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OF THE JAPANESE MILITARY ADMJNIST~ATION

Volume No. 7

Edit,d by THE JAPANESE MILITARY ADMINISnATION

• by MANILA SHIM9UN SYA


THE OFFICIAL JOURNAL OF THE

J AP ANESE MILITARY ADMINISTRATION

Volume

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7

J Edited by


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PRIMA RY E DUCATIO N

Not content with having the world's highest ,"ate of litcl'acy, J U1JUneSC schools can lay claim. to the even 'morc vital aCC011l,l,lis /l/lnent 0/ pl'ovidino scientificallY'pToven 'ntcthods of edu.cation along with ltl,路to路date equipment and /acil'itics. Every national school is (I. laboratory 'where P'U1,ils follow up tbcoties and facts with pl'ac t ical exercises and illu.minating clemonstra,tiollS. The aim is to develo1) in the 'minds of the child'ren an. intelligent Oi'asp. not Duly 0/ the world's knuwledge, but of the techniques of life as 1uell,in terms of the illclividuul and society, 'national c:n's tell ce (md luttional defense.


MIDDLE SCHOOL FOR GIRLS

The C1.1.,?-ri(rutu'n/, of girls' 1)'I"iddle schools in Ja;pan includes, annong othel's, s'LLch subjects us science, household econo'mics and. cultu.')-&l t'raining. Science is an aid to an intelligent grasp of the modern, high-state civili;tation; household economics pl'OvideB fut".-e ",othe,-s with uBeful knowledge and hints of a better scientific manage'ment of household duties; while cilltw'ol training serves to b'ring out to fll11 adv antage the intrinsic qualities of Ja1""ne.e womanhood_ Physical d,-iU. of all kinds for building 'U}1 hea'/t h al'C, meanwhile, HCVe?' neglected.


as Buch, alol1U with painting and 8cullJtU're.

predilections. It is noteworthy that 1l1lll/crou s so-culled crafts, both household o'ucl industrial, are in Ja p(tn made into uris 1'n th emsel ves. They ((.re fa'ught at art schools

ctS1J{re to pl'o/e88fonal C(l!reel'S, 1vhil e otll o'I"8 take up ctrt OJ' 1IIusic to sa t isfy Ih eir na/,lt1'(Jl

0"""

MUSIC AND ARTS ACADEM IE S Tho Japanes6 arc lla,tu1"al lovers of 'muBic, 'While their achievcm.ents in the arts are almost p')"overbial. A 1J1Jlicants f01' entrance to 'recognized m:u.sic and u'rt 8chools 'In'lUJt have a Bound edu.cattonal background oquivalent to l'Ofl u /(l,r h'igh 8()hool t-r aining. Most 01 the students Irom more or le88 well路to路do landlies . Many 01 the talenteel


TOKYO WOMEN'S UN IV ERS [TY T o meet th e ctlC}"Utowing demand of Japanese lOom,en seeking advanced educa路 tion, Japan has 80me 50 institutions of higher learning establiBhed exclusively for female stu.dents. ReprC8cntati've is the Tokyo Women's Vm'vel'sity shown on. these pictures, with its fine buildings, spaciou.s ca1'Lpus, and unexcelled odu.cational program (wei facilities. Established iii ) .9 18, it has an eW'ollment 0/ between 850 10 tOO stu' dellis. Th e hiuh est cellt(I)' of scholarshi1J for W01nen in Ja pan, i t opellS Ihe door to lJI'Oj'cs8 ional cateers, or"igiuui )'cso((rch and leadership.


INert hI the .Japan Se(l,

1Jages they aJ'c shown having fht 'r un oj the vele)'un 1um'shi,J ,jMikasu," jlagshi1) of Ad'miral Togo 1.uhen he l eel Ihe ./fl7)ltfleRe Navy 10 v ictory ()1Jer T S(II-iR I RU,fu;;ia'f; Ba il ie

SEA SCOUT TRAIN ING Picked 1m.pils of national schools, boys wnd ui1'ls, fully determined to pel'])stuafr the uloriot(s naval tradition of J(1)(W, al'e getting the salty, 1'nsp'ir1'7/,U taste of the sen . Young sea scouts of a sea.g路i rt nation, theirs is the Spi1~it of forever keeping t.he control of the sea. Tom.01-)'O'U/s Pacific 1uill be the-i'" he)~;tauc. to have and to hold. On these


TOKYO IMPERIAL UNIVERSITY The highest institu,tion of learning in Japan, Tokyo /'Ynperial University en?"oUs the "ream 01 educated youths and ""oulds them into lit mat",,-ial I Or carrying on the na,tion's leadership. Offering all th6 essential Uni1JC1osity COU1"SCS such as la.t4J, '1nedicine, science, engineering, agl'icult'k.7"C, econ07n.ic8, literatwre, i ts stal! of a.bout 600 laculty me",bers p,-ovides ""nd.rgm-duates with ."perio,- "'-aining that will .nabl. Ihern to D'I"{tSP and sorve crl'riif(1b/1J fhe c01mtr1J'.'{ mn'1J1I prnbfems of ?lftt7(J11rll "?Hi, ';utl!'rnn Ii0l1(l 1 importance.


T ABLE OF CONTENTS Page8

Address by the Director-General of the Japancse Military Administration, at the oaremony of r elease on parole of the soldiers who have deserted or been separated from tho USAFFE, October 6, 1942 _______ _____________ ... .... . . . _... __ ... _.... . .... . ... _ Speech delivered by the Director-General of the Japanese Military Administration, at the graduation exercises of Filipino war prisoners in the educational ca mps at Del Pilar, Pampanga, and Capas, Tarlac, September 18, 1942 . _... __ .... . _.. __ .. _. . . . . Add,,,ss by the Director-General of the Japanese Military Administra tion, at the second entrance ceremony of the Constabulary Academy, September I , 1942 ..... __ .......... _.. .. .... _ . . . . . . . Address by the Director-General of the Japanese Military Administration, at the first entrance ceremony of the Normal Institug" August 31, 1942 .. .... ........... ....... .. ............ . .. . Address delivered by tbe Director-General of the J a panese Military Ad ministration, a the Inaugural Ceremony of the Government Employees' Trail/ing Institute, Ma nila, October 19, 1942 . _. . . Affairs Concerning Education Instruction (No_ 86), concerning the prohibition of co-education in the secondary schools Instruction (No. 92), concerning the reopening of public secondary schools .. . .. _ . _.... . _. .. __ ........... _... _.. _ Instruction (No. 93), regarding th~ reopening of private musical educational institutions . ... . ... . ... _. . . . . . . . . . . . . Section 2_ Affairs Concerning Communication. Notification (No. 15), concerning the registration of all persons who have skill and experience in electrical communications _.... .. . . .. ... Administrative Ordinance (No. 15), concerning the Philippine Shipping Association ...... _... _ . ... _........ _ . . . . . By-Laws of the Philippine Shipping Association ..... _. . . . . Administrative Ordinance (No_ 9) Revised rules, concerning the restriction of the usage a nd o~ration of motor vehicles . . .. . __ . __ ...... _. ..... . ..... _........ .... _ . .. _ Section 3_ Affairs Concerning Industries_ Plan of Increasing the Production of Ramie ..... __ . _......... _. . . _.. __ ... _... _. .. _. Plan of Increasing the Production of Jute ........... _. . . .

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Section L

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Page. Section 4.

Section 5.

Section 6.

Affairs Concerning Maintenance of Peace and Order. Announcement, regarding warning against impostors, specially those pI",tending to be members of the Military Police

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Announcement, l'egarding severe punishment of violators of Military Laws .............. _. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

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Proclamation, l'egarding punishment of the members of the crew of enemy aircraft, who violate International law in time of war . . ............ .. ....... .. .................. Affairs Concerning th~ Release of Filipino Soldiers. Order (No. 15), regal'ding Filipino officers and soldiers of the USAFFE who were separated from the Army bafore its surrender to the Impel'ial Japanese FOI'CS and who ware not made prisoners of wal' ...................... . .......... Executive Orders by tha Chairman of the Philippine Execu路 t ive Commission (Nos. 87, 88, 89, 90, 91, 92, 93, 94. 95, 96, 97, 98, 99, 100, 101, 102, 103) ......................... . . Executive Order No. 87, g l'antnng, in specified cases, a minimum pay of tbree hundred sixty pesos pel' annum to em ployees of tbe Central Administrative Organs and Judicial COUl路tS occu ying positions allocated to gI'ade ten .. ... ... Executive 0 'der No. 88, requiring that all contracts for public service or the supply of articles, materials or equip. ment needed for public use be made thru public bidding. . .

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E~cutive

Order No. 89, prescribing the legal fees in the registration of lands and of transactions affecting registered and unregistered land and chattel mortgage ...........

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Executive Orde r No. 90, prescribing rules and regulations governing the granting of bail to persons accused of Crimes

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Executive Order No. 91, providing for a scbedule of per diems for officers and employees of tbe Central Administrative Organization and Judicial courts when travelling. . .

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Executive Order No. 92, prescribing regulations governing travel expenses of provincial, city, and municipal officers and employees ........... . .. .. ................ .. ....... Executive Order No. 93, bolding of lotteries or horserace sweepstakes ............. .. .. .. . ............ ......... .. Executive Order No. 94, declaring Thursday, (September 24, 1942), a special public holiday . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Executive Order No. 95, regulating gaming centers and places of amusement ii

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PageB Executive Order No. 96, amending paragraph No.3 of Exe· cutive Order No. 39 so as to give the Director of Religious Affairs or the city or municipal mayors authority to act directly on applications to hold public l·eligious processions or demonstrations .................................. .. . Executive Order No. 97, providing for a temporary system of apportionment of Internal Revenue taxes to provinces, cities, and municipalities .... . . . .... . .. ........ . ........ Executive Order No. 98, making all moneys received from the sale of public lands in the City of Baguio accrue to the Central Administrative Organization .................... Executive Order No. 99, declaring Friday afternoon, October 16, 1942, a special public holiday ... . ................... Executive Order No. 100, amending fUl·ther certain sections of Executive Order No.4, dated February 6, 1942, so as to transfer the supervision of matters pertaining to marriage, from t,he Bureau of t he Census and Statistics to the Bureau of Religious Affairs; the duties of local Civil Registrar for the city of Manila from the Bureau of the Oensus and Statistics to the City Health Officer of the City of Manila; and to empower the Bu reau of the Census and Statistics to perform such other functions heretofore attended to by the former Burea of Immigration as are nor inconsistent with the exigencies of the Military Administl·ation ... . . . . . . . . Executive Order No. 101, providing for the inclusion of the rating in the examinations for the private practice of a profession in the con·esponding civil service examination .. Executive Order No. 102, extending further the period for the registl·ation of aliens for the year 1942 .. . ... ...... Executive Order No. 103, annexing the Polillo islands to the province of Laguna .... . . .. . ..... . ..... . ...............

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Remarkable Changes Seen in New Southeastern Asia ................

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J apanese Education ...... . ...... . .. ....... ............. . ..•..... . .

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ADDRESS BY THE DIRECTOR-GENERAL OF THE JAPAl\1ESE MILITARY ADMINISTRATlO AT THE CERBvIONY OF RELEASE ON PAROLE OF THE SOLDIERS WHO HAVE DESERTED OR BEEN SEPARATED FROM THE "USAFFE." OCTOBER 6.1942

It is my desire to address a few words of instruction and guidance to Filipino citizens formerly conneeled with the USAFFE but who deserted or were otherwise separated therefrom and who are today taking their oath of compliance before the Imperial Japanese Forces. All of you were form erly co nnected with the USAFFE and in that capacity took active part in the armed hostilities aga inst the Imperial Japanese Forces. In the midst of these hostilities or subsequent to the unconditional surrender of the USAFFE. yo n.ot only deserted or were otherwise separated from your detachments but aelually c ntinued to remain in hiding until only y terday. Under the e circumstances. you are obviou Iy entitled only to the severest punishment sanctioned by the principles a nd practices of modern internationa l law of la nd warfare. Tn spi te of these damaging evidence against you. however. the Imperial J a panese Forces. fa'ithful to their previously announced fundam en ta l policy tha t they do not cons ider the Filipinos as enemies but rather as friends and brothers. are now granting to you not only complete amnesty for your aels of hostiliti es before. and your esca pe and hidin g after the surrender. but in addition. they are extending to you the same status of pardon as that which was previously granted to the regu larly released prisoners of war. The nature of your response to this unprecedented act of magnan imity and kindness on the part of the Imperial Japa nese Forces should be clear. It is for you to colla borate with the Imperial Japanese Forces from the bottom of your hearts and to devote yourselves. under the direct gUidance of the Executive Commission. unstintedly to the establishment of the lew Philippines. striving at all times. to make of yourselves. living model s and examples par excellence. for your countrymen to look up to and to follow .

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The Imperia l Japa nese Forces wish to extend to all of you. felicitation and success in your future activities. At the same time, they solemnly expect of YOUT utmost efforts and deepest devotion to duty in bringing to a successful com pletion thi s heroic and sub lime Task of the Century. the establishment of the Greater East Asia Co-Prosperity Sphere and the rehabilitation and reconstruction of the Philippines as a n essential a nd integral unit of that Sphere. My fina l admonition to you is tha t you bear these th oughts in your hearts an d co nduct yo urse lves hereafter in strict accordance wil l, th ese instruction .

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PEECH DELNERED BY THE DIRECTOR-GENERAL OFTHEJAPA 'ESE MILITARY ADM1NlSTRATION. AT THE GRADUATION EXERCISES OF WAR PRISONERS I THE EDUCATIO AL CAMPS AT DEL PIL R. PAMP IGA, AND CAPA . T RLAe. SEPTEMBER 18. '942 It gives me great satisfaclion to state that due to th e conscientious efforts of the Commanding Officer a nd th e Staff of Ihi s Camp. the objectives of the third session of the educa tional and training program for Filipino prisoners of war have been sa li factorily attained. Reflecting upon the status of you trainees here it must be observed that at the outbreak of the Greater East Asia War. you took up arms aga in st the Imperial Japanese Forces and actua lly persisted to continue your acts of hostilities aga in st us. Consequent! . in trea ting you. it would only have sufficed to follow Ihe di ates of international law a nd practices. under which there is not the slightest necessity of either giving you train ing or guidance nor of granting you release prior to the cessa lion of hostilities and the return of peace. Notwithstanding this. however. the Japanese Hi gh Command in the Philippines has stTiven to promote the physical and mental im provement of you prisoners of war with the ullima te view of improving and advancing the Filipino people as a whole. The underlying reason for thi s unprecedented act of magnanimity is that the Japanese in making manifest the foundation spirit of the Empire. do not regard the Filipino people as enemies. but on the contrary. recognize them as an Orien tal people enml ed to assume their proper role and position on thi s globe. I am aware that you a lready possess proper appreciation of the subject matter. but I urge you to compare once again Ihe treatment you have received in the hand s of the American forces since the outbreak of the war. with what ),ou a re now receiving from the Japanese and to refl ect especially. upon the altitude the Japanese forces have taken towards the Filipino people. Upon serious reflection . you will arrive at your own conclusion that all of you have the grave responsibility of reinstating yourselves as true Filipinos and motivated with a spirit of gratitude towards the Imperial Japanese Army. devote yourselves unstintedly to the fulfillment of your duties.

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\Vithin less than nine months after the outbreak of the War. Japan has solidly consolidated her position in the Greater East Asia region and today wilh undisputed supremacy and contro l of the seas and the air. she is making rapid strides in the task of reconstruction. The U nited States may make frantic efforts to rein sta te her pre-war status in the Pacific area but the outcome of the war is a lready perfectly clear. You can res t assured that for every effort the enemy may make to increase his power. Japan wi ll not only match it stride for stride. but the increase in the national strength and fighting power of the Japanese will be at a higher rate. Reverting to th e problem of the Philippines, it must be borne in mind that regardless of whether you like it or not, you are Filipinos and belong to the Oriental race. No matter how hard you may tory. you cannot become white people. On the other hand. bow can you retain your identity as Filipinos by renounhlng your native country? Japan has risen to liberate all Oriental peoples and armed with tremendous striking power she is ready to e liminate any party who refuses to collaborate with her in the realization of her unshakable determination to es t bl ish in the Orient a sphere of lasting peace and prosperity" here all may receive and enjoy their just dues. Today we are 路commemorating the termination of the training program for Filipino prisoners of war and the greater majority of you will be gran ted the honor and privilege of release. ly admonition to you is th at you constan tly bear in mind the true role of the Filipinos and the realities con fronting your country today. and under the guidance of the Japanese Military Administra t-ion. you give your full measure of devotion to the fulfillm en t of your responsibilitie a true and loyal sons of the new Philippines. September

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17th Year of Showa.

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ADDRES BY THE DIRECTOR-GENERAL OF THE .J PlESE lILITARY ADfvlIN1STRAT10I . AT THE SECOND ENTRANCE CERElVIONY OF THE CONSTABULARY ACADEMY. SEPTEMBER t . t 942

It is with the greatest pleasure that I offer you my congra tulation on this day of the second entrance ceremony of the Constab ulary Academy. You will no doubt take it your privilege to be admitted into this Academy to become leading members of the new Constabulary force. after the hard examination which you have uccessfully passed in competing wilh hundreds of other applicants. There are not a few among you who have been released from the P~isoners' Camp as your repen tan ce of your past conducts and awakening to the actual circum tances have been recognized. and now selected as staff-students of thi s Academy. This unparalleled generosity which has amazed the whole world must have created hearty rejoi ing not only among yourselve but a lso a ong your families and friends. and J hope you will do yom best to reciproc~ te such magnanimity on the part of the Imperial jqpanese Forces. The ohject of th e opening of thi s Academy is not only to give you necessary training . but to gu ide you to cultivate the spirit of Constabu lary which will enab le you to overcome all difficulties and temptation and to ca rry out your duties. and thu to make you brave and efficient officer who will devote themselves to the regeneration of the Constabulary of the New Philippines. under hte lililary Administration. as an instrumentality of th e maintenance of peace in this country. You will in this way form the backbone of the new constabulary for e. and ele\'a te th e standard of policemen in general. In order to a ttain th ese objectives. you must a lways keep in your mind th e following commandm ents: t. Endeavor to carry on your duties with thorough conciousness of the fa ct that you bear a heavy responsibility as Constabulary members. 2. Let discipline and courtesy be your motto of service. Trust and cooperate with one another regardless of your rank.

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3. Enhance the spirit of service and sacrifice. keeping always in mind your position as officers for peace. 4 . Try to cultivate courage and e ndurance for the fulfillment of your duties. 5. B e a live to the sense of honor. lead a simple and frugal life and always try to build a fine character in yourselves. The a fore-mentioned commandments are the essentials of the code of duties of the constabulary. which should be the guiding principles for your private as well as public life. 1 now order you to obey the in structors, to comply with their instructions. and to devote all your energy to the menta l a nd physical training. which will make you the most promi sing officers with a ll the fine C(ualifications 1 have just mentioned a nd finally enable you to m eet with the wishes of the authoriti es.

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DDRESS BY THE DIRECTOR-GENERAL OF THE JAP ESE MILITARY ADMINISTRATION. AT THE RRST E TRANCE CEREMONY OF THE OR tAL I lSTITlITE. AUGUST 3 1 • 1942 On thi s momentou occasion today of the first entrance ceremony of th e new orma l Institute. I feel constrained to add ress a Few words to you . It is clearly evident tha t the key to the resurrection of the Philippines lies in the spiritua l reformation of the Filipino peop le. For. without this reformation of the spirit. it wou ld be useless to hope for the renova ti on a nd revita lization of government. economics. industry and civ il ization in genera l in these Philippine Isla nds. Furthermore. it is a lso apparent that educa tion is the nucleus fro'm w hich this reForm a tion must evolve and that. therefore. the renova t-ion of education itself is the most fundamental and press ing necessity of the mom en!. It was for this rea on that the Hi gh Command of the Japanese Army delineated . at the eadie t po ible date. the basic principles underlyi ng education in the Philippines as set forth in the Military Order 10 • 2. It is ordained therein th at education sha ll be ca rri ed out in a spi rit which wiIT enable th e people of the Philippi nes. through the acqui rement of th e Japanese language. to obtain a full comprehension of the Spirit of Japan and th us lead them to the rea lization tha t Japan's real aim in waging the present War lies in the es tab lishment of a sphere of mutua l prosperity in East Asia and that only under the leadership and gUidance of Japan it is possible for the Philippines to enjoy peace and prosperity. It is furth er decreed that th e guiding spiri t of educati on shall be such as will eradica te undesirable Anglo -Americanisms such as government by the masses. th e se lfcen tered lack of restraint a nd the cravin g for thin gs ma teri a l and easy- livi ng ; lea d to reforms. based upon those characteri sti c mora l virtues of the East. in the modes of life a nd thought ; and such as will be truly conducive to a proper respect for service and labour. Although it is evident that all educationi sts should harbour this spirit in the execution of their duties . the influence

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of ma ny years of occidenta l education a nd the d eepsea ted permea tion of Anglo-American ideas ha ve made it difficult to obta in in them a comprehensive understa ndin g of the radical ch a nges which h ave come over the Philippines. loreover. the ci rcumstan ces obstructin g the ma teria lizati on of this new spirit in the actu al p rocess of education are b y no means few . In th ese difficulties may b e seen the reason for the necessity of re-ed uca t'in g and re- training Filipino educationists. In these obs ta cles may a lso b e found th e pu rpose a nd a ims invol ved in the es tabli shment of thi s Norm a l In titute. You . w ho a re the first to enter this new Institute. are select representa ti ves of elemen tary school educationi sts. You are the glori ous ch a mp ion of the n ew educa tio nal reform s in th e Phil ippine. You musl'- there fore rega in . th rough se lf-rea lization a nd endeavour. your true As ia tic perso na lities. For. alth ough you h ave b een tra ined under we tern ed ucationa l methods. the b lood w hich cour es th rough your ve ins is Asia tic blood. \ Vhen it is realized th at the fa te of the Phili ppines rests upon the shoulder of h er yo ut h a\ld tha t the upbrin ging of these youths re ts entirely with YO\1. it can b e asserted tha t no th in g in the ljew Phili ppine COI;npares with th e w e ight of your respo nsib ilities and th e sub lim ity of yo ur m iss ion. C on fi dent th at you are we ll ab le to b ear up under th e h eavy resp onsibiliti es entrus ted with you. I a dmoni sh you to gr asp full y the signifi cance of th e a ims and p urpose of thi s Ins titute ; to obey im plicitly the comma nds of yo ur ins tructors; to forge you r mi nd s a nd b odies in to fit instrum en ts w ell-a d apta ble to th e n ew cond itions; to become. with a finn convi ction of your Asia tic a nces try. th e precursor of a ren aissant Philipp ines: a nd thus. to stri de fo rwa rd in your endeavours towa rds th e compl ete realization of the fund amenta l principles of educa tion as set forth by the Hi gh C omm a nd .

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ADDRESS DELIVERED BY THE DIRECTOR-GENERAL OF THE JAPANESE MlLiTARY ADMINlSTRATION AT THE I AUG URAL CEREMONY OF TIlE GOVERNMENT EMPLOYEES TRAINlNG INSTITUTE. tvlANlLA . OCTOBER 19. 1942 It is indeed a great pleasure to be present here. to witness and participate in the inaugural ceremony of the Government Employees Training Institute which is today commencing its first period of training. It is my desire to address. on this occasion. a few words on the profound significance of this memorable event. and to deliver. at the same time. some instructions to the members of the first class now assembled here in full force before me. It is V'y firm conviction that the founding of this Institute was motivated by the genuine desire. on the part of the Philippine E.xecutive Commission. for the necessity of establishing new morale and higher standards of conduct among government officials and employees in order that this stupendous task of creating a completely rejuvenated Philippines. in strict conformity with the stark realities of the present situation confronting Greater East Asia. could be advanced towards early completion through the concerted action of a hand-picked body of high-minded and inspired public servants pledged and devoted to the successful culmination of that task.

Role of Administration The supreme importance of the role of administration in the early rehabilitation of this country cannot be over-emphasized. The successful pursuance of the political. economic. industrial. educational, and other policies in the New Philippines and the development and progress of these Islands as an essential and organic unit of the Co-Prosperity Sphere rest. to a preponderant degree. upon the shoulders of the officials and employees in the government service. Such being the case. all public servants are hereby charged with the dutiful performance of the following specific responsihilities: namely. to pass judgment on their individual conduct. both l?ublic and private. in strict accordance ,vith the highest standards of efficiency and morality; to lead and guide the masses of the people through their own living examples and everyday action; to understand

)tili


the real significance of the present Greater East Asia War as we ll as the tTue meaning of the principle of the sin gle household. which forms the basic conception underlying the establishment of the Co-Prosperity Sphere; to increase their knowledge and understanding of Tippon and things ipponese. by intensive stud\' and through per onal contacts; and above a ll . to render whole-hearted support and unstinted coopera tio n to th e satis factory fun ctioning of the military admini tration in these Islands. New Order Gains Ground \Vh en we hriefly review the world situation as it stands today. we can state with absolute certainty th at Anglo-American Imperia li sm and its policy of eternal economic domination of oppressed pe"ples are rapidly di sintegrating and falling to the grounr,l. whil on the ot路h er h and. the establishment of a ew \ Vorll:! Order ha ed on niversal Justice and Ri ghteous ness. is steadiJy making progress under the determined aegis of the Japanese Empire. In the Philippines. we note with great sati faction that the work of reconstruction is showing remarkable progress a nq every new day brings new hopes and opens up lI ew vistas. The establishment of this unique a nd sp lendid In til ute a t thi s t'me i . there fore. most Fitting and opportune. Th e Executive Commiss ion i to be highl y commended for their initi a tive and foresight in in stituting ths educa tional program and to the governm en t officials and employees who have been specia lly selected to a ttend the first period of training. J wish to offer my sincere congratulations for their honor and privi lege.

Forsake Euil Practices It is expec ted of all trainees that they become imbued with the avowed objectives of the present tTai ning program and by completely divorcing from themselves every trace of d epend ence and pursuit of th e materialistic ideals a nd th e hedonistic and superficial outlook on life d erived from Anglo-American teachin gs. forcib ly break away from the evil practices and degenera tin g custom s of the old. a nd crea te a new cod e of conduct for publi c officials and employees in order tha t they might more fully live up to the high expectations and heavy respon sibiliti es placed upon their shoulders b y the req uirements of tbe times and thru th e wishes of the people.

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J now dose my address with the slatement that I am fully convinced as to your sincerity and capability of complying closely with my foregoing instructions and admonitions and that I am cerlain that you wi ll all do your best to accomp lish a ll the objeclives set forth for this Instilute, bringing high honor and reputation , by doin g so, not only to yourselves, but to this Insmute and to all officials and employees in the serv ice of the Philippine Government.

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Section 1. Affairs Concerning Education INSTRUCTION NO. 86 (Sept. 20, 1942.) To: JORGE B. V ARGAS, Chairman of the E xecutive Commi ssion

RE: INSTR UCTION CONCERNING THE PROHIBITION OF CO ·EDU· CATION IN THE SECONDARY SCHOOLS. CO' educati,m in the secondary schools in the Philippines shall be prohi· bited from now on. In those schools which ha ve already been opened, classes shall be divided for boys and girls for the time being and proper arrangement shall gradually be taken in conformity with the spirit of thi s instruction. DIRECTOR ·GENERAL OF THE JAPANESE MILITARY ADMINISTRATION

INSTRUCTION NO. 92 (October 1, 1942) The Commissioner of Education, Health and Public Welfare

RE: INSTRUCTION REGARDING THE REOPENING OF PUBLIC SECONDARY SCHOOLS With due attention to the requirements of Instruction No. 2, r egarding the reopening of public secondary schools the said r eopening shall be expe· dited ,vith the observance of the following points: 1. In secondary schools for boys practical a nd vocational cun';' cula shall be compulsory and due stress shall be laid on the same. 2. In secondary schools for girls domestic. science courses shall be compulsory. DIRE CTOR-GENERAL OF THE JAPANESE MILITARY ADMINISTRATION

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INSTRUCTION NO. 93 (October 1, 1942) The Commissioner of Education, Health and Public Welfare

RE : INSTRUCTION REGARDING THE REOPENING OF PRIVATE MUSICAL EDUCATIONAL INSTITUTIONS The }'eopening of the department of music of Santa Escolastica College shall be permi tted by your Department after the due attention of the col 路 lege authorities has been drawn to the following points : 1. That the musical education given in the college shall be such as will be instrumental in the development of cultUl'e of the New Phil 路 ippines. 2. That steps be taken in the teaching of the Japanese language. The same conditions shall be observed in the reopening of other pri vately ma intained musical school s and academies. DIRECTOR-GENERAL OF THE JAPANESE MILITARY ADMINISTRATION

)

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Section 2. Affairs Concerning Communication NOTIFICATION NO. 16 (Sept. 19th, 1942) CONCERNING THE REGISTRATION OF' ALL PERSONS WHO HAVE SKILL AND EXPERIENCE IN ELECTRICAL COMMUNICATIONS

All persons having skill and experience concerning electrical communica路 tions (wire and/or wireless ) and who r eside in Manila City or its suburbs, shall register their names and addresses, skill and experience, etc., as pre路 scribed hereunder, except those who are presently working or have decided to work as experienced operators for the Imperial Japanese Army or com' panies connected ,vith the Army. 1. Items to be registered: (a) Name, A,ddress, Age and Nationality. (b) Skill and Experience, stating name of company or concern for which be , orked befol'e the war. (c) Otber pertinent referential information. 2. Period for reiistration: Betw2en Septembel' 21, 1942, and September 30, 1942. Office hours for registration: Between 9:00 A. M. to 5:00 P. M.-every day of the week except Sundays. ~. Place of R'I!gistration: Denseikyoku, Juan Luna, Binondo, Manila (fonner Trade & Com路 merce Building). THE JAPANESE MILITARY ADMINJSTRATION

ADMINISTRATIVE ORDINANCE

O. 16 (Oct. I, 1942.)

ORDINANCE CONCERNI NG THE PHILIPPINE SHIPPING ASSOCIATION SECTION

I

The PHILIPPINE SHIPPING ASSOCIATION (hereafter called As路 sociation) is- hereby established for the efficient operation of all interisland

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vessels; the reasonable and accurate allotment and distribution of vessels, all of which will account for the sound development of the Philippine inter. island shipping. SECTION II The head office of the Association is located in Manila City. Branch and sub·bl·anch offices will be established at necessary places throughout the Philippines under approval of the Director General of the Japanese Military Administration. SECTION III The functions and genel'al business of the Association will be as follows: (a) The registration of all types of vessels which come under the con. trol 0:6 the Association. (b) The intermediary transactions required for the handling of the ap. plications for operation permits 0 1' certificates for all vessels under control of the Association. (c) Control and handling of the business concerning allotment of ves' sels for the various interisland routes under the direction of the Army. (d) The intermediary transactions required for the handling of appli· cations for fuel or materials, and the business of allotment and accurate distribution of the said fuel a nd materials under the direction of the Army. (e) The necessary business regarding the control of freight and pas· senger rates under th,e dh'ection of the Al1my. (f) Any a nd all other business necessary and required to attain the main purpose and object of the Association under approval of the Army. SECTION IV The owners and administrators of any type or class of watercraft of 20 gross tons and over, and of less than 20 gross tons in case of watercraft equipped with engines consuming fuel for their operation (fishing boats of the Fishing Association approved by the Army or of the members thereof as well as watercraft under operation of the Army and others which shall be granted by the Army are hereby excepted) are required to register for membership in accordance with the prescribed form of the Association. Membership in the Association is strictly compulsory for all such owners and a dministratol's, a nd the membership will be effective on and from the date the registration is received a nd duly entered by the Association. The registration for membership as provided for in the first paragraph of this section ,vill be allowed at the Provincial Governments Or Chartered Cities where owners or administrators are residing. SECTION V

Any member of the Association or any person or concern who acquires, purchases or becomes the administrator of one or more vessels or any type or class as described in Section IV, must register in the same manner as provided for in same section IV, within one month after the date of acquire· ment, purchase or administratorship of such vessels.

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SECTION VI The owners and administrators of vessels in the Philippines other than those ,,,,ferred to in Section IV, above, and all other persons who are con' cerned with the shipping business in the Philippines will be also allowed to become members of the Association. The terms and conditions provided fO l' under Section IV apply in such cases. SECTION VII The Officers of the Association are as follows: One Chairman of the Boa rd of Directors, Several Directors and Several Inspectors (Auditors). In case it should be necessary, several Councilors (Advisers) will be also appointed. All theses Officers of the Association will be appointed and/or dismissed by the Dil'ector General of the Japanese Military Administration . All Man· agel'S of the branch or sub·branch offices will be also appointed and/or dis· mi ssed in the same manner as the officells. SECTION VIII The Director Ge,ne"al of the Japanese Military Administration has fu ll control of the Association. SECTION IX The Articles governing the Association, jts a nnual Budget of income and expenditures, settlement of accounts and a ll other administrati ve and opel" ative important matters will be subject to the approval of the Director Gen' eral of th", Japanese Military Administration. SECTION

X

The Association is authorized to ask its members to bear all expenses of the Association in accordance with the regulations set forth by its Arti· cles. SECTION XI Th", Association is authorized to collect from its members all charges required fo,' the u se of accommodations and facilities rendered by the Asso· ciation or a commission for whatever service rende,,,,d to them by the Asso· ciati('ln in connection with its function s and bu si ness. SECTION XII When deemed necessary the Association may ,'. quest its members to invest the required funds in order to carryon its functions, and purposes with approval of the Director General of t he Japanese Military Admini stration. SECTION XnI Any t.-ansfer of rights of ownership or administ.-atorship of all types and classes of wate\-craft of the members as provided for in Section IV hereof shall be subject to the approval of the Association in accordance with its Articles.

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SECTION XIV The Association is authorized to enforce the necessary regulations con路 cerning fines, penalties and punishment to the members violating the rules, regulations and/or Articles governing the Association and its members. SECTION XV Any member who violates the regulations set forth in Sections IV and V hereof without any justified reason will be fined PI ,OOO.OO or less. SUPPLEMENTARY RULES SECTION XVI The effective date of this Military Ordinance shall be as from October 1st, 1942. SECTION XVII The Director General of the Japanese Military Administration will appoint "Committees" for the proper establishment of tha Association and instruct these "Committees" to arrange the necessary business for establishing the same. SECTION XVIII The "Committees" for the establishment of thi! Association will, upon having completed the drawing up of the Articles and other necessary business, apply to the Director General of the Japanese Military Administration for the approval of the Asso~ation . Thi s application shall be accompanied by the Articles so drawn up by the "Committees!' The Association shall be established and effective as from the date of its approvaL SECTION XIX Upon approval of the establi shment of the Association, the "Committees" will transfer the business to the Chairman of the Association. SECTION XX Any person or concern that owns or administer whatever type Or class of watercraft as provided for in Section IV hereof at the time when thi s Military Ordinance takes effect, shall r eport and register at the Association on or before the following dates, unl ess otherwise directed. (1) For persons and concerns residing in Luzon Island-up to and in路 eluding November 16, 1942. (2) For persons and concerns residing in places other than Luzon Islandup to and including December 31, 1942. SECTION XXI If the date for registration provided for under Section V hereof is prior

to the dates set forth in the preceding Section XX the l ~tter dates will govern . DIRECTOR路GENERAL OF THE JAPANESE MILITARY ADMINISTRATION .

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BY-LAWS OF THE PHILIPPINE SHIPPING ASSOCIATION

CHAPTER

[-GENERAL REGULATIONS ARTICLE l.

The Philippine Shipping Association (hereafeter called Association) is hereby established for the efficient operation of all interisland vessels; the reasonable and accurate allotment and distribution of necessary fuel and otber materials required by certain types of vessels, a ll of whicb will account for the sound development of the Philippine interisland shi pping. ARTICLD 2.

The official registered name of the Association is: " PHILIPPINE SHIp 路 PING ASSOCIATION." ARTICLE

3.

The head office of the Association is loca&d in Manila City. Branch a nd sub路 branch offices will '" e established at necessary places throughout the Philippines under approval of t he Director General of the Japanese Military Administt路ation in the Philippines. CHAPTER

II-MEMBERSHIP ARTICLE 4.

Members of the Association will consist of individuals Or concerns who are owners, administrators and operators of a ny type or class of watercraft of 20 gross tons a nd over, and of less than 20 gross tons in case of watercraft equipped with enginess or aux:iliary motors consuming fuel for their operation (fishing boats of the Fishing Association ap proved by the Army or of the members thereof as well as water craft under operation of the Army and others which shall be granted by the Army, are hereby excepted). The owners, administrators and operators of vessels in the Philippines other than those referred to in the above paragraph, and all other persons or companies who are concerned with the interisland shipping business in the Philippines will be also allowed to enter as members of the Association. In this case, however, r egistration of membership is not compulsory. The r egistration for membership a s provided for in the first and third paragraphs of this article will be allowed at the Provincial Governments or Chartered Cities where owners, administrators or operators are residing.

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ARTICLE 5. Members of the Association who come under the first paragraph of the preceding article are not allowed to make any transfer of rights of ownership, administratorship or operatorship of any type or class of watercraft that comes under the control of the Association if such transfer of }'ights is for more than 3 months time, unless they apply for and obtain the approval of the Association, in accordance with the prescribed form of the said Association. ARTICLE 6.

The Association will, upon decision of the Board of Directors, punish any member who acts against the aim and object of the Association. Any of the following penalties will be imposed by the Board of Directors after special meeting to that effect, in accordance with the seriousness of the offence: (a) Warning. (b) Fine. (c) Suspension of distribution of fuel and materials. (d) Suspension of operation of vessels. In case either one of penalties (c) and (d) is recommended and asked for to be imposed, it shall be subject to the final approval of the Director General of the Japanese Military Administration in the Philippines. CHAPTER

III-GENERAL BUSINESS AND ITS FUNCTION

ARTICLE 7. The function and general business of the Association are as follows: (a) The registration of all types and classes of vessels which belong to the members of the Association. (b) The intermediary transactions l'cquired for the handling of ap路 plications for the operation permits or certificabes for all vessels under the control of the Association. (c) Control and handling of the business concel'ning allotment of vessels for the various interisland routes under the direction of the Army. (d) The intermediaJ'y transactions required for the handling of applications for fuel and materials, a nd the business of allotment and accurate distribution of the said fuel and materials under the direction of the Army. (e) The necessary business regarding the control of rates of fl'eight and passage fares under the direction of the Army. (f) Any and all other business necessary and required to attain the main purpose and object of the Association, under approval of the Army. ARTICLE 8. Regulations concern ing the function and general business of the Association and its execution shall be set forth upon decision of the Board of Directors. These regulations shall be subject to the approval of the Director General of the Japanese Military Administration in the Philippines.

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CHAPTER

IV-OFFICERS AND STAFF ARTICLE 9.

The officers of the Association are as follows : One Chairman of the Board of Dil'octors, Several Dh'ectors and Several Inspectors (Auditors ). Besides the above officers, several Councilors (Advisers) will be also appointed to respond to inquiries of the Chairman of the Boa rd of Directors regarding the function and business of the Association. ARTICLE 10.

Officers of the Association are considered "honol'ary posts" and they shall be appointed and / or dismissed by the Director General of the Japanese Military Administration in the Philippines. However, notwithstanding the fact that officers are considOl'ed under "honorary posts" only, they are allowed to r eo ceive compensation. ARTHILE 1I.

The tel'm of office for the Chairman of the Board of Directol's, the Directors, and the Inspectors (Auditors ) \vill be a s f ollows : Chairman, 3 years. Directors, 2 yea 路S . Inspectol's (Auditors 1 yea r . However, these offic rs and allowed to be r e路appOi!lted upon expi r a tion of their ''<lspective terms. ARTICLE 12.

The Chairman of the Board of Directors r ep''<lsents and supervises the Association, its function and general bus iness. The Directors shall a ssist the Chairman. In case of absence of the Chairman of the Board of Dh'<lctors, a temporary Acting Chairman may be appointed by the Chairma n in property from among th" Directors. ARTICLE 13.

The Inspectors (Auditors) shall inspect and audit the financial status of the Association. ARTICLE 14.

Manager s of the bra nch offices of the A ssocia tion shall be a ppointed and / or dismissed by the Director Gene r'al of the J a panese Military Administration in the Philippnes. Managers of the sub 路branch offices of the Associa tion shall be appointed and/ or dismi ssed by the Chah'man of the A ssociation under approval of the Director General of the J a panese Military Administra tion in the Philippines.

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CHAPTER

V- MEETINGS

ARTICLE

15.

The general staff of the Association, including that of branches and sub路 branches, shall be appointed and/or dismissed by the Chairman of the Board of Directors of the Association. ARTICLE 16.

Meetings will be divided into 2 kinds: (a) General Meeting of Members, and (b) Meetings of the Board of Directors-regular or special. A General Meeting will consist of Members of the Association. Meeting of the Board of Dit'ectors will consist of appointed Directors. Both kinds of Meetings will be calle d by the Chairman of the Board of Directors whenever necessary. ARTICLE 17.

The decision rendered by any Meeting-whether of Members or Directors, shall be given by the Chairma n of the Board of Dil'ectors as the authorized speaker of the ~etings. ARTICLE 18.

All minutes concerning the d'zcisions l1endered by the meetings shall be reported to the Direct I' General of th e J a panese Military Administration in the Philippines. Howevar, r evision of t he Articles, a nnual Budget of income and expenditures, settlement of accou nts a nd a ll other importa nt matters will be subject to the approval of t he Dil-ector General of the Japanese Military Administration in the Philippines. When t he approval of the Director General is not obtained in thi s l'<'spect, the decision t hereof by the Meetings shall become null a nd void. In case of any instruction being given by the Director General of the Japanese Military Administration in th'" Philippines concerning the decisions rendered by the Meeti ngs, t he Association sha ll see to it that proper arrange路 ments are enfor ced, in accordance with the nature and contents of such in路 struction. ARTICLE 19.

In case there should be no time to call either a General or Directors' Meeting to di scuss very urgent matters, t he Chairman of the Board of Dir' ectors will be a llowed to decide independently under approval of the Director Gen el'al of the J apanese Military Administration in the Philippines. This will also be adaptable to any case when no decision is reached a t the General Meeti!lgs or Director s' Meetings. ARTICLE 20.

Minutes of the decisions rendered by t he General Meeti ngs shall be draft路 ed by the Chairman of the Board of Directors of the Association, describing at

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least the following items, and shall be signed by the Chairman and mo,'e than tWJ members present at th" Meeting: (a) Date and time, and place where the meeting is held. (b) Number of Membars present. (c) Brief description of how the meeting was carried on. (d) Items discussed and decisions rendered by the M"eting. ARTICLE 21.

Meetings of the Board of Directors shall discuss and decide the following items, besides those items prescribed otherwise in the Articles: (a) Items or subjects presented for discussion to the Board of Directors. (b) Other items or subj ects which the Chairman deems necessary. CHAPTER

VI-ACCOU 'TS AND ACCOUNTING ARTICLE 22.

The expenditures of the Association will be covered by the following income: (a) Registration handling fee. Pl.OO pel' vessel to be paid by the owner or administrator upon registration. (b) Mentbershij) III ntltly ree (Beal-inu allotment to cover expenditures) : The gross tonna e of each vessel, per month, shall be taken as the base IOr computation of the membership monthly fee in accordance with the following tables of scale'rates, to be paid by the owner or administrator during and/or until the end of each month. Owners 01' administrators will be allowad, however, to pay at one tiime the combined monthly fees of two or more months-up to six months, in advance. Any fraction of a gross ton will not be affected by the above fee. Any vessel undergoing repairs or laying idle due to lack or short. age of materials (such as fuel, etc.) and requiring seven days (one week) or more continuously for such repairs and/ or supply of materials, shall be free of the corresponding monthly membership fee for whatever period is necessary. computed at a pro-rata basis. However, any vessel requiring less than seven days (one waek) for such repairs and/or supply of materials will not be entitled to any allowance of the cor路 responding memhership monthly fee for that period. Before any vessel is repaired and/or laid idle, the owner Or ad路 ministrator shall notify the Association and apply for the approval of the estimated number of days required to undergo repair or for the supply of materials (such as fuel, ete.)

SCALE RATES (n)

Fo,' interisland vessels: Steamers, Motorships, Steam and Motor Launches, Ferryboats, Auxiliary Schooners, Auxiliary Sailboats, Motor-boats, Motor-sailboats, Sail -boats, Lorchas, Bateles, Virays, Pan tines, Pancos, Lanchones (with sail) and Paraos.

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r -FiI'st

50 tons or less

Over 300 tons

.46

RATES PER GROSS TON Next- -Next Next 60 50 60 tons tons tons or or or less less less .25

.35

.15

Next 100 tons or less .10

.Every next ton .05

----

uPtO

.10 .26 .15 .45 .36 300 tons Up~ .25 .1 6 .46 200 .36 tons - Up to .25 150 .45 .35 tons - uPto.45 .35 100 tons - Up to .45 50 tons (b) For ,ive,., han'bol' and bay vessels: Steam and Motor Launches, Tug-boats, Motor-boats, Ferry-boats, Motor Bancas or Ca scos, Lighters (Gaban'as), Barges, Scows, Cascos, Bancas, Bateas, Balsas and Dredges. RATES PER GROSS TON ---, Next Next First 60 100 50 I tons tons tons Every or or Or next less less less ton --- - -Over .15 200 .20 .10 .05 tons Up to _10 .20 .15 200 tons lfPto .20 .16 100 tons - Up to .20 50 tons

I

I

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(0)

(d)

(e)

Hamdling Fee for allo/lment and di8tribut'ion of fuel and material8. A five percent (5%) commission of the gross face value of each and everyone of the invoices and/or sale documents covering fuel and/or materials purchased through the handling and mediation of the Association is to be paid to the Association by any owner, administrator, operator or by any other person or concern effecting such purchases, on each occasion. Transfe'/" fee-for the appro1)al of transfe,' of right8 of ownership or administratorsh'j;p of 1)es8els: P5.00 pel' vessel transfened, for each transfer, to be paid by transferor. Other fees and/or bea,-ing allotments deemed neCeS9a111. Owners or administrators shall, clearly and distinctly, indicate on the registration form, application for operation permit Or operation certificate, or any other form or document concerned, whether the vessel referred to therein is engaged or is to be engaged for the interisland shipping or for river, harbor and bay navigation.

ARTICLE 23. When deemed necessary, the Association may request its Membet路s to invest the required >funds in order to canyon the functions and purpose of the Association with the approval of the Director General of the Japan路 ese Military Administration in the Philippines. ARTICLE 24. The term of the fiscal year for the general business of the Association will be from April 1st to March 3lst of the following year. ARTICLE 25. I Any and all other necessary matters concerning accounts and accounting of the Association shall be discussed and decided by the Board of Directors upon holding meetings to tha.t effect.

ADMINISTRATIVE ORDINANCE NO. 9 (REVISED RULES) (September, 1942.)

CONCERNING THE RESTRICTION OF THE USAGE AND OPERATION OF MOTOR VEHICLES. ART. I .-All usage and operation of motor vehicles, either for official, public or personal purposes, is strictly pt'ohibited, except when for the motor cars authorized by the Military Administration of the Imperial Japanese Forces when such vehicles fall under one of the following categories: (1) Vehicles used by Government, Municipal and/or public offices.

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(2) Vehicles used for the transportation of essential goods and com. modities. (3) Vehicles used as public conveyances. (4) Vehicles used by newspapers and similar agencies in pursuit of their duties. (5) Vehicles used for the transportation of patients and by physicians in pursuit of their profession. (6) Vehicles not included in any of the foregoing, but deemed of special importance by the Japanese Military Administration. The date of effectivity of the prohibition as mentioned above shall be September 1 in the cities a nd provinces mentioned below. In the other provinces, t he chief of the corresponding branch of the Japanese Military Administration will fix such date. Ilocos Norte, Ilocos Sur, La Union, Pangasinan, Nueva Vizcaya, Mountain Province, Tarlac, Nueva Ecija, Pampanga, Bulaean, Cavite, Zambales, Laguna, Batangas, Tayabas, Rizal, City of Manila, City of Cavite and City of Bagnio. ART. I1.-Application for the permit described in the foregoing articles shall be made on forms specially provided for this purpose, by firms, factories, or other legal persons through their respective provincial offices. In the case of he City of Manila, application is to be made through the bureau of transportation, department of rublic works and communieations. and in the case of other chartered cities, t hrough the offiCe of the mayor. ART. I11.-Upon approval, a permit for operation and usage路 of motor vehicles together with an identification sticker will be issued. The permit and sticker mentioned in the foregoing paragraph shall be valid in every provinCe and municipality. ART. IV. -Is modified as follows: ART. IV. -The Central Administrative Organization with the approval of the Japanese Military Administration will provide for the disposition of eases of violation of Article I of this ordinance or of the regulations in the permit and identification sticker. ART. V.-Suppressed. Supplementary Stipulations. ART. VI.-Effective on Aug. 31, 1942, Sections 1 and 2 of the Proclamation pertaining to the restriction of the usage of motor vehicles and declaration of ownership and / or possession of motor vehicles, gasoline, etc. issued January 14, 1942, will he considered null and void. ART. VII.-Any person and / or persons to whom permit for operation and usage has alt路eady heen granted under the provisions of the Proclamation mentioned in Article VI shaH be considered as baving been granted permit under Article I of the present administrative ordinance; and therefore such permit shall be valid. OFFICE OF THE JAPANESE MILITARY ADMINISTRATION.

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Section 3. Affairs Concerning Industries PLAN路 OF INCREASING THE PRODUCTION OF RAMIE I.

POLICY

construct Philippine agriculture, the production of ramie will be promoted according to the following plan, taking into consideration the natural and other conditions in the Philippines. In order to illsure an adequate supply of raw materials for clothing, find a substitute for cotton fiber, and at the same time develop and reII.

PLAN'

ScheduleIn the first five years, it is planned to produce 30,000,000 kins (about 18,000 mojoric tons) of ramie. As the area planted to ramie will possibly be increased in the future, the second five -year plan will be adopted before the expiration, of the, first five year~ so as to increa se the production of this fiber _ The production s hedule for eacb year in the first five-year ph," is shown in the followin table: Prod,,~tion

1.

I

Yea,'

Planted area to fi: r.isring l)lanted i A,-ea to be (M掳ea Planted be increased 2,500

690,000

5,600

6,900,000

1

500

2,000

2

3,000

2,500

3

4,000

5,500

9,500

4

5,000

9,600

15,000

-

16,000

15,000

II

5

I

I

2.

I

Pro duction

12,700,000 I

I

20,500,000 30,400,000

Provinces and a,'ea of land to be p/Ohtted to ra'" ,ieRamie will be planted in the following provinces. taking into con sideration the soil and economic conditions: Davao Cotabato Agusan

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The area proposed to be planted in each province is as follows: P"o vince

Davao

Abaca land to Existing be dive,·ted to planted a,·ea 1'amie 1,600

Cotabato

300

Agusan

100

1,000

Idle Land

Land to be newly opened

---200 -

3,400

6,000

6,500

6,000

2,400

3,000

-

500

-

Total

3. O'·ganization. (1) Ramie Growing Companies and the provinces where they will grow ramie are as follows : Ohta Development Company. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .. Davao Furukawa Plantation Co., Inc. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . • .. Dav"o Toyo Mashi Boseki Kaisha ........................... Cotabato Tokyo Mashi Boseki, Kai sha . . . ...... ... .. .... . ... . . ... Cotabato Daiichi Ramie Boseki Kaisha .......................... Agusan The above·mentioned Ramie Growing Companies shall engage in the following acti vties: a. Growing. b. Propagation and di stribution of superior varieties of seedlings. c. Technical g ui da nce in ramie growing. d. Financing. e. Collection and purchase. f. Management of stripping and processing plants. g. Baling. h. Transportation. i. Other activities. (2) The Philippine Hemp Growel"S' Association. For the purpose of conducting research and experiments, controlling and directing the Ramie and Jute Growing Companies and instructing farmers in the gt·owing of ramie and jute, the Philippine Hemp Growers' Association shall be formed and organized under the supervi sion of the Military Adminis· tration. a. The rules and r eg ul ations of the Philippine H emp Growers' Associa· tion 3h all be prescl~ bed later. b. The officers of the Philippine Hemp Growers' Association shall be composed of officials of the Military Administration, officials of the Executive Commission and Ramie and Jute Gro\ving Companies. (3) Cooperation of the agricultul·al technical men of the Department of Agt·iculture and Commarce. It is requested that the agricultural technical men of the Department of Agriculture and Commerce cooperate in instructing farmers in the growing of ramie.

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4. Collection alld Pwrcha.8e of Ramie. (1) The collection and purchase of ramie produced by contract as well as by growers in general in a district assigned to a Ramie Growing Company shall be handled exclusively by the Ramie Growing Company concerned. Other parties engaged in the collection and purchase only shall not be allowed to collect or purchase ramie in any district assigned to a Ramie Growing Company. (2) Purchase price. The purchase price of ramie shall be fixed taking into consideration the cost of production and the price of other crops. The Land to be Devoted to Ramie Growing in 1942 The land to be devoted to the gl'owing of ramie in 1942, the total area of which is 2,500 hectares, has been selected in the provinces of Davao, Cotabato and Agusan on the island of Mindanao, taking into consideration the natural and economic conditions and peace and order in those provinces. The ramie·growing companies shall have charge of the promotion and development of ramie on this land.

Province

Area

--Davao

l

~

400

IO~ta

~

Davao

1,400

-Davao

Add,·e•• of office

14

Furukawa Plantation Co., Inc.

- Cotabato

250

Development Company

--"---

.L

Davao

Ra'ntie Gro1Ve,.

-----

Maresira

Tokyo Mashi Boseki Kaisha

---- Cotabato

250

Kidapawan

Toyo Mashi Boseki Kaisha

Agusan

200

Butuan

Daiichi Ramie Boseki Kaisha

I

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I

I


PLAN OF INCREASING THE PRODUCTION OF JUTE I.-POLICY

In order to insure an adequate supply of raw materials for gunny bags and others and to contdbute to the rationalization of Philippine agriculture, the production of jute will be promoted according to the following plan. H . -PLAN

Production schedule It is planned to produce about 6,000 mett'ic tons of jute by devoting 4,000 hectares of land to jute growing during the first five years (1942·1947). In order to increase the production of jute and insure an adequate supply of jute f iber the second five ·year plan will be adopted before the expiration of the first five yeal·S. During tbe first year (1942) of the first five·year plan the work to be undertaken shall be limited to experiments on jute growing for the purpose of selecting the right varieties and of getting seeds. Production scheduled for each year in the first five·year plan is shown in the following ble: 1.

\

Yea.'

By Ad.n;n;8· traaon

By Contract

Total Planted A.·oa 20

1

20

2

50

50

100 1,000

300

700

4

600

1,400

2,000

5

1,000

3,000

4,000

3

Note: All areas ex' pressed in bee· tares

PI'ovinces ((nd ((I'ea of la/ld to be lJ/anted to ;uteDa vao ... .. ....... . ......... . ..... ... . 2000 hectares Agusan ............ . .. . ..... ........ .. 2000 hectares 3. Oructnization(1) Jute growing companies and tha provinces where they will glOW jute are as follows: Mitsubishi Shoji Kaisha, Ltd. ................. . Davao Mitsui Norin Kaisha ............. .. ........... Agusan The above·mentioned growing compan ies shall engage in the following business: (1) Growing. (2) Sowing and distribution of superiol' varieties of seeds. (3) Technical direction in ramie growing. 2.

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(4) Financing. (5) Collection and purchase. (6) Baling. (7) Transportation . (8) Others. (2) The Philippine Hemp Growers' AssociationFor the purpose of conducting hemp research and experiments, controll路 ing and directing the ramie and jute growing companies and instructing farmers in the growing of "amie and jute, the Philippine Hemp Growers' Association shall be formed and organi,,;,d under the supervision of the Mili. tary Administration. (a) The rules and regulations of the Philippine Hemp Growers' As路 sociation shall be promulgated Jater. (b) The officers of the Philippine Hemp Growers' Association shall be composed of officials of the Military Administration, offieials of the Exe' cutive Commission and of Ramie and Jute Growing Companies.

4.

Collectwn and p""chase of jute (a)

The collection and purchase of jute produced in a district assigned

to a jute gro\ving company shall be handIed excl usively by the Jute Growing Company concerned Other parties engaged in the collection and purchase only shall not be allowed to collect or purchase jute in any district assigned to a jute growing company. (b) Purchase Price-The purchase pljice of jute shall be fixed, as a rule, taking into consideration the cost of production and the price of com路 petitive crops. THE LAND TO BE DEVOTED TO JUTE GROWING IN 1942 The land to be devoted to the growing of jute in 1942, the total area of which is 20 hectares, has been selected in the provinces of Davao and Agusan, on the island of Mindanao, taking into consideration the natural and economic conditions and peace and order in those provinces. The Jute Gro\ving Companies shall have charge of the p"omotion and development of jute on this land.

Provinces

A"ea

Jute G.路owe,.

Davao

10 has.

Mitsubishi Shoji Kaisha, Ltd.

Agusan

10

Mitsui Norin Kaisha

.

[19]


Section 4. Affairs Concerning Maintenance of Peace and Order ANNOUNCEMENT (Oct. 4, 1942.)

lUJ;GAIWING WARNING AGAINS7' IMPOSTERS SPECIALLY THOSE PRETENDING TO BE MEMBERS OF MILITARY POLICE Under the present circumstances when the New Philippines is forging ahead with the close cooperation of the citizens, it is regrettable that there st:ll exist some bad elements who disturb the peace by falsely using the name of the Imperial Japanese Army or by pretending to be members of it. Recently we noted several cases of persons pretending to be soldiers or members of the military police of the Japanese F01'Ces, threatening people into giving them money or maltreating law 路abiding citizens. These impos路 tors have also resorted to unlawful requisitions by swindling people on the pretext that the Japanese Army needs the articles which those impostors took. An investigation by the military police has led to the discovery and the arrest of the brains and the members of the gang. There are, how路 ever, still some remnants of this gang in the city, and the military police takes this occasion to warn the public about them. The mission of the military police is to protect those in the right and to apprehend wrongdoers. In the execution of their duty, members of the military police are required to wear their uniform. If they are on plainclothes duty, they are required to carry official credentials, which they have to show before executing their duty. In the performance of their duty they absolutely do not ask for money, etc. And so if the public have any dOUbt about the authenticity of persons who approach them claiming to be members of the military police, they are requested to get in touch with the military police without hesitation, Tel. 2-33-21 (day time), and 2-51-78 (night time). Following are instances of how impersonations have been carried out: 1. Claiming to be a member of the military police and calling at a house, a member of which is in the custody of the military police, to ask money for compensation, promising the family to do something for the release of their relative under custody. 2. Wearing a military khaki uniform, without a sword, and investigating houses by posing as a military police. 3. Posing as a military police and obtaining bribes from gambling houses, or asking these houses to employ them as watch dogs.

[20J


4. Refusing to pay for what they eat or drink in public restaurants or bars by pretending to be members of the military police. 5. Confiscating articles without authol·ity by claiming to be officers or members of the military police. In the case of authorized confiscation, a military police in uniform is always present, and the public is warned accordingly. The military police emphasizes that it will take strict measures against such bad elements, especially when the dignity of the Imperial Japanese ji'orces is involved. MANILA BRANCH OF THE MILITARY POLICE OF THE IMPERIAL JAPANESE FORCES

ANNOUNCEMENT (Oct. 9, 1942.)

REGARDING SEVERE PUNISHMENT OF VIOLATORS OF MILITARY LAWS The Imperial Japanese Forces have in the past issued a proclamation enumerating the offenses punishable by death or other severe punishment under the Martial Law. It is a matter fo great regret, however, that on account of the circula ·on o~ false propaganda and exaggerated reports by the United States, the e still are some offenders who violate Martial Law ,vithout recognizing the presant wartime state under the Japanese Military Administration and who choose to mi sunderstand the true meaning of the Greater East As ia Co· Prosperity Sphere. Recently 34 persons (of whom one was an American and one a Chinese) were committed to trial by military courts, which passed the sentence of death on 14 and long penal terms on the remaining 20. Among those court-martialled were rebel soldiers, government officials, leading business men, and promising young men charged ,vith important missions for the rehabilitation and development of the New Philippines. With a view to reconstructing the New Philippines and for the purpose of sweeping away anti·Japanese elements and rebellious groups who persist in committing disturbances to the public peace, the Imperial Japanese Forces have made no change in the administrative policy affecting offenders who violate military laws, the severe punishment prescribed for these offenses being imposed as hitherto. Not only all Filipinos, therefore, but also thirdparty nations are earnestly urged to give the closest cooperation to the 1m· perial Japanese Forces for the establishment of the New Philippines. Every. body should work with vigor and ,vith reneved hopes for the welfare of the New Philippines and of all the peoples of Greater East Asia upon understanding the real intention of the Imperial Japanese Forces and recognizing th~ present situation.

[21]


For illustrative purposes, some of the cases recently tried by military courts and the persons involved in them are cited below: CASE No.1 1. C. C. Unson (46 years old), 633·2 Merced, Paco, Manila. 2. Lorezo Silverio (37), 813 Mayhaligue, Sta. Cruz, Manila. 3. Pablo Dimapilis (46), 1696 Enrique, Santa Ana, 4. Victor Pagulayan (47), 216 Tuberias, Quiapo, Manila. 5. Pablo S. Katigbak (37), 760 Vito Cruz, Malate, Manila. 6. Jose Meguerra (47), 268 Gen. Solano, San Miguel, Manila. 'I'hese six men listened to . false propaganda broadcast from the United States and put it down on typewritten sheets which they distributed among government officials, the personnel of companies and their pl·ivate neighbors, thus creating bad propaganda. CASE No.2 Marcelo Ga'erlan (32), Baguio. An employee of the Baguio Ice Company, he listened to tbe propaganda of a San Francisco radio station and spread exaggerated reports among the personnel of the company and comrrritted other anti·J apanese acts. CASE No.3 1. Luis de Castr (53), Bangat·, La Union. 2. Francisco RamI ·ez (24), Bangar, La Union. These two men joined an anti·Japanese group near their homes, listened to pr)paganda broadcasts from America, and printed and distributed propa· ganda matter among the members of their group and to their neighbors, apart from committing other anti·J apanese acts. CASE No.4 1. Marcelino Simon (60), Sto. Cristo, Guagua, Pampanga. 2. Benjamin Simon (30), Sto. Cristo, Guagua, Pampanga. 3, Salvador Simon (25), Sto. Cristo, Guagua, Pampanga. They listened to American propaganda broadcast in their province, and believing in the truth of these false reports they spread anti·Japanese propa· ganda among the people in their province. CASE No.5 John Carlyle Cowper (64), American, of San Francisco del Monte, Rizal. Released from the internment camp by reason of illness and confined to his home for medical treatment, he abused the privilege b~ going to the city of Manila and spreading anti·Japanese propaganda.among the p. ople waiting at a bus station. He also frequented a certain club in Manila, where Amer· icans gathered, and always commented adversely on and criticized the Jap· anese Military Administration.

[22]


CASE No.6 Amado Reyes Narag (20), Baritan, Sual, Pangasinan. A soldier in the USAFFE, he communicated with an officer of the USAFFE remnants and repOlted on movements of the Japanese forces in various districts. He had also been recruiting soldiers for the USAFFE l'emnants for a long time. CASE NO.7

Simplicio Intal (36), Lourdes, Minalin, Pampanga. Elias Francisco (24), San Lui s, Pampanga. They joined a bandit group near their homes and invited foreigners to supply them with food and arms. They also gathered repolts on the move路 ments of the Japanese Forces. 1. 2.

CASE No.8 Felipe Embuscardo (30), Valedana, Zaragoza, Nueva Ecija. Joining the remnants of the defeated USAFFE troops, he was appointed commander of a company which attacked natives and a soldier, looted food, and kidnapped and shot a policeman. CASE No.9 Juan p. Cruz (41), San Juan, Cainta, Riza\. He showed enmit toward a town mayor, and used every endeavor to t"ace the whereabouts of the mayor acting on the instructions of a group of the defeated USAF1FE remnants, always facilitating the action of this bandit group. CASE No. 10 Florentino Laconsa (18), 57 P . Zamora, Caloocan, Riza\. While working as a servant in the Japanese military forces, he shot a soldi"r with an army rifle as he had a quarrel with the soldier and harbored personal animosi ty against him. CASE .No. 11 Pedro Carson (23), 12 Kahilom, Pandacan, Manila. Candido Fain (23), 12 Kahilom, Pandacan, Manila. They attempted to counterfeit Japanese military notes with a face va lue of 1'10, and attempted to dispose of them in the city of Manila, where they were discovered and arrested.

1. 2.

CASE No. 12 J:lanito Abeliana (24), Kapairuran, Banawa, Cebu City. In Cebu, when the Imperial Japanese Forces prohibited the circulation of emergency notes issued by the former Commonwealth government, he obstructed this proclamation and distributed posters in markets at various places, threatening those who refused to accept these emergency notes with serious punishment in the name of the governor.

[23]


CASE No. 13 1. GonzaJo Vitug (18), Olympia, Makati, Rizal. 2. Benigno Ramos (23), Olympia, Makati, Rizal. These two entered certain photographic stores in the city that had been sealed by the Imperial Japanese Forces and stole several cameras, bUt were arrested in the act by a Japanese soldier.

HEADQUARTERS OF THE IMPERIAL J AP ANESE FORCES

PROCLAMA TION (Oct. 19, 1942.) REGARDlNG PUNISHMENT OF THE MEMBERS OF THE CREW OF THE ENEMY AIRCRAFT WHO VIOLATE INTERNATIONAL LAW IN TIMES OF WAR.

The members of the crew of the enemy aircraft who entlers the territo路 ries of the Empire of Japan, Manchoukuo 01' the regions of our strategic operations and violate International Law in times of war, will be committed for trial by the court martial and sentenced to death 01' severe punishment as grave criminals in times of ,val'. COMMANDE R.IN 路CHIEF OF THE IMPERIAL JAPANESE FORCES

[24]


Section 5. Affairs Concerning Release of Filipino Soldiers ORDER NO. 16 (Septembel' 7, 1942.) TO: JORGE B. VARGAS, chairman of the executive commission SUBJECT: Filipino officer. wnd .oldie,路, of the USAFFE who .epamted from the army before it. 8u,-render to the Im1Je,w.1 Japane.e Forces and who we"e "ot 'made )l'l'i80"el" of W/JII路. 1. Filipino officers and soldiers of the USAFFE who were separated from their army befo\'e its surrender, and who have not been made prisoners of war by the Imperial Japanese Forces, are required to follow the regulations to be issued by the Chairman of the Executive Commission. 2. The Chairman of the Executive Commission shall make these soldiers pledge their loyalty to the Japanese Empire in the presence of representatives of the Imperial Japanese Forces. 3. The Chairman of the Executive Commission must submit to the Commander-in-Chief of the Imperial Japanese Forces the list of said soldiers. The list should include the division to which each soldier belonged before separating frolll the army, his section, rank, full name, fingerprints, date a:ld place of separation from his division, and the manner they separated. Mention should also be made of the present address, occupation, and other facts that will serve as reference. 4_ After complying with the r equirements as above prescribed, the Filipino soldiers who separated from the USAFFE will be considered as released prisoners. DlRECTOR-GENlERAL OF THE JAPANESE MILITARY ADMINISTRATION

[25]


Section 6. E xec1ttive Orders by the Chairman oj the Executive Commisrion. EXECUTIVE ORDER NO. 87

GRANTING, IN SPECIFIED CASES, A MINIMUM PAY OF THREE HUNDRED SIXTY PESOS PER ANNUM TO EMPLOYEES OF THE CENTRAL ADMINISTRATIVE ORGANS AND JUDICIAL COURTS OCCUPYING POSITIONS ALLOCATED TO GRADE TEN. Pursuant to the authority coniened upon me as Head of the Central AdmiIrisu'ative OrgaIrization by Order No.1 in connection with Order No.3 of the Commander-in-Chief of the Imperial Japanese Forces in the Philippines, and upon recommendation of the Executive Commission, it is hereby ordered that1. Any employee of the Cenu'al Administrative Organs and Judicial Courts, occupying a position allocated to Grade 10, and actually receiving less than 1'360.00 per annum, may be granted a minimum pay of 1'360.00 pel' annum, which shall include the equivalent money value of subsistence, quarters, clothing, and other allowances in kind, if he falls under either of the following conditions: (a) If the employee is married and is supporting a family wherein no other member is earning any other income from any employment or occupation whatsoever; (b) If the employee is single and is the only means of support of the family to which he belongs. 2. Before an employee is granted the benefits of this Order, he must subscribe to and submit an affidavit stating: (a)

For the married employee(1) That he is legally married and is living with, and supporting, his family; (2) The name of his spouse and the names and ages of his legitimate children and other dependents; (3) That no other member of his household is earning an income from any employment or occupation whatsoever.

(b)

For the unmarried employee(1) That he is living with, and is the only means of support of, his family_ (2) Names and ages of his dependents and their relation to rum,

[26)


3. This Order shall take effect on September 1, 1942, and to cany out its purpose, the savings of the appropriations for each Department, in· cluding the Supreme Court, as provided in Executive Order No. 65, dated July 23, 1942, shall be available to cover t he necessary salary adj ustments herein authorized. In the case of special f unds, the salary adjustments shall be charged against the savings from the authorized allotments. Done in the City of Manila, Philippines, this 9th day of September, 1942. (SGD.) JORGE B. VARGAS Cha;,'man of the Executive Commission APPROVED by the Director General of the Japanese Military Administration on September 9, 1942.

EXECUTIVE ORDER NO. 88

REQUIRING THAT ALL CONTRACTS FOR PUBLIC SERVICE OR THE SUPPLY OF A.RTICLES, MATERIALS OR EQUIPMENT NEEDED FOR PUBLIC USE BE MADE THRU PUBLIC BIDDING. Pursuant to t he authority conferred upon me as Head of the Central Administrative Organi ation by Order No.1 in connection with Order No.3 of the Commander-in-Chief of the Imperial Japanese Forces in the Philippines and to the provisions of existing law, and upon the recommendation of the Executive Commission, jt is hereby ordered that 1. In all cases where any bureau, office, branch, subdivi sion, agency or instrumentality of the Centl·al Administrative Organs and Judicial Courts, including provinces, cities, municipalities and government·owned or controlled corporations, may have to enter into a contract or renew one actually in force in connection with any public service or t he supply of articles, materials or equipment needad for publi c use, said contract shall not be executed or re·newed without previous advertisement calling for bids in which case the award, if at all, should invariably be made in favor of the lowest responsible bidder. For very extraordinary rea on, however, such as on the occasion of a nd /or property, this requirement may be waived, but only after the Com· missioner of the Departlnent concerned and the Auditor General and Director of t he Budget have been consulted and t he approval of the Chairman of the Executive Commission has been secured beforehand. 2. In calHng for bids, especial ca re should be taken thut the advertise· ment herein r equired shall contain the nature, kind und full particulars concerning the public service desired, a nd the necessary specifications to the Illbt possible detail as to the quantity, quality, workmanshin, color, make,

[27]


design, source, dimensions, strength, weight, etc. of the articles, materials or equipment desired, showing them by illustrations or samples for the informa· tion and guidance of prospective bidders. 3. The advertisement caHing for bids should indicate the date and exact time when the bids ,·eceived shaH be opened and considered. Absolutely no bids shall be accepted after the time limit fixed in the advertisement shaH have expired. The opening of such bids should be made in the presence of a representative of the Auditor General and Director of the Budget, who is hereby authorized to secure a nd identify such papers and samples of the articles, materials, or equipment submitted by the bidders, and in general supervise the proper conduct of the public bidding. This authority, however, shaH not be understood as empowering him to make the award of the contl·act in favor of the successful bidder nor shall he at any time form a part of the committee on award. 4. The advertisement herein required should be given the greatest possible publicity by printing the same i n the Official Gazette or in a local newspaper havi\lg a \vide circulation for not less than six days or by posting it for a like period in at least four public places in the community where the contract shaH pe executed or enforced. In addition, copies of such ad· vertisement should Be mailed to parties likely to be interested therein in order to invite the necessary competition, and thus be able to obtain the most satisfactory bid. 5. The lowest responsible bidder shall be undel·stood to be the party who, besides offering the lowest price among the bidders, is deemed sufficiently reliable, financiaHy and otherwise, to meet hi s obligations under the contract. AH things being equal, the lowest bid should be preferred. Where there is any doubt as to whether the lowest bidder is responsible or not, or in case for any reason h.is bid is not favored, the matter should be submitted to the Chairman of the Executive Commission, thru the proper Department Head and the Auditor · General and Director of the Budget, for final decision. Before making such reference, however, an opportunity should be given the bidder concerned to present his side of the case. 6. AH existing laws, rules a nd regulations in conflict with this Exe· cutive Order are hereby revoked. Done in the City of Manila, Philippines, this 9th day of September, 1942. (SGD.) JORGE H. VARGAS Chai1"1!Wn of the Executi"e Comntission. APPROVED by the Director General of the Military Administration on September 11, 1942.

[28]


EXECUTIVE ORDER NO. 89

PRESCRIBING THE LEGAL FEES IN THE REGISTRATION OF LANDS AND OF TRANSACTIONS AFFECTING REGISTERED AND UN路 REGISTERED LAND AND CHATTEL MORTGAGE. Pursuant to the a uthority conferred upon me as Head of the Central Administrative Organization by Order NO.1 in connection with Order No.3 of the Commander路in路Chief of the Imperial Japanese Forces in the Philippines, and upon the l'ecommendations of the Executive Commission, the following rules and regulations governing the collection of legal fees in the registration of lands and in the registJ'ation of tJ'ansactions affecting registered and unregistered land, and chattel mortgage, are her eby promulgated: SECTION 1. Fees 1Jayable to tke clerk of cow路t.--':'The fees payable to the clerk of court or his deputies shall be as follows: (a) For filing an application for the registration of la nd, the fees shall be based on the assessed value of the propel'ty for the current year, in accordance with the following schedule: (1) When the value of the property does not exceed P2,OOO.OO, P20.00 for the fint P500.00 or fFactional part thereof and P5.00 for each additional P500.00 or ft'actional past thereof; (2) When the value of the property is more than P2,OOO.OO but does not exceed P10,OOO.00, P35.00 for the first P2,OOO.OO and P5.00 for each additional P1, 00.00 or f ractional part thereof; (3) When the value of the property is more than P10,OOO.00 but does not exceed P50,OOO.00, P75.00 for the first P10,OOO.00 a nd P10.00 for each additional P5,OOO.00 or fractional paTt thereof; (4) When the value of the property is more than P50,OOO .00 but does not exceed P200,OOO.00, P155.00 for the first P50,OOO.00 and P15.00 for each additional P10,OOO.00 or fractional part thereof ; (5) When the value of the property is more than P200,OOO.00 but does not exceed P500,OOO.00, P380.00 for the first P200,OOO.00 and P20.00 for each additional P20,OOO .00 or fractional part thereof; (6) When the value of the property is more than P500,OOO.00, P680 .00 for the first P500,OOO.00 and P25.00 for each additional P50,000.00 or fractional part thereof. If the property has not been assessed for taxation, the fees above prescribed shall be based on the market value, and the applicant shall fil e with his application a sworn declaration of three di sinter ested persons that the value fixed by him is to t heir knowledge a fair valuation. (b) For filing a petition for review of decree, or other claim adverse to the registered owner, for each petition, ten pesos. (c) For every petition filed after the deci sion has become f inal, three pesos. If it affects land decI'eed in more than one case, for each additional case, one peso.

[29]


SEC. 2. Fees payable to the ?'egiater of deeds.-The register of deeds shall collect fees for all services rendered by him in connection with the registration of documents r<llating to registered land, under the provisions of the Land Registration Law, in accordance with the following schedule: (a) For the entry of one original certificate of title, and issuing one duplicate certificate, seven pesos for the first parcel of land described therein a nd one peso for each additional parcel. (b) For th-e entry in the primary entry book, including indexing, fifty centavos. (c) For the entry of any attachment, levy, or dissolution thereof, for each property covered by the entry, one peso and fifty centavos. (d) For the entry of a notice of pending action, or the cancellation thereof, for each property affected by the action, one peso and fifty centavos. (e) For the entry of a certificate of sale at public auction by virtue of an order of execution, or of any redemption of the propel'ty so sold, for each property, one peso a nd fifty centavos. (f) For the entry of cancellation of a mortgage, for each property, on~ peso and fifty . centavos; but the fees to be collected under this item shall not exceed the amount of the fees paid for the registration of the mortgage to be cancell<ld. (g) For the entry of inclusion or exclusion of improvements, for each certificate of title, th 'ee pesos. (h) For the entr of any judgment or decree of the Court which does not divest the land in ree simple, or any order for the amendment of a certificate of title or a memorandum thereon, for each cel路tificate of title, two pesos. (i) For the entry of the cancellation of a lease, or of any encumbrance affecting one or more properties, for each certificate of title, two pesos. (j) For registering and filing a power of attorney, letter of adminis路 b'ation whether or not accompanied by a copy of the testament, 01' appoint路 ment of guardian for a minor or incompetent person, of receivers, trustees or administrators, five pesos for the first certificate of title, and one peso for each additional certificate of title on which it is noted. For entry of revocation of said papers, for each certificate of title, one peso. (k) For the entry of affidavit or other instrument for consolidation of ownership, for each certificate of title, two pesos. (l) For the entry of notice of lost duplicate or copy of certificate of title, notice of change of address, notice of tax lien of any description, public right of way, public easement, or other lien imposed by law in favor of the Government or any of its branches, for each certificate of title, one peso. (m) For the e ntry of any memorandum in a certificate of title for which no specific fee is pl'eRcribecl in thiR section, fOI' each certificate of title, two pesos. (n) For the issuance of a transfer certificate, including its duplicate, to a trustee, assignee, executor, administrator, or receiver, pursuant to an order of the Court, or for the cancellation of such certificate of title and

[30]


issuance of a new one, including its duplicate, to the original owner, five pesos. If the certificate covers mOra than one parcel or lot, an additional fee of fifty centnvos shall be collected for each additional parcel or lot. (0) For the issuance of a transfer certificate of title, including its duplicate, tn a person other than those named in the next pl'eceding sub路 section, two pesos, in addition tn the fees prescribed in s ubsection (q), if the Dame are also due. Ii the certificate covers more than one parcel 01' lot, and additional fee of fifty centavos shall be collected for each additional parcel or lot. (p) Fo,' issuance of additional dupJicatJe or copy of certificate of title, two pesos for the first sheet and one peso for each subsequent page. (q) For the registration of a deed of sale, conveyance, transfer, ex路 change, partition or donation; a deed of sale pacto de retro, or any sale subject to redemption, or of the repurchase or redemption of the property so sold; any instrument, order, judgment or decree divesting the title of the registered owner; any mortgage, surety bond, lease, easement, right of way, or other real right or lien, or the assignment. enlargement, extension 01' novation of a mortgage or of any other real right, where no specific fee is prescribed therefore in the pI'eceding subsections, the fees shall be as follows: (1) When the value of the consideration does not exceed P5,OOO.00 , P5.00 for the fiI'St P500.00 or fractiona l part thereof and 1'1.00 for each additional 1'300.00 or fractional part thereof; (2) When th" value of the consi eration is more than 1'5,000.00 but does not exceed 1'20,000.00, 1'20.00 for the first 1'5,000.00 and 1'2.00 for each additional 1'1,000.00 or fractional part thereof; (3) When the value of the consideration is more than P20,OOO.00, but does not exceed 1'100,000.00, 1'50.00 for the first 1'20,000.00 and 1'5.00 for each additional 1'5,000.00 or fradional part thereof; (4) When the value of tbe consideration is more than 1'100,000.00 but does not exceed 1'200,000.00, 1'130.00 for the first 1'100,000.00 and P9.00 for each additional 1'10,000.00 or fractional part thereof; (5) When the value of the consideration is more than 1'200,000.00 but does not exceed 1'500,000.00, 1'220.00 for the first 1'200,000.00 and P14.OO for each additional 1'20,000.00 or fractional part thereof. (6) When the value of the consideration is more than P500,OOO.00, the fee shall be 1'430.00 for the first 1'500,000.00 and 1'20.00 for each additional 1'50,000.00 or fractional part thereof; (r) In the following transactions, the basis of the fees under subsection (q) above, instead of the value of the consideration, shall be as hereunder set forth: (1) In the exchange of real property, one路half of the combined assessed value of tbe property exchanged in addition to the value of other consideration, if any, stnted in the contract; (2) In the partition of inherited real property, when the same is

[31]


still in th~ name of the deceased, the assessed value of the portion ad judicated to each co-heir, devisee 01' legatee, the fees being collected for each pOl,tion so adjudicated; (3) In the partition of real property held in common by several registered co-owners, the assessed vawe of such share as held by the other co-owners in the _portion acquired by one co-owner, the fees being collected fOl' each party, (4) In the sale of two or more parcels of land in favor ' of two or m01'e separate parties but executed in one single instrument, the selling price paid by each party-buyer, or, in the case of a lump sum consideration, such portion thereof as apportioned in accordance with the assessed value of the respective land acquired by each party-buyer; (5) In the sale of two Or more parcels of land belonging to different registered owners ha yjng no common interest therein, but executed in one single instrument in favor of one person, the selling price paid to each party-vendol', or, in the case of a lump sum consideration, such portion thereof as apportioned in accordance with the assessed value of the respective land acquired from each party-vendor; (6) In contracts of lease, the total amount of rentals f01' the duration of he contract, 01' if no period is fixed, the total amount of rentals equivalent to one year; (7i In other transaction s wherc the actual value of the con sideration is not fixed in the contract or cannot be determined from the terms thereof, the assessed value of t he property involve d in the trans路 action, (s) For furnishing certified copies of any entry, decree, document, 01' other papers on file, for each page or fraction thereof, consisting of a sheet approximately two hundred sixteen by three hundred thirty milimeters with proper heading, double space, and approximately three centimeters margin, one peso and fifty centavos, (t) For issuing a certificate showing the existence or non-existence of an entry in the registration books relative to any transaction, for each certificate of title examined, one peso. SEC. 3, Fees 101' ,'egist,'ation 01 doc"",ents relative to "",'egiste-red land. -For services in connection ,yjth the r egistration of documents relative to unregistered land 01' to real property recorded under the Spanish Mortgage Law, the same fees prescribed for similar services in the preceding section shall be collected by the register of deeds, so far as they may be applicable, SEC. 4, Fees 10" ,'egist,'ation 01 chattel 7/tO/'tgage,-The register of deeds shall collect the following fee s in the registration of chattel mortgages and other documents in connection therewith: (a) For each entry in the entry book, fifty centavos, (b) For filing and recording each chattel mortgage including the neces路 s3ry certificates and affidavits, the same fees and basis prescl-ibed for similar service and transaction under subsection (q) of section 2 of this O,'der,

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(e) Fo)' J'o:!co l'ding each as~ignment of mOl'l.gage c l'edit, a n amount l'quivulc nt to one-halJ' of the f ees coll ected for the recordin g of the mortgage, (d) 1"01' r ecording each notice of embargo, three pesos. (c) For recording each sheriff's return sale, three pesos. (f) For recording each rel ease of mortgage, one peso. (g) For r ecording each r elease of e mbargo, fifty centavos. (h) For fUl'Ili s hi ng certified copies of record, t he sa me f ees pl'escribed [01' similar service under s ubsection (5) of section 2 of tbis Order. (i) F OI' each certificate relative to any entry 01' document on fil e, one peso, (j) F or each nega tive cel·tificale, one pc o. SEC. 5. Fees payable to the Chief, J1LC/iciClI Land T itle Division, Dep,w t. Ittellt 0/ J/( stice.- Th e Chi ef, Judicial La nd Title Divi ion, Department of Justice, shall li kewise be entitled to collect for services to bo rendered by him in connection with land reg istration cases the same fees establi s hed for similar services under this o I'd or , and whe"e no s pecific fee is fixed for othe,' services rendered by him, n ot r equi red by law to be r ender d without chul'ge, s uch fees s ha ll be collected as may be a u tho";zed by t he Commi ssioner of Justice. SEC. 6. F ees payable to t/~e Shedlf.-For services rendered by the s her:ff in connection with lund r egistra tion and cadastra l cases, there shall be pa id to him the follOWing fee : (n) For pos ting a copy of the notice 'n a consJ,icuous place 0 11 each purcel of land described in sai d notice besi de travel fees, t l1l'ee pesos. (b) For pos ting a copy of the sa m notice in a conspicuous place of th~ chief muni cipa l building of t he city or Illunicipality, in w hich t he land lies, besides travel f ees, two l,esos. (e) For a ll oth er services not m~ntioned above, the arne fees includ· ing kilometrage as are provided in the Rul es of COlll·t for similar services. SEC. 7. E//ectivity.-Thi s Order s hall take effect upon its approva l by the Commande r ·i n-Chief of the Imperia l J apa nesa F orces in the Philippines. Done in the City of Manila, Philippines, t hi s 9th day of September, 1942.

(SGD.) JORGE B. VARGAS Chail-man of the E:recuUve Commission APPROVED by t he Commander·in-Chief of th ~ Imperial J a pa nese Forces in the Philippines on September 11, 1942. EXECUTIVE ORDER NO. 90

PRESCRIB ING R U LES AND REGULATIONS GOVERNING THE GRANTING OF BAIL 1'0 PERSONS ACCUSED OF CR IMES Purs uanl to the authority conf~ lTed upon me as H ead of the Central Administrative Orga nization by Order No. 1 in connection with Order No.3 of lhe Commandedn-Chief of the Imperial J apanese Forces in the Philippines,

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e.'19


in order to date)' more effectively the commission of crimes and better promote peace and ol'der, the following rules and regulations governing the granting of bail to persons accused of crimes are, upon the recommendation of lhe Executive Commission, hereby promulgated: SECTION 1. Non-bailable offenseB.-Except as otherwise provided in Section 2 hereof, no person accused of an offense shall be bailable in the following cases: (a) Where the penalty prescribed by law for the offense charged is death or life imprisonment; (b) Where the accused is a habitual delinquent; and (c) Where the imprisonment prescribed by law for the crime charged is more than twelve (12) years. SEC. 2. Grallt of bail under special ci.路cunt8tances.-Notwithstanding Lhe provisions of Section 1 hereof, when pecial circumstances exist which justify the grant of bail to the accused without harm to the public intel'est, the competent court, other than the Supreme Court, before whom any of said cases is pending trial or on appeal ma)" \\~th the previous approval of the Commissioner of Justice, grant bail to the accused. In such case, the court shall, by resolution, set forth the special circumstances and reasons relied upon in favor of the granting of the bail and sha ll forward the same, together with the pertin~nt papers, to the Commissioner of Justice for appropriate action. In cases wh~ch are pending appeal in the Supreme Court, bail may be granted by sai d Court when special circumstances exist as provided herein without the previous approval of the Commissioner of Justice. SEC. 3. Bailable offellscs.-In all cases other than those mentioned in Section 1 hereof, the accused shall be admitted to bail upon cash deposit or bond in an amount to be fixed by the COUlt as follows: (ol) Where the penalty prescribed by law for the offense charged is impri sonment of from six years and one day to twelV'e years, from 1'6,000.00 to 1'12,000.00; (b) Where the penalty is imprisonment of from six months and one day to six years or is suspension, 01' "destierro", from 1'600.00 to 1'6,000.00; (c) Whe,,, the penalty is imprisonment of from one month and one day to six months, from 1'100.00 to 1'600.00; and (d) Where the crime is punishable with imprisonment of from one day to thirty days, not more than 1'100.00. SEC. 4. Bail bOlld.-In the cases of bailable oifenses, or when bail is allowed under Section 2 hel'eof, the accused may deposit in cash with the court 01' with the near est collector of internal revenue or provincial, city or municipa l treasurer the amount of hi s bail as fixed by the court, or give to the court a bond for the said amount executed by a surety company aluthorized to transact business in the Philippines, or by at least two sufficent sureties each of whom must be a "esident of the Philippines and owner of real properties situated therein worth the amount specified in the undertaking and free from any lien or encumbrance.

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SEC. 5. Su"pens'ion of inconsiste1lt la-ws.-The effect ef existing laws and rules which are in conflict 01' inconsistent herewith is hereby suspended until furtber orders. SEC. 6. Effectivity.-This Order shall take effect upon its approval by Lha Commander路in路Chief of the Imperia l Japanese Forces in the Philippines. Done in the City of Manila, Philippines, this 9th day of September, 1942. (SGD.) JORGE B. VARGAS APPROVED by the Commander-in-Chief of the Imperial Japanese Forces in the Philippines on lSepbember 14, 1942. EXECUTIVE ORDER NO. 91

PROVIDING FOR A SCHEDULE Oli' PER DIEMS FOR OFFICERS AND EMPLOYEES OF THE CEN'PRAL ADMINISTRATIVE ORGAN路 IZATION AND JUDICIAL COURTS WHEN TRAVELING. Pursuant to t he authority conferred upon me as H ead of the Central Administrative Organization by Order NO.1 in connection with Order No. 3 of the Commander'J -Chief of the Imperia l Japanese Forces in the Pbilippines, a nd upon the reco mendation of the Executive Commission, it is hereby provided that when fer diems in lieu of subsistence and lodging while traveling are allowed tq officers and employees of t he Central Administrative Organization and Judici'D1 Courts as provided by law, the same shall be fixed with the approval of the corresponding Head of Department at rates not to exceed the following: (a) For officers and employees receiving a salary of two thousand pesos or less par annum, a pel' diem not exceedi ng one peso and fifty centavos; (b) For tho e receiving more than two thousand pesos per annum, but not exceeding four thousand pesos pel' annum, a per diem not exceeding two pesos and twenty-five centavos; (c) For those receiving more than four thousand pesos per annum, but not exceeding six thousand pesos per annum, a per diem not exceed路 ing three pesos; and (d) For those receiving more than six thousand pesos pel' annum, a per diem not exceeding three pesos and seventy.five centavos. An officer or employee whose compensation is fixed at other than the per annum ba sis may be given the rate of par diem authodzed for that reeeiving compensation on the corresponding per annum basis. Done in the City of Manila, Philippines, this 16th day of September, 1942. (SGD.) JORGE B. VARGAS Chal1"1nan of the Executive C011t'miss10n APPROVED by the DircctoJ' General of the Japanese Military Administration on September 16, 1942.

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EXECUTIVE ORDER NO. 92 PRESCRIBING REGULATIONS GOl'ERNING TRAVEL EXPENSES OF PROVINCIAL, CITY, AND MUNICIPAL OFFTCERS AND EMPLOYEES.

Put'suant to the authority conferred upon me as Head of tha Central Administrative Organization by Order No.1 in connection with Order No.3 of the Commander-in-Chief of the Imperial Japanese Forces in the Philippines, and upon the recommendation of the Executive Commission, it is hereby provided that officers and employees of provinces, chartered cities, and municipalities when traveling, or when absent from thei,' permanent stations on official business, sha ll be allowed travel ex pens," to be paid from the funds of their respective governments, as follows: 1. When traveling by water tl"ansportation, the actual travel expenses necessarily incurred. 2. When traveling in the City of Manila or elsewhere outside of their offici al stations, the cost of transportation of person and essential baggage, together with per diem in li eu of ubsistence .a nd lodging, as follows : (a) FOI' officers and employees receiving a salary of two thousand pesos or less p r annum, a per diem not exceeding one peso and fifty centavos; (b) For those receiving more than two thousand pesos per annum, but not exceeding our thousaod pesos per annum, a per diem not exceeding two pesos and twenty-five centavos; and (c) For those receiving more thap four thousand pesos per annum, a per diem not exc eding three pesos. In addition to the per diems provided in paragraphs (a), (b), and (c) hereof, office,'s and employees concerned, while traveling in the City of Manila on official business, may be raimbursed the cost of their transportation not exceedi ng 1'1.00 a day. 3. Officers and employees who are technically in the service of the Oentral Administrative Organization but ",hose sala ,'y or compensation is paid eith er wholly or partially by the local government concerned shall be subject to the provisions of this Order. 4. The provisions of existing law and regulations regarding travel ex路 penses of provincial, city, and municipal officers and employees which are inconsistent with the provisions of this Order are h ereby declued inoperative. Thi s Order shall apply to claims for travel expenses, including per diems, pending approval or payment on the date of the issuance hereof. Done in th e City of Manila, Philippines, this 16th day of S ~pte mber, 1942. (SGD.) JORGE B. VARGAS Chairman of the E xecutive C01>l71lis,,;01l APPROVED by the Di rectal' Genet'al of the Japanese Milita,.~, Administration on September 16, 1942

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EXECUTIVE ORDER NO. 93

HOLDING OF LOTTERIES OR HORSERACE SWEEPSTAKES Pursuant to the authority conferred upon me as Head of the Central Adllunistrative Organization by Order No.1 in connection with Order No. a of the Commander路in路Chief of the Imperial Japanese Forces in the Philippines, and upon the ,,,,commendation of the Executive Commission, the following regulations governing the holding of lotteries or horserace sweepstakes and the clisposition of the proceeds of the same ",,'e hereby prescribed: L The Commissioner of Finance shall determine a sales quota or the number of tickets to be sold, the number and amounts of prizes to be given, and the dates of the opening and closing of the sale of tickets for each lotte,'y or horserace sweepstake; and shall issue necessary regulations reo garding the printing of tickets, holding of draws or horseraces, payment of prizes, and such other matters as may be necessary for the proper holding of lotteries and horserace sweepstakes .

2, Not less th/ln fifty.five pel' centulI! of the proceeds of the sale of tickets in each lottery or horserace sweepsta ke shall be distributed as prizes. The balance, after deducting the conesponding adnUnistration expenses of the Philippine Charity Sweepstakes, s hall be set aside as a special fund and allotted by the Chairman of the Executive ComnUssion upon recom' mendation of the Commissioner of Education , Health, and Publi c Welfare for charitable, health and civic purposes.

a.

Only sold tickets shall participate in a ny draw.

4. Upo'n the recommendation of the Director of the Philippine Charity Sweepstakes, the Commissioner of Finance may suspend 01' postpone the sale of tickets and holding of the draw or hOl'serace when the interests of the public so require.

5, The penalty of imprisonment for not less than one month nor 1II0rc than two years, 01' a fine of not less than one hundred pesos nor more than five thousand pesos, or both, shall be imposed upon: (a) Any person who is found possessing, 01' dealing in, fal se 01' fraudulently altered tickets, knowing the tickets he possesses or deals in to be false or fraudulently altered; (b) Any persoll who, for Lhe I>urpose of causing damage, mutilates allY ticket issued in accol'dance with this Order; (c) Any person who sells tickeLs issued by the Philippine Charity Sweepstakes at a price more than that stated on Lhe tickeLs; or (d) Any person who sell s lottery or sweepstake tickets and fractio-;;s or coupons thereof lIot issued by the Philippine Charity Sweepstakes,

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l'Opresenti ng or tending to represent an interest in tickets issued by the sai d office. Done in the City of Manila, Philippines, this 18th day of September, 1942. (SGD.) JORGE B. VARGAS APPROVED by the Chai''1nan of the Executive Comn,igsion Director General of the Japanese Military Administration on September 18, 1942.

EXECUTIVE ORDER NO. 94

DECLARING THURSDA Y, SEPTEMBER 24, 1942, A SPECIAL PUBLIC HOLIDAY WHEREAS, on this da y, September 24, 1942, falls the solemn occasion of SYUUKI KOOREI SAl (Autumn Worship of the Imperial Ancestors); WHEREAS, it is but fitting and propel' that the public officials and employees as we I as the public should show due respect and reverence towards the Imperial Ancestors on this day; NOW, THEREFORE, pUl'suant to the authority conferred upon me as H ead of the Central Administrative Organization by Order No. 1 of the Commander路in路Chief 0 the Imperial Japanese Forces in the Philippines, and in connection with Executive Order No. 20, dated March 20, 1942, I do hereb)' declare Thursday, September 24, 1942, a special public holiday in order to enable the officials and employees and the public at Jarge to properly observe the solemnity of this day. Done in the City of Manila, Philippines, this 24th day of September, 1942. (SGD.) JORGE B. V ARGAS Chai,..nan of the Executive Co'mmission

EXECUTIVE ORDER NO. 95

REGULATING GAMING CEN TERS AND PLACES OF AMUSEMENT Pursuant to the a uthority conferred upon me as Head of the Centra l Administrative Organization by Order No. 1 in connection with Order No. 3 of the Commander-in-Chief of the Imperial Japanese Forces in the Philippines, and upon the recommendation of the Executive Commission, the following rules and r egulations governing the establishment, maintenance and opel'ation oi gaming centers and places of a mu sement are hereby promulgated: CHAPTER I GENERAL PROVISIONS

SEC. 1. Scope of O,路del'.- This Order shall apply to the establishment, ma intenance and operation of race tracks and horse racing, frontons and

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basque pelota games, cockpits, bars, ~ight clubs, cabarets, da ncing schools, dance halls, boxing a nd wrestling contests 01' ex hibitions, billiard halls, pool ha lls, bowling a ll eys and such other gaming centers 01' places of amusement as Lh,' Clulirma n of Lhe Executive Com miss ion may in hi s discretion decide to regula tc. SEC. 2. Supervisory /luwer of CommissimlCr of Ihe Interior over ganting ce"le"8 ""d places of amusement.-Th,e Com missioner of the Interior shall exercise general supervision over the establishment, ma intenance and operation of a ll the gaming centers a nd places of amusement contem plated in this Order and such other gami ng c~ ntcrs or places of amusement as may be regu lated and placed under hi s jurisdiction from t ime to time, as well as over the officials and employees thereof, and sha ll see to it that all laws, orders and regulations relating to s uch gaming center s and places of amuse, ment al'e duly enforced. Subject to t he approval of t he Cha irma n of the Executive Commission, he sha ll have the power to prohibit 01' allow the operation of any class ~f gaming center 01' place of a mu sement on any day 01' days or modify t heir hours of operation, a nd to prescribe additional ru les and regulations to govern their establishmen t, maintenance and ope, r<1tion. H e shall appoi n t, subject to the provisions of Sections 55 and 56 of Executive Orde ' No.4 dated F ebru ary 5, 1942, such per sonnel as he may nced fo r the purpo es of this Order, and their compensation shall be fixed in accorda nce with t 0 provisions of Executive Order No. 11 dated February 27, 1942. SEC. 3. P ."ovincia governors ancl city OJ" 'lntlnicipal '1nay01"S as local ..ep ..esellt"t;ves of the Commissione .. of the lnterio ...-The provincial gov' emors and city 01' municipal mayors shall act as the local representatives of the Commi ssioner of the Interior in their respective provinces, cities or municipalities, a nd shall be charged with t he duty of enforcing in their territol'ial jurisdictions the provisions of this Order a nd t he ru les and re路 gu lations issued thereunder. The pel'sonnel which they may need for this purpose shall be appoin ted in accordance with t he proYisions of existing laws and regulations governing the a ppointment of provincial, city or mun ' icipal officials and the salaries of such empl oyees sha ll be fixed in accordance with the provisions of Executive Order No. 13, da ted March 12, 1942. SEC. 4. Pe'l'1"its.-It shall be unlawful for any person or entity to establi sh or operate a ny gaming center 01' pl ace of amusement contemplated in Section 1 of thi s Order, \vithout a permit issued by tho corr esponding provincial goyernor or city mayor, as t he case may be. Any permit issued by the proYincial governor 01' city mayor shall be )路eport.d by him to the Commissioner of the Interior. SEC. 5. L ice"ses.-ln addition to t he perm it herein req uired, the operator sha ll obtain a license from the city 01' municipa l mayo r of the city 01' municipal ity where the gaming center 01' pl ace of amus ~m ent is to be opera t, ed, wi>ich license shall be issued upon presentation of the permit provided in the preceding section and payment of the fees her ein prescribed . No permit or license shall be issued unless the ap plicant has complied with the provisions of this Order.

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6. Lice".e fees.-The following license fees shall be paid: For each race track, P2,000.t>O annually or 2500.00 quarterly. For hold ing each day of racing, 4600.00. Fo!' racing managers, judges of l'aces, stewards and handicappel's, PIS.OO eacb annually, and for jockeys, trainers, timekeepers, starters and )veighers, P12 .00 each annually. (d ) For each horse running on each race, PI.00 . (e) For each basque pelota fronton, P2,000.00 annually or P500.00 quarterly. (f) For pelotaris, judges or r ef erees and s l1perintend ~ nts (intendentes ) of basque pelota games, PIS.OO each a nnually. (g) F or promoter s a nd persons or entities conducting boxing or wres tling contests or exbibitions P200.00 each annually, or P50.00 quarte rl y, if the seating capacity of the building, stadium or struc· t ure wherein the contests or exhibitions are to be held is fOl' not more than 4,000 persons; a nd P400 .00 annually or PIOO.OO qua rterly, if the seating capacity is for more than 4,000 persons. (h ) For professiona l boxers, professional wrestlers, boxing or wrest· ling managers, matchmakers, physicians, and referees, P15.00 each annually, and for timekeepers, announcers, trainers, and seconds, PIO .OO each a lll;lUally. (:) For each cockpit, nigbt club, cabaret, dancing school , and dance ha ll , P200.00 annually or P50.00 quarterly. (j) For ever ] cockfight held in the cockpit, PO.25. (k) For each bar\ PIOO.OO annually or P25.00 quarterly. (I) For each billiard or pool table, or bowling alley, PIO.OO annually or 1'2.50 qua rterly. The a bove license fees sba lJ accrue to the fund s of the city or munici pality wher e the ga ming center or place of amusement is operabed. Existing ordinances presc ribing hi gher fe~s than those fixed herein shall l'emain in force until otherwise provided for by t he Chairman of the Executive Com mi ssion. It s ha ll be lawful for a city or municipal mayor to impose by ordi· nance a higher f ee than those provided herein with the approval of the Chair· man of the Executive Commi ssion. SEC. 7. Location of ga1ning centers Or places of amusement.-No race track or horse racing, basq ue pelota fronton, cockpit, nigbt club, cabaret, nigbt club, dancing school or da nce hall s hall be maintained or operated within a r a dius of two hundred lineal meters from any city hall or municipal building, provincial capitol building, national capitol building, public plaza, public school, church, hospita l, athletic stadium, public park or any institu tion of learning or charity; nor sh"ll any bar, boxing or wrestling contest or exhibition , billiard hall, pool hall or bowling alley be maintained or operated within a radius of one hundrcd lineal meter s from a ny of the aforem entioned buildings or s ites. SEC. S. 8,.;/d·inU, sanitary a1ICZ lJur/d"U ,·equire1nent.s.-No permit or license for the constl'Uction Or operation of a gaming center or place of amuse' ment shall be issued without proper ce rtificate of the provincial or city en· SEC.

(a) (b) (c)

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gineer and architect certifying to the suitobility and safety of the building nnd of the provincial 01' city health officer certifying to the sanitary condi, tion of said building, The Commissioner of the Interior may in hi s discretion and as the cil'cumstanc ~s may warrant, l'equiJ'e that gam ing centers and places or amusement be provided with suffici ont space for parking so that the public roads and highways be not used for such purpose, SEC, 9, P,'oleRt 01' cOlI/p/ai1lt.-Any person who believes that any gaming center a nd place of amusement i' located or established in any place not authorized herein 01' is being operated in violation of any provi sion of this Order may file a protest 01' complaint with the Comm issioner of the Interior dit'ectly or through the provinciaJ governor, or city Or municipal mayor conc~l'ned, and after propel' investigation of such complaint, the Commissioner may tak-e such action as he rnay consider necessary in accordance with the pro' visions of Section 13 hereof, SED, 10, Pe,'solls pl'ohibited ÂŤdlll\Ssion,-Pel'sons under sixteen years of age, persons ca rrying firearms Or deadly weapon of any description except government officials performing their official duti es, intoxicated persons, and persons of disorderly nature and conduct who are a pt to disturb peace and order, shall not be admitted or allowed to remain in any gaming center or place of amusement: Pl'ovided, That persons under sixteen years of age may, when accompanied by their parents or guardians, be admitted in gaming centers or pJaces of amusement but in no case shall such minors be allowed to bet in gaming cen rs nor shall minors under fourteen years of age be admitted in bars, SEC, 11. Gambling "o ldbited ,-No card ga mes or any of the p,'ohibited games shall be permitted within the pi'emises of any gaming center or place of amusement coming under the provisions of this Order; a nd upon satisfactory evidence that the operator or entity conducting such gaming center or place of amusement has tolerated the existence of any prohibited game within his or its premises, the Commissioner of the Interior may take the necessary action in accordance with the provisions of Section 13 hereof, SEC, 12_ Duty of opemto,'.. maintenance of peace and. o,'d.e ..,-It shall be the duty of the operator or concessiona il'e of any gaming center or place of amusement to sez that pence and order is maintained at all times therein, that the premises be i<ept under sanitory condition, and that the rules and regulations prescribed in this Order are properly observed, Whanever public interest requires or at tha request of the operator 01' concessionaire, the senior inspector of Constabulary 01' met,'opolitan constabulary commander concerned 1l1 ~~~t assign one or more members of the Constabulary units under his command in nn)' gaming center 01' plac2 of amu sement to maintain peace and order in and around the premises thereof and to enforce the provi sions of this Order and other municipal or sanitary regu lations therein, SEC. 13. Revocatio11 01' S1ts7Jen~ion of lJ81'ut.ifR and licenses.-The Commissioner of t.he Interiol' may suspend 01' revoke any permit and license g,'anted under this Order to any of the gaming centers 01' places of amusement herein regulated or to any officilll 01' employee thereof, for violation of any of the rules 01' regulations provided in this Order 01' those which the

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said Commissioner of the Interior may prescribe, or for any just cause. Such suspension or revocation shall operate to forfeit to the city 01' munic. ipality concerned all sums paid therefor. SEC. 14. Appeals.-Any action taken by the provincial goV<!rnor or by the city or municipal mayor concerned under the provisions of this Order may be appealed to the Commissoiner of the Interior whose decision shall stand unless modified or revoked by the Chairman of the Executive Com· m.ission. SEC. 15. Books, records c",d accolln/s.-The Commissioner of the Interior or his duly authorized representatives shall have the power to inspect at all times the books, records and accounts of any gaming center or place of amusement. He may in his discretion and as the circumstances may war· rant require that the books and financial 01' other statements of the person 01' entity operating the gaming center Or place of amusement be kept in such manner as he may prescribe. SEC. 16. Exemptions.-Any gaming center or place of amusement li· censed as of April 1, 1942, that is within the prohibited zones or distances herein provided, or cannot comply ,vith t he building requirements prescribed in this Order shall be given one year's notice within which to close, transfer, 01' otherwise comply ,vith the provisions hereof, but the Commissioner of the Interior may, with the approval of the Chairman of the Executive Commis' sion, in special cases and for justifiable l' sons, authorize their continuance in their present location. The Commissioner of the In terior shall also have the authority, subject to the approval of the Chairman of the Executive Commission, to exempt in sp~cial meritorious cases any gaming center or place of amusem.ant which is not operated for gain or profit, from any Or all of the requirements pre· scri bed in this Order. CHAPTER II RACE TRACKS AND HORSE RACING SEC. 17. Pa,·ticlIla,· duties of COlnmi8l<ioner of the interim' regarding operation of "ace Imcks and hO)'8e ,·aci"g.~In connection with his duties to enforce the laws, orde,'s, rules, and regulations governing the operation of race tracks and the conduct of horse racing, the Commissioner of the Interior shall require that race tracks be properly constructed and maintained; that adequate sanitary accommodations be provided in the track, grandstands, stables and other structures of racing clubs; that there be an equipped mel" gency clinic for the care and treatment of injuries and ailments of jockeys a'ld track personnel; and that measures be taken against the use of im· proper devices, drugs, stimulants 01' other means so as to artificially enhance the speed of horses or materially hal'm their condition. SEC. 18. Days and how's of operation.-Except as may otherwise be provided h erei n, the holding of horse races shall be allowed on Sundays and legal holidays from 8:00 o'clock in th .. morning until not later than 11 :00 o'clock at night.

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SEC. 19. Raci·ttg 1na1lag ~rs, jockeys, starters, etc.; license 1'equ'i'r ed.-No person 01' entity operating a r ace track or conducting horse racing shall employ any racing ma nager, judge of l'aces, steward, bandicapper, jockey, tl ainer, timekeeper, starter, weigher 01' any other official performing duties <lit'eclly connected with the races, unless such persons or track official bas been duly licensed by the city 01' municipal mayor concerned. Sucb license shall be obtai ned yearly. SEC. 20. Automatic electric totalizatol·.-No person or enti ty operating a raeo track 01' conducting horse racing whose total betting on any race day exceed fifty thousand pesos, shall be allowed to hold races, unless sucb person or entity is provided with an automatic, electrically opera ted public indicator system a nd ticket selling machines, by means of which every ticket purchased on every horse in a ny race, shall be automaticall y and instantaneously r eo corded by the electrical impulse on a prominently di splayed bulletin board, each figure, letter 01' symbol of which sha ll be readabl e from a distance. SEC. 21. Official .tm·tel·s.-Any per son 01' entity operating a r a ce track or conducting horse racing shall designate at least two official starters for t he races. The stewards of t he day shall determine by lot the star ter ' to officiate in each race. SEC. 22. St uards.-There shall be at least two stewards fo r each racing day who shall ha ve the necessary power s to su parvise the conduct of the r:lces, and to enforce the rules and regulations applicable on all questions arising in t he race track during a racing day. It s ha ll be their duty to see, befor e allowing the p 'ogram of races to begin, t hat a license therefor has been duly secured; to apply and enforce t he penalties provided agai nst of· fending jockeys, trainers, horse owners, track officia ls and employees and perso ns who in any way perform duties, directly or indirectly, connected with the mces. SEC. 23. Juclues ·of-finish.-There s ha ll be three judges-of-fini sh whose duty shall be to determine and decide the winning horses in each race for wi n, place and show. They shall rendcl' t heir decis ions in accordance with the order t he winning horses shall have crosscd the tape line, and in case 01 closely contested events, as shown by the photo·fin ish picture, which in a ll such cases shall be taken. Any of the stewards of t he day may, at t he discretion of the racing club 01' entity conducting t he raC2S, be designated to act as judge·of·finish . SEC. 24. Committe. of Ha ndical'/Jcrs.-E verl' person or entity operating a race track of conducti ng races shall ha ve a Committee of· H a ndicapper s to consist of t hree members, one of whom sha ll be a l·epres.mtative of the Commissioner of the Interior. It shall be the duty of t he Committee of Handicappers to keep a com pl ete and up-to·date record of a ll regi stered horses, their ownel'S. color, height, and such other cha l'acteristics as will aid in their propel' identifi ca tion; the particular grou p or class to which each horse belongs , togethel' with the weight each carried in t he previous races participated in. The handicapp. rs shall prepare t he program of races, taki ng into consideration past performances and condition of each horse, and shall so g roup and so ha ndica p them as to nearly as practicable equalize the

[43]


winning chances of all the entries in each race, in accol'dance with such rules as may be prescribed by the Commissioner of the Interior, The program of races as prepared by the Committee of Handicappers s hall require the ap' proval of Lhe Conlluissioner of the Interior, SEC, 25, Field iuspecIO?'8.-The Commissioner of the Interior shall as, sign fi eld inspectors and agents on each racing day to wateh the events of t he day. They s ha ll be assigned at various places throughout the race track, It s ha ll be their duty to carefully observe and detect anomalies and irregularities of any na llure that may be committed at the start 01' finish 01' during th e p rogress of a race; and to detect any fraudulent 01' dishonest deals, transactions 01' acts that may be committed in the race tracks. They s ha ll report immediately any such anomalies, irregularities or fraudulent or dishonest acts, which they may di scover, to the stewards of the day, who s hall promptly take such action as the circumstances may warrant, The salaries 01' compensation of fi eld inspectors and agents shall be paid by the person 01' entity concerned from the special fund provided in section 34 hereof, SEC, 26, T,'ack lL"di/oI'8,-For t he purpose of s upervising and verify 路 ing the accuracy of reports of any person 01' entity operating a race track 01' conducting ho rsc ra cas, with respect to the totalizator receipts of the total amount of wager mad e on each event, the dividends awarded for win' ning horses, whether win, place, or s how on each event, and other matters referring to finan cial computations 01' sta tements, the Commissioner of the Interior shall assign such number of audi ing officars and checkers as may be necessary, It shal\ be t he duty of s~ id auditing officers and checkers to report to the Commissioner of the Inte1';01' any il'l'egularities 01' el'l'oneous computations, which they may discover in connection with repo1'ts on the tot.!.lizator sales 01' the total wager funds, 01' the dividends awarded on each r acing evant, Theil' salaries or rate of compensation s hall be paid by the person 01' entity concerned from the special fund provided in section 34 hereof, SEC. 27, Jo ckeys; gualificalions.-No person 01' entity operating a race track 01' conducting horse raci11g shall allow a person to ride as jockey, unless such person possesses the qualifications to be prescribed by the Com, missioner of the I11terior, The Commissioner of the Interior may, however, permit mal e 01' female rid"rs without license in special events, SEC, 拢8, Jo ckeys to be held in enclostt,'e,-The jockeys riding in the races of the day shall be quarbered in an enclosure of the race h 'ack apart from the public at leas t one bour before they shall ride their respective races, They shall not communicate with any person 01' persons in the race track, except with authorized officiars of the racing club 01' entity conduct路 ing the races, 01' with duly authorized representatives of the Commissioner of the Interior, They shall be allowed to come out of the enclosure only at tha time of riding their r espective races. Jockeys who are not riding shall not, however, be permitted to mi x with the public in any part of the buildings 01' premises of the race track, SEC. 29 , When two 0" mO"e h01'8e8 of 0". OW,"" a". ""te,'.d in Bam"

[44J.


tuae; "fi eld" ell try.- 'Yhen two or more horses belong ing to one owner are entel'ed in the same race, such horses shall be considered as an "entry" only and pai''i!d in the betting as one horse, so that if a ny of the sa id horses wins, the holders of tickets for the "'entry" sha lI be entitled to the clividend. No horse may participate in a r ace unl ess it carries a number a nd tickets are offered for sale on such a horse. The handicappers at their discretion may group two or more horses participating in a race in a tlfield/' when such horses belong to different owners. Such horses shall be grouped in th ~ betting as one hor e and when any of such horses \vins, all holders of the "field" tickets shall be paid the dividend corresponding to t he "field". SEC. 30. Wager alld dividellds.-The face-value of totalizator tickets for wager shall not exceed five pesos, whether for \vin, place, 01' show. The facevalue of said tickets, as the case may be, sha ll be the bas is for t he compu tation of dividends, and s uch dividends shall be paid after eliminating frac tions of ten centavos: for example, if the resulting dividend i PlO.98, the dividend that shall be paid will be only PIO.90. If no ticket has been sol d on a winning horse, whether for win, place, or show, the dividends corre路 s ponding to s uch race shall be paid out to the holders of tickets sold on the horses that finished dead heat>, or on t he horse that f ini hed next to that on which not a s in.",l e tick >t was sold: Provided, That t he owner of said winning horse sball be en titl ed to tbe corre ponding stake or prize. SEC. 31. Selec iOll of daily -double evellts.-A ny person or enti ty operating a race track or conducting horse racing may hold one daily-double event in the morni ng and a notbe\- in the eveni ng on each racing day. The four races constituting the morning a nd ev~ning daily-double events sball be drawn by lot by the au thorized representative of the Commissioner of the Interior from the Pl'og,'am of races submitted by the Committee of Handi cappers. The authorized r epr esenta tive of the Commi ssioner of the Interior may draw sa id daily-double races soon after t he completion of the program of races and may a llow the sale of betting tickets outside t he race track premises prior to t he day on which such races will be run: P rovided, however, That the sale of such betting tickets sball be carried out under the supervision of the authorized representa tive of the Commi sioner of the Interior, who shall place a specific mark or imprint on sa id betting tickets. Not more than fourteen horses belonging to different owners shall be allowed to participate in a dail y-double race; and in case t here are more than fourteen horses belonging to different owners, the exceecling number shall be eliminated by Jot by the representative of t he Comm issioner of t he Inl:!'rior. SEC. 32. Daily-double )'aces; amlOUllce",ent before stCt1"tillg.-Before sta,t路 ing the first race o~ a daily-double event, the person or entity operating the race tl'ack or conducting the races s ha ll a nnoun"" thru loud speakers, the names of jockeys mounting each horse, the weights on each horse, the number of tickets sold on each horse, and the total numbe,' of tickets sold on the r ace. The same process shall be repeated before starting th" second race of a daily-double event, except that in this case, the number of tickets sold on eacb horse of the second }'ace, coupled with the winning horse of the first race, shall be announced, instead of the t ickets sold on each horse of the

[45J


second race. The pel' on 01' entity conducting a daily路double race shall submit to the auditors of the Commissioner of the Interior the stubs of tickets sold and such other information on the betting as may be required for verification. SEC. 33. Hour of I'unning daily.double "aces; posting of ticket sa les.The first race of the morning daily路doubl e event shall be run not later that] 12:00 o'clock noon and the second l'aCe not latel' than fOlty-five minutes thereafter. The first race of the evening daily-double event shall be run not latar than 6:00 o'clock P. m. and the second race not later than forty-five minutes immediately thereafter. The number of tickets sold on each horse in the two races of eac h daily-double event and the totals thereof shall be posted at conspicuous bulletin boards at an interval of forty-five minutes from the opening of the races in the morning_ The sale of tickets fOl' these events shall be closed forty-five minutes before running the first race of each daily-double event. Th e closing of the sale of tickets for each event shall 00 properly announced by the stewards. SEC. 34 . Totalizator ,-eceipts or wage,- funds; how dis~ributed.-The total wager funds or gross receipts from the sale of totalizator tickets shall be apportioned as follows: eig hty-five pel' centum shall be distributed in the form of dividends among holders of win, place and show horses, as the case may be, in the r egular races ; twelve and one-half pel' centum shall be set aside as t he commission of the person, racing club, 01' entity conducting the races, which shall includ the amounts for the pa yment of authorized stakes or prizes for " ,n, place and show horses, and authorized bonuses for jockeys, and two and ne-half per centum sha ll be paid to the Centra l Admini strative Orga nizati n for disposition as may be authorized by law or executive order; and in t he case of daily-doubl路. races, the gross r eceipts derived from the total sale of daily-double tickets shall be apportioned in the same manner as provided hereinabove, except that the eighty-five pel' centum of the gross receipts from the total sale of daily.double tickets shall be distributed in the form of dividends a mong the holders of the \vinning combination of horses, that is, the two horses that won first place in the two l'aces, in stead of among holders of win, place and show horses, as in the case of regular races: P,-ovided, however, That of the twelve and one-half pel' centum r ep resenting the commission of t he I,erson 01' entity conducting the races an amount equival ent to one-half percentum of the total wager funds 01' gross receipts from the sale of betting tickets sha ll be set aside by the said persons 01' entity as a specia l fund to covel' the expenses of the personnel of the Commi ssioner of the Interior assigned to duties l-e1ating to r noe tracks or horse racing, as well as other authorized expenditures, such expenses to be apportioned by the Commissioner of .the Interior among the different persons or entities operating r ace tracks or conducting horse l'acing, a nd any unex pend ed balance of this fund at the end of each year shall revert to tha general funds of the persons 01' entities concerned. SEC. 35. Races to be 1Jl-01>tptly.- Except as othenvise provided in t hi s Order , the races listed in the official program shall be run promptly at an interval of not mo'" than thirty minutes from the running of the first race in the morning.

,-u"

[46]


CHAPTER. 1lI BASQUE PELOTA GAMES AND FRONTONS SEC 36. Dcfillitiolls.-Whenever used in this Order and unless Lhe con· LexL indicates a differenL mea ning, the following Ilarms shall bea r the mean' ing' indicated herein: (a) "Basque pelota game" shall include the pelota game with the use of pala, raquetn, cesta punta, remonte and mano, in wh ich professional players participate. (b) " Fronton" comprises the court where basque pelota games are played, incl uding the adjoihing structures used in connection with s uch games, sucb as the betting booths a nd galleries, totalizator equipment, and the grandsta nds where tha publ ic is admitted in connection with such games. (c) " P elotari" is a professional player engaged in playing basque pelota . (d) " Professiona l player " is one who plays for compensa tion. SEC. 37. Part icular dnties of lite Comm'ismon,r of tlte fnterior ,·ega,·d· illg operation of basque pe(o ta games "nd frontolls.- In connection with his duty to enforce Lhe laws, orders, rules a nd regulations r elating to frontons and basq ue palota games, Lhe onuni ssioner of t he Interior shall require t hat such frontons b properly constructed and maintained; shall see that proper sanitary accommodations are provided in the g randstands a nd other structures comprising uch f rontons ; and sha ll require that such fronton be provided with a propel'ly equipped emergency clinic for the care and treatment of injuries of t a pelotaris. SEC. 38. Da1ls a d hOllrs oj operation •.-Except as may otherwise be provided herein , basque pelota games with betting sha ll be allowed every day, excepting Sundays, from 2:00 o'clock p. m. to not Jater tha n 11 :00 o'clock p. m. SEC. 39. Pelotaris, judges, referees, etc, . hall be licensed.-No per son or entity operating a basque pelota fronton, wherein games are played with betting, shall employ any palotari, judglo or referee, superintendent of games (intendente), or any other official whose duti es are connected with the operation or supervis ion of the gam..zs, unless such person has been duly licensed by the city or municipal mayor concerned. Such license shall be granted upon satisfactory proof that the applicant is in good health, knows the rulas and u sages of the game, and is a person of good moral character and of undoubted honesty. Tn the case of pelotaris, s uch license shall be granted only upon the fUl-th er condition tha t t hey are able to play the game with reasonable skill a nd with sarety to themselves and to their opponents. The Commissioner of the Interior may fUl-ther require other r easo n abl ~ qualifications for applicants to a li cense, not otherwise provided h'. rein . Such license shall be obtained yearly. SEC. 40. hlstallation of allto.".«tic elect,..ic totalizato'·.- Any person or entity operating a fronton wherein belling in any form is allowed shall install in its premises within the period of one year from the date this Order takes effect, an automaLic electl'ically operated indicator system and ticket selling machines, commonl y known a s totalizator, which shall clearly r ecord each

[47]


ticket purchased on eve ,'y player in any game, the total number of tickets sold on each event, as well as the dividends that correspond to holders of winn;ng numbers. 1'his requirement shall, however, not apply to double. evenls 01' forecast pools 01' lo any belting made on the basis of a combination or grouping of players until a totalizator that can registe,' such bets has becn invenbed and placed on the market. SEC. 41.

Supel'vision over sale oj belting tickets ltnc/ payment oj diviel·

ends,-For the purpose of verifying the accuracy of reports in connection with the sale of betting tickets and the com[JUtation of dividends awarded to winners on each event, as well as oth"r statements with reference to the betting in the games played, the Commissioner or" the Interior shall assign s uch number of aUditing officers and checkers as may be necessary for the PUI pose. These au diting officers and checkers shall be placed in the ticket selling booths, dividend computation booths and such other parts of the fronton, where betting tickets are sold and dividends, computed. It shall be their dut~, to check up and correct any irregularity 01' any enoneous report or computation that may b~ made by officials of the fronton, in con' nection with the sale of tickets and the payment of dividends. SEC. 42. W(I!!el' tickets a?lel dividends.-The face value of the wagoer ticket., fo,' any ev~nt shall not exceed P5.00 whether for "win" 01' "place", 01' for any combinatio or grouping of winning numbers. The face va lu e or sa id tickets, as the (\ase may be, shall be the basis for the computation of thp dividends and BU dividends shall be paid after eliminating fradions of ten centavos (P.10), for example : if the resulting divid"nd is P10.43, the dividend that shall be Pllitl will be only PI0.40. SEC, 43. D'ist"iblltioTl oj wager Junds.-The total wager funds 01' gross receipts from the sale of betting tickets s hall be apportioned as follows: a commission not exceeding ten and one·half pel' centum (10 % M,) on the total bets (\11 each game 01' ev nl s hall be set a ide for the person 01' entity operat· ing the fronton and foul' and one·half pel' centum (4 ' ,,',) of such bets shall be paid to the Central Administrative Organization for disposilion as ma~' be authorized by law 01' executive order; and lhe balance or eighty·five pel' centum (85 r ; ) of the total bets shall be distributed in the form of dividend. among hold ers of Hwin JJ 01' "place" n_umbel's 01' holders of the winning combination or grouping of nUl'l'lbel's, as thz case may be: Provided. hO'UJeve)', That of the ten ancl one·half pel' centum (10 ' 1, M,) repl'esenting the com· mission of the person 01' cntity operating the fronton, an amount equivalent lo one'half pe,' cenlum (,"' , ) of the total bets or wager funds shall be sel ",ide >lnd In,,de available to covel' the expcnses of the personnel of the om· missiJne,' of lhe Interior assigned to duties relating lo basque pelota gamcs ancl Iron tons, including payment of sa laries of such personnel , pu\'chas·, of }leceSsarl' equipment and other und,·y expenses as may be authorized \>y competenl author ity, such total .xpenses to be apportioned by the Com· missioner of the Inle";or among the different frontons in operation, and any unexpended balance of th is fund shall, at the end of each yea,', revert to the genel·al funds of the frontons which contributed to saicl expenses, in aceordance with a basis to be determined by the Commissioner of the Interior.

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SEC. 44.

SuperviS'io1l o ve r th e cond'l(ct of g(lm es; enforce ment of rules

regu!ntio1/s.- The Commissioner of Lh e Interior is authorized to place within the premi ses of LhJ fronton s, such number of in specto rs and agents as may be deemed necessary Lo supel'vh;e the conduct of t.he games, to see thnt the rules of the games are strieLly enforced, and to carry out the provisions of this Order as well as such ot.her regulations as may hel'eafter be prescribed.

(/ltd

SEC. 45.

Rul es go tlcruill{J fh e gUllies ami pel'soutl I of th e frouton .-The

rules a nd regulation that have been adopted by an)" f"onton to govern the ope.ration of its games and the behav ior , duti,s a nd performance of the official s and personnel connected therewith, such as pelotaris, judges, refel",es or superintendents of the g-a mes (intandentes) and others, s hall be the reo cognized rules and regulations of suc h fronton until the sa me are altered or repeal ed by the Commissioner of the In lerior ; a nd a ny fronton may introduce a n~' type or form of ga mes or even ts, provi ded they are not contrary to the p!'ovisions of this Order or any ,ule or regulation hereafter issued by the Commissioner of the Interior. SEC. 46. Regldat io11S governiny pelo/"ris.- Any rul e or reg-ulation adopt路 ed by an)' esta lished '("onton govp rning the con duct or performance of pelotaris to the ontrary notwithsta nding, the following r egul ations shall ba observed: (a) The pelotal'is who are pal ticipating in the games shall not Ix: a llowed to communica , ta lk or make sign \vith anyone in the public 0 " with any official Or employee of the fronton during t he games, except with the judges or I' ferees or the superin tendent ( intend ante) in charge of t he g ames; (b) The prog-ram of games or eV'ents, as well as t he line-up or ol'der of pi Hying of the pelotori s in each event shall be determined by the superintend ant of the games (intendente), subject lo the approva l of the Com路 missioner of the Interior or his authorized representative. (c) Pelotari s hall be in good physical condition befo re participatingin any game und shall be l aid off from playing at I'aas t two days in a week. Every pelota"; shall once a month secure a medical certificate f "om a government phys ician to be des igna ted by th2 city or municipal mayor concerned certif)';ng- to his physical fitn ss to engog-e in the games; (d) 'rh e amount of dividends compuled for a n)' vent s hall not be post.e(1 within thr view of th e peloLnl'i s part.i ci pating' in the eve nt until nHe!' t hl' t ~ l'lninalion of said evenL. CHAPTER IV COCKPITS SEC. 47. Cockpit clefillecl.-"Cockpit" hall include any enclosure, pit, building or place where cockfighting with betling in any form is held . SEC. 48. Days and hOln's of operation.-Except as may othenvise be provided her ein, cockfighting s ha ll take place only on Sundays and I"gal

[4.9]


holidays and fo r a period not exceeding three days during the celebration of Lhe town f iest<1 as fi xed by t he municipal authorities, frQm 8 :00 o'clock in the morni ng to 11 :00 o'clock at night. SEC. 49 . Persolls allowed in side the " r ing".-With the exception of the ref eree a nd the ,'espectivc " soltadores" and other employees not exceeding foul' , no per son s hall be allowed to tal' within the ring during any cockfi ght ing : PI'ov ided, h owe~'.", That, if necessary to maintain peaoa and order, a ny peace officer may ente r 0 1' stay in said premises. SEC. 50. Prohibition lLglLinst slLle 01 liqllO,路.- No intoxicating liquor of any kind s ha ll be sold w ithin th a premises of any cockpit nor within a dist<mce of one hundred lineal meter s from the cockpit enclosure. CHAPTER V BAR S, N IGHT CLUB S, CABARETS, DA N CING SCHOOLS,

A N D DA'NCE HALLS

SEC. 51. Delinitiol1s.- (a) "Bar" shall include any place 01' establish menL whosa principal bus iness 0 1' a ctivity is the sale to the public 01' to the member s of a ny club 0 \ ' enti by operating such bar, of alcoholic beverages 01' liquor s of a ny kind to be used 01' consumed within its premises: P"ovided, Th a t a ny stor e, pl a ca or e tabli shment wherein alcoholic beverages or liquors of an y kind a r e so d s ha ll be considered a bar for the purposes of the limi tations as to hour of operation p rovided in Section 53 hereof: Provided, IlIrt her, Tha t a bar t l a a llows music or dancing within its p''ilmi ses shall be consider ed a nig ht club, cabaret , dancing school or dance hall, as the case ma y be. (b) "N igh t club" sha ll include a ny place 01' establishment selling to Lhe publi c or to t ho members of a ny club 01' entity operating such establi sh路 ment, f ood or d.-i nks where customer s 0 1' other per son s are allowed to dance. (c ) "Ca ba ret, da nce h all 01' da ncing school" s hall include any place 0 1' establi smant wher e da ncing is permitted to the public 01' to the members of any club 01' enti ty t hat opera tes such establi s hment and where professional hostesses 01' da ncer s a r e employed or wha r e an admission fee or any other c h a rg~ f OI' da ncing is coll ected. (d) " Prof essiona l hostess" s hall include a ny woman employed by any of the2stabli shments defin ed her ein to entertain guests at their table or Lo d nee \\~th them. (e) " Professional da nce r " s hall include any woman who dances at any of t he esta blishm en ts defined her ein for a f ae or r emuneration paid directly or indirectl~' by the opera tor or by the person with whom s he dances. ( f) "Ope rator " s hall includ a the owner, manager, administrator or any per son who oper a tes a nd is res ponsible for the operation of any bar, night club, ca baret, da ncing school or dance hall, in accordance with the provis ions of these r egul a ti ons. SEC. 52. Additional building reqlt il路ements.- (a) Bars, nighL clubs, ca bal'ets, da ncing schools or da nce ha ll s shall be well lighted and properly venti lated a t a ll times whil e uch establi shments are open, leaving no dark

[50]


corners the,·ein. There shall be no private rooms nor separate compa,·tments, except these designated for lavatories, dressing room for la dies and kitchen: Provided, howev ...·, That the dancing, dining 01' drinking hall of e"ery such establishment which is also authorized to operate a hotel, shall be on a floor separate from its lodging rooms: Provided, f"'·tI' ...·, That there shall be in such establishments at least two sets of lavatories, one exclusi vely for women and another for men. (b) Every night club, cabaret, dancing school or da nce hall shall be properly enclosed with a f ence and ha ll have no direct or indirect communication whatever with any neig hbOl'ing dwell ing place, house or building. SEC. 53. Hours of operation.-Excepting on Christmas eve and New Year's eve, bars shall be open only from 9 :00 o'clock a . m. to 11 :00 o'clock at night; and night clubs, cabarets, dancing school s, and dance hall s, from 5:00 o'clock p. m. to 11:00 o'clock at night every day, except on Saturdays, days preceding official holidays and days falling on town fiestas when they can be open until 12:00 o'clock midnight: Provided, however, That in special cases and for justifiable reasons, the Commissioner of the Interior, with the approval of the Chairman of the Execu ti ve Commission, may grant a spec ial permit to any particular club, association or establishment to operate beyond the hours herein specified: P"ovicled, fw·th e)', That in case any such establishment is also duly authorized to operate a regu lar restaurant, cafe or refreshment parlor or is operated in connection t her ewith, it may remain open before or after said hours solely an exclusi vely to sel've meals, refreshments Or non-in xicating drinks. SEC. 54. Professional hostessas, waih-esses 01' clance,·s.-No woman shall be employed as professional hostess, waitlfess or dancer in a n;' bar, night club, cabaret, dancing school or dance hall unl ess she is at least eighteen years of age and without first having obtained a written certificabe from the Provincial or City Health Officer that she is free from contagious or in fectious diseases : P"ovided, That with the written consent of her pa rents or guardian a woman sixteen years of age or mOl'e but below eighteen years may be so employed. No professional hostess, waitress or dancer sha ll be . allowed to continue working as such, upon discovery by the provincial 01' City Health Officer that she is suffering from any contagious or infectious diseases or after conviction for any disorderly, imnlodest or immoral conduct, or violation of any provision of this Order. The medical certificate required herei n shall be obtained once every three months. CHAPTER VI BOXING AND WRESTLING CONTESTS OR EXH I BITIONS

SEC. 55. Definitions-For the purpose of thi s Order and unless the context indicates otherwise, the follo\ving terms shall bea r the meaning indicated herein: (a) "Professional boxer or professional \Vl'estler " shall be one who

[ 51]


competes for a money prize 01' purse 01' teaches or pursues 0" assists in t he practice of boxing 0 " wrestling as a means of obtaining a livelihood or pecuniary gain; and (b) " Purse" s hall mean the pd""" percentage or other remuneration for which box ing or wrestling contestants compete, SEC. 56. L icen,,;nu of officials, boxers, wrestle,'s, etc.-Persons pal" ,cipating directly or indirectly in a boxing 01' wl'estling contest or exhibition, such a s judges 01' refer ees, physicians, matchmakers, professional boxers and wrestlers, their managers, trainers and seconds, timekeepers, announcers, and such other persons as may be included under this classification, shall first secure a license from the city 01' municipal mayor concerned before engaging as such , The Commissioner of the Interior shall, by regulation, prescribe the qualifications and r equi si1l<!s which each applicant to a license shall p ossess. Any boxer 01' wrestler applying for a license mu st first be exa mined by a physician designated by th e propel' city 01' municipal mayo ,' to establish both physical and mental f itness for competition, and annually t hereafter the boxer or wrestler must take this r equired medical examination. The proper city 01' municipal mayor may, however, order the examination of a boxer or wrestler at any time for the purpose of determining whether such boxer or 'Vl'estler is fit and qualified to engage in fUJ路ther contests. The license l'eferred to harein shall be obtained yearly. SEC. 57. D(JJ!Js a zd hOltrs of o/le,路atio?z.-Except as may otherwise be provided herein, boxing, or wrestling contests or exhibitions shall be allowed not oftener than twice a week from 2:00 o'clock in the afternoon until not later than 11 :00 o'clock at night. SEC. 58, Au e of contestants.-No contestant under the age of eighteen yea rs shall be permitted to participate in any professional boxing or 'Vl'estling contest or exhibition, SEC. 59. Officials at boxinu ""d wrestling contests 0" exhibitions.-At each boxing or ,nestling contest Or exhibi tion, the Commissioner of the In' terior shall assign from among those dul y qualified and licensed, a rereree 01' referees, judges, timekeeper, announcar, physician, and a representative of the said Commissioner to officiate at s uch contests or exhibitions, whose salaries or compensation, with the exception of such representative, shall be paid by the promoter or entity conducting the contest or exhibition. Befor e the start of each event, the referee shall ascertain from each contestant the nallle of hi s chief second, and shall hold such chief second respon路 sible for the conduct of hi s assistant seconds during the p!'Ogress of the contest or exhibition. SEC, 60, L icensed physician.-lt s hall be the duty of every promoter or person or entity conducting boxing 01' wres tling contests and exhibitions to have in attendance at every such contest 01' exhibition at his or its own expense, a licensed physici a n who has had not less than three years' medical practice, whose duty shall be to observe the physical condition of the boxers and wrestlers and advice the referees "~Lh r ega rd thereto, and olle hour

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before the contesta nts en bar the ring, to ce rtify in writing to the Commissioner of the Interior or his representative a to the contestants' physical condition to engage in the contest 01' exhibition. SEC. 61. Rules uoveminu boxinu and 1ure.tling contests or exhibitions.The Commissioner of the Interior shall , in addition to the rules I"'ovided in this Order, prescribe a set of rules governing the contests and the conauct, behavior and performance of boxers and wI'estiers as well as the duties and functions of officials during a contest or exhibition inside the ring: Provided, That until such rules are pI'omulgated, the standard rules established by law 01' the PI'actices of the profession shall govern. SEC. 62. Sham, fake or fl"Uudulent bo xing or tvrestling contests or ex hibitionB.-Any promoter or entity conducting or participating in any sham , fake 01' fraudulent boxing or wrestling contest or ex hibition s ha ll thel'eby have his or its license revoked by the Commissioner of t he Interior; and such promoter or entity shall not thereafter be entitled to receive another such licen~e.

Any contestant who shall participate in any sham or fake or fraudulent boxing or wrestling contest Or exhibi tion shall, for the first offense, be su . pended for a period of six months (such period to begin immediately after the occurrence of such offense) from participating in any boxing or wrestling contests 01' e?<hibition conducted or held by a pl'omoter 01' person or entity licensed for such p rpose: a nd for a secQnd offense, he shall be totally disqualifi~d from furth r admi sion or participation in any boxing or wrestling contest or exhibition. SEC_ 63. Inducing fraudulent bo..;ing 0" tvrestlinu.-It sball be unlawful for :lny porson by gift, promises Or money consideration to induce a boxer or wrestler to give up tbe fight in any boxing or wrestling exhihition or contest 01' refrain from displaying all his stt'ength and skill, in order that his contestant may be given the decision 01' that there may be a draw. SEC. 64. Must file surety bond to guarantee ticket holde:rs.-Any promoter 01' entity applying for boxing 01' wI'estJing licanse must furnish a surety bond to the Commissioner of tbe Interior in an amount equivalent to fifty per centum of the total estimate of receipts from tbe full seating capacity of tbe building, stadium or structure wherein tbe contest or e,xhibition is to be held . This surety bond is to ba conditioned for the payment to the Commissioner of the Interior in any of the following cases: (1) in caSe of a failure to bold tbe main event contest upon the data advertised unless the same is thereafter held at a postponed date with the consent of tha Commissioner of tbe In barior or his representative; and (2) in oase of a failure to hold said main event contest at any subsequent date fixed by the Commissioner of the Interior or his representative for the bolding thereof. The amount represented by said bond shall be payable within fifteen days after default to insure reimbursement to the purchaser of tickets for such conte t 01' exhibition. SEC. 65. Mu.t file fifty pe,. cent bond to gllarantee payment of boxe,.â&#x20AC;˘â&#x20AC;˘ ,",..Btl",,¡., officials, .tc.-Any promoter or entity applying for a boxing or wl'estling license must furnish and additional surety bond to the Commissioner

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of the interior in an amount equivalent to fifty pel' cent of the total estimate of receipts from the full seating capacity of the building, stadium 01' struc. ture wherein the contest 01' exhibition is to be held, to guarantee the pay· ment of services of boxers, wrestlers, referees, Judges, physician, ti"",,· i<'<leper, announcer, and other persons entiLled La such payment as may be determined by the Commissioner of the Interior. SEC. 66. Contmcts between promot.,·s, etc., and bo", ..·s and wrest/e,·s.The Commissioner of the Interior 01' his representative shall ba furnished by the parties concerned \vith a copy of all contracts between promooors 01' other persons 01' entities conducting boxing 01' wrestling contests 01' exhibitions, and boxers or wrestlers, their managers, and other persons who officiate at such contests 01' exhibitions. Such copy of the contract shall be filed with the office of the Commissioner of the Interior 01' his representative at least seven days before the contast or exhibition to which the contract reo lates. If two or more promoters 01' entities file disputed claims on the servo icas of a boxer or wrestler, the boxer or wI·estler concerned shall be auto· matically suspended until such claims have been adjusted or legally ad· judicated. SEC. 67. Payment of contestants.-Payment of purses of contestants shall be made immediately after the contest or exhibition, or, in case of a percentage contract~ immediately afbar the percentage is determined by the auditor of the Commissioner of the Interior. The promote!· or entity con· ducting the boxing or wrestling contest or exhibition shall pay, in cash or check, all parties entitled to payment for services in the presence of an auditor of the Commissioner of the InteJior. The promoter or entity con· cerned shall take a receipt for all paymellts made and give a copy of such receipt to the representative of the Commissioner of the Interior. SEC. 68. Admission ,..ceillts.-The Commissioner of the Interior shall, through his duly authorized representative, supervise the sale of admission tickets for any boxing or wrestling contest or exhibition. The sale of tickets shall not be authorized until the plans showing the seating a!Tangements, aisle, spacing, exit facilities, and the location of fire appliances, have been approved by the Commissioner of the Interior or his duly authorized reo presentative. All tickets, except complimentary tickets, shall have the price, name of the promoter or entity conducting the contest or exhibition, and the date of the show printed plainly thereon. No tickets shall be sold for more than the price as printed thereon; and any change in ticket prices or the date of the show shall be subject to apPl·oval of the Commissione,· of the Interior. Complimentary tickets may be issued upon approval of the Com· missioner of the Interior or his representative. Any promoter or entity conducting a boxing or wrestling contest or ex· hibition shall set aside from the gross receipts derived from admission tickets on each day of business, one pel: centum (1 % ) of said total gross receipts, which shall be available to defray the general expenses of the personnel of the Commissioner of the Interio;· assigned to duties relating to boxing or wrestling contests or exhibitions and other authorized expenses, such total expenses to be apportioned by the Commissioner of the Interior among the

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different promoters 01' entities conducting boxing or wrestling contests or exhibitions, and a ny unexpended balance of such fund shall, at the end of each calenda r year, revert to t he general funds of the promoters or entities that contributed to the said expenses, in a proportion to be determined by the Commissioner of the In terior. The fund herein referred to shall be turn· cd over to the Commissioner of the In te rior or his representative within t he period of two days from the date of the boxing or wrestling contests or ex· hibition. SEC. 69. InS1Jectol's and auditing 011;ceI'8.- At every boxing 01' wrestling contest or exhibition, the Commissioner of the Interior shall have an jnspector charged wi th the duty of seeing t hat the rules a nd r egulations provided in this Order and those that may be issued the.eunder, are strictly observed. Sa id inspector sha ll be provided with the necessary assistants, agents and employees. The Commi ssioner of t he Interior shall also assign an auditing officer, who shall be present at ea ch boxing or wrestling contest 0" exhibition and whose duty shall be to supervise and verify the sale of a dmission tickets. Such officer shall be assisted in this wO"k by such number of assistants and employees as sh I be deemed necessary for the purpose. SEC. 70. A mat eur conies is or e",Mbitions e",emlJted.-Amateur boxing or wrestling exhibition held by and under the auspices of schools, colleges and universities r ecognized by the Government o~ of generally recognized amateur athl etic societies 01' f derations s hall not be governed by the provisions of this Order. CHAPTER Vn BILLARD AND POOL HALLS AN D BOWLING .ALLEYS

SEC. 71. DelinUion.-"Billiard or pool hall Or bowling all ey" sha ll in· clude any room, compartment, building 01' place where billiards, pool or bowling games are played by the public on a compensation or hire basis or by the members of a priva te clup or entity opera ting the same. SEC. 72. H oItI·s 01 opel'Utioll.-No billiard or pool hall or bowling alley shall be open to the public 01' to the members of a private club or enti ty operating the same, and no billiard, pool, or bowling games shall be allowed the,.. in, except during the hours from 8 :00 o'clock a. Ill. to 11 :00 o'clock at night daily : Pl'ovided, however, That on Christmas eve and New Year's evc a nd on Saturdays, days preceding official holidays and town fiesta s, billiard or pool ha lls or bowling alleys Illay be open until 12 :00 o'clock midnight. SEC. 73. Prohi bilion against liq1<o,·.-No intoxicating liquor of any kind shall be sold within the premises of any billiard 01' pool hall or bowling alley. CHAPTER VIII FINAL PROVISIONS

SEC. 74 . Regu Lation 01 olh el' gal/ting centel's and lJlaces 01 (£7I"I.8eme1l 1. The Chairman of the E xecutive Commission shall , by executive order, re·

[55]


gulate from time to time the establi shment, maintenance and operati9n of other gaming centers and places of amusement not embraced in this Order and may, in hi s discretion, pl ace the general supervi sion thereof under the Commissione,' of the Interiol', SEC, 75, Blldyefiny "nd (Ll/eli /illY uf {1",d for .... ]lellSeS of personnel of C01llmis.ionel' of Ih. f llferiol',-The expenditure of such funds as may be r eceived by the Commiss ioner of the Interior under the provi s ion s of Sections 84, 43 a nd 68 hereof to covel' t he expenses of the person nel assigned to duties relating to race tracks 01' horse racing, basque pe)ota games a nd frontons, and boxing or wr estling contests OJ' exhibitions shall be made in accordance with a budget to be app roved by t he Chairman of the Executive Commi ssion and aud ited by the Auditor General and Director of the Budget or by hi s duly authorized r epresentative, SEC, 76, A)l)llie",t;o" of Natiollal I nternal Revenue Law, -The license fees, levies, charges, taxes 01' assessments prescribed in this Order shall be in addition to whatever other taxes Or assessments may be imposed upon the business of gaming centel'S or places of am usemant by the National Intel'llal Revenue Law. SEC 77, P enal ties,- (a) Any person who s hall establish , maintain and operate' any gami ng oenter 01' place of amusement regulated by this Order without t he necessary peJ'ln i 01' license shall be punished by impri sonment of not more than six mop th s 0)' a fine of not more than P2,OOO,OO, 01' by both, in the discretion of the COU1't. (b) Any violation of the provisions 37, 38, 39, 43, 48, 50, 54, 56; 57; 62, s hall be penalized by impri sonment of not of not more than Pl ,OOO,OO, or by both, in

of Sections 10, 11, 17, 18, 19, 34, 63, 68, 72, a nd 73 of this Order more than t hree months or a fin e the discI'etion of the court,

(c) Any operator , official, participant Or person who shall participate in or cause the holding of a sham , fake or fraudulent horse race, basque pelota game 01' cockfighting; 01' who shalI give, make, solicit, accept 01' agree to accept a ny offer, promise, g ift or present for the purpose of holding, making Or participating in such sha m, fake 01' fra dulent race, game 01' cock' riJrhting- or in consi deration of any malfea anca, misfeasance 01' nonfeasance ('on necLcd with t he duties of s uch operator, official , parti cipant 01' person as p!'Ovided herei n, s ha l1 likewi Se be puni shed by imprisonll1'2nt of not morc t han three months 01' a fine of not more than PI,OOO,OO, or by both, in the discretion of the cou r t, (d) If the violation is committed by a club, finll 01' corporation, the manager, managing dil'ector 0 1' per son charged with the management of the business of s uch club, finn 01' corporation shal1 be cri minal1 y responsible thercfo!',

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(e) The penalties herei n imposed sha ll be in addition to the ad ministrative punishment p"ovided in other sections of this Order. Done in the City of Manila, Philippines, this 27th day of September, 1942. (SGD.) JORGE B. V ARGAS Cha;,-man of th e Executive Commission APPROVED by the Commander-in-Chief of the Imperial Japanese Forces in the Philippines on September 17, 1942.

EXECUTIVE ORDER NO. 96

AMENDING PARAGRAPH NO. 9 OF EXECUTIVE ORDER NO. 99 SO AS TO GIVE THE DIRECTOR OF RELIGIOUS AFFAIRS OR THE CITY OR MUNICIPAL MAYORS AUTHORITY TO ACT DIRECTLY ON APPLICA1'/ ONS TO HOLD P UB LIC RELIGIOUS PROCESSIONS OR DEMONSTRATIONS Pursuant to the authority conferred upon me as Head of the Central Administrative Organization by Order No.1 in connection with Order No. a of the Commander-in-Chief of the Imperial Japanese Forces in the Philippines, and upon the recomn endation of the Executive Commission, paragraph No.3 of Executive Order No. 39, dated Ma y 13, 942, is hereby a mended to rea.d a follows: "3. The Director of Religiou s Affairs Or the City or Municipal Mayor concerned in acting on the application, should be guided by the provision of SectiO\l 11, Articl e II of E X'!!cutive Orde,' No.4, dated February 5, 1942, r egarding the right of r eligious organizations or orders to enjoy freedom of religion and worship a nd freedom to preach their doctrines and to perfol~m their religious rites so long as t hey ob路 serve public order and good social manners: Provided, howeve,', That the holding of any religious procession Or demonstra tion may be r estricted, suspended or prohibited by the Military authorities. "The Director of Religious Affairs, or the city or municipal mayors shall get in touch with the Branch Office of the Military Administration before issuing the permit. "The Director of Religious Affairs, in granting an application, shall furnish information thereof to the Mayor of the City of ManHa who shall take such measures as he may consider nece sary regarding the same," Done in the City of Manila, Philippines, this 10th day of October, 1942. (SGD.) JORGE B. VARGAS APPROVED by the Di rector General of the Japanese Military Administration on October 3, 1942.

Cltai1~m(lIl

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of th e E !l'ecutive C01n1Uiss';{)n


EXECUTIVE ORDER NO. 97

PROVIDING FOR A TEMPORARY SYSTEM OF APPORTIONMENT OF INTERNAL REVENUE TAXES TO PROFINCES, CITTES AND MUNIClPALITIES. Pursuant to the authority conferred upon me as Head of the Central Administrative Organization by Order No.1 in connection with Order No 3 of the Commander路 in-Chief of the Imperial Japanese Forces in the Philippin'es, and upon the recommendation of the Executive Commission, there is hereby established, as an emergency measure, a new system of internal revenue apportionment under the following l'ules: 1. The proceeds of residence taxes, except those due in 1940 and 1941, s hall accrue to provinces and municipalities and to the Central Administrative Organization in the following proportion: twenty-five per centum to the municipality wherein the tax is collected, twenty pel' centum to the province to which the municipality belongs, and fifty-five per centum to the Central Administrative Organization. Of the collections in chartered cities, forty-five per centum shall accrue to the city wherein the tax is collected and fifty-five per centum to the Central Administrative Organization. 2. The procee s of residence taxes due in 1940 and 1941 shall acelue to provinces and municipalities and to the Central Administrative Organization in the following proportion: forty per centum to the municipality wherein the tax is collected, thirty per centum to the province to which the municipality belongs, and thirty par centum to the Central Administrative Organization. Of the collections in chartered cities, seventy per centum shall accrue to the city wherein the tax is collected and thirty per centum to the Central Administrative Organizaion. 3. Internal revenue collected, other than from residence taxes, shall accrue to the Central Administrative Organization, with the exception of the following amounts which shall be set aside as the share accruing to the province or city concerrred: one pel' centum of the collections in the City of Manila; five pe,' centum, in the cities of Baguio, Cebu and Iloilo; ten per centum, in the cities of Davao and Bacolod; fifteen p el' centum, in the provinces of Camarines Norte and Masbate; twenty-five per centum, in the provinces of Agusan, Occid'ental Negros and Pampanga and in the city of Salt Pablo; thirty-five per centum, in the provinces of Camarines Sur, Laguna, Tarlac and Zamboanga; forty-five per centum, in the provinces of Bulacan, Cagayan and Tayabas; fifty-five per centum, in the provinces of Nueva Ecija and Oriental Negros; sixty-five pel' centum, in the provinces of Bataan, Cotabato, Davao and Pangasinan; eighty per centum, in the provinces of Batangas and Lanao; -eighty-five per centum, in the provinces of Albay, Isabela, Nueva Vizcaya, Surigao and Zambales; and one hundred per centum, in the provinces of Abra, Antique, Bohol, Bukidnon, Capiz Cavite, Cebu, I1ocos Norte, I1ocos Sur, Iloilo, La Union, Leyte, Mindoro, Misamis Occidtantal, Misamis Oriental, Mountain, Palawan, Rizal, Samar, Sorsogon and Sulu, and in the city of Cavite.

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4. The amounts accruing to the Central Administrative Organization shall be remitted to the Bureau of the Treasury and the amounts accruing to provinces, cities and municipalities shall be retained by them and made available for expend iture for their own purposes. 5. Where a province, city or municipality, prior to the promulgation of this Order, had expended for its own purposes any part of the internal revenue collections accruing to the Central Administrative Organization, such province, city or municipality may be allowed by the Chairman of the Executive Commission, upon the r ecommendation of the Commissioner of the Interior and the Commissioner of Fina nce, to reimburse the same in equal monthly installments for a period not exceeding one year beginning on the date of the issuance of this Order. The installment for a certain month shall be paid to the Central Administrative Organization ,vithin the first five days of that month and in case the province, city or municipality concerned fails to make such payment, the provincial treasurer, city treasurer, 01' municipal treasurer, as the case may be, is authorized and directed to withhold from t he r venue of the said province, city Or municipality tbat may con", into his possession an amount sufficient to cover the payment and shaH remit the said sum to the Bureau ' of the Treasury. G. The accountin!\" and reporting of internal revenue collections and the remittances of that portion thereof accljlling to the Central Administrative Organization, as vol I as the remittances under the next preceding paragraph, shall be maile in accordance with the regulations that shall be issued by the Auditor General and Director of the Budget and approved by the Chairman of the Executive Commission. The Auditor General and Director of the Budget shaIl also issue uch other regulations as may be necessary to carry out the provisions of this Order.

7. This Order shaIl take effect as of January 23, 1942: Provided, That the Chairman of the Executive Commission may, in his discretion and in specific cases, debarmine the effective date of the application of the provisions of this Order to a province, city Or municipality where the local govz:,onment under the Philippine Executive Commission has been organized after January 23, 1942. Done in the City of Manila, Philippines, this 12th day of October, 1942. (SGD.) JORGE B. VARGAS Chairman of the ExeClLtive Co,n,nission APPROVED by the Dil-retor General of the Japanese Military Administration on October 6, 1942.

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EXECUTIVE ORDER NO. 98

MAKING ALL MONEYS RECEIVED FROM THE SALE OF PUBLIC LANDS IN THE CITY OF BAGUIO ACCRUE TO THE CENTRAL ADMINISTRATIVE ORGANIZATION. Put'suant to the authority confel'l"Cd upon me as Head of the Central Admi:tistrative Organization by Order No.1 in connection with Order NO.3 of the Commander-in-Chief of the Imperia l Japanese Forces in the Philippines, and upon the recommendation of the Executive Commission, it is hereby ordered tha I;1. AJI moneys received from the sale of public lands within the City of Baguio shall accma to and be deposited with the Treasury of the Central Adm:nistrative Organization as part of the general funds. 2. This Order shall be applicable to all sales installments receivable from purchasers of townsite lots in the said City. :.I. Such provisions of ~xisting laws as are inconsistent with the provisions of this Executive Order are hereby revoked 01' modified accordingly. Done in the City of Manila, Philippines, this 14th day of October, 1942. (SGD.) JORGE B. VARGAS Chai)'1nan of the Executive Commission APPROVED by the ~ Director <Rneral of the Japanese Military A ministration on October 10, 1942.

EXECUTIVE ORDER NO . 99

DECLARING FRIDAY AFTERNOON, OCTOBER 16, PUBLIC HOLIDAY

19J,i~,

A SPECIAL

WHEREAS, there will be held on October ]6, 1942, a s pecial worship of the wa" dead newly enshrined at th" Yasukuni Zinsya in Tokyo; WHEREAS, it is but fitting and pl'Oper that the public officials and employees as well as the public should show due reV'erence on this occasion; NOW, THEREFORE, pursuant to the authority confetTed upon me as Head of the Central Administrativ" Organization by Order No. 1 of the Commander-in路Chief of the Imperial Japanese Forces in the Philippines, in connection with Executive Order No. 20, dated March 20, 1942, I do hereby declare Friday afternoon, October 16, 1942, a special public holiday in order to enable the officials and employees and tha public at large to properly observe the day. Done in the City of Manila, Phili)pines, this 15th day of October, 1942. (SGD.) JORGE B. VARGAS Chail'man of the ExeclItive Commission

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EXECUTIVE ORDER NO. 100 AMENDING FURTHER CERTAIN SECTIONS OF EXECUTI VE ORDER NO.4, DATED FEBRUARY 5, 19411, SO AS TO. TRANSFER THE SUPERVISION OF MATTERS PERTA I NING TO MARR IAGE, FROM THE BUREAU OF THE CENSUS AND STATISTI CS TO THE BUREAU OF RELIGlOUS AFFAIRS; THE DUT1ES OF LOCAL C1VIL REG1STRAR FOR THE C1TY OF MANILA FROM THE BUREAU OF THE CENSUS' AND STATI,sTICS rro THE CITY HEALTH OFF ICER OF THE CITY OF MAN ILA; AND TO. EMPOWER THE BUREAU OF THE. CENSUS AND STATISTICS TO PERFORiH SUCH OTHER FUNCT10NS HERETOFORE ATTENDED TO BY THE FORMER BUREAU OF IlvIM IGRATlON AS ARE NOT INCONSISTENT TVITH THE EXIGENC1ES OF THE M ILITARY A DMIN1STRA TfON. Pursuant to the authol'\ty coni1arced upon me as Head of the Central Admirristrative Organization by Order No.1 in connection with Order No.3 of the Commander-in-Chief of the Imperial Japanese Forces in the Philippines, and upon the recommendation ",f the Executive Commission, it is her eby ordered tha t-SECTION 1. Th second paragraph of Section 11 of Executive Order No.4, dated Februal'Y 5. 1942, as amended by E X'acutive Order No. 59, dated June 30, 1942, is here y further amended to read as follows: "SEC. 1 L Bllr~all of Religious Affai?'8.- x x x. "It shall attend to matters of proprietary cbaracter of churches a nd religious orders or organizations and to such other matters and activities as do not "elate to the freedom of religion and cult and shall exercise supervision over matters pertaining to marriage and the registl'ation of priests and ministers." SEC. 2. Section 12 of Executive Order No.4, dated F ebruary 5, 1942, as amended by Executive Order No. 59, dated June 30, 1942, is hereby further a mended to read as follows: " SEC. 12. B""eOl< of tit. C.?lSUS and Statistics .-The powers and duties of t his Office shall be to collect by enumeration, sampling or other methods, and compile and publish statis tics and other information concm"ing population, agricultural conditions, the area and production of crops, the number of livestock, the production of livestock products, exports, imports, commerce, industrial and commercial enterprises, prices, employment wages, stocks of commodities, agricultural and other pro' pelties, social and economic institutions, and such other statistics as it may be directed to coUect. It sha ll a lso perform the duties of Civil Registrar General and shall undertake the registration of aliens a nd such other functions heretofore attanded to by the former Bureau of Immigration as are not inconsistent with the e>.-:igencies of the Military Administl"ation." SEC. 3. The duties and function s of the Bureau of the Census and

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Statis tics a s loca l civil r egis trar for the City of Manila shall hereafter be assumed a nd discha rged by the City Health Officer of tha City of Manila. SEC. 4.. (a) All t he fund s, equipment, materials, l'ecords and other properties pe r ta ining to a nd used by the Bureau of the Census and Statistics in the supervi ion of ma tters r elating to marriage, Or so much thereof as may be considered necassary by the Commissioner of the Interior and the Auditor Gene ra l a nd DirectOr of the Budget, shall be mel'ged with the funds, r ecords and proper t i'as perta ining to the Bureau of Religious Affairs, to be used for th e sa me purpose or purposes fo,' which they were originally in· tended. (b) All the ,'ecol'ds pertaining to and used by the Bureau of the Cens us and S tatis tics in the p erformance of its duties as local civil registrar for the Ci ty of Manila are hereby transferred to the City Health Officer of the City of Ma nila. SEC. 5. Thi s Order s ha ll take effect upon its approval by the Com· m::.nder ·in·Chief of the Imperial Japanese Forces. Done in th e City of Manila, Philippines, this 17th day of October, 1942. (Sgd.) JORGE B. VARGAS Chab 'man of the Ex ecutive Commission APPROVED by bhe Director Genera l of the J a pa nese Mili tar y Admini stra tion on October 17, 1942. "---r-tEXECUTIVE ORDER No. 101 PROVIDIN G FOR THE INCLUSION OF THE RATING IN THE EXAM · INATIONS FOR THE PRIVATE PRACTICE OF A PROFESSION IN THE CORRESPONDIN G CIVIL SERVICE EXAMINATION. Pursua nt to t he a ut hori ty conferred upon me as Head of the Central Admini stra t ive Orga nization by Order No. 1 of the Commander·in·Chief of t he Imperial J a pan"se F or ces in the Philippines, and upon the recommenda · tion )f the Chi ef of t he Civil Service concurred in by the E xecutive Com· mission, it is her eby pre cribed t hat to secure simplification and avoid dupli· cation, the r a tings obtained in examinations for the private practice of the va rious prof essions be g iven credit in corl" sponding civil service examinations of a prof essiona l Or semi ·prof essional grade to which qualification in exam· ina t ions for t he private practice of the professions is a preraquisite for a dmi ss ion. The weight or credit that may be given such ratings in the cor· r esponding civil servi ce examinations is left to the determination of the Chief of the Civil Service. Thi s O"der shall take effect upon its promulgation and shall include ratings in examinations for the priva te practice of th" professions given p" eviou s to Lhe issuance hel·eof. Done in t he City of Manila , Philippines, this :JOth da y of October, 1942. (Sgd.) JORGE B. VARGAS Chai,.,nan of fhe E o:eoutive Commi8sWlI

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EXCUTIVE ORDER NO. 102

EXTENDING FURTHER THE PERIOD FOR THE REGISTRATION OF AUENS FOR THE YEAR 1.91,2 Pu .. suant to the authority confe .... ed upon me as Head of th e Cent.. al Administ..ative Organization by O .. de .. No.1 in connection with Ord" .. No. ;j of the Commander-in ·Chief of the Imperial Japanese Forces in the Phil · ippines, and in accordance with his proclamation dated April I, 1942, th e period for the regi tration of alien under E xecutive Order No. 25, a s amended by Executive O .. der s Nos. 60 a nd 66, for the year 1942 is, upon the recommendation of the Executive Commission, hereby further extended to November 14, 1942, in the case of ali'an. residing in the City of Manila and to November 30, 1942, in the ca Se of alien$ r es iding in othe .. localities. Done in the City of Manila, Philippines, thi s 31st day of Octobe .. , 1942. (Sg d.)

JORGE B. VARGAS

Chairman of the E :recuti l)e Co mm issio"

APPROVED by th Director Ge)ler~ of the Japanese Militarx Administration on Octobe.. 31, 194;2.

EXECUTIVE ORDER NO. 103

ANNEXING THE POLl bLO ISLANDS TO THE PROVINCE OF LAGUNA Pu .. suant to the authority confe .... ed upon me by O .. de .. No. 1 in con nection with Orde .. No.3 of the Commander·in ·Chief of the Imperial Japanese Forces in the Philippines and upon the r ecommendation of t he E xecutive Commission, it is hereby ordered that1. The Polillo islands a .. e segregated from the province of Tayabas and shall be annexed to the p ..ovince of Laguna. 2. In carrying out bhe purposes of thi s Order, the provisions of para · graphs 6, 7 and 8 of Executive Orde .. No. 84 dated Aug ust 31, 1942, shall be made applicable he,,,,to. 3. This Order shall take effect thirty days after its approval by the Commander-in·Chief of the Imperial Japanese Forces in the Philippines. Done in the City of Manila, Philippines, this 1st day of N ovember, 1942. (SGD.) JORGE B. VARGAS Chail'1nall of the FJ xe cuti'lJe G0U11m"ss ioll APPROVED by the Commander-in-Chief of the Imperial Japanese Forces Ul the Philippine on November I, 1942.

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REMARKABLE CHANGES SEEN IN NEW SOUTHEASTERN ASIA With AB CD Ring of Encirclement Smashed People in Sou th ern Areas Tread Path to Co-Prosperity Since Japan's deClal'ation of war on Britain and America, not on ly the Pacific basin ha s witnessed the I'ise of new conditions, but the entire southeastern Asia has undergone a remarkable transformation. The complete des· truction of the so·call·ad ABeD milit:alt·y encirclement against Japan has caused tte Anglo-American nations, to bo\v to the inevitable. The Unjted States has now been placed at a great disadvantage to acquire necessary material supplies to feed her mammoth \Val· industry. In fact, she has already met her nemesis in th·" southern ·egion. Her policy of keeping Japan in a state of economic starvation, by ma ·ng a gigantic show of her powerful navy an·d economic potentiality, has fai ed utterly. In I'e,tUln, Japan, fortified by continuous wal' s uccesses, i now eco omically strangling her Pacific neighbor. It is common kno ledge that Amarica, be ing endowed with rich natural resources, has been con idering h e rsel f the reatest manufactul·ing country in the world. Being confl'Pent of the s opellio r role of her dollar supremacy in international commerce, she has been extending her capitalist sway wherever possible. Therefore, it is no wonder that when the European war broke out, President Roosevelt adopting an attitude of "savior complex" declared that America would become "tha arsenal for the Democracies." But tbe moment the Roosevelt administration became involved in the current two·front war it found to its great consternation that her economic resources are in sufficient to meet the requirements of far-flung military operations. The P earl Harbor disaster, followed by the loss of tbe Philippines, Malaya, tbe Duteh E ast I ndies and Burma reacted adversely on the economic fabric of t he United States. T he loss of control over the sea·lane of southeasbern Asia, which is rich in natural resources and from which she used to obtain most of the important raw :naterials not available internally, engendered the sad military plight of the United Stallas on the one hand and confTonted her with a "have·not" economic status to meet her wartime requirements in diverse fields on t he other. So far as merchant shipping is concarned, it is seen that tbe United States has not been able to adjust her maritime progress with the rapid growth of her industry. The total tonnage of her ocean·going vessels as at the end of 1939 was approximately 9,000,000, half of which represented worn-out ships. B~fore the start of tha Pacific war, she used to rely to a gl·eat extent on foreign shipping for tl:anshipment of supplies, inasmuch as only thirty per cent of her exports and seve nteen per cent of her imports used to be carried

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QY her own shipping, the rest bei ng transported by British and other foreign veosals. This is the reason why America adopted a largescale shipbuilding plan to increase her total tonnage by several millions within the course of a few years. But the scarcity of skilled workmen and dockyards hindered the full material ization of the plan, and the subsequent P acific hostilities turning rapidly in favor of J a pa n created a serious difficulty to r epl eni3h the losses in shipping bottoms. Moreover, German submarine activities not only dealt a telli ng blow to her maritime power, but menaced t he na vigation of her vessels in the Atlantic zone adjacent to the seaboard of the Western He mi sphere. TR EMENDOUS

Loss

At the present moment, the daring German U路boat operations a,,, causing a f ast-increasing shortage of tonnage and are gr ea tly interfering with Amer路 ic~'s maritime transportation between the North a nd South American countries. On top of this, sea communications between the Pacif ic a nd the Atlantic through the Pa nama Canal have become well-nigh impossible. These adverse conditions have lowered the productive power of her industr y, \vith the result that her previous "have" character is no longer visible. Even the Washington Government has been compelled to di sclose that there are over ten kinds of strategic I':\W ma terials, for the supply of which America has to depend on forei gn imports enti rely 01' pa rtially a nd that there are as many kinds of lesser raw material s which a,,, eeded urgentl y, but are not pl'oduced adequately in the country. The fact is that the United S talles used to seCUl'a most of these raw materials from t e Sou th Seas, southeastern Asia, E ur ope and Africa . Now t hat the greater ~a)'ts of Europe and Africa ha ve been placed under the control of Garmany alld 1taly and the whole of South Seas and southeastern Asia ha ve been bnought under the influence of Japa n, it may easil y be imagined what tremendous h 'ial th'e America n industry, particularl y munition industry, is facing to harness the sinews of t he war. Of the various strategic l'aw materials, rubber, raw s ilk, Ma nila hemp and quinine are not produced at a ll in the United States. For these products, she used to depend entirely on the southern r egion, which is now under t he control of Japan. She used to meet her eighty per cent requirements in ti n, which is an indispensable war material , from the same region, and her seventy p el' cent supply of rubber used to come from Malaya and the E ast indies. Being deprived of these important supplies, the United Stares ha been forced to r ecogoize the gravity of her material shortage. Not only have the automobile industry, shipping and aircraft a nd munition f actori es been ha rd hit; the American nation has been brought to reali"e the pangs of uhave-notU condItions during militAry exigencies. BIG RUBBER CONSUMPTION

The rapid increase in the world production of r ubber in the past decade was due to the su ~prising increase in the consumption of the product by America . During the last World War period, the output of rubber was only fifty or six ty thousand tons a yea r. But in 1940 the total out-turn reached as hig h as 1,400,000 tons, because the consumption in Arne) ica, which was

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27,000 tons in 1918, rose to 620,000 tons in 1940. Last year that counwv obtained a littl e over 800,000 tons to meet its milita ry requirements. ' Up to a bout seventy years a&,o, the basin of the Amazon River in South America used to be the only rubber·growing region. It was in 1876 that t ra nsplan tation of rubber plants from that locality into the South Seas was first undertaken. Favored by climatic conditions, fertility of the soil and other suitable natural circumstances, rubber plantation in the South Sea area became a profitabl> commercial proposition , swiftly outstripping Bl'azil in cultivation. This led to the monopolized production of rubber in the southern countries. Finally t he rapid growth of American automobile, aircraft and electric machine manufacturing industries acceler ated its output on an inter· national scale. As soon as the com mercial angle in rubber cultivation wa s thoroughly apprai sed by foreign capitalists, f oreig n investments began to mount. In consequence, the amount of money \nvested so far in rubber plantation has exceeded Y3,100,OOO,OOO. It is, indeed, a mi sfortune to America that at this critical moment in her history she h as not a single rubber·producing cenber within her telTitor y. Before her retreat from the Greaber East Asia zone her total rubber import Ilercentage was made up as follows : Malaya 59, East Indies 27, French Indo·China 5, Ceylon 6 and South America 3. Althougb she is making fra n 'c efforts to meet her dema nd in this matedal from Latin America, it is obvious that she, being the la rgest consumer of rubber in the wOI'ld, cannot make up the loss of ninet)' pel' cent of imports within a few yea rs. Her net store of this material a of May last year amounted to 328,767 tons \vith the Government holding 177,856 tons, manufacturers 141,191 tons a nd rubber·dealers, 19,720 tons. As this stored quantity was ba rely sufficien t for military requirements, the Gove1'llment organized a special company to monopolize the import and stori ng of rubber. By this method, it at the end of October, 1941, increased its rubbe,' r eserve to 781,000 tons. However, observing the fact that the total consumption of this product in 1941 exceeded 800,000 tons, it can be p" esumed that America's rubber reserve is just enough to last one year under rigid economy. RUBBER ACREAGE] I N WORLD

There is no di g ui sing the fact that the rubber output in South AmerIca is not of such mag nitude that the United States cal) ignore the losses in imports from the countries included in Greater East Asia . The aggregate area of rubber pl a nta tion in the world is 8,600,000 acres, of which 6,300,000 acres, repr esenting seventy·three per cent of the total acreage, situated in Greater E ast Asia, have become una va il a ble to the Anglo·American nations. They are now depen(ling on the outputs of Ceylon, India and Latin America, the respective annual productions of which centers arc ]08,000 tons, 10,000 tons and 15,000 tons. But the interception of the Indian Ocean sea route by the J a panese Navy has deprived them of the facility of shipping rubber from Ceylon, while the volume of rubber produced in India is needed by that country to meet her home requirements. In other words, the only ,wurce left open

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to Britain and the United States is Latin America. Although the Roosevelt administration is agitating for the cultivation of substitu te products, it i a question whether such sUbstitutes could be acquired ,vi t hin a short time or whether their qualities can come up to the standard of para路rubber. In view of the essential need of rubber in munition industry, it has to be admitted that the appalling scarcity of it would substantially dislocate the productive capacity of American plants engaged in manufacturing war ma o t>arials and that the richness in iron and petroleum resources would not be able to adjust the adverse trend. Meanwhile, the experiments which have been going on in Brazil to cultivate rubber have not yielded heneficial results, for no effective method has yet been found to protect the rubber trees from the attack of insects and paras ites. Therefore, to increase t he output of rubber in Brazil would take at least a decade or two. Being faced with such odds, the Washington Government ha s drastically restricted civilian consump ' tion of rubber, limiting the annual production of automobiles to 700,000, a s against 5,000,000 cars turned out last, year. It is also reported that motor tires have been placed undel: a ration system. It needs no al'gument to ay that the only alternative for the United States now is t.o encomuge tbe manu拢acture of synthetic rubber and reo clamation of rubber. In this regard, Germany has achieved a considerable success, whereas thEl agitation in the former country is still in its .. udiment.... y stagc. The Dupont Company has been turning out and selling a kind of synthetic rubber since 1931. As the pToduction cost of this product is more than three times that of natullal rubber, its output has been extremely limited. Only about 1,700 tons' cre manufactured in 1939, repl'esenting 0.5 p_r cent, of the total requirement of rubber in America. WiLL COST $2,000,000,000 It is stated that the Washington Government is planning to give fur ther inducement to the synthetic rubber industry with the intention of acquir 路 ing 15,000 tons of this material a year in the near futUl'e. It is believed that the cost of the plants and facilities necessary to raise the production to such a limit would reach $2,000,000,000 and that it would require many years to an'iv<l at that production figure. On tbe other hand, the rubber reclamation industry has made a considerabl e progress in the country. Its present out-turn is somewhere between twenty路seven and thirtl' per cent of the total imports of natural rubber as will be noticed from the sllb-joined table: Yea lOS OulplIl Ratio to in tOllS ?/alural rub be.' 1938 108.000 27.6 '7_ 1939 28.7 186,000 209,000 1940 30.3 1941 (Jan. to July) .......... . .......... . 153,000 29.1 Reclaimed rubber is now, for the most part, primari1y used to mix it with crude rubber on account of the high cost of production. Its total consumption in America is estimated at about 300,000 tons in a year.

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Quite apart from this shortage of rubber problem, the United States, owing to Japanese control over Greater East Asia, has been denied the benefit of importing chrome, manganese, tin, tungsten, raw silk, Manila hemp and quinine in varying degrees from that area. Particularly the loss of resources of chrome, manganese, tin and tungsten has not only bl'ought about a confusion in the mainbenance of wal'time material economy, but has created a "have路not" situation causing hardship to the populace. Now that the Roosevelt administration is urging the American people to undergo all sorts of privations to meet the exigencies of military needs, it is more than apparent that America's so路called economic supremacy was not due to her internal economic potentiality, but due to her effective control over the economic resources of Greater East Asia. The liquidation of this control has caused her to feel the pinch of economic starvation reflecting the character of a "have-notU nation.

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JAPANESE EDUCATION In order to undel'stand the culture of a peopl e and the state of their national prosperity, it would be willI to examine the educational system of that nation. In Japan, ever since the establishment of the Education Ministry in 1871, or just 71 years ago, all those born in this country have been subject to "eceive compulsory education. Japan has always been a land of education. But while numerous public and private school s already were in existence even prior to the establishment of compulsony educa tion, th<! introduction of this system contributed a definite il1lpetus to the people's natural fervor for learning. An investigation conducted in 1938 of the variou s ed ucational institutions existing in Japan, from primary to univer sity, r evealed that there was a total of 48,637 schools and 17,638,780 students. Thi s figures to a pproxima tely 12 schools for each 100 squal'" kilometers of land a rea in J apa n. It also means that 99.58 ou of evel'y 100 persons living in J apan are either students 01' school graduates, a fact which puts illiteracy down to less than ¥., pel' cent. As literacy in England is 84 per cent, in the United States 76 pel' cent, in Germany 99 pel' cent, and in the Soviet Union 48 pel' cent, it is apparent that Germany is t he only great power which cJos<!ly matcbes Japan's high rate of lite'racy, with standards in the other coun tries consider· ably lower. The percentage of school attendance as announced in 1935 by various countries as follows: 100 pel' cent Japan . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .. . . . . 100 Germany . . . . .. .. . . . . . . . . .. ..... . 93.5 France ... . . ... . . . . . . . . . . .. . . . . . . . England .. . . . . . . . . . . . .. . . . • . .•.. 91 United States ... ... ... •. . .. .. . .. . •. 89 U. S. S. R. ........ ...... .... .. ... . 70 A study of the Second World War which broke out in Europe will suffice to show the peculiar relationship between educational propagation alld military preparedness. Japanese education is designed to correlate scientific methods of training with bodily strengthening, to the end that in the event of a crisis, the everyday training will express itself in t enns of the fullest intellectual and physical capabilities. Emphasis is also placed on etiquette and manners in Japan's scheme of education. Courbesy is observed not only among the Japanese people themselves, but perhaps to an even greater extent in the ir attitude toward foreigners. Beneath their polisbed exterior, however, the Japanese are a fiery people capable of intense ardor

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and feeling. B1Isido, or the characteristic spi rit of the Japanese race, omni路 presently pervades the country's education in developing man and women capable of giving their a ll for the establishment of a co-prosperity sphere in East Asia. A classification of the number of schools and students in Japan between 1934 and 1938 is as follows: YeaI'

1934 1935 1936 1937 1938

Schools 46,900 46,100 4g,200 48,600 48,637

Students 13,800,000 14,000,000 15,700,000 17,100,000 17,638,000

Japan's educational system is divided into the primary, secondary nnd higher courses, in addition to which there are kindergartens and facilities for training school teachers. PRIMARY EDUCATION The rate of entrance to ko/"'min galrko (primary schools, first to eighth grades) is 100 er cent. The completeness of this compulsory system of primary education accounts for the fact that there is not a single normal J:1pnnese who does not know how to read, write or compute figUl'2s. In primary educaLion, bodily development is emphasized just as much as the teaching of m ral lessons and basic national studies, as well as the practical knowledge aJ d skills necessarj' for one's every day living. Some of the characteristics of primary education are as follows: 1 The course of study is designed not merely to impa,路t knowledge and skills, but to shepherd such knowledge and skill s for the develop路 ment of Japanese national traits. 2. Tha courses are basically divided into five parts: national studies (including reading and history), science and arithmetic, physical culture, the arts, and vocational training. 3. These prepare the pupil with a complete basic training in the making of a Japanesa citizen. 4. The different courses have their own distinctive features, but they also complement eac h other in producing the desired results. 5. Unifo1111ity of education is de igned throughout the different gmdes. 6. Courses deemed nacessary in view of the trend of the times are added to 'effect a better understanding of the problems at hand. The Science and Arithmetic course includes the teaching of elemental'Y geometry and a lgebra. Reflecting the high standard to which modern scientific methods of pedagogy are practi sed in Japan, vocal music, for illstanca, stresses the teaching of the acoustical theory of sound rather than just the singing of songs. Furthermore, as agriculture, commerce. fishery and other studies of immediate practicability are taught in the kokumin gakko, persons with only primary education ara still adequately equipped to become useful citizens.

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SECONDARY EDUCATION Ninety路five per cent of all primary school graduates continue on to the S2co,rdnry school s. Secondary education is offered at the middl e schools, girls' high schools, vocational schools, etc. In addition, there are a great many secondary schools which specialize in teaching one subject. The secondary school s endeavor to bl'ush up what ha s been taught in the primary school s, a nd al so to lay stress on studies pertaining to national ethics. A.

MIDDLE SCHOOLS

'In 1938 there wel''; 563 middle schools throughout the country with a total enrollment of 364,486 stud-ents. The number of school years is five, And t he courses include ethics, civics, Japanese language, history, geography, fo"reign la nguages, mathemat'ics, science, vocational training, dl'awing, music, practical work and gymnastics, as well as military training. Heretofore the student had a choice of taking up one foreign language out of only threeEnglish, French and Ge,:man-but "ecently Chinese a nd other languages of til;'- Ea~t Asian countl~es have been incorporated into the curricula in an irrcreasing number of sC,hool s. The number of students seeking to learn Chinese, Thai, Mala y and other foreign languages pertaining to East Asian co,mtries is also sl)owinll' a tramendou increa se, thus indicating their sharply awa kened interest in East Asian affairs. B, GIRLS' HIGH S HOOLS The girls' high school aims to offer a ordinary cour e of higher ins 路 truction suitable to girls, giving particular attention to the cultivation of Wnmanly virtues, Besides th e ordinary courses including foreign languages, these schools teach home economics, sewing, hand icraft and other studies of pl'actical use to women. Gil'l s' high school s have developed markedly in recent yeal's, In 1938 there were 996 such schools with a total enrollment of 454,423 students, Thi s shows the extent to which leal'l1ing has spr ead among Japanese women, C. VOCATIONAL SCHOOLS 'These schools meet the specific needs of young boys who wish to get into industry afror finishing their primary school education, Like the middle girls' high school s, the vocational schools offer a fdllr to five路year cou,'se, Its graduates are the young men who are destined to become the COl'e of .Japan's vast indus trial development, In r ecent yoars many of these school s have come to attach great importance to the training of you ng men who aspi,'c to work in new lands of enterprise, Statistics show t hat in 1938 there were 477,596 students attending 1,355 vocational school s, During the past five- years the number of such school s and students has increased by about 60 per cent. Thus the tide of young men being prepared to man not only Japanese indu stries but also the greater industrial development of East Asia has never been greate,' than it is today,

,,,,,I

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HIGHER EDUCATION Graduates of the foregoing secondary schools may continue on to still higher schools of lea rning, and the tendency towards higher education is increasing sharply in keeping with the country's demand for trained men and women fitted for carrying out the national tasks. Japanese higher education emphasizes the cultivation of national ideals and character train· ing in those who are destined to hold positions of leadership. Japan's system of higher education comprises the universities, kolo gakko (higher schools), technical schools, higher nOlmal schools, girls' higher normal schools, etc. The alHnc1usive range of higher education in Japan is a matter of just pride to the Japanese. The increasing popularity of higher e ducation is indicated by the fact that whereas in 1932 there were 450 schools of higher learning and 190,000 students, in 1938 the number had jumped to 470 schools and 466,713 students. A. UNIVERSITIES The . universities, which train men and women for positions of both theo· l'z".ical and practical leadership, commonly offer a number of different courses, although there are some universities specializi ng in only one subject. The fOlmer includes such departments as law, economics, literature, science, engineering, medicine, commerce, political science, and agricultul·e; while the latter makes a s)),ecialty of engineering, medicine or commerce. In line with busi ess developments an.d national gl·owth, the policy of university education is designed with a view to benefiting society as a whole, instead of confining its activities within its cloistered walls. A splendid example of this new policy is demonstrated by the schools of medicine, which utilize the summer and winter vacations by sending their future doctors out on tours of out·of·the·way places to teach and practise the prevention of sickness. As of March 1938, there were in Japan 45 universities and 94,422 students. B.

HIGHER

SCHOOLS

Those who have finished four years of middle school education are eligible to enter the higher school. While the universities and technical schools admit women students, the higher schools are reserved for boys only. The higher schools offer two kinds of "Courses, literature and science, a nd the students here are prepared for entrance to the universities. The course runs for three years. At present there are 32 such school s with an enrollment of 14,546 students. C. TECHNICAL SCHOOLS There are some 179 tzchnical schools offering advanced training in the practical arts and sciences. The course extends over three years, and in 1938 there were 99,701 students attending such scbools to pl·epare themselves fo!· careers in industry.

[72]


KINDERGARTENS The purpose of the kindergarten is to supplement the home education of little children and also to gi¥z proper guidance to their mental and physical growth. In this important phase of pre·school training, recent years have seen a phenomenal gain in the establishment of wzll'equipped kindergartens offering modern scientific methods of junnile instruction. In 1938 the number of kindergartens ran to mOI'e than 2,000, attended by 172,027 children. EDUCATION FOR FOREIGNERS Japan has always been a mecca of learning for foreign students. Note· worthy in the educational tradition of Japan is the fact that there are no ba.rs of discrimination against foreigners. By meeting the proc.zss of a very simple formality, a foreign student can enter any school he chooses to mao triculate in, just like any Japanese national. Furthermore, in view of the recent lal'ge influx of foreign students coming here to study from various East Asian countries, the Japanese Govemment has even gone to thz extent of establishing special educational facilities for their conveniznce. In ad· dition, special government subsidies have been granted for building dormitories and othar living quarters to accommodate visiting students. According to statistics as of September, 1936, there were 4,126 foreign students in Japan. While their number suffered a slight decrease after the outbreak of the China Affair, the ensuing years have witnessed such a remarkable recovery th"t by September, 1940, the rlUmber of foreign students had exceeded the 10,000 mark. Because the Japanese people are by nature strongly against all forms of racial p''8judice, they find it pleasant to cooperate with foreigners in the common ideal of learning. Even government schools have various special facilities established expressly for the benefit of foreign s tudents. Some of the favorable facilities accorded them are as follows: Pi"st Higher School's Special Highe,. Cou,·se. The foreigner who completes this three-year course is entitled to enter a university on the same footing as the regular graduate of a higher school. p,.eparato'lI Department Attached to the Tokyo Technical Un'ive,·sity. Completion of this three-year course entitles the person to take up the University's regular course. Special Preparato'l! Cou"ses at the Tokyo and Hi"osima Higher NO"mal Schools. This one·year course qualifies the person to enter either school as a reg.ular first-year student. Special p,.epa,·ato'lI Course at the NW'a Girls' Highe,' Normal School. This one-year cou rse fits the applicant to take up the School's regular coursz as a first-yem' student. Similar special preparatory courses are established at other government schools, such as the Nagasaki Higher Commercial School, the Yamaguti Higher Commercial School, the Meizi Technical School, etc. The same privileges are also accorded by almost all private universities, colleges and techn'cal schools.

[73]


COST OF EDUCATION The foregoing paragraphs make it evident that education is a big national undertaking, and as such the government takes a hand in subsidizing a part of the cost of education. In 1935 the Education Ministry spent the staggeri ng sum of Y551,381,OOO to maintain the high standard of education in Japan, as classified helow: Educational No. of Cost per

E xpense

Students

(in Yen)

National Schools ...... . ... ... .. . . . . Middle Schools ..... ... ..... .... . .. . Girls' High Schools ... ...... ... .... . H igher Schools ..... ... ... .... . .. . . Universities (including Higher Normal School s) .. .. .. . . Technical Schools .... .. ....... ... .. . Young Men's Schools . ....... ...â&#x20AC;˘. . .. Normal Schools ............. . ..... . Various Special Schools . . . ... ... . .. . Other Miscellaneous Schools ........ .

capita (in Yen)

300,886,776 67,495,997 25,699,533 6,937,200

11,232,076 340,657 388,935 15,429

26.788 168.779 66.077 384.807

56,644,494 23,931,890 17,211,674 10,654,821 2,318,248 51,700,075

72,937 94,195 1,281,814 31,235 11,426 230,394

762.912 254.067 13.428 337.916 202.892 224.398

551,380,608

13,699,098

40.249'

â&#x20AC;˘ Average cost per capita As shown in the above table, the Japanese Govocrnment contributed in 1935 a maximum sum of Y762 pel' capita for educational purposes. With such a generous allowance a nd encouragement, it is no wonder that Japan ranks second to none in the Ii teracy of its people. Of noteworthy interest also is the fact that up to the year 1931, the amount of money Japan expended for education equalled the total army and navy budgets, which gives a fair idea of the important grip education has on this country.

[74]


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Lieutenant路General Sizuiti TanakcL, Commander.in'Chief of the bnpe,'ial Japanese Forces in the Philippines, 011 aninspectio71 trip to Baguio, 11Ilountain Province. This pict",'e was take" in !?'ont of the Branch Offioe of the J\ililitwry Ad,ninistmtioll.

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Profile for Filipiniana Online

Official Journal of the Japanese Military Administration Vol. No. 7  

Official Journal of the Japanese Military Administration Vol. No. 7