I

T

~

i!il<

itfr

:{!k

'}

ff -\<

;7 )~ )~

=

1& V

1f

jfX ~

:mt

Jt

fib g

1} ~ ~ ~JIl wI) ~ ~

;

IlQ

00 A

~

@j

=

:t\

T

i!i?o

-

~

::0-

J¥;

';; ';; T

I

/f

\lit

.IV

m

'Ii\'

}~

9

I

;;F

~.

T

>.'!k ;Z,

Ib

%'

A

P.IT

*

~ *'l7iliB

-r V I'

l!!l Ii1!

1<

1l

*

£iR Pjf

!li!

~

? @;

:lll\

M

:IE

:It

m, ill

IDt

~

Jib

~

?

m!l

IDII

.l:t ~.

~

:A

B

}~

~

:ali

n*

'r

**

I

=j

}~

~

)~

-r

OIl

;#<

1<

&:. .l:t

i{ fjJ

~~

li

-!i1J

" "" I

'}

7j

A

I

:Ii!;

~~T~~""'"'::"::"'::~


..

,.. iEi ~)II

5f: ;;<. 0

7-

7-

*-

ft

4-

~

-\"

I

~

\tJf

-JOC

*l i ~ ~

III I

:Ii r

""

7-

II!l

I

;f.tl

+

3

.I:t

-e-

~ 11

I

tR:

v &:. Ifk. rL

}I.-

*B

;;<.

I-

;;Ie

*

"

CIt

r

~

V

if:ic

~

{B 7C

=

~

-e-

V ;;Ie

%

X

&p

tJ

'" \.!f

~

B

-I!:

;,.::z

r

;;Ie IDJI

!lli-

~ 7-

T

;;<.

{~

JIt

fI6! ~

~ ~ ~

/

~JlI

~

FJi"

~ [i!\

""

:;t

.I:t

IT

lib

m <P

/

.!'£

* 1& ~ It lilt M A "f *1 7

~!li

fill

./

7 ~

§

m

:lit!

~

.;

~

11

7 /

~ 7

fA

JL

~JlI

kJIi

Nr

~

-I!:

'7

,...

) 1.-

~

'11; I}

lID

~

=f-

T A

* ff

-

Ji~

lW

~

* {f tJ

""""!'"~ ~'*

~

111i

}L

A.

"if,.'

*

~1 WI)

}l

}L

""'.,-:::".:. ~

, 7

~

*

m Jt

.I:t A

#:

lOt

!I

.

I

{f,! ~

J'V'

'" ? ;;Ie ..s" B n '{:';"11 i

*-r

~

;r'!tlJ

m ~

1K

/

?

-7 faJ

.I:t

~!f.

A

}L

§W:

~

"

ilfr

-;j~

~

~

~

;It-

B

""r * ~

IW

~

"$I.. T ~

!!1.:

~

*n JJt

?

II".! fit.

~

C 1Jr

if;/{

=

1l

I

m

V

I

1J!

-I!: ,y

a

B

if

V

lit' =f-

'-r*

r

v

~~

r.n I m

I -tlt

-I!:

7

.I:t

0

~

~

'7

0

V

P'l r lit

flT

~

::z

" -r

~

}I.-

+

I-

f«f

1'.

Fl

I-

;;<. )L

::z

T

m

~

M

\tJf .I:t

/\ ~

=f-

JI&

...

~ -


~

:...-.

~~

~

~ ~ -=:~ -;:::'~ ~4!! ·1',:.;w..1:1.... ~

!ill 1fl:

l:t

;ii;i

~

~

tit

~ii

11:.

~

~

!llt ~

I

if¥..

~ .

*1f. 11 <F

~

~

f,j'

1~

""

"E'

tit

-j11-

tit

it

=

l:t

iIii

7

/

:e * *.. ;?t

~

l! ;ffl

V

Jil(; lI-

I

~

fT

~ ~

~t:§ fi

g I

A

Jl (J

4'l .=.

-I-

~

~ a)l 7J<.

i\

'$L fj!i

=r

~

v

it

'" Jl B

l:t

Ii:.

iili ~

ffi1 /

II pt =J

5\

U( ? r:j:t .jc

1fn

/ ~ii

~

ff.;;

!1 Y

I~~

~

ifR

~

lO.

!fi 3

1/

=

~

l:t C!J

JJ,.

*'\" Ii. tf' /J

ilff ~

.It

$

l:t

--

,---

...J

fflG *1i - It IDJ ;A

IV'

If± III

* Jf~

;A

II;

--,

.It fjfi

~

1L ~

vm ~

ft fi

L.

--:.... .::~ ~:..-.~~-=... --!;l,;a.~ ..; ~--:.. ~


tf:

~ I

.a;t *ili

$

i± -1< ;/

"$I.

;Wi

}~

I

I

7'

~

j;). '7' ~ ~ I ~

~

l1& :iiIi

"*JeffIi.

$

T }t0

><

;;I;:

6f.

FP

iii

",

JJii '7

m :/

"*

7C

:/

Wi J;t

!iiJ

$

- ~~~

7-

*-r IQI

}~

&.ll

,.,. f.Ii :/

$ i± III I

~

~

r

:Wi

I

Wi

J:t

&h

-j-

}\-'E/

ji T }~ 0

711J

fiT.

* ff

5-

.R:

~

fa·c

In /

:&

;g

'+:-::- -

ft

II f\:

~ ~

t-M ~

t6f,

11 3.lk;

1R

11; -Jjl) '1

k

~~

IYl

'1

$

3<: 11.

g

.. '*

3l..

1t:

li'it

~ ~

:/ ;10

:tt

;fa: ><

Jib Jt

iJ\il "f Jtt

i1i.J

1.i iii

IT

:/

fl~

r.Jt

•;

B

J;t

-\!:

l"r

~

'1

,%

fiij MJ ~

~

iF-

~

~

tJt

A

iDt

IB Jt

~ )J

'7

J;)l

7~

~

Iiit

I

-T

.~

~

~ ~

J;t

1W

}t-

I ~

JI

-l! :/

:/

tf:

';!

li

~

:/

)~ 0

1flt

jJ

a~ I

T

itli rJt

:/

iji! {iii

JL

~

*ll-r

~

'1

'*7'

~ '7

m

3c

~ flj!

-j-

1Ji:

:/ "

i'I't

IT

Ill!:

i!;

1ft

~

I

7-

~

&h }~

\13i

~~ "$I.

Wl A.

J;t

;,f{:

v

{Ie. ~

~ a~ ~ "$I.

'7

;/

a\J

lit

,~,

fr

=

...-

-r

}~

$ tf:

:.

'7 -Jjl) ~

.U:

:/

)frt

I

-1

~

W

~

~ ~

'*frr.

::1

.. -

0

ilVJ 7'

><

~

T

nii

}t-

:jJp

'7

v

';I

Jl[

-1<

;/

EI

bi,

JI

;10

-j-

~

lj-\' J;t

~ A

!),j-

F.I

}\.

~ijl I

~

;,

"*-r

for

7"

'"

)V

~

Fl EI'I

=E 1&

a\J

.Il!

'tJl,

~ -1<

'7

v ~

'-'IIi'

-


,.,

~_~=~;::-7.:~~~

1iE i~ ~ -1< y

';I

J\ jp -I-

FI

-1I1Y A

:;;

='

ilt

/

-IJ!J

/

5"

-1-

"'"

5",

7"

:;;

IllS

;{fj

l7 ~

jfp

titL

~w jjiJj1 7

C'. "7

"

~

~J!.

7

7

iil!:

~ :;;

,

0

B

*M 7

* m ~L

""

:/

1-

1lii liE

~

J\t Itb

m

it 'If

111:

][ /

m

IDt

:;;

ii!li itt

Iil ';I ';I

:;;

T

111:

';I ';I

jj

I' }L

"$I.

il'lf ;g-

Il

,h

tl'll'-

=t

I-

!Ur

~

/

}J.,

ill !Ii

~

""" :;;

~-

w,'"

'f' ~.f,.t

~

~

/

il-

l'

1:

11-

}J.,

'.lII.

';I

5"

*-

*

I-

-r t/

:>!'.:

~

41-

;f!i:

][

;it

/

/

m

T 0

"$I.

~

- -m'/

....

~

'~J

lOt

~

:it

~

}I-

7

=

.:-

:;;

*-

}~

~~

Ii:t 15

11

.li-:::

~$j

J;t

i~

l][

J

!iilI

~,

!I-!IX

[!!!i 9;;-

-r

W


.~

;f JIj( /

rm

- _ ~~~1I!i:

4"-I'

ll~ "f~

~,

Wt nlG 1)

~

" 'lit

f.~!

, -r ifc

JJI<

*1'l

*Jl(

li

3f-

fir.

~

'7

+

~

;W:: ;H

V

V

'*1Ji:

?

m Jl(

*If

;l(

Ii!iI

*

2f

'I'f-r 15 '!¥: lID V

*ffl ~

1!.:

I

&'

~ ~

=

7-

~ /

fi.

~t,

IX

'J 'J '/

:lit

'7 'J

v -;

T

V

)v

;Jt /

H~

7J

""

~

:)1" &'

:!Ii: liI~ m

'7

~

1m

1)

I

;{3

-1,

:JJ

I~ ~

? 1)

J

41' I

ftu

:r 7

}v

rQ9 fMj

?

~

V

/

-7-

W

A.

Ii!...

~'

V

:)1'

11 -,

7 '7

#it.

}v

m /

\itli ~

'-;\ V

~

illf 1-l

WA

jliI: ~ =

7-

liJJi

v

,'1)~

7,

}v

}v

7 '7

;(3

1)

*Ie.,

':I T

0

'iff l!iI

~

!?l1

~

ffii ~

;Z. '7

illf I

~ A )J..

J1, H~

~

A

V

:E

'Ii'. I

6'';;

:1L

-Jf.: l!iI *it it I

*Wl 1!.: T

Wt

m

jlf! t.J

v

.-(

'ff; ~

l' 7 }v

.... 11

Ifil iP.f =

J1,

HIl A

""

III

V

R.

:)1"

11

T

!6~

)~

1m

-&\'(

T

'J T

51

l!iI

~

1tI.

;;t

7'

'J 7'

;It

'J

.-(

1t

i&

$:

7' ~JJ

7 '7

j.

)v

l J..

7'

~

V

~

~ T

fill.

,",

1"

T

5)-

V

V,

!l\f

*Jli:

li

-r

:r"

'V'

1!.:

.QiI/

'7

11

7'

~

.A

""

/

1S€ II~

J'

ill:

g;'7

i'lI i:I:l

=

I' ~

-r

m

'J

"j(: /

11

:t9i

0

jf:

;j'.!i

TPI~

ID:

U!f

V

.-(

V

!1

~

7'

/

;H

T

lfL iE!c

:r )~ 0

V

til'

....

.J

iiIl1 fUl

:JJ

"f

':I 7'

Jc

-p

Jt

-1lt:

A

:JJ ? 7'

'7

~

=r

~

=r

~t. ~

IZ!!

iU:

B!

I' '7 ;E:

j:Jj 7'

/

A

/

~ .D}J '7

f~

}~

=r

bJJ /

~

~~

Jt

~

V

?

}v

.r:

7'

JR

.-(

bh

/

V

'J 7'

;01-

,

* ~

/

:r

...

Jt

V

~

.-(

:)l

JR.

T

Ii

7'

!»1~

Jli:

'7

jifI

3f!1 /

:r T

-V ~

~

:If

Jt I'i!1

/

iIX

li

it(

.QiI/

~'

',lfr ~

§ ~

~

.Il!,

li

/

~

'7

~

jli

~ ~

~

:r J'?0

v

;h: III

/

~ '7

I'

"t-r-

"" A

"W!

V

'7

~

/

fit-

*Jli:

I

V

5(;

4!r

J;!(

~

7

T

V

~t.

}v

)J..

1i!li.

Jc

-r

~ "

:@

,

)(

;H

=r

)v

)v

~ ~ ~

)v

51

1t

T ~

/

m 7J

~

1!.:

7

:r :r

ill: !I- ~ ~

<P

A

I

~ '7

ill: lID

j~

}v

i'!li ..... iI'If

-

4!r Nt /

}v

,..

~

:)i

*-

* 4iJi' '7

;;R

-r '7

-f-

1 /

:r 7

}~ 0


r'"

IA~

Ii /

._

"" ,.,-'iCi

m

~

-;<

.If'.:

'7

T

:;!l!

;y

)1-

:t:;

7'"

~

I'

~

/

lit

'tt/,

1J

=

!ail:

7

.If.

~

* -j-

f7

V,

'/

~0~~~~'~

~.-

"*

.ill

;l-

, +

=r

iii J\:

-,

~ )1-

/

m:

ji

!7

T

~ I)

J;t

li!l

:JI!' iIX

)~

,

it:

~

\:0'

;y

/

) 1-

T

iii!

-r

L.

iff "'F

~

-;<

~

-j-

7lf ff

$!

T

/

itt

y

)~

ijl;

r(;f

-li

:j!

*'"

:/J '/

I)

/

::.--

T

T

!1Ii

I' ~

.iiIJ

;I-

)~

;t.J

~ p

jj

*

'/ T

:Ji

ill!. iID

jp :fij

:Jj

:It

~ /

{fi ~ /

fl., "7

::.-A

lOt '7

~

1f

J;t

li:t

l.r

FJ '7 ~ f7

~ 7' / filJ

13

I'

"lL We

'Ii:

if:

r

V

7' :¢

::1

7'"

l!t

.ill:

t1

-;< T ':/

'7

*Ii 7'

.J-

$: ~

:li ~ ~ /

:;!l!

iff! /

I:Z!!:!

V ':/ '/

1iIJi !IX

.~

"MI,Ll

~

':/ 7'"

,

z ml

**Ii f7

s

.\ll,

I}

./

13

~

!7

:ilL

;(-

.,.

-"

:7J'

-r "7

/

~ ~

I'

}I-

)~

L.

jl

4- li

lIii III

FJ

1'1J

~' ~,

~

!!lil

:7

",

A

::1

~ :!>\: ,;..< :;!l!

~iL

!

iI'!c 7

£

*:l!l: .ill

~

-I'

Jl!

A

.

---,

7J

)1-

J:t Ob /

B: IDl: '--

7

7

V 7'" ~

:iJn

/

J;J.

~ '7

'~

i

/

v

"7t

JiH

;I-

jijl, f7

B:

M

lIrr J:t

.JI/

~,

~'

J;t

"'1-

~ '7

:lfI!

J::

~

=

IIi; ;)j

'.lilt :/J

}~

"7

y

I-

~ ~ A

) l-

)~

I,

~

~'

?i"

J/5

-r

/

':/

~

~

i* ;t!'

itt

~

:m {£fI

;g :JI

~

}I-

T

-j-

.II:

w.

.(

-y

T

:7

)~

~ f7

l'

.::A

:Il MJ

I

~

:i'lf

/

Wk

Y..

.... V

.j,g.

1!I We

::.-:I-

~

-t-

/

~~

-I.;.

/

I-

!

~ )if '7

....

-\!:

I'iiJ

=

iRf

4'

7'"

..,

Jilt 6i

"-

~

IIi;

J\:

~

A

~

J;t

& 1m

~

~

=r

"Y

13

-j)1-

1L

/

~~

7

*

ft if

V

f7

/

1iIJi =r fi ---, A J:t )1Ji1f

m

Jib

iii[

*

It ilt .*C

~~::::311!


..

-L..

/

E ;<Ie ~

%l 3t ~

lil

:tt A

1;~

~ -1-

!tit y

3t M lm I&¥.l

f*

$

.!Ji

.

li

~

ilX

1tl>

WI

.I. ~

1Xli IDt ~

iI!JJ

Jf)(

~

MI. JIll

Ii:

1;~

~

+

fL Mt y

Ims

f!!l<

+ JJr -t; JJr ~

1m iElc I\Wl ?J '€t"" tJ{ f*

Ii:

~ Jib ~

J:t

c

ili-

MI. W

y


ill!:

--•

*~

~ iNf tf; {TIS ;f;t +

.,.;.

·t

I&f.I

1l\

~

itt 1"!i

rEI

-t, ~

B

* .a

,0

;f;t

~

=li;

i*

B

*

* m

B

;r;

,0

it

-1:; ~

:tt

~

ffit

~

*

l~

-If;: :;i:

is~

*""

~

'JIi:

fd-

$

is~

* 1i!: .0

ffil '?i:

IE

/~

~

'-'

1* ;..Jj.

5i£

IfIl

IAJ

~

fjj ! gr S ~

ti<

§

IIJl

B ,..;.

;j;jI.

'i!t !B

-If;: :;i:

-,

-;s-

J}{

"*m Ea

.R: /

Fi i¥f;

Ie! llJ

'5:.

3'JIl.

IUJ

~

A

= [#l

'" It

A

"f'j :

I!!I

~

~ ~

JIL

I¥I

"I'-

,.... lI!i /

ft

~

=

1i

~I(

~ *!'l 41'"' t-J- i '"' t-J. ~ ~ ff.;

]\ ~

SE -1- SE -t-

~ ~SC

i\

:m. ~SC

41- tit 41'-' =

:1i!li

ft

;tJ!. ~IJ

i\ ~ '-'

ilt {fJf.

ff,91

IW!

K: /

lfi1l ~

ilt

41-

nr

~

l;

5i£

+ liB

:fff

!Jit

{1\(

~

JJ&

i. J'-'

;j;jI. IJ;:

=

,"

SE

iEri

'v

~ ~

~ ~

m

/'

~

1m 1* ,$J}{

~

m :?(.

iii] =

IUJ :;r.

) t-

SE ~ t-J.

A

1~'

i

iMI

= Iijj

Jv

~

fJl

41-

rm71'1'

H ;<.

D4

1m

....41-'*

is-

1i

M

. ~,

=

Jt-

1m

1'i'

:;r.

, t-

#

0

it

:lL

t

t

"

"

1i.

_n _

I!!!


.

.

..

• •* •* ;g. • • :€Jr :t\: ft :t\: ft

J:t

~ ~

fr

1m

=-

=-

..IlIL

7-

Jv

M~·

iEc

.::.

J~

WII

~

7F

/"\.

fP.Jf,

iE!c

.I:!:

'"' +

llL

41- lib

~

7F

....L..

'r

1L tit

~J11

iE!c

~ ~

ug %Il

+ j\

,:\~

J1t

~

4'lf jJlJ

~

P.Jr

~ ~

45

*

M

[!!)

It.-

*wll ~

** I:A:

".&

~

=-

JY~

~

7-

I!--

,

*I~ ~ ]X ~r

~1i ~

IUl

:&:

*

rwll

P.Jr

~9J

J1i

1m

A.

.. ff~

iEc 8

~

7F Ii. M

7-

. ff5

~

J~

7

R§,

PH

~

Ii.

It

"tJi: .tt

m:

~ ~ ~ ~

V

It

~

~

7-

It-

fr.

~

~ ~

Wi iR: 3t

r-.,

t:P ft

~

1L

~

*'

~ :f1i rlU ff5 it 1£ :&: ~ )f...

1:1: ~ ~ itM 1m iJR ~ .:E if ~ if ~ EI fl ~c ~ l!I£ *5

jfiJL X ~ ff~

=- fr.

¥

?- {ff.f!

I!--

r

'--'

fi(

!8:i ~

=- wll

/

8

J~ ~JlI

~

A:

15ft

ill

illt

It iIi:

1~

- 1* [B]

~

7F pJr iEc 1m 7F PlT ~ !8:i 1m

F {ff.f! F (ftt

wI! Wi'

.Iv

~

~.

* Ii' *wI!

wll 1m

~

iE.f(

!8:i

.

It :t\: ~ =-

It Jk It C¥> fJ' 71m ~ It JI.- It T ~ A ~JII nx; A

~

fiYJ IlK::

PJT

iEc

,

.

nx; ..=.

~

V" ~

£f. ~

:7

F.JII

~


.

~

:i\: .::..

~

;-

It-

~i" 1([ ~ lt j& -sfOi) ~ L

~I

1im

*!f.i:Jt Jt

11[ A j[:$( ~~

!Ni::

/

J:t @.

IUJ

1i

wll Wi 1m * F ~ ~ wI! JYr 1J

~ J-lX:

;

Ifr

:m

fr. m § *

A

)v

J

m f~

I;It.-

1J

~ @

u;ft: jt

~

)fE:

f§' '§'

.:::.

J~ l;II--

W

.lID.

llit

r;JII

~

~

~~"

~

E!.

~

it .:::.

~

fOi)

~ m 'g --

1m

II!

)v

~

~

.::..

~

~

.A

I

W ,-.., m

lb--

..

. .

1m Jt i!& r :¢ !;iI. F,J I! lijjt 1m ~

! 1J i!& m M1t

m:l;-

@ f!l!

,

~

1m I!m -- 1m it }t T ~

M ffi ~ -afOi)

I

tIT Jt

~

Jt

.It

J~ I;-

~

-r

~mi jz

II--

;f

.:::.

~

1m

~

!I[ 'g *Ul ~ i!& ~ 1\. ~ 9! ~ 1m ~JlI

~ I:::J a

~111 ~

... ~

:/ I)"

~+1

II'll

~

I:Y> om.

~

'g

ft

~

~

.A

)v

!I[

i!& c¥.

.lID.

~

"M!1

IDt r"\

~

J:t

Cb

I»1

1* /

,

'--'

f~

J ~

A

-1-" ~ ~

i

M ;.

I;II.-

r

~

~

plf ~

(lQ

[ill

A Err

A .:::.

~

T

~

'--"

§

*


1£ 11&

!k ¥a "~ -1-

~

\..../

~

~

)


.,-'

.......-

~

<t ~J[

II!'! "lip -I-

_____ ~

~..=-:~~

~ '7 ~

;J:t:

V

fIJ

7"

~

t~ '7

.J.I:

;$ .-..: .J;l

'7 v ?

'r

i}

-i!:

0

lip, -Ii\

:'p

+ fJ +

:.j:'.t~

;;t;

~ ;W:

~

'7

-JI'<

*EI ;;I;:

'Iff ~

Mc

IZQ

ij:f

13

,.

Iff flJ

-1.:

/

J]i.I

T

7"

ill~

llX

;f!<

l:t

'7 .J;l

(l;;

-f.Il

'* "E-

.jj; ~

0"

7"

Yl ?

:it -'ffl 11-

*- ?'"

*:iI< ]l[

;~

<$

*13

WI /

j\

~ I-

tJJ

K

I-

V

Jl: if

7"

V /

;;I;:

'Iff ~ /

p,:-

JI-

/

T-

'7 .J;l

fIi

'"

Fnl

Ji&: lE

~

f$

7"

JU

'*

-7~

~ '7 .J;l

-r

A )1-

/ ~

w!l fl!!, JJ

)~

jJX "E-

'!j&

-I! i}

&1:-

0

?-

-1-

3ยง;

?

'"V.

~lli

it;

/

;;t;

JI'_

I~

~

-r

CfJt

If;':

0

-tfJj

a~

ir'.: t&. flJ A

ยงl

Fnl

Jll'. JfX ~

Iii

;1-

1r.. ~

W-

'7 '-

t5

-m

1& Jt ftt

~

'.r JI-

'.r

l:t

-r

%: il

:I!L

I

/

..,

/i'a

Ii:J Ii rot

ill: !I-

~

:ilL

.1:1::

'.Wi

;.it ~ -I-

- -"...

V

1If-

~

~

V

.m

'7

~iJ

~

1*

!i!il

ti\.J

it

i}

~

ti\.J

FJ

/

Ill-I

/

3:=.

t{li

m iii(

if

A.. /

lilt '7

Ii rot V

~ ~

~~

11

3C

-I!

/'

./

l:t

my ~

Jfi fJ]

Ii:.

l:t

'7

ยฅII

.1:1::

'7 ~

;1-

jft ~

I~

jil,

lib

ill

~

{t. /

~1~

~

Jll.

:\i!j.-

/

/

'7

...

"'';;,.-: '''~~ '"'';;m:.~~,


~

c+'

'+'

~--~

---

-= ---

.-

11£1

*n -jj\

~ -j-

JJ

-j-

liB

1m EI

*11 -j-

W.

i\'

~

-j-

JJ

-j-

1m

R

.J:t

~

'7

T

It ~ ~

~

N .=.

iii

~

iP[i

r.JJ m 00

'g

fifi

jJ

iEt tit JfI -

1m ..A

M :l& JI/ ;t 7

~

~

Jv

'7

tilt

&i A

flI:

m ~


INSPECTION PARTY BACK-

w ho origillall'y heaMd 1/.e cl elegatioll,

H eaded by Hil(Irion S . Si lallan, D'irect o'r of Plant lud'us/ry. lit e 11 mel1t b e r~ 0/ the First F i1.ipillo In spection Party to Ja.pan 'retn r ned to MCUI'ila on JuJy 90 . 'l'he pi cl wr e was ta.1r:en at Pier .j , wh rrc the party WGS 'wel comed by Mal/or L eo n O. Chtinto, cent er i n. 'lv/lit e SUit ,

'-'

lit

~ ~

n

1;{l;

1ft

R

-j -

!'l

o

I)

"

1m;

/

*

,...,

,

R

/

'1'

'\'-

jjli A /

~:if![ ~J!.

}L

~~

M -!il'iIl.v 7.. v 7-

" tlJ :fยงt /

mJ:t'ffi

/ " 1!f.

}\l:

3\~ fri( ;llt~

bl,

tdi ' !ill! J:t H"I- 7

}L.I.~

" Ow y

~Hji.'f't~

"j'"'"

11 ~ 1~ t.\\' \- IV1I "" ~ 7" -1 ..t:; -t< ';I ft A l@{


'"

.~ ~

~


P . L aurel, Pres icle lll 01 the CO w 'I1tit t ee, 1VltO steppc(/ ou t 0/ til e hos pi ta l /o r the /irs l tim e, 1.'1 ~ itt i ll.V1 f aci'I Y th e Prc:mier (1. / til e table.

lo r

P re"mier Ge neral H ideki T OZYO ,~ mil e8 a g r eeti ng ta mem. bers of the P re p(l r (J ( or!l Com missio n Ph'il'ippillcs I nd epClld e1l ce, in th e DaD I?oo m of the Manil(l Hot el. Com missio ner J ose

PREMIER R ECEIVES P CP! MEMBERS-

f-J

-\;

J"

:r

11;

'7

~

'"'

-If'!

It~

:r

A

~

...

;It .ftl>. 7

f(;

J"

'7

....

'7

~ -J;l:

-t;

illi

ijl!

Hl t'd '" ~10 ;\I~ elL

,"

1:1:

f1* -i'f

11{ 11;

'7

Jt;


••

o">)(~ '-I1~E '- >-)!S\~a?l+~~

.~.~."e~.OO

m+~~)~ • • •

( I;F.) ~~~I" 4 ,-)i!?;:;;.~.


AT STOTSENBURG-

'l'1I c Highes t Commancler of til e Japanese i lrlll!l il1 the Phi1i.ppines, Lieul ena nt路 Ge-ncra l S i(fen or; Kuror/a mafle (I fou r of inspection in Stolsenbll ry. Pamponga, on June 15, Photo sholVs lIi m hi helmet, third trom , .ir} ll! .

LIEUTENANT-GENERAL KURODA

~

"");

(f

I

,{

Y

'1-

I'/

A

" 11!:

e

--1Xi

f-J

1'-

Y

r

;tr,

-J&

/

<=P

Wilt

illS

j!fi

1J

"

Y

'T

I'/

A

!HI

if

'"M.' ... , ~J Y

Jill

Hi ...,


FRO~r

THE HIGHEST COMMANDER-

A/l er IIl e forma/ Oll/loill/m ellt 0/ l1I e POPE m e mbers, a liillll er was lellt/ered ;/1 their hOllar, al It' //l cli HiOhosl Command er Kuroda r earL llis grcetill{/8 to Ill e apPoin tees.

GREETTNGS

-*

:ttl!

~

l!lii

'-'

m

0

" Ilil 11':TJ:t I fi tt iitt W

~J/{ 1!" ~'-

j>"di ~ ~It .,..~

Itz ;;

)"

Ii'~ .Ii 9" 11<.

= !£ :rr. -1- ~ i\1! n iIfi

FJ

"' '£Ebb

{t .l:t


AMITY

CEMENT ED;

I NDEPENDE NCE

ident Of Ih e Commit / ce.

L ieu.tena nt -Genera Z l( uf O(/.a is sll own shaking l/ cwr/s with Ram.on AvcLll celia, Fi rst Vice- Pres-

K ur oda Nig hes t PCP1 mem bers.

A SSURED-

Aft er th e i 1l clllC/ iou ceremoni es a t [(oi K osy o, Lielli c.lIlo'1l i-Gcll eral Sige nor; Comma nller of th e I mperi al Ja pa nese A r my, gree ts til e lIewly (lp poill l rll

JAPANESE-P HIL I PPI NE

I/

I7

lid

J:t

!l;\\

'<

~.

jJil

.',,,"

it~j

-!rk

jl~

,...,

B

tl -1-

~_

d

Jil.

B:T

~J

.11J jilt -roo

--tIT

m ir.:j

~

I~

q)" ;It.

-\' M:

-I<

:/ 1ft

T

~

r.li: / 7" 2 -i ;it 1*

*it flfr J'L

~ jlij

"f ?t; {Iff

t!li )" i\!l r~

"~vJ'L.l:t

!1/!: >;7 j!O


K..tLTB J1PI 10 form a preparotOrJl commi tl('c lor Plulippjnc Indeperui{mcc. Pilat o sl/Ott's LlclltCllOllt-Orncral Siytuori Kuroda. Higll est Commander of th e Imperial Japanese Annu, at til e ceremony marking til e formal apPoUltmetit 01 lite PCP! members.

tlte Highest Com.mander 0/ tlte Japanese Arm.v ill the Philippin es orf/crCII tltr

PCP! APPOINTMENT CEREMONY AT KAIKO路SYA-

On June 20

'-'

" !Ill

Hi j,I' -go

.\'!l

b~ ~i<.

!L 31< .,::j *- Ht .1t

o

l)

?

;I

illi

fiR

;:t;

;I

~t

;jfl1r:<l:;

JI-

-l!

!:t

>< ,"

1m

禄'~1

~!F

!!Iii ".. ~.)J; !L t/# tt = r.lt I#l

(,;,J;).b'd"

.1t

;I"

Fl .fl :/ "v:: fr ilIi ? ., lit jJ'"8!L

v :;J\r*\ "

!fit

....:n~llIl !L ?f1:rr~

Jili fill 1'1 mt (,;, ><;jl;='i!r!Oi

I:~ ij!l

;I

il!! (,;, (,;, :m: fliT ~!Iii {\; irk


CO?l11lnQ'1l(lcr Lieutenant -Gene ral Sige n ori KlL fo(la visi tccl JlJula ccuiu lI 011 Jun e 1 (UHf met melnb&rs 0/ the Philippin e Executive Co mmission. At this n/,ee ting, Lieutenant-Oeneral Kuroda received the r epoTt of the Omu, miss ion regcl.raing Mala co /lml activi ties and POliC1J.

HIGHEST COMMANDER HEARS REPORT-

Highest

jill

~ij

it~i

-liZ

1'Jr

'-'

/(.f

ftiil!. JfJc

~i(:;

0'- I1f.

,.."PI ..". 1Jl

JfJc

.ft

Ii'"

J:t

/

r

00

i3 1,l'

-

!'j

/,


Din'cI or·Gell eral

01 th e

AHlilary Admi,lIoislrat'ir.m.

T11 e da y al ll't th e mlili ca.tiotl of Ol e Cou stilu l'iOIl , 011 .~cpl. '7. 1.9!-.j , th e Hon. JOS(' P. La1l.1'e l ((';1; 1,.('11/" Ie/I) IIO W Prcsici ullt of the R (,~J)llb1'i c 01 tlt e Pllirippill e,'i. (Inri lh(> HOll. Ra>1tJOII A 11011 celia ( NC'r(JI/(/ f r om ri[l1ll) th eu Vi ce Pr(~sM(I /l1 oJ flll' Prf>pumlory Commit/i' ,', me re {J1I (>,~t .~· al 171,' H eadquart crs 0/ Hiyll e6't Commander Si{1e nori K/l.rofla (cent er) . Also p'r e~ent is lhe the-n

TOAST TO THE FREE PHILIPPINES-

/*

vli&U;il!1!,~::lll1Prl

)"JFi:W7'7'<!J:;f.P ..... ~ 1it -i-

I

1il: )"

rJlJ

:3

tJ.,

• l'l J:t ii!ij -I:;

i\

I

-r

fi!:

r&. J,;l illl

' ~:7#;J:t(J, f~ {-t

7' 13

r

il'J 13 ttll 7' tlf ],:

'r,-

tIff

l!;\\

"

>:I

/ , iK 1;£ fr

1lL:U:'i!:tIi ,"? ;tli:fiEJ • Il!/j rJl ;to )" 'f1l *41r"fl*liill'r ~0:U:t!;JI;:7' :7 "$ I t!; I@l

:IJl-EliHI:=vJ1:~*

;to llI-tlll >:I

r

1" l' ~ J!l.1

:.-- ItJ"j

I ~ 13 tlltHl\)m€-1t~ j~l M ~ 3i!( (J,

~ 1!t lb.)

T

:OC 1li.

j§\~J(?J'H:Ii-=i\r&\ • I»l 1p ~ ,;.',*,1j( ?nWi"iLi~t

~


in

tll e Pliilippine,~,

aud

til e

til e Phi1ippin es. Ambassa dor Syazo Murata , President Laurel, H igl/ es t

Commander Sigl'-1lori Ku.roda 0/ th p I mperia l Japanese Army /o rm " ,. Direct or-OPJl era l 0/ the Mili tary Adm. inistralio1:.

Jopon esr Navy in

th e inaugural ccrf"monirs 'which. ush ered Philippiu e In ci!'penflencc. Presideut J oso P. L aurel wa,i II os l at ,JJ/olacaiiau to a gatherhlg of important personages . 8 11 01l1l1 ill tllis pitoto as tll ey offerPfI a l oa.s t. are (from left to right) til e Righ eJi t CommolHl er 0/ th e

~l fl er

INDEPENDENCE TOAST-

'J

Iii!;

l~

I

('I:

â&#x20AC;˘

~"{

.... f:i1 7-. tit'

~ ~

:/ 11

~I

~.

lilt

tlfi

~~

lftA:-t!iKl '7 I'll 1111 ;7 *- 'I" 1) I!t \ ~i -,- J:\: jV-

r

u

)C

/

lili!

~

1i:

'"

~

!.t

1/'~

1~

7"

1t ::--

j!(

J'l.f/i

!k 'f1ll ill: 111,

?' :lll: 7 2(

*,t31ii~/ ' 1 %l'J:i!,~P4 1111 R '" j'L II "1'- T =; ,~

*;ti/~fl

)"7'~,!-!i!,1

....

iL

lG

r >it.J;; J:\: url ' .n: ~ 1i~ ;11 tllJ 77 7 ~ 1 -F'7rPJ ii(iIli i1 ili'

11:'

~


1k

I/ll

Ui 1{

1}

/

tli

m

iI': j\; ... ,

i!ll

*:

/

• \'l(

"t~·

5~ A J.

llC. J~

m JL·

"'" /

I' ~

~

"

~

:Jft

ao. :m:

~

1}

m;

.\fi

!li

iii

m;

~

~

~

ii

-:

kIii

dx Hi

.w

fPl 1& A

"'I'-

/

m

~

~ ft

fJi

m "" '7 'ill" If:

il~

~

-;:

iii I' :>'

ft

m;

?t;

iii ~

;tf'

f!

m'

'-

'7

tl1: 'I'-

m a ~

* ff.;

"~

IJ!l A Jl

m:

III

1l'

**

=

v

IN!

9.J

A

'"

I"

M :!11: J'I; /

jft

:7

/

&:'

!li

;jJI:

1J!: '7 ~

ftI!

m

iii

v

i!t§

~

a :e: ;tj;

M!

!'$

;;t '7

JlR

JjI; ::..~

:Ii

-t:

-ftll /

1}

*

lit.

;lJr. ~ '7

:m: a iE!c

"jj

lk. ;t;

;{jj

~

tt

£iii

A JI-

il3c

Itf

*

:lit

07"

II\]

'if(

l& ~

~ ffJY ~

EI ~I(J

~ ::..-

&

1ilt 3(. Iff ;;t Z :H :Ii M

~

/

~ ~

-r

iii{ ~ '7

Jv

1lt

~

IT '7

/Ill A

v lI' J8c

9Itl IT J1I!.

~

A

rh

FI

;~

"*

IT

A

f:IJ

~

iEIc

it i!t

II-

a

~

IHl 1* U!! IHl .-., 'I\1l W<

~

'r J"

fill tl( ~


IIjjn£l

~'" -\+ i\i\ &1'-&1;

++ ]"j

H

-\-1i\ t.; Elf!

Hi'll fflilU

.

Profile for Filipiniana Online

Official Journal of the Japanese Military Administration Vol. No. 13  

Official Journal of the Japanese Military Administration Vol. No. 13