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OF THE JAPANESE MILITARY ADMINISTRATION '.),

V(j)!ume No.9

Edited by THE JAPANESE MILITARY ADMINISTRATION

Pdo,tJ "0' Pu~li,h,,1 by

MANILA SlNBUN-SYA


THE OFFICIAL JOURNAL OF THE

JAPANESE MILITARY ADMINISTRATION

Volume No.9

Edited by

THE J APANESE MILITARY ADMINISTR ATION

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wutenant-General Sizuiti Tanaka and Chairman J orge B. Vargas of the E xecutive Commission toast to a happy future of the Philippin"s at the official residence

of Japan', promise of Philitppine in.depe"dence_

a! the former w here a g,-oup of Filipino officials pay a call to express appreciation

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The Direct01路路Geneml of l li e Japanese MiNtl1ll'll Adminisb'ation is shown h ..'e reading before a group of Filipino leaders at I"e Manila Hotel his Idstorical state路 ment on Japan's policy to grant Philippine independence. January 28, 191.9.

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Chairman J()'I'ge B. Vargas. of the E xecutive Com'mission, leading the crowd in shouting tlwee chee,'s of "BANZA!" which closes the ce,'enwny on the occasion of the First Anniversa?'y of the Establishment of the PhiliPl);?le E xecutive Com1l\'i$$iQl1 n,( th New Lllneta, Manila, January 23 , 1943,

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Chai1"rnan Jorue B. Va"uas 01 the E xeotttive Commission urues t." e Fi[;pino people to exert all thei,. eflo,路ts. under t"e benevolent uuidance 01 t.he Ja panese Milita'11 Ad路 ,ninistration, in the buildinu 01 a Philippines for Filipinos wit/,in an O,-i."t 101' Orient<J.ls 0" the occasio" 01 the Fi"st Anniv.r8a111 01 the Establish""."t 01 the PhiHp' 1,ine ExeCl.l tive Commission held at the New L"neta, Manila, .January 29. 19~.1.

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C/tairman J orge B . Varga~ ~f the E xecuti1le Commission t8 shown in this photograph ,.rging Filipino prisoners of war scheduled /0" "elease, on the occasion of their gra duation front the O'Donnell Concent.-ation Camp in Ta"/ac, to / 01-ge ahead wit" in domitable Bpirit in the ,路.construction of thei,' conn try.

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TABLE OF CONTENTS Page ADDRESSES By the Commander-in-Chief of the Imperial Japanese Forces in the Philippines at the New Luneta on January 23, 1943, on the occasion of the fit-st anniversary of the Philippine Executive Commission ............. . .. . ...................... . .... . .... . ..

v

By Ohairman Jorge B_ Vargas of the Philippine Executive Commission on the same occasion .... . ........................ . ...

viii

By the Director-General of the Japanese Military Administration during tbe second entrance ceremony of the Government Employees Training Institute, January 18, 1943 ____________________

xi

By the Director-General of the Japanese Military Administration before tbe 8th session of tlte Central Constabulary Academy, January 26, 1943 ____________ ...... _. _ ...... . .. _... _.... _. .

xii

By Chait'man Jorge . Vargas of the Pbilippine Executive Commission on the occasion of the first anniversal'y of the Greater East Asia War, at tbe New Luneta, December 8, 1942 ........

xiv

By Director-General Benigno S. Aquino of the KALIBAPI on the same occasion ... . ........... . ....... . ...... . ... . ........ .. .

xviii

OONCERNING THE INDEPENDENCE OF THE PHILIPPINES 1. Resume of Premier llideki Tozyo's address at tbe 81st session of the Imperial Diet on tbe subject of Philippine independence

xxi

2. Communique on Philippine independence, issued by the Director General of the Japanese Military Administration . . _.. .. __ . . _

xxii

3. Reply of the Commander-in-Chlef of the Imperial Japanese Forces in the Philippines to tbe message of gratitude delivered by Chairman Jorge B_ Vargas on the reiteration of the promise of independnece _.... _.. __ . __ .. __ . __ ...... _. . _. . . . . ..

xxvi

4_ Declaration by Chairman Jorge B. Vargas regarding the independence of tbe Philippines ........ _.. _... _. __ .. _. . . . . . . .. xxvii 6. Declaration of KALIBAPI Director-General Benigno S. Aquino regarding Philippine independence . ......... _.. . ........ _.. xxviii


Page SECTION 1. JAPANESE MILITARY POLICE Declaration of the Chief of the Japanese Military Police regarding the method of police system for the maintenance of peace and order ................................................. . SECTION 2.

DEPARTMENT OF GENERAL AFFAIRS

APPROVAL No. 20 Approval of proclamation calling upon all Filipino prisoners of war who were provisionally released because of sickness or other causes, to register ,vith the propel' authorities so as to enjoy the status of regularly released pdsoners of war . . ..

4

SEIREI No.1 HITOO GUNSEIREI (Military Administration Order of the Philippines)

4

KANREI No. 1 Concerning }'estrictions applicable

SECTION 3.

to enemy nationals ........

6

Notification Concerning restI'ictions on movements and employment of enemy national s ............... . .. :..........

6

Warning, Concerning restrictions on movements of enemy na' tionals ..... .. .... . ...... . ........ . .............

7

COMMU~ICATION

SEIREI No.2 Concerning reconditioning of radio r eceivers

8

DENSEI-KYOKU REI No.1 Concerning execution of th e reconditioning of radio }路eceivers..

8

DENSEI;KYOKU NOTIFICATION No.1 Concerning execution of the reconditioning of radio receivers in the City of Manila .................... . .... . ............

9

DENSEI路KYOKU NOTIFICATION No.4 Concerning extension of period of application for reconditioning }'adio receivers in the City of Manila ........... .... ..

11

RIKUUN KANRIKYOKU NOTIFICATION No.1.......... . ..

11

SECTION 4. EXECUTIVE ORDERS BY THE CHAIRMAN OF THE PHILIPPINE EXECUTIVE COMMISSION From Executive Order No. 117 to Executive Order No. 130 13-52 ii


LIST OF ILLUSTRATIONS 1. The Commander-in-Chief of the Imperial Japanese Forces in the Philippines and the Commander-in-Chief of the Imperial Japanese Navy in Philippine Waters ackIlowledge the felicitations of Manila residents on the occasion of the second New Year's Day celebration held by the Imperial Japanese Forces.

2. The Director General of the Japanese Military Administration makes an offel~ng to the spirits of war dead, on the First Anniversary of the Occupation of Manila, January 2, 1943. 3. His Excellency, Lieutenant General Sizuiti Tanaka, Commander-in-Chief of the Imperial Japanese Forces in the Philippines, leads the three cheers for the rapid establishment of a rejuvenated Philippines at the ceremony commemorating the First Anniversary of the E stablis hment of the Executive Commission. 4. A picture of the exhibition of handicraft made by Japanese and Filipino school children. Th exhibi t ion is part of the festivities which marked the acclamation by tH Filipino people of Premier Hideki Tozyo's reiteration of Philippine ind pendence. 5. The Commander-i n-Chief of the Impel'ial Japanese Forces in the Philippines welcoming Japanese men of learning at the reception he gave at his official l'esidence in theil' honor. In his speech, he urged them to collaborate closely and actively in the endeavor towal'ds the advancement of culture. 6. The representative of the Japanese and Filipino scholars, on the occasion of the reception given in their honor by the Commander-in-Chief, is shown here making a reply to Lieutenant General Sizuiti Tanaka's words of welcome_ 7. The Commander-in-Chief of the Imperial Japanese Forces in the Philippines, on an inspection tour, visits a newly-establi shed cotton plantation in Batangas. 8_ Lieutenant General Sizuiti Tanaka, Commander-in-Chief of the Imperial Japanese Forces in the Philippines, handles \vith n smile a cotton plant ready for picking. 9. Industrious Filipino farmers at work in the fields. 10. An address by the Chief of Staff of the Imperial Japanese Forces in the Philippines is read at the graduation exercises of trainees held in the O'Donnell ConcentJ'ation Camp in Tarlac. iii


11. Lieutenant General Sizuiti Tanaka and Chairman Jorge B. Vargas of the Executive Commission toast to a happy future of the Philippines at the official residence of the former where a group of Filipino officials pay a call to expl'ess appreciation of Japan's promise of Philippine independence. 12. The Director General of the Japanese Military Administration is shown here reading before a group of Filipino leaders at the Manila Hotel his historical statement on Japan's policy to grant Philippine independence. January 28, 1943.

13. Chairman Jorge B. Vargas of the Executive Commission, as the represen路 tative of the Filipino people, raises hi s glass in a toast of profound gratitude immediately after the Director General of the Japanese Military Administration has read the official communique regarding Philippine independence. 14. Chairman J. B. Vargas of the E xecutive Commission delivering a statement on J a pan's policy regarding Philippine independence before the members of the Philippine Council of State. January 29, 1943. 15. Filipino Government officials and employees, gathered at the New Luneta, Manila, celeb ate the first anniversary of the organization of the Execu路 tive Commission, January 23, 1943. 16. Chairman Jorge lB. Vargas of the Executive Commission leading the crowd in shouting three cl)eers of "BANZAI" which closed the ceremony on the occasion of the First Anniversary of the E stablishment of the Philippine Executive Commission at the New Luneta, Manila, January 23, 1943. 17. Chairman Jorge B. Vargas of the Executive Commission urges the Filipino people to exert all their efforts, under the benevolent guidance of the Japanese Military Administration, in the building of a Philippines for Filipinos within an Orient for Orientals on the occasion of the First Anniversary of the Establishment of the Philippine Executive Commission held at the New Luneta, Manila, J anuary 23, 1943.

18. Chairman Jorge B. Vargas of the Executive Commission is shown in this photograph urging Filipino pri soners of war scheduled for release, on the occasion of their graduation from the O'Donnell Concentl'ation Camp in Tarlac, to forge ahead with indomitable spirit in the reconstruction of their country,

iv


SPEECH DELIVERED BY THE COMMANDER-INCHIEF OF THE IMPERIAL JAPANESE FORCES IN THE PHILIPPINES AT THE NEW LUNETA ON JANUARY 23. 1943. ON THE OCCASION OF THE FIRST ANNIVERSARY OF THE PHILIPPINES EXECUTIVE COMMlSSION. Today we are happily commemorating the i4'st anniversary of the creation of the Philippine Executive Commission. In observing this historic day. 1 consider it fitting and proper that full credit and praise be given to all of you who have so wholeheartedly cooperated with the Imperial Japanese Forces during the past twelve months. working steadfastly toward the political. economic and social readjustment of this country after surmounting the numerous difficulties that presented themselves in the wake of the recent hostilities. As the result of your superhuman efforts and close team-work. we can assert with conlidence that during the one year's existence of the Philippine E.xecutive Commission. we have seen an unprecedented record of achievements made in the establishment of domestic peace and tranquility. in the rehabilitation of the economic structure of the country. as well as in giving full assurance of a life of security to the mass of the people. In other words. you of the Executive Commission have accomplished. in this comparatively short time. much to enhance the common weal of the people and have contributed greatly to increasing the total well-being of the country. At the same time. we wish to express our appreciation of the unreserved all-out cooperation you have given us. encompassing every phase of activities. in order that this holy war. which is being waged by Japan for the liberation of all oppressed Oriental peoples and with the establishment of the Co-Prosperity Sphere as its ultimate objective. could be successfully prosecuted. Pausing for a moment and looking back to the events which transpired a year ago. we recall with great pleasure how Chairman Vargas and other recognized leaders of the peace-loving Filipino people stood up resolutely at the first clarion call of the awakening of East Asia. and courageously stepped forward to collaborate who leheartedly with the Imperial Japanese Forces. Upon receiving orders. you immediately set forth to the coordination of the central administrative organs. thus giving new shape and life to the demoralized poli-

v


ti cal s tTUclure of a coun[-ry so recently visited by the ravages of war. and it must be stressed. over and over again. that this took place even while the fires of hostilities were s till burning on [-he opposite shores of lan ila Bay as well as elsewhere in the Philippines. You worked hard a nd fa st in those initial days. with astounding fervor an d undying faith. and rendered your utmost for the speedy rehabilitation of the administrative st~ucture. You h av~ continued that effort up to this v~ry day. w,thout rest and wIthout let-up. a nd we take great pnde and joy in pointing out to the world in ' general. that the admirustra tive organization of th e Philippines has been brought to satisfactory completion and tha t d ay by day the enlightened policies of the Japanese Military Adminis tra tion are being tra nslated into actua l practice and applied with an e ffi cient and unders tandin g hand by high-mi nded Filipino officials whose sole interest at h eart is the benefit of the mass of the people. Durin g this tra n sition period. there were. t路o be sure. certain elements among the populace who. continuing to believe in the false sensational American propaganda against the Japanese and acting under th e po isonous spell of th eir A merican masters. com pl ete ly forgot th at their first allegiance was due to their na ti ve country and not to thei r defeated dominators. All the ir nefarious designs a nd traitorous acts of creating路 discord and intern a l di sruption among their own countrymen were. however . of liltle avail due. in a large measure. to the vigilance and prudent action of the Philippine Executive Commission. Th e Commission h as a lwavs placed as its foremost objective and its hi ghest goa l the gUidance of the mass of people towards peace. pro perity and progress. It has consisten tly acted in strict accordance with this fund amental policy. a nd has. to date. accomplished much that accrues to the benefit of the people. The painstaldng efforts and the h ard worl, con tributed by a ll members of the a dmini stra tive organization. regardless of rank, position or sta tion . are matters for which every individual in the Philippines shollld feel a deep obligation of indebtedness. a nd I wish to take this opportunity to highly commend each and every member in the Philippine government for his meritorious service and enviable record of accomplishment. Th a t the rel ation ship between Japan and the Philippines should always have been one of close am ity and of mutual trust and friend hip. is self-evident and in full consonance with the logical dictates of nature. Unfortunately for the two peoples. however. this natural relations hip was con sis tently and

vi


wilfully interrupted and only until yesterday it was impossible for the two peoples to come into happy and fruitful association with each other. This unfortunate and regrettable state of affairs was entirely due to the perverted policy of AngloAmerican powers who saw in such association an end to their own selfish policy of shameful racial discrimination and selfperPetuating political and economic domination. It took the cold realities of the VI/ar of Greater East Asia and the quick succession of Japan's overwhelming victories to frustrate once and for all this age-old Anglo-American plot. Today all Asia is on the threshold of a new dawn in history and in the Philippines we are facing the happJ day when the establishment of the central and pro"incial administralive organization composed entirely of Filipinos is already an accomplished fact. During this period, we have also witnessed the voluntary dissolution f all existing polilical parties and rallyin!! of all true and loy I Filipinos to the Kapisanan sa Paglilingkod sa Bagong Pilipi"as (KALTBAPI). ""VitI, the initial'ion of this popular movemefll. the social strocture of Ihe New Philippines can now be said to have been establis led on firm foundations and that the peopJe are now in a position to march in complete concord and !;.aTmOIlY towards their common objective of rehabilitating their heloved country. The fact Ihat we are commemorating the first anniver ary of the inaugural'ion of the Philippine Executive Commission under these auspicious political and social circumstances. is of !!reat significance and augurs well for Ihe continued success of our concerted efforts toward making the Philippines a worthy member of the CoProsperity Sphere. It is fervently hoped that you will continue to be ever alerl to Ihe unmistakable "'end of the times and. imbued with deep understandin!! of the sincere intenUons of the Japanese EmpiTe towards the Filipino people expressed and manifested on numerous occasions in the past,. conlinue to render the same wholehearted services and high measure of devotion to duty that you have so abundantly manifested in the past. Your responsibility hereafter will be to translate into everyday practice an the ideals and policies outlined to you heretofore. thus fulfilling your noble mission of serving your country and ap路 proaching one step closer to the realization of your u ltimate ambition. January 2;. t8th year of Showa.

vii


ADDRESS DELIVERED BY CHAIRMAN JORGE B. VARGAS OF THE PHILIPPINE EXECUTIVE COMMISSION ON THE OCCASION OF THE OBSERVANCE OF THE FIRST ANNIVERSARY OF THE ESTABLISHMENT OF THE PHILIPPINE EXECUTIVE COMMISSION AT THE NEW LUNETA, MANILA, JANUARY 23. 1943. One year ago the Filipino people. through their chosen leaders. inaugurated a new regime of unity and cooperation with the Japanese Empire in the establishment of a New Order in Greater East Asia. dedicated to the liberation of the Oriental peoples and to the attainment of their common happiness and prosperity. Today we can see the first fruits of that regime of cooperaHo'n in the vigorous rebirth of our naHve civilizaHon and in the enduring foundations that have been laid for our political maturity. our economic security. and our social welfare. The insp~ring progress we have made constitutes the best justificaHon of the choice we made last year. It should also inname us with the resolve to redouble our efforts to complete the vital and noble task before us and to achieve the final establishment of a new Philippines which . in natural and producHve harmony with the other nations of East Asia under the leadership of Japan. will secure for ourselves and our posterity the blessings of peace and plenty. We shall need all our spirit of abnegation. all our energy. all our patrioHsm. to surmount the difficulHes in our way and to reach our goal. A promising start has been made but it is only a start. The wreckage of war and of past mistakes is being cleared away. but this is only the preparation for the positive construction that, must follow. We must now build. faithfully and well . with confidence and determination. the fitting habitaHon of our native soul. If I were asked to characterize the first year of the present administration. I 'would say that it has been one of transiHon. a year of spiritual preparation. Beyond the purely material tasks of reconstrucHon. beyond the reopening of roads and the rebuilding of bridges. beyond the restoration of law and order. the main purpose and chief achievement of the new regime has been the spiritual regeneration of the Filipinos.

viii


We have ever been gUided by the realization that lasting peace cannot be restored so long as the minds of the people continue to be distracted and deluded by pernicious Western influences. and that enduring happiness cannot be achieved so long as the spiritual energies of the people are stifled by a fatal blind dependence on the West and by an obsession of fancied rights with meaningless disputes. Thus. in pursuing our immediate political and economic objectives during the past year we sought to lay down firm Foundations for the future by implanting a deep consciousness of social duty. As members of the great family of the Filipino people. we have a duty to unite for the common good. sacriIking all personal considerations. discarding all causes for jealousy and division. abandoning all doubt and hesitation. and pledging all our eHorts to the full development of our native culture and institutions. As members of the vast community of Oriental natio\ls. we have also a duty to support Japan \vith all our will and all our resources in the great war for the liberation of Gre\ter East Asia from Western imperialism and for the establishment of a New O~der ot freedom. equality. and prosperity for all Orientals. secure forever from Occidental depredations. When the chosen leaders of the Filipinos were invited one year ago by the Commander-in-Chief of the Japanese Expeditionary Forces to establish an organization for Filipino participation in the new regime. we responded to the magnanimous invitation. with full trust in the unselfish and lofty motives of Japan and the Japanese Military Administration. with heartfelt gratitude for the opportunity to assist in the accomplishment of a noble mission. and \vith unflinching determination to serve the Filipino people. I trust that the events of the past year have justified our decision and ' that in the end history \vill vindicate it completely and triumphantly. Today. on this solemn occasion. it is pleasing to recall that we have left behind us an era of partisan struggle and disunion. Without regret and hesitation we have dissolved all Philippine political parties which only aroused selfish ambitions and created personal animosities because of the individualistic desire for political power and prestige. We have laid party affiliat'ions aside. because in our present task of building the ew Philippines we cannot and must not be divided by political brickerings that \vill on ly divide and lead us to fai lure

ix


and ruin. Political parties have fallen with the fall of the Commonwea lth regime. and we must now think. speak and act. not as many but as one for the common good of the Filipino people. Recently we have organized the "Kapisanan sa Paglilingkod sa Hagong Pilipinas." an association founded on the principle that the happines of the Filipinos must rest on the peace. contentment and prosperity of the entire Philippinse. The estab lishment of the KALIBAPI. w hich has the full endorsement of the Japanese Military Administration. is the next logical step to take a fter the eradication of political parties. The Filipinos desire to perform their part in our present constructive endeavors; therefore. they organized the KALIBAPI. which aims at the mental education. moral regeneration. physical in路 vigorations. a nd economic prosperity of the Philippines under the beneficent gU idance of the Japanese Empire. the natura l leader of a ll Oriental peoples. But we have only begu.n the enormous and vitally important task b fore us . Spiritually renovated. conscious of our unavoidable obligations as Filipinos and as Orientals. we must now throw ourselves with earnes and inflexib le will into the actual constru tion of a new PhilIppines within the New O rder. The First ear of transition and of preparation has come to a glorious e'[1d. The years of achievement lie ahead. Let us h ere resolve to do our part. each and every ma n a t his post, each a nd every man with faith in the sacredness a nd ,vitI, undying h ope for th e ' triumph of our cause. to bui ld a Philippines for the Filipinos within an Orient for the Orientals. that will live and grow and prosper until the end of time.

x


ADDRESS DELIVERED BY THE DIRECTOR-GENERAL OF THE JAPANESE MILITARY ADMINISTRATION AT THE SECOND ENTRANCE CEREMONY OF THE GOVERNMENT EMPLOYEES TRAINING INSTITUTE On this momentous occasion of the second entrance ceremony of the Government Employees Training Institute of the Philippines. I take pleasure in addressing a few words to you. It is my firm belief that underlying the founding of this Institute is the earnest desire to foster and train promising young men from among government officials. to enable them to throw themselves wholeheartedly into the tremendous task of creating a new Philippines and. furthermore . to estab lish a new standard of morale and conduct among employees of the government. Already a full year has passed since the outbreak of the present war and today the last vestiges of United States. British and Dutch hegemony have been s vept from the vast limits of Greater East fiI ia. It is only natiIral. therefore. that you who are being callep upon at this momentous hour to shoulder the heavy responsibility of establishing a new Philippines shou ld feel a further obligation towards a complete spiritual renovation of yourselves. Fortunately we have here. already established. this Institute which has as its chief objective just this mental rejuvenation. As you are aware. the first group of trainees has already graduated. all finishing the course with high honours. Now the Institute is about to welcome you who have been selected from among your colleagues. I have faith in your aspirations and your firm resolve to serve to the best of your abilities under the conditions imposed by the current world situation. However. I wou ld ask of you to carry firmly imprinted in your hearts the true significance of the establishment of this Institute and . like your predecessors. to endeavor wholeheartedly and unfailingly. with sincerity and devotion. in your studies and in the fulfillment of your duties. January 18. 1943. 18th year of Showa.

xi


ADDRESS OF THE DIRECTOR-GENERAL OF THE JAPANESE MILITARY ADMINISTRATION BEFORE THE EIGHTH SESSION OF THE CENTRAL CONSTABULARY ACADEMy In inaugurating the 8th session of the training course for non-commissioned officers of the Central Constabulary Academy, it gives me great pleasure to greet the incoming students and address the future peace officers on the importance and distinction of their chosen mission. All of you have been admitted into this academy after passing the most rigid competitive examinations. This fact in itself should properly be a matter of great rejoicing and honor, not only from your individual standpoint, but also for the sake of your country, now heroically embarked on an important voyage into the sea of future destiny. In this bold and adventurous undertaking she will need all the best hands available on deck and in having obtained you for the all-important position of officers of public peace and security, I am more than sure your Mot erland feels inordinately proud of you, while at the same tim , more confident of the outcome of the voyage. The establishment of the Central Constabulary Academy was occasioned by the necessity of fundamentally reorganizing the then existing police system which was so full of inherent as well as traditional weakness and shortcomings. This could be accomplished only by completely overhauling the old system and installing, in its stead, an entirely new system fully consonant with the establisl1ment of the New Philippines as an organic and important member of the Co-Prosperity Sphere. The establishment of the New Philippines could be made possible only by her return to her true Oriental self, and this in turn could be achieved only if this country were blessed with complete domestic peace and order. The rejuvenated Philippine Constabulary Service has been created to undertake this cardinal responsibility and the Central Constabulary Academy was founded to turn out the proper manpower to efficiently and conscientiously administer the newly instituted peace preservation mechanism. The Philippines today is entering upon her second year of rehabilitation under the gUidance of the Japanese Military Administration. The various administrative agencies and organ-

xii


izations have been completely reorganized and new life and purpose have been instilled into all of them; the feeling of public peace and security is general and deep-rooted and greal progress and advancement have been witnessed in the field of economic rehabilitation of the individual as well as of the country as a whole. To be sure. there are a few remnants of misgUided elements in the outlying provinces. It will be the primary duty of the Constabulary Force to eliminate these bands of ruthless brigands and renegades who prey upon their own countrymen and work depredations on the property and lives of innocent country folk. No one can deny the outstanding fact that the speedy rehabilitation of this country as well as the rapid attainment of the New Philippines to a position of honor and prosperity cannot be accomplished without her first obtaining complete peace and tranquility at home. From this. you will readily realize for yourselves how important and serious is the responsibility placed upon each 01 you. who. in due time. ,viII be taking your positions at the fronl lines of duty. At the same time. you will also realize for your路 selves how great is the debt of gratitude your Motherland will eternally owe you for the service you will be rendering in the interest of domestic peace and tranquility so essential to her rehabilitation and progress. In view of the importance of your mission and the gravity of your responsibility. I sincerely trust that you will constantly bear in mind the heavy responsibility that goes with your status as future peace officers of the New Philippines. As to your conduct in the Academy. I am sure you do not need further coaching. But I cannot refrain from offering you a few simple bits of advice. Always obey the order of your superiors and instructors Willingly and faithfully; study hard and devote yourselves consistently and wholeheartedly to your ambition of becoming brave. loyal. and efficient members of the Force. Through this means. and only this. can you hope to become some day the respected mainstay of our great Constabulary Service which is now so brilliantly and successfully bringing about the much needed peace and order throughout the length and breath of the New Philippines. May Heaven protect you and guide you in your work . January 26. 18th year of Showa.

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ADDRESS DELNERED BY CHAIRMAN JORGE B. VARGAS OF THE PHILTPPINE EXECUTNE COMMISSION ON THE OCCASION OF THE FIRST ANNNERSARY OF THE GREATER EAST ASIA WAR, AT THE NEW LUNETA. DECEMBER 8, 1942. Your presence here this morning after marching in th is parade fills me with great joy. for the spontaneous and enthusiastic participation of hundred s of thousands of Filipinos in these fes tivities commemorating the first anniversary of the declaration of the Greater E ast Asia War is a most eloquent proof of the fact tha t the Filipino people are now fully cognizant of the true intentions of the Japanese Empire and of the meaning of thi s sacred war to the lastin g security and happiness of the Ph" lippines and other Orienta l countries. Together with the invincible Japanese Empire. the n a tural lead er of the Orient together with all the p eoples of East A sia. to whom we are bound by indissoluble ties of blood and race; in the n a me o~ our national past. which was dedicated to the dream of fre edo from Western intruders; in the name of OUI na tional future. which will witness the fulfillment of that dream. the Filipino people celebrate today the first a nniversary of the just and triumpha nt War of Greater East A sia. The historic d a te of D ecemb er 8. 194 t. which we commemorate today. ma rked the b eginnin g of the final stage of a great and noble crusade undertaken by th e mi ghty Japanese Empire. to liberate the p eoples o f th e Orient from Western imperialism. and to awaken them to their common des tiny. It was inspired by the high ideal of a union of a ll Oriental peoples in a sphere of mutua l h elp and common prosperity, built on the firm and ending basis of their mutual d ependen ce and natural affinities. We, therefore . a s Orienta ls a nd as Filipinos. cannot but cooperate with J ap a n \vi thout any mental reserva tion in the achievement of h er historic mi ss ion a nd rejoice in her victories durinl1 the pas t year, for Japan 's mission is the liberation of the Philippines from American domination 'and Japan's victories are the guarantee and sa fegua rd of the security of the Philippines. Side by side with the Manchurians, the Chinese. the Burmese, the Indonesian s. and the Malays. we acclaim the Rising Sun of Japan which lights the d awn of Asia. Hand in hand. shoulder to shoulder. with a ll our Oriental brothers,

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from the northernmost plains of Manchukuo to the Farthest islands of the southern seas. we are ready to build a new A sia for the Asians and a new Philippines for the Filipinos. under the leadership of Japan. guardian and protector of the Orient. The past year has witnessed the successful commencement of our common task . On December 8. 1941 . after America's rejection of all Japan 's sincere offers of co ncilia tion and peace. Japan rose in arms against the intolerabl e Anglo-Saxon interference in the Orient. There was no other recourse. All the avenues for peace had been closed by impossible American insistence on conditions which nullifi ed all the previous sacrifices of the Japanese people. Amicable negotiations had been doomed by an economic blockade and the ABCD military encirclement that threatened. not only the peace and stability of East Asia. but even the very life of Japan. Faced with an overbearing challenge and wi~h insufferable demands . J apa n was forced to give the only possible a nswer. At dawn . one year ago. the Imperial Japanese Navy amazed th e world by a gallant and daring attack on H awa ii. the very keystone of American naval might in the Pacific. Having struc a death-blow at th,e United States P aci fic fleet . in spite of t e warnings secretly issued by the American government to its army and navy commands. the Imperial Japanese Forces laun ched an astonishing and brilliant campaign all over East Asia. The achievements of I路he Imperial arms proved how gross were the Ameri can mi sca lculalions a nd underestimations of Japanese power. The United Sta tes had fondly believed that Japan was ruined and exhausted by the kng war in China and by the American economic blockade. and could therefore be bluffed and dominated with impunity. Such overconfidence proved fatal. The Japanese Empire. put to the test. displayed tremendous reserves of military. economic. and spiritual power that were decisive in Ihe li ghtning campaigns that opened the war. One after another. the vaunted strongholds of Western imperialism in the Orient fell before the J apanese avalanche. Hongkong. the symbol of British exploitation of China. fell in less than three weeks . ]VJan ila. the nerve-center of American imperialism in the Orient. was surrendered without a struggle in the first days of 1942. The Dutch were forced to part with the fabulous riches of the Indies. which they had hoarded a nd amassed during centuries of oppression . Malaya was next. Striking with unbelievable speed and bravery through dense

xv


jungles and malarial swamps. the Imperial Japanese Forces did the impossible again and again. They passed the impassable de fen ses in Malaya: they sank the unsinkable battleships of the British fl eet: they captured the impregnable fortress of Singapore. Finally. the Imperial forces routed the armies of Britain in Burma and closed. once and for all. the last avenue of Anglo-American aid to Chungking. Simultaneously. the Imperial Japanese Navy was winning equally impressive and decisive victories at sea. The combined American. British and Dutch fl eets were crushed in the battles of Makassar straits and the J ava sea. The United States Navy was repeatedly humbled in the Coral sea. around the So lomon islands . and in bhe South PaciFic. The proud American boast that the United States Navy could annihilate the Japanese Navy in tluee weeks was never fulfilled. Instead. it was reversed. Thus. in the brief space of a few months. J apan gained comp lete cOYl;lmand of land. air, and sea, in the whole of Greater East Asia. N'Qw, a wall of steel has been built from the Aleutians to the Solomons. against w hich the Anglo-Ameri~an counter-offensiv has dashed itself In futile and costly attacks. Behind this impregnab le wall. J apan has devoted hersell to the noble mission of emancipating the Oriental peoples an d of uniting them in free and equa l brotherhood. Belying the malicious a nd groundless propaganda of the Western powers. Japan has solemnly proclaimed her unselfi sh purpo e of achieving peace and prosperity for all the Asiatic nations. without thought of domination or exp loitation. and with full respect For the native culture and integri ty of each peonle. In spired by the Japanese appeal. the Manchurians. the Chinese. the Thai. the Burmese. the Indonesians. and the Malays. are now dedicated to the vital work of reconstructing Greater East Asia as an independent and unconquerable union of Oriental races. V'Ve in the Philippines will not. we cannot. close our eyes to the glorious dawn of Asia. We will not. we cannot. close our ears to the call of our Oriental blood. If we Fought on the side of the Americans and resisted the Imperial Japanese Forces. we did so only because. at the start of the war. we were subjects of the Unitf>d States. The Filipino people did not want this war. The Fi!;pino people were never consulted on this war. and they never consented to it. Taking advantage of its sovereignty. the United States inducted the Philippine Army into its own Forces and sent the flower of our youth


into useless battle. Misled and deceived by propaganda and under the compulsion of military discipline. the Filipino soldiers put up a gallant and heroic fi ght in Bataan and Corregidor. America demanded this bloody and futile sacrifice. in spite of her knowledge that further resistance was hopeless and doomed. This was the tragedy of the Filipino people. It is our great good fortune that the Imperial J apanese Forces have shown a deep sympathy and a complete understanding of our erroneous conduct. Instead of dealing with us according to the strict principles of war. as conquered enemies. the Japanese have displayed an unparalle led magnanimity by treating us like brothers. The Commander-in-Chief of the expeditionary forces to the PhJippines gave strict orders to spare the Filipino people as much as possible from the ravages of war. After the fall of Bataan and Corregidor. the Filipino prisoners-of-war were liberated and rehabilitated . in a gesture that has no equal in the history of the world. From the very beginning. the administrative machinery was a llowed to remain in the hands of the Filipinos under the guidance of the Military Administration and our native cultuTe was not only respected but actually encouraged and strengthened as never before. From the very beginning of our subjection to Western imperialism. our heroes have fou ght and died for the liheration of our nation from the rule of the Occidental powers. The War of Greater East Asia has now accomplished what we have always sought wuhout success. in spite of repeated sacrifices. The Imperial Japanese Forces have broken the AngloSaxon chains of A sia. and we can now arise. free and emancipated. to share in the enjoyment of the Oriental inheritance. That is why. on this great and significant day. we are gathered here to proclaim our allegiance to the noble idea ls of the Japanese Empire and to pledge all our efforts to the liberation of the Oriental peoples. We rejoice in the magnificent victories of Japanese arms during the past year. We look forward with hope and confidence to the day when the full light of freedom shall shine over a liberated and united Asia . . We pledge our heart and hand. in the name of our sacred desire for freedom. in the name of our heroic past and our glorious future. in the name of our Oriental blood and culture. to the unyielding prosecution of the War of Greater East Asia. which can and will end only with the triumph of J apan and the liberation of the Orient.

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SPEECH DELIVERED BY DIRECTOR-GENERAL BENIGNO S. AQUINO OF THE "KALIBAPI" DURING THE FIRST ANNIVERSARY OF THE GREATER EAST ASIA WAR, AT THE NEW LUNETA.

DECEMBER 8,

1942.

At this moment I feel overwhelmed by a deep feeling of gratitude for the confidence once more reposed in me by honored and recognized heads of the present Administration. With all candor I must say, however, that I am first to recognize my limited abilities. inadequate as they undoubtedly are for the great task which ~s entrusted to me and the heavy responsibility that it involves. Nevertheless. I accept the trust without trepidation because I take it that. more than mere success. what is expected of me is firmness and resolve to comply with the duty which corresponds to me in our common task of laying down and consolidating the bases which will distinguish and characterize the New Philippines so that she may be able to become a worthy ember of the Greater East Asia Co-Prosp ity Sphere. The presen problem of the Philippines is no longer that of race or nationality, but is one of greater significance and wider scope. It embraces and includes all the heterogenous elements that comprise our hemisphere. Diverse races and different nations live in Greater East Asia. All of them, fortunately, fall under the same denominator: Orientals. Their common problem is therefore to crystallize, to consolidate, as it were, the hemispheric sentiment, to unite all un<;\er one aspiration-that aspiration which finds a fitting expression in the watchword: all for one, one for all. It is taken for granted, naturally, that such crystallization or consolidation of hemispheric sentiment is based primarily and fundamentally on the love of every one's country, on the recognition and retention of each people's personality, on mutual respect for the native traditions, customs and idiosyncracies of each component or constituent race, and on the application of a single rule of conduct which includes every distinction or discrimination. Only in that way, I am sure, can the Oriental races and nations feel proud of becoming enthusiastic members of the Co-Prosperity Sphere, for the preservation of which they would gladly make supreme sacrifices,

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Modern trends made clear by the present world war compel us to revise the old nationalist concepts. They were predicated on the exclusivist tendencies and were confined in their application within the frontiers of each nation. Nationalism meant exclusive love of one's country. It disregards the prosperity and even the existence of other nations. The natural result of such exclusivistic tendencies and trend of thoughts was a rabid conflict of interests. international discord. and strife. This state of aHairs precluded the existence of smaller and weaker nations to continue enjoying peace and security; and finally it led to their subjugation or domination by a more powerful nation or combination of nations. Realizing the weakness a nd disadvantages of this old school of political thoughts. there evolved a new and more enlightened concept of nationalism to supplant the old ideas. This new concept of nationalism is best described as the hemispheric entiment based on community of interest and the we lfare of the various countries with geographical. economic. ethnical and cultural affinity. This hemispheric sentiment when put to practice has the double advantage of assuring the stability of the national existence of the countries comprising the sphere an'd at the same time of inspiring a mutual respect and fear between the various spheres whose final result is the maintenance of universal peace. For years past. the United States of America has established the groundwork of its sphere of influence in North and South America. Chancellor Hitler of Germany began with the postulation of his Aryanism and now advocates the solidification of a European block. "Vhat then is the most logical attitude of Oriental peoples who were oppressed and exploited by Occidental countries. to say nothing of those others who. though not subjected to foreign domination. were nonetheless constantly threatened and hara sed by the cupidity and ambition of the Anglo-Saxon? The answer is plain: To form and establish their own sphere of co-prosperity. and obtain through the strength of their solidarity the security of their common and enduring existence. Such is the doctrine that we shall bring home to the minds of our masses so that they may understand that our aspiration For independence would be vain unless they unite solidly in thought and in action behind the idea of establishing a new Philippines. a Philippines which is genuinely ours because it

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is so, ethnically, racially, economically, socially, and orientally, and so that our people may fully realize the necessity of preparing her to become an active member of the Groater East Asia Co-Prosperity Sphere, since the stability of her existence will depend so lely on the real effective consolidation of such sphere, 1 say real and effective consolidation . because what is important to every Oriental is not the momentary victory of the magnanimous Japanese Empire, champion of the rights of the Orient, but the preservation of her triumph in the years to corne. What use would it be to us to have been freed from the yoke of the Occident if after a brief period we would again come under its domination 7 Consider the eloquent lesson of 1896. Hardly had we finished drafting the Malo los Constitution, thanks to t~e victory of our arms during that revolution against Spain, than America came here to trample on our charter Qf freedom and to chain us to ber sovereignty. For more thal\ four decades we have been demanding the fulfillment of America's promise to recognize our independence. After endless negotiations she finally fixed the date of July 4, 1946. When the present war of the Pacific broke out, as we were still nder her flag , the most tragic thing happened to us and to ou country. The Philippines was involved in the conflict and we the Filipinos, were obliged to fight, not to defend our country 's sovereignly and territorial integrity, but to shed our blood for the retention of the sovereignty of the United States over our land. Japan's successive and brilliant viclories in the present war are due principally to the righteousness to the cause she champions: the extirpation of every tyranny. exp loitation and subjection of all Oriental peoples. 1 appeal. therefore, to the good sense of our people and plead for their sincere and determined cooperation in the realization of the fundamental purpose of the Japanese Empire of estab lishing in Greater East Asia a sphere of co-existence and co-prosperity. December 8, 1942. 17th year of Showa.

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RESUME OF PREMIER TOZYO'S ADDRESS AT THE BtST SESSION OF THE IMPERIAL DIET, ON PHILIPPINE INDEPENDENCE Addressing this Diet last year. I made public the statement that if the Filipinos will hereafter understand the real intentions of Nippon and offer to cooperate with us as one of the partners in the establishment of the Greater East Asia Co-Prosperity Sphere. Nippon' wi ll gladly enable them to enjoy the honor of independence. I now take this occasion to reiterate last year's declaration.

It is to be observed with satisfaction that the Philippines today are re,\dering sincere cooperation to Japan under the new leadership of Chairman Vargas and that the restoration of peace and order in the Phifippines is steadily improving_facts which aug,ur well for the future of that country. I sincerely expect that the Filipinos wiII further strengthen their cooperation with Nippon and thus consummate at the earliest possible opportunity the independence of their land.

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COMMUNIQUE ON THE INDEPENDENCE OF THE PHILIPPINES ISSUED BY THE DIRECTOR GENERAL OF THE JAPANESE MILITARY ADMINISTRATION Premier General Hideki Tozyo, in his address to the Slsl session of the Imperial Diet, now convened, has made the fo llowing solemn and irrevocable statement concerning the future political status of Burma" the Philippines, and India. The context of the Premier's statement is as follows:

On Burma.t. In view of the magniFicent and tangible evidence of sincere and wholehearted cooperation rendered by the entire population of Burma acting in complete unison under th inspiring leadership of Dr. U Ba Maung, Burma will be ranted independence not later than the end of this year.

On the Phtlippines_ I. Subs antial progress is being made in the degree of cooperation rendered to the Japanese Empire by the people of the Philippines as well as in the restoration of internal peace and security. Under these circumstances and on condition that further tangible evidences of cooperation are actively demonstrated, it is contemplated to put into effect the statement made previously on the question of Philippine independence in the shortest possible time.

On India.I. Positive and wholehearted support will be granted to the Indian independence movement regardless of whether such movement is carried on inside or outside of India proper.

Thus, in accordance with the present official pronouncement of the Imperial Japanese Government. the independence of Burma is to be uncontestably an accomplished fact by the end of the present year. With this forma l recognition of her independence, Burma will be freed from her long years of oppression and enslavement under the British and with the powerFul support of the Japanese Empire. she will proudly

xxii


assume her rightful rol e as an independent and worthy member of the Co-Prosperity Sphere of Oriental peop les. This glorious fulfillment of Burma's national ambition is indeed a matter of rejoicing for all the peoples of Asia. That the independence of Burma h as b ecome a realized fact at such an early date is attributable to the following reasons. In the first place, it is non e other than the practica l manifestation of the sincerity a nd good faith of the J a panese Empire in its avowed objective of prosecuting the War of Greater East Asia for the J?urpose of liberating all oppressed Oriental peoples and enabling them to assume their proper role and place under the sun and estab lish among themselves a sphere of permanent peace and lasting prosperity. The second fundamental reason for the rapid attainment of Burma to a status of independence is the intensity and sincerity of the cooperation ~endered by the entire popu lation of Burma, who, without one single exception, have cons istently shown unqualified and unconditiona l cooperation to the Japanese Empire ever since the very first days of hostilities in that region. Th e people of Burma, from the very beginning, rendered superlative and ardent cooperation with the Imperial J apa nese Forces in effectively eliminating all vestiges of British and Chungking forces from that section of the battle front and subsequently, when the Military Aministration was set up in that country, every individual. without a single excepti on, took an active and progressive part in the task of reh abi lita tin g Burma for the Burmese. There was not a si nqle reca lci tra nt elemen t opposing this work of reconstruction a nd there h as never existed in Burma any lukewarm or half-hearted supporter of the new regime and there was obta ined, as a result, complete unity and concerted effort among all elements of society. As to the important question of Philippine independence, the policy of the Imperial Japanese Government as formally announced on the present occasion, further clarifies and emphatically reaffirms the original statement made by the Imperial Japanese Government at the outbrea k of the present war. Deep significance must be properly placed on the fact that this sta tement concerning the independence of the Philippines is being issued simultaneously ' with the declaration of the independence of Burma . Concern ing the good faith a nd integrity of Japan , it must be borne in mind th a t the Japanese Empire is ruled a nd governed by the August Virtues of Hi s Imperial Majesty, the

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Emperor of Japan. Japan is a country of faith and honor: it is the land of Bushido: and her proud history conclusively proves that she has fulfilled with sincerity and good faith every obligation and pledge she has entered into or made. This is in distinct contrast to the action of the Americans with respect to their promise to the Filipinos during the early days of the Malolos Republic or the similar action of the British with respect to their promises made to India during the first World War. It is contrary to the Japanese code of honor to break pledges once made or treat international commihnents as scraps of paper and a fundamental and sharp distinction should be made between the hypocritical actions of the Anglo-American powers on the one hand a d the actions dictated by sincerity and good faith. of Japan. on the other. The people of the Philippines will do well to reflect seriously on their experience over the past one year of Japanese Military Administration. We are coNident that they will have come to a true understanding an evaluation of the integrity and honor of the Japanese nation and the sincerity of our intentions in th .. Philippines. It is an es ablished and im"i!utable fact that the Philippines is to be granted indepen ence on condition that all the people of these Islands manifest further tangible proof of closer cooperation and sincere collaboration with the Japanese Empire. The only question that remains is that of the exact time of recognition of that independence. This in turn is most definitely a problem which is placed squarely before the Filipinos themselves and one which must be solved through their own efforts. Categorically speaking. if the Filipinos desire complete independence in the shortest possible time. it behooves them to demonstrate by tangible evidence a more intensified degree of cooperative attitude. It is a fact that outside of the few bands of recalcitrant elements which continue to exist in outlying provinces. most of the Filipinos are happily collaborating with the Japanese Military Administration in hUi lding up the New Phlippines for the Filipinos. Henceforth it must indeed be a matter of deep chagrin to all loyal Filipinos that the independence of the Philippines is being realized at a later date than the independence of Burma whose civil administration was inaugurated almost four months after that of the Philippines. To us of the Imperial Japanese

xxiv


Forces stationed here in the Philippines. it Is also a matter of regret and disappointment. It is therefore my keen desire and sincere entreaty to every Filipino who wants to see his country win independence in the shortest possible time. that he pay particular a ttention to carrying out the following cardinal program. Firstly. Eradicate from among your midst of 16 million Filipinos all entanglements and connections with the past regime. Unify and harmonize your efforts into one compact body and demonstrate to the b est of your ab ility your sincere and active cooperation with the J a panese Military Administration. Above all else. take vigorous and force ful measures at your own initiative to eradicate the remnants of Americans and the bandits from this country. thereby bringing about complete peace and security thruout the length and breadth of the land. Secondly. Not only work for the economic rehabilita tion of the country in close cooperation with the Japanese Military Administration but initiate. through your own will a nd efforts. effective ways and means of brin!!in g about the much-needed economic self-sufficiency of the Philipl'ines through the rapid reconstruction and renovation of the economic strucrure of this land. Thirdly. Work for the speedy reorientation of your peo ple both spirirually a nd intellecrually. thereby regaininlt your origina l Oriental souls and with this as the found a tion . drastically reorganize the socia l strucrnre of th e Philippi nes in strict accordance with the ideals and standards of Oriental peoples. The above mentioned three-point pro gram is clearly set b efore you for active fulfillm ent. The basic policy of the Japanese n a tion with regard to . your independence is now unmi stakable and unequivocal. The problem is now definitely up to the people of the Philippines. Every sin gle individual in the Philippines is called upon today to come to a stronger and clearer conception of the real aims a nd objectives of J apa n in prosecuting the W ar of Greater East A sia a nd with renewed vigor and enthusiasm demonstrate ta ngiblv hi s w holehearted cooperation with Japan in establishin g the Co-Pros perity Sphere of Oriental peoples. It is fervently hoped that you will. b y so doing. win for yourselves the honor of independence in the shortest poss ible time. January 28. t8th year of Showa.

xxv


REPLY OF HIS EXCELLENCY. THE COMMANDERIN-CHIEF. TO THE MESSAGE OF GRATITUDE DELIVERED BY CHAIRMAN JORGE B. VARGAS. ON THE OCCASION OR THE REITERATION OF THE PROMISE OF PHILIPPINE INDEPENDENCE BY THE IMPERIAL JAPANESE GOVERNMENT Premier Tozyo in addressing the 81st session of the Imperial Diet has clea rly reiterated the basic policy of the Imperial Japanese Government with regard to the independence of the Philippines. to wit. that should the people of the Philippines continue their active cooperation with the Japanese Empire. the consummation of their independence can be expected to take effect at the earliest possible opportunity. This unequivocal reiteration of the national policy concerning the Philippines is most gratifying and I wish to offer to you representatives of the Philippines. my sincere and heartfelt congratulations.

It is also my wish to take this occasion to attest to the fact that as a rE)sult of the sincere and wholehearted cooperation rendered us by all the people of the Philippines under the able leadership of Chairman Vargas. from the first days of the institution of military administrntion. substantial improvements have been achieved in the dual fields of Military Administration and maintenance of peace and order. In return for your superhuman efforts and hard work. I hereby offer my expression of sincere appreciation and respect. both individually and collectively.

xxvi


DECLARATION BY CHAIRMAN V A RGAS REGARD)NG THE INDEPENDENCE OF THE PHILIPPINES We are deeply moved a nd inspi red by the solemn d ecla ration on independence for the Phil ippines in the shortest possible time. reitera ted as the irrevocab le policy of the J apanese Empire by Premier G enera l Hideki T ozyo in his address to the Imperia l Diet on the 28th of the present month . and for which the Filipino people are eterna lly gra teful. This is another concrete proof of J apan's nob ili ty a nd sincerity of purpose with respect to the Philippines. a nd should convince every Filipino tha t J ap a n 'is determined to fulfi ll her promise of independence on condition that the F ilipinos actively a nd unreservedly coopera te in the estab lishment of a new Phil ippines a s a worthy member of the G rea ter E ast As ia Co-Prosperity Sphere. I am awed by the magn itud<\ of the task but I am sure tha t the Filipinos w ill not fai l in their sin cere and intensified efforts 10 achil\ve through un co nd itiona l coopera tion w ith J a pa n the fi nal Fulfillment of our national as piration . T o this end each a nd every Filipino should rencler full and un stinted loyalty to the Japa nese (\1 ilitary Admini stratio n in the Ph ilippines. I am gra teful to the Director-G enera l of the J apa nese Military Administra tion for hi s continued interest in the granting of Philippine independence a nd for outlining for us a concrete program of adion to foll ow in vivid contrast to th e a mbi guous policies p ursued in th e Philippi nes b y the American Government. Th e early a ttainment of our independen ce. therefore. depends on the promp t realization b y the Filipinos themselves of the A dministra tion 's three-point program. I am certain that the Filipi nos are conscious of this heavy responsibili ty a nd tha t they are determin ed to d irect a nd concentrate a ll their thoughts a nd energies toward the achievement of their cherished ideal of freedom . I appea l to the patriotism of the six teen million Filipinos to do a ll that is in their power to win a nd deserve th e honor of independence that we have des ired so lon g a nd so ardently . and whioh . through the unprecedented ma \!nanimi ly of the G reat Japan ese Empire. is b eing placed with in our grasp .

xxvii


DECLARATION BY DIRECTOR GENERAL AQUINO OF "KALlBAPI" REGARDING PHILIPPINE INDEPENDENCE The solemn declaration of Premier Hideki Tozyo made yesterday in the Imperial Diet of Japan. which is a ratification of the promise of the Government of His Majesty. the Emperor. of granting the Philippines the honor of independence. deserves the most sincere gratitude of every Filipino. This promise. in the light of a ccomplished facts as we know them. cannot b e regarded suspiciously as empty and meaningless. becau se it is supported by the example of Burma. According to the very ~ords of the Illustrious Premier which are as follows : " U",der these circum stances and on condition that further tangibl e v' dences of cooperation are actively demonstrated it is contempl eted to put into effect the statement made previouslyon the estion of Philippine Independence in the shortest poss ible tim ~ ... " ~he early and definitive realization of our an ce tra l asp i\ations now depend totally upon us. ourselves. the Fili p in os : \h ", t is to say. the Eundamental questions of the gra ntin g of in llepen dence to the Philippines on the part of the G rea t Japanese Empire is already a consummated and irrevocable act. Its attainment and realization depend exclusive ly upon the d egree of effort and decision of every Filipino for the fulfillm ent of the required condition: that is. to demonstrate the most active and tangible cooperation and loya lty w hich is exp eoted of the people. not only for the su ccess of the J a pa nese Milita ry Administra tion here. but also for th e solution of th e p roblem which is mos t vital to the whole O rient: the estab lishme nt o f the Co-Prosperity Sphere. This m agnan imous attitude of the Japanese Empire towards th e Fili pino people should be pondered upon conscientiou Iy a nd fervently by each and everyone of us. In the p ast th e liberty of a ll subjuga ted peoples was atta ined only through bloodsh ed . V/ith th e Iiberalion of Burma and the Philippines. J apa n in an eloquent manner demonstrates to the whole w orld a new procedure in the granting of independence to subjugated peoples. insp ired exclusively by the magnanimity of the ruling n a lion and by the cooperation . sincerity and gratitude of th e dominated peoples.

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As Director-General of the KALlB.'\PI. I feel. now more than ever, highly resolved and determined to commune with the masses and to reach, if possible, even the remotest regions of the country, in order that I might carry out the mission entrusted to the KALIBAPI of informing and convincing the people of the real purposes of the government of His Imperial lajesty, and of the great responsibilily which falls upon every Filipino in these decisive moments for the realiza tion of the National Ideal.

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xxix


Section 1. Affairs Concerning Japanese Military Police DECLARATION BY THE CHIEF OF JAPANESE MILITARY POLICE REGARDING THE METHOD OF POLICE SYSTEM FOR THE MAIN路 TENANCE OF PEACE AND ORDER

L

ABSOLUTE PEACE SHOULD FIRST BE ESTABLISHED

Without first establishing peace and order, it is impossible to bring about real happiness to the Filipino people. At present, the task of maintaining peace and order and restoring normalcy in the daily life of the people is made harder by gangsters in Manila and outla\vs in the provinces. The latter in路 clude former USA;FFE soldiers who have degenerated into brigands and bandits, who pin bljnd faith in the return of America to the Philippines. These outlaws and gangsters harass the peaceful and law 路abiding citizens. They kill, loot, burn, pillage and victimize the masses. They are the worst public enemies, for they even pose as patriots when in tl'uth they are traitors. As chief of the Japanes Military Police, I am endeavoring to totally exter' minate them as a necessary step toward the complete restoration of peace and order, and normalcy. 2.

RACIAL DISCRIMINATION SHALL BE DISCOURAGED

We are well acquainted with the Filipinos' good qualitie8 and love fOl' peace. The Japanese are not conquerors. And the Filipinos are not a con路 quered people. These two peoples are friends, nay, brothers: there should be no racial discrimination between them. As a matter of general pl"inciple, the Japanese Military Police do not discriminate because of racial differences. In the performance of theil' duties, the Japanese Military Police tl'eat all people equally, regardless of nationality, Japanese and other nationals alike. 3.

MORE EMPHASIS ON ENLIGHTENME~ RATHER THAN ON PUNISHMENT

Most of those who have committed offenses calling for punitive action were those who blindly believed in American propaganda or who misjudged facts because they were not in a position to learn the truth. If these elements had been informed of the real facts regarding the world situation, and given proper and timely guidance, there would have been less of their numher now. They would not have committed offenses had they, in the first place, had the opportunity to know the facts. In problems such as

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these, the solution lies ndt in punishment but rather in enlightenment. Punishment is the last thing I resort to, in dealing with Filipino offenders. There is no necessity to prove this, for it is well known that only those who refuse to "see the light" have been punished by the Japanese Military Police. I am only too anxi<?us to help the Filipinos grasp the meaning of the New Order. I am willing to go to the extent of making sacrifices to succeed in this task. Needless to say, since more emphasis is laid on enlightenment and teach· ing, rather than punishment, cruel tJ:eatment and torture are unnecessary. 4.

FOR WILLIN,GNESS TO COOPERATE WITH JAPAN, OFFENDERS MAY BE FORGIVEN FOR THEIR CRIMES

One·sided propaganda during the American regime and circumstances then prevailing are the root causes of the offenses committed by misguided Filipinos today. The masses did not know the truth about international affairs because of American unfairness in the dissemination of news. Indeed, the Filipinos were forcad into a pitiable position which aroused the sympathy of the Japanese people. Under such circumstances, I believe that the of· fenses they committed were not grievous, as they were mainly the result of ignorance. Now that the tlruth may be known, the Filipinos' worth may be measured by theh' willingness to coopel'ate with Japan in the establishment of the New Order in East Asia. We may forgive past offenses for offenders' willingness to coli abo ·ate. I am convinced that a bright future is in store for the Philippines, if the Filipinos willingly forget the unwholesome influences of America and work wholeheal·tedly with Japan. Meanwhile, I will let those who are not willing now to cooperate witb Japan to reconsidar their stand and have a new start. 5.

ACTIVE COOPERATION BY THE MASSES IS NECESSARY

The Imperial Japanese Forces are exerting all efforts and making sacri· fices to restol'e order and to bring back to the Filipino homes their tJ'aditional peace and tranquillity. The time will come when the Filipino people them· selves will be able to take up the work of restol'ing and maintaining peace without the help of the Japanese forces. Real peace cannot be forced on the people. It will come to them only with their help and willingness to keep it. If the masses seek real peace, they should help actively in its restoration, and maintenance, and thus contribute their share in the establish· ment of the New Philippines. 6. THE JAPANESE MILITARY POLICE WILL COLLABORATE WITH THE CONSTABULARY The Filipinos' contribution to the cause of peace and order is exemplified by the good record of the local police, who work day and night in the per'

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formanoe of their duties. Filipino policemen, as I have observed, are imbued with n high sense of justice and of public service, brave and efficient. I say for the welfare of the people that I \vill go ha nd in hand with my co路workers, the Filipino policemen, who are making their way toward the noble and glorious goal common to us all. 7.

INCONVENIENCES TO THE PUBLIC WILL BE MINIMIZED AS MUCH AS POSSIBLE

Because of the war situation, it is inevitable that the public is sometimes subjected to little inconveniences, especially by the Military Police. This is true in Manila as it is everywhere else in the world. For in the maintenance of peace and order the police officers have to adhere strictly to Martial Law. In the case of the J apanese Military Police in the Philippines we have made it a fundamental policy to minimize these inconveniences. This we have been doing by exercising at all times the strictest impartiality. In the name of the Japanese Military Police of the Philippines and in mine I wish to thank all citizens of the Philippines for collaborating whole路 heartedly with us in maintaining peace and order.

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Section 2. Affairs Concerning D epartment of GeneraZ Affairs APPROVAL NO. 20 January 29, 1943 The Honorable Jorge B. Vargas Chairman of the Executive Commission Manila RE:

APPROVAL OF PROCLAMATION CALLING UPON ALL FILIPINO PRISONERS OF WAR WHO WERE PROVISIONALLY RELEASED BECAUSE OF SICKNESS OR OTHER CAUSES TO REGISTER W ITH THE PROPER AUTHORITIES SO AS TO ENJOY THE STATUS OF REGULARLY RELEASED PRISO ERS OF WAR.

The above-mentioned proclamation covered by Letter Ex_ No_ 200, dated January 21, 1943, is hereby duly approved. DIRECTOR-GENERAL JAPANESE MILITARY ADMINISTRATION

SElREI NO.1 HITOO GUNSEIREI (MILITARY ADMINISTRATION ORDER OF THE PHILIPPINES) ARTICLE I The term GUNSEIREI (Military Administration Order) as employed in this Order shall cover all orders, rules and regulations issued by, or issued on the authorization of, the Commander-in-Chief, excluding orders, rul es and regulations issued by the Philippine Executive Commission, for the purpose of carrying out the military administration in the Philippines_ ARTICLE II

GUNSEIREI (Military Administration Orders) shall consist of SEIREI, KANREI and REI. SEIREI shall be orders which are issued by the Commander-in-Chief for the execution of such matters as involve the fundamental principles of military administration and coming under his jurisdiction_

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KANREI shall be orders which, on the authorization of the Commander-inChief, are issued by the Director-General of the Military Administration concerning matters within his jurisdiction. REI shall be those orders which, on the authorization of the Commander-inChief, are issued by the Directors of Branch Offices of the Military Administration, the Director of the Office of Land Transport Management, the Director of the Office of Electrical Communications, or by those in equivalent positions concerning matters within their respective jurisdiction. ARTICLE

III

SEIREI shall be dated and signed by the Commander-in-Chief. KANREI shall be dated and signed by the Director-General of the Military Administration. REI shall be dated and signed by the Directors of Branch Offices of the Military Administration, the Director of the Office of Land Transport Management, the Director of the Office of Electrical Communications, or by <lthers authorized to issue such orders. ARTICLE

IV

SEIREI and KANREI shall be numbered chronologically in yearly series, according to the order of their promulgation. In REI, the name of the office issuing it shall be stated and it shall be numbered chronologicall~, in yearly series, according to the order of its promulgation_ ARTICLE V GUNSEIREI shall be promulgated in an appropriate manner. GUNSEIREI shall, unless othewise provided, take effect immediately as of the date of promulgation. ARTICLE

VI

All orders, rules and regulations concerning the execution of military administration issued by or issued on the authorization of the Commander-in-Chief prior to the promUlgation of this Order shall remain effective notwithstanding the provisions made herein_ SUPPLEMENT

This Order shall take effect as of the date of promulgation. This 1st day of January, 1943. COMMANDER-IN -CHIEF, IMPERIAL JAPANESE FORCES IN THE PHILIPPINES.

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KANREI NO.1 CONCERNING MOVEMENTS AND EMPLOYMENT OF' ENEMY NATIONALS ARTICLE I Unless specially excepted, enemy nationals who have been released either on Permanent or Conditional Release shall, when they leave their respective homes out of unavoidable necessity, wear a mark designated by the Military Administration. In the districts under the jurisdiction of the Oentral Luzon Branch Office of the Military Administration, the Commandant of the Internment Camp in Manila shall publish a notification on designation of the above路mentioned mark. In other districts the same notification shall he made by the Chief of the Branch Office concerned. ARTICLE II Released enemy nationals who desire to engage in any occupation or employment, or to continue therein shall obtain a permit therefor from the competent Autho 1ties, viz., in the districts under the jurisdIction of the Central Luzon Branch Office, from the Commandant of the Internment Camp in Manila, and in other distri cts from the Chief of the Branch Office concerned. ARTICLE

III

Anyone who violates the provisions of the first paragraph of Article I or those of the preceding Article shall be punished in accordance with Martial Law. SUPLEMENTARY PROVISION

The present Order shall be put into force on the 18th of January, 1943, \vithin the districts under the jurisdiction of the Central Luzon Branch Office. In other districts, the date of the coming into force of this Order shall be fixed by the Chief of the Branch Office concerned. This 14th day of January, 1943. DIRECTOR GENERAL JAPANESE MILITARY ADMINISTRATION

NOTIFICATION (TENTATIVE TRANSLATION)

Concerning restrictions on movements and employment applicable to Enemy Nationals: I. For the application of the KANREI No. 1, all Enemy Nationals, either permanently or conditionally released, who reside in the City of Manila or in its suburbs are hereby ordered to obey the following regulations:

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(A) The mark mentioned in Article I of the KANREI No.1, shall be a red armband to be Issued by this internment Camp Office, and it shall be worn by enemy nationals whenever they go out of doors. (B) As the red armbands will be assigned on the basis of one band per family, repl'esentatives of families shaH present themselves to this Of. fice during the period of January 16th to 21st inclusive, 1943, between the hours of 10:00 and 2:00 and 4:00 P. M. Representatives of the Religious Group shall present themselves during the same period to the Religious Section of the Department of the Interior, 5th Floor, New Military Adminis' tration Office, former Finance Building. (C) Children under 15 years are exempt from the above requirement of wearing an armband. (D) Those who have been permanently released on account of their neutral nationality need not wear the said armbands. (E) Those who desire to have a permit in accordance with Article II of the KANREI No. 1 shall apply in writing for particulars to this Office. (F) Enemy Nationals, permanently or conditionally released, shall act in strict accordance not only with the present regulations but also with all the regulations and the pledges regarding permanent or conditional releases. II. In view of the putting into force of the present regulations, the public is hereby wamed to comply with the following: (A) All the citizens shall always carry identification cards of nationality, passports or residence certificates, etc., which will prove their identity, so as to facilitate the conlll:ol of enemy nationals by the authol'ities. (B) Visits to the residences of enemy nationals shall not be permitted except for unavoidable ecessity. Those who frequent them may be considered as citizens of enemy character. January 15, 1943.

COMMANDANT, iNTERNMENT CAMP, MANILA WARNING

CONCERNING RESTRICTION ON MOVEMENTS APPLICABLE TO ENEMY NATIONALS Feb. 1st, 1943. '1'0 released enemy nationals: Enemy nationals, either conditionally or permanently released, are hereby warned on the foHowing points: 1. When they leave theil' place of residence for the purpose of exercise, they shall not go beyond the limited neighborhood of their place, and they shaH not take a walk along Heiwa Boul路e vard or any similar highway. 2. When they leave their place of residence for exercise or for other absolute necessity, each of them, excepting children under 15 years old, shall wear the red armband issued by this office. OFFICE OF THE SANTO TOMAS INTERNMENT CAMl

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Section 3. Affairs Concerning Communication SEIREI NO. 11 CONCERNING THE RECONDITIONING OF RADIO BROADCAST RECEIVING SETS ARTICLE I

With the exception of those who have obtained special permission from the Military Authorit1es, all possessors of l'adio broadcast receiving sets shall submit the same for reconditioning in accordance with instructions to he issued by the Director of the DENSEI路KYOKU (Office of Electrical Com. munications) . ARTICLE II No radio broadcast l'eceiving set, with the exception of those which have been reconditioned in accordance with the provisions of the foregoing article, shall be sold, transferred, or moved within the areas designated by the Director of the DENSEI路KYOKU. ARTICLE NI Anyone who refuses without justifiable reasons and in violation of the provisions of Article I of this Order, to submit radio broadcast receiving sets for reconditioning or who violates the foregoing Article II shall be severely punished in accordance with martial law.

This 7th day of January, 1943. COMMANDER路IN ' CHIEF, IMPERIAL JAPANESE FORCES IN THE PHILIPPINES.

DENSEI路KYOKU REI NO.1 (Office of Electrical Communications Ordinance No.1)

CONCERNING THE RECONDITIONING OF RADIO BROADCAST RECEIVING SETS ARTICLE I

The reconditioning of radio broadcast receiving sets as set forth in SEIREI NO. 2 shall be carried out in accordance with the provisions of this REI (Ordinance).

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ARTICLE II With the exception of those who have obtained special permission from the Military Authorities, all possessors of I'adio broadcast receiving sets, irrespective of nationality, and irrespective of make, type, or frequency range of the radio broadcast receiving sets in question, shall submit the same to the DENSEI路KYOKU for reconditioning or inspection. ARTICLE

III

The areas ,vithin which reconditioning of I'adio broadcast receiving sets will be enforced together with the date and all other details concerning the same shall he made known by a notification issued by the DENSEI KYOKU. ARTICLE IV Radio broadcast recelvmg sets which have undergone reconditioning or inspection shall be so certified by the DENSEI路KYOKU.

DIRECTOR, DENSEI路KYOKU (Office of Electrical Communications)

DENSEI路KYOKU NO IF'ICATION NO.1

CONCERNING THE RECONDITIONING OF RADIO BROADCAST RE CEIVING SETS IN MANILA AND ENVIRONS The reconditioning of radio broadcast receiving sets, in accol'dance with the provisions of SEIREI NO . 2 and DENSEI-KYOKU REI NO. I, shall be commenced in the City of Manila on January 8, 1943, as follows: 1. Procedure for reconditioning of radio broadcast receiving sets (hereinafter referred to as "RADIO SETS"): (A)

Applications fo!' reconditioning: Possessors of radio sets shall apply for the reconditioning of such sets at the nearest "Delivery Center for Radio Receiving Sets" (hereinafter referred to as "DELIVERY CENTER") which shall be established and maintained by the DENSEI-KYOKU during the period mentioned below.

(B)

Presentation of radio sets: Radio sets for which applications for reconditioning have been filed shall be brought to the appointed DELIVERY CENTER on the date designated at the time of application. Each radio set shall be presented together with a copy of the certificate of registration prescribed in Executive Order No. 73.

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(C)

Return of radio sets: Reconditioned and inspected radio sets which have been so certified shall be returned to their respective oWners at the DELI. VERY CENTER on the date as designated at the time of pre路 sentation.

2. Period and places where applications for reconditioning may be filed: (A) Period: From January S, to January 31, 1943 (Every day from 9:00 to 16:00 o'clock). (B)

pUzees: 1. Ayala Building, Plaza Sta. Cruz.-35 Plaza Sta. Cruz, Bagumpanahon. 2. District Building of Bagumbayan-Epifanio de los Santos Elementary School, S07 Singalong Street. 3. District Building of Bagundiwa-Araullo High School Annex, 610 Paz Street. 4. District Building of Bagumpanahon-Mabini Elementary School, Severino Street. 5. Di ~trict Building of Bagumbuhay-Isabelo de los Reyes Elementary School, 1246 Sande Street. 6. District Building of Balintawak-102 Porvenir Street. 7. Distl;ict Building of Diliman-Former Quezon City Hall. S. Dish'ict Building of San Juan-San Juan Elementary School, N. Domingo Street. 9. District Building of Caloocan-General Luna Street. 10. District Building of Mandaluyong-67 Blumentritt. Ii'. District Building of Makati-A. Mabini Street. 12. District Building of Pasay-Zamora Elementary School, Burgos Street. 13. District Building of Paraiiaque-Municipal Building of Paraiiaque, Real Street.

3.

Reconditioning of unregistered radio sets: Possessors of radio sets not registered as required by the Philippine Executive Commission (Executive Order No. 73) shall, in accordance with the instructions of said Commission promptly take appropriate steps for their registration and shall have the aforementioned l'adio sets reconditioned as prescribed herein.

4. Other details and particulars shall be obtainable at the nearest DELIVERY CENTER or at the Information Office for Reconditioning which shall be established at the following place: Ayala Building, Plaza Sta. Cruz, (Bagumpanahon). (Jan. 7th, 1943)

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DENSEI KYOKU NOTIFICATION NO.4.

CONCERNING EXTENSION OF PERIOD OF APPLICATION FOR RECONDITIONING RADIO RECEIVERS IN THE CITY OF MANILA. The period of application for reconditioning radio receivers in the city of Manila, as regulated in the DENSEI KYOKU NOTIFICATION NO.1, has been extended as follows: From Feb. 1st, 1943 To Feb. 16th, 1943. (Feb. 1st, 1943). CHIEF OF DENSEI KYOKU (OFFICE OF ELECTRICAL COMMUNICATIONS)

NOTIFICATION NO.1 RIKUUN KANRIKYOKU

(The Land Tran8portation Mall11gement Buo'eau) Bus service will be inaugurated beginning on the 16th of January, 1943, over the following lines: I.

II

LINES AND DISTANlCES: (1) Naguilian Line-(between Baguio and San Fernando U) 60 Kms. (2) Laoag Line-(between San Fernando U and Laoag) ... . 227 Kms. (3) Rosario Line-(between Baguio and Damortis, via Rosario) .... 62 Kms. (4) Tarlac Line- (between Camp One and Tarlac, via Pozor路 rubio) .... 90 Kms. (6) Bontoc Line-(between Baguio a nd Trinidad) .... 6 Kms. SCHEDULE OF TRIPS OF BUSES: Schedules of trips of motor buses will be posted at public places and bus stops for the information of the public.

III.

SCOPE OF SERVICE: To serVe passengers and their personal baggage.

IV.

FARES FOR PASSENGERS AND BAGGAGE: (1) Pa888'11ger Fare. Passengers ,vilJ be subject to the rules and regulations governing the u'ansportation of passengers and freight promulgated by the Rikuun Kanrikyoku as pel' Notification No.4 last year.

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(2)

Each pay passenger will be allowed to carry in the bus 10 kilos of personal baggage, free of charge, and any baggage the weight of which is in excess of 10 kilograms will be subject to the payment of PO.04 per kilogram. For any fraction of 1 kilogram in weight or fraction of not less than 5 and not more than 10 kilograms, the baggage rane prescribed in the Rules and Regulations governing the transportation of passengers and freight promulgated by the Rikuun Kanrikyoku will be applied. Baggage Chwrge.

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Sc:ction 4. Executive Orders by the Chairman of the Philippine Executive Commission OFFICE OF THE CHAIRMAN OF THE EXECUTIVE COMMISSION MALACA~AN PALACE By THE CHAIRMAN OF THE EXECUTIVE COMMISSION EXECUTIVE ORDER No. 117

REGULATING HOUSE RENTALS IN THE CITY OF MANILA Pursuant to the authol'ity conferred upon me as Head of the Central Administrative Organization by Ordar No.1 in connection with Order No.3 of the Commander-in-Chief of the I.nlperial J apanese Forces in tha Philippines, and upon the racommendation of the Executive Commission, the public interest so requiring on account of circumstances created by the present emergency, it is hereby ordered that-SECTION 1. For the purposes of this Order and unless the context indicates otherwise, the follo'ying terms shall bear the meanings indicated herein: "House" shall be cOliS trued to include any building, house or dwelling togethar with the appurtenant land, any part of any building, house or dwelling; any apartment room, or suite of rooms, used or intended to be used for habitation, r esidential, commercial, industrial or other purposes. "Owner" includes a lessor, sublessor, usufructuary or other person en路 titled to receive rent for the use, habitation, or utilization of any house or any interest therein, or his agent. "Tenant" includes a sub-tenant, l-essee, sub-lessee, usuary, usufructuary, or other person, not the owner, entitled to the use, habitation, or utilization of any house. "Rental" includes any pecuniary sum or its equivalent charged by the owner of a house for rent or of land whereon a house belonging to another exists or is to be built, or agreed upon between such owner and the tenant thereof and paid or to be paid by the tenant to the owner at fixed intervals, for the use, habitation, or utilization of such house or land. SEC. 2. The increase of the rentals of houses in the City of Manila, 'e)(cept as herein authorized, from and aftel' the effective date of this Order, is hereby declared void and unenforceable_ SEC. 3. Any owner desh'ing to increase the rental of his house because of special causes or reasons which have arisen after January 1, 1943, shall apply thereafter to the Mayor of the City of Manila, who shall l'afer such

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application to the Committee for the Control of House Rentals hereinafter provided for the necessary investigation. The Mayor shall act on the ap. plication taking into consideration the recommendation of the Committee. SEC. 4. Any owner deSiring to lease a house which has not been previously rented shall fH'st apply to the [\!layor of the City of Manila who Shall deter. mine the l'easonable rental therefor, after p,'evlous consultatIon WIth the Committee for the ContrOl of House Rentals. SEC. 5. Owners of houses for rent are hereby l'equired to submit a report of their house rentals to the Mayor of the City of lVlanila within thirty days altel' the effective date of this Urder. SEC. 6. Upon petitIOn of the tenant, the Mayor of the City of Manila is heretly empowered m specific cases to ol'der the decrease of house l'entals if, in tne opllllOn of the Comml ttee for the Control of House Rentals, they are unreasonable. Pendmg conSIderatIOn of such petition, the tenant shall contmue to p ay the r ental sought to be reduced Without preJudice to such r eadjustment as the fmal deCISion may justify. SBC. 7. The rental that may be determilled for the purposes of Sections 4 a nd 6 of thiS Older shaJJ not be less than fJ.tty pe.路 cent (50 '10 ) of the hignest montly 'en tal charged durmg the three months immediately pI'eced路 ing December the rughth, nilleteen hundl'ed and forty-one, nor more than seventy-five 1,er cen.,tum (/5 % ) thereof: i:'ro'IJuJ.ed, That if the house was not rented durmg any of the aiolesald mont~s, then the rental is to be determmed by considerlllg the customary rentdJ chalged durmg the said months for houses of slmJ..lar la tUl'a or situated under tne same Circumstances. SEC. 8. This Order sh a ll not be construed as pI'ohibiting or precluding any owner from coJlectmg '" rental less tihan that fixed or determmed hereunder. I SEC. 9. In order to carry into effect the provisions of this Ol'dar, a Committee for the Control of House Rentals is hereby created. The Gom路 mltteee shall be composild of five member s, two of whom shall be members of the " Asociacion de Propietal'ios de Manila", and they shall be appointed by the Chairma n of the Executive Commission upon tha recommendatIOn of the Commissioner of the Interior. The emoluments of the members of the Committee, its organization, and the manner in which it shall dischal'gc its functions shall be determined by city Ordinance. SEC. 10. The provisions of this Order shall also apply to any land that may be leased by the owner of such land to a tenant for residential or business purposes wher e the house existing thereon belongs to the tenant, or the land does not have any house and the tenant agrees to build one thereon. SEC. 11. The owner of any house or land for rent who shall collect a r ental higher than that fi xed hereunder and any owner, tenant or other p el'son who shall, directly or indirectly, violate any of the provisions of this Order shall, upon conviction, be punished by imprisonment for not more than six months or by a fine of not mOI'e than two hundred pesos (P200.00), Or both, in the discretion of the court. If such violation is committed by a

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firm or corporation, the manager, managing director or person charged with the management of the husiness of such firm or corporation shall be criminally responsible therefor. SEC. 12. This Order shall take effect upon its approval by the Com· mander·in·Chi ef of the Imperial Japanese Forces and shall be in force only in the City of Manila. Done in the City of Manila, Philippines, this 4th day of January, 1943. (SGD .) JORGE B. VARGAS Chairman of the E xecutive Commission APPROVED by the Commander·in·Chief of the Imperial Japanese Forces in the Pbilippines on January 4, 1943.

EXECUTIVE ORDER NO . 118 CREAT NG THE BUREAU OF EMPLOYMENT

Pursuant to the authority conferred upop me as Head of the Central Administrative Organiza~ion by Order No.1 in connection with Order No.3 of the Commander·in·Chl'ef of the Imperia l Japanese Forces in the Philip· pines, and upon the reccomendation of the Executive Commission, it is hereby ordered thatSECTION 1. A Bureau of Employment is h ereby created under the ad· ministrative s up er~sion and control of the Commissioner of the Interior. SEC. 2. The Bureau of Employment shall have one Chief and one As· sistant Chief, to be known respectively as the Director of Employment and the Assistant Director of Emplo~'lDent. SEC. 3.-The Director of Employment shaH have the foHowing specific powers and duties: (a) To see to the proper enforcement of aH laws regulating em· ployment in the Philippines; (b) To compile, systematize, and submit from time to time reports to the Commissioner of the Interior data relative to wages of laborers, the number of workers in each trade 01' occupation, skiHed or unskilled, employed and unemployed, their place of birth, age, sex, civil status, and moral and mental culture; the estimated number of families of married workers, houses rented by them, and annual rental; property owned by them, if any, and the value of such property; the cost of living; the estimated number of persons dependent on their daily wages; conditions and certainty of payment of wages; and other matters reo lative to the commercial, industrial, social, educational, moral, spiritual and sanitary condition of t he working classes;

[15]


(c) To take the proper legal steps to prevent the exposure of the health or lives of laborers, and to aid and assist by all propel' legal means laborers a nd workers in securing employment and just com pen· sa tion for their labor; (d) To devise a systematic method of controlling the movements of laborers to avoid their overcrowding in one 01' more provinces or cities and depletion in others. For this purpose the Director of Em' ployment shall cooperate ,vith the Director of Agricultural Adminis· tration in encouraging migration to sparsely populated regions; (e) To promote the physical, material, spiritual, social, intellec· tual a nd moral improvement of workers and laborers; and (f) To prescribe, with the approval of the Commissioner of the Interior, such rules a nd r egulations as ma y be necessary to canoy into effect the aims a nd purposes of this Executive Order. SEC. 4. The provincial governors and city mayors shall enforce tbe provisions of this Order in tbeir r espective provinces and cities. SEC. 5. There shall be such number of labor administrators and assist· ant labor administrators in the office of the Director of Employment as the needs of the service may require and funds permit. They shall be ap ' pointed by the Ohairman of the E xecutive Commission upon the recom· mendation of th e ommissioner of the Interior. Any such labor administra· tor or assistant lao r admi ni st~'ator may be deta iled by the Dh'ector of Employment, with th a pproval of the Commi ssioner of the Interior, to any one or more provinces or cities where important labor p1'oblems exist to assist the provincial governors 01' city mayors in the performance of their duties in connection ,vith the enforcement of this Order. SEC. 6. The provincial governor or city mayor, as the case may be, shall keep an up·to·date census of the laborers in his province 01' city, show· ing their names, ages, sex, nature Or kind of work, salary, whetber skilled or unskilled, length of service, tenure of employment (whether permanent 01' temporary), and the number of their dependents, a nd such other data as t he Director of Employment may require. SEC. 7. It shall be the duty of any person, firm or corporation who has under hi s employ not less than twenty laborers 01' farm·hands to submit to the provincial governor 01' city mayor concerned, witbin one month after the promulgation of this executive order, a list showing the data mentioned 'in the preceding section. SEC. 8. The provincial governor or city mayor shall keep completo record of the movements of laborers in his province or city and for this purpose no labor er or farm·hand shall transf er from one province or city to another without the app1'oval of the governor 01' city mayor concerned; but no governor 01' city mayor shall di sapprove a r equest to transfer except for good and sufficient cause: P"ovided; That in case of approval, the gov· ernor 01' city mayor concerned shall provide the laborer or farm ·hand ,vith such t'ecommendation or credentials as may be necessary for the employment

[16]


of said laborer or farm-hand; and Provided, fur the,., Tbat the decision of the governor or city mayor denying a request for transfer to another province or city may be appealed to the Director of Employment whose decision shall be final unless 1'evoked by the Commissioner of the Interior. SEC. 9. Whenever any department, office, branch, sub路division, agency or instrumentality of the Central Administrative Organization and Judicial Courts or any person, firm 01' corporation is in need of new laborers 01' farm -hands, or on account of the expansion of his enterprise or in order to replace others, it shall be his duty to secure such laborers or farm-hands through the provincial governor or city mayor of the province or city, and it shall be the duty of such governor or city mayor to supply such laborers or farm-hands from among those who are unemployed and residing within his jurisdiction; but should he be unable to do so he may have recourse t o the nearest provinces 01' cities through their respective governors 01' city mayors. In filling demands for laborers 01' fa1'll1-hands made upon him, the governor or city mayor shall be guided by t he requirements of the one making the demands and by the personal circumstances of those to be chosen for placement. SEC_ 10. It shall he the duty of every employer mentioned in Section 7 hereof to report to the provincial governor 01' city mayor concerned all dismissals and suspensions of laborers and farm -hands in his employ, or whenever they are laid off for any reason, said report to be submitted ,vithin three days after such dismissal, suspension or layoff. SEC. 11. For the purposes of this executive order municipal mayors shall assist their respective provincial governors in the enforcement of this Order. As such, they shall submit to the governor concerned whenever h e requires the names of the unemployed persons in their respective municipal ities whom they may desire to recommend for placement, and perform such other duti es not repugnant to law or regulation as the governor may require of them. SEC. 12_ The Director of Employment shall have the power to administer oaths in matters connected ,vith tbe administration of the Bureau of Employment and to take testimony in any investigation conducted in pursuance of tbe provisions of this executive order_ Any labor administrator 01' assistant labor administrator shall have power to administer oath and exercise the authority to take evidence which is h ereinabove vested in said Director when thereto specifically deputed by the Dit'ector of Employment. SEC_ 13. The duties and functions of the Bureau of Public Welfal'e in connection with the supervision and administration ovel' all matters relating to the employment of the F ilipino laborers shall hereafter be assumed and discbarged by the Director of Employment. SEC. 14. The personnel, appl'opl'iation, equipment, material s, records and other properties pertaining to the offices or activities wbich are autborized to be transferred under this Order, 01' so much tbereof as may be considet'ed necessary, shall be merged with tbe personnel, appropriation, records and

[17]


properties pertaining to the Bureau of Employment to be used for the Bame purpose or purposes for which they were originally intended. The transfer of personnel, appropriation, equipment, materials, l'ecords and other prop' erties herein authorized will be made by the Commissioner of the Interior with the concurrence of the Auditor General and Director of the Budget. SEC. 15. Viol ation of a ny of the p rovisions of Sections 7, 8, 9 and 10 hereof and of the rules and regulations promulgated by the Director of Em路 ployment pursuant to Section 3 (f) hereof, shall be punished by impri sonment for a period of not less tha n one month nor more than one year, or by a fine of not less than two hundred pesos nor more than five thousand pesos, or both, in the discretion of the court. If the violation is committed by a firm or corporation, the manager, managing director or person charged with the management of such firm or corpol'ation shall be criminally responsible therefor. SEC. 16. This Order shall take effect upon its approval by the Com路 mander-in-Chief of the I mperial Japanese FOl路ces. Done in the City of Manila, Philippines, this 4th day of January, 1943. (Sgd.) JORGE B. VARGAS Chai,-man of the E xecutive Commission APPROVED by the Director General of the Japanese Military A.dmi\listration on January 4, 1943\

)

EXECUTIVE ORDER No_ 119 DISPOSITION OF PUBLIC LAND LOTS HELD FOR LAND SETTLE MENT PURPOSES UNDER SECTION 3, PARAGRAPH (c), OF COMMONWEALTH ACT NUMBERED FOUR HUNDRED AND FORTYONE. Pursuant to the a ut hority conferred upon me as H ead of the Central Administrative Organization by Order No.1 in connection with Order No.3 of the Commander-in-Chief of the Imperial Japanese Forces in the Philippines, and upon the r ecommendation of the E xecutive Commission, it is hereby ordered that1. Every bona-fide holder of public land lot under the provisions of Section 3, paragraph (c) of Commonwealth Act No. 441, is hereby declared a homesteader and may be issued homestead patent by the Bureau of Lands for the lot actuall y occupied by him. For the purpose of the issuance of the patent, it sha ll be sufficient that the Bureau of Agricultural Administration certify that the applicant is a bona-fide holder of the lot, i. e., that he has cultivated the lot and is either actually on the land or ready to return to the la nd and continue the cultivation thereof. All other l'equirements

[18]


under the homestead provisions of the Public Land Act are hereby dispensed with; Provided, however, That no homestead patent shall issue by virtue of this Order for a lot over twelve hectares in area. 2. Should an occupant be a debtor to the former National Land Settle· ment Administration, he shall be required to mortgage the homestead for the amount so indebted in favor of the Governmeut payable in ten annual install· ments with interest at 4% per annum on the amount remaining unpaid. Done in the City of Manila, Philippines, this 4th day of January, 1943. (Sgd.) JORGE B. VARGAS APPROVED by the Chail"lnan of th_ Executive Commission Director General of the Japanese Military Administration on January 4, 1943.

EXECUTIVE

ORDER No. 120

MAKING THE COSTS AND EXPENSES OF CADASTRAL SURVEY AND REGISTRATION PROCEEDINGS, DUE AND PAYABLE EVEN IF THE PROCCEDINGS HAVE NOT BEEN COMPLETED, AND AL· LOWING TEN PER CENT OF THE COLLECTION MADE BY THE CITY AND MUNICIPAL TREASURERS TO ACCRUE TO THE TREASURY OF THE CITY OR MUNICIPALITY CONCERNED AND FIVE PER CENT OF SUCH COLLECTION TO THE PROVINCIAL TREASURY. Pursuant to the authority conferred upon me as Head of the Central Administrative Organization by Order No.1 in connection with Order No.3 of the Commander·in·Chief of the Imperial Japanese Forces in the Philip' pines, and upon the recommendation of the Executive Commission, it is hereby ordered that-1. The costs and expenses already assessed and apportioned of cadastral survey and registration proceedings which, under existing law, must be paid by the owner of the land, the province and municipality or city concerned, shall be due and payable even if the registration proceedings have not yet been completed: Provided, That the owner of a lot within a cadastral survey shall not be required to pay the corresponding costs and expenses until the said lot is finally adjudicated to him. 2. The costs and expenses not yet assessed and apportioned of cadastral surveys and proceedings shall become due and payable beginning with the year next following that in which the provincial, city and l or lDunicipal trea' surer receives a copy of the apportionment of the costs by the Director of Lands. !l. Provincial, city and municipal treasurers of the provinces, cities and municipalities wherein cadastral surveys have been undertaken shall assist in the collection of cadastral costs from the owners of the lots therein. Ten

[19]


per centum (10 % ) of all collections made by the city 01' municipal treasurer shall accrue to the treasury of the city or municipality concerned and shall form part of its funds and five pel' centum (5%) of such collections shall accrue to the provincial treasury. 4. Such provisions of existing laws as are inconsistent with the provi路 sions of this Executive Order are hereby revoked or modified accordingly. Done in the City of Manila, Philippines, this 4th day of January, 1943. (Sgd.) JORGE B. VARGAS APPROVED by the Chairman of the Exermtive Cont'mission Director General of the Japanese Military Administration on January 4, 1943. EXECUTIVE ORDER No. 121 EXTENDING FURTHER THE PERIOD FOR THE REGISTRATION OF ALIENS FOR THE YEAR 1942 Pursuant to the authority conferred upon me as Head of the Central Ad路 ministrative Organization by Order NO. 1 in connection with Order No.3 of the Commander-in-Chief of the Imperial Japanese Forces in the Philippines, and in accordance with his proclamation dated April 1, 1942, the period for the registration of aliens under Executive Order No_ 25, as amended by Executive Orders Nos. 60, 66 and 102, for the year 1942, is, upon the recommendation of the Executive Commission, hel'eby further extended to March 31, 1943. Done in the City of Manila, Philippines, this 9th day of January, 1943. (Sgd.) JORGE B. VARGAS Chai1"Y1tan of the E x ecutive Contmission APPROVED by the Director General of the Japanese Military Administration on January 9, 1943.

EXECUTIVE ORDER No. 122 TRANSFERRING THE CODE COMMITTEE FROM THE DEPARTMENT OF JUSTICE TO THE OFFICE OF THE CHAIRMAN OF THE EXECUTIVE COMMISSION. Pursuant to the authority conferred upon me as Head of the Central Ad路 ministrative Organization by Order No.1 in connection with Order No.3 of the Commander-in-Chief of the Imperial Japanese Forces in the Philippines, and upon the recommendation of the Executive Commission, the Code Com路 mittee is hereby transferred from the Department of Justice to the Office of the Chairman of the Executive Commission. The Code Committee is hereby

[20]


empowered to call on any official or employee of any bureau, office, branch, subdivision, agency or instrumentality of the Central Administrative Organization to assist or otherwise extand his cooperation to the Committee in connection ,vith the performance of its functions _ Articl as I and IV of Executive Order No_ 4, dated February 5, 1942, are, therefore, correspondingly amended_ This Ol'der shall take effect upon its approval by tha Commander-in-Chief of the Imperial Japanese Forces. Done in the City of Manila, Philippines, this 11th day of January, 1943_ (Sgd.) JORGE B. VARGAS Cltai,·?>tan of tlte Executive Commission APPROVED by the Commander-in-Chief of the Imperial Japanese Forces in the Philippines on January 11, 1943_

EXECUTIVE ORDER No_ 123 AUTHORIZING TEE PAYMENT OF THE REAL PROPERTY TAX FOR THE YEAR 1943 IN THREE INSTALLMENTS Pursuant to the a thority conferred upon rna as Head of the Central Administrative Organization by Order No_ 1 in connection ,vith Order No_ 3 of the Commander-in-Chief o£ the Imperial J apanase Forces in the Philippines, and upon the recommendation of the Executive Commission, it is heraby provided that the payment of the real proparty tax for the year 1943 may, in the discretion of the tax-payer, be paid in three installments, as follows: 1. The first installment consisting of one-third of the tax must be paid on or before the 30th day of June, 1943, the second installment consisting of one-third of the tax on or before the 30th day of Saptember, 1943, and the third installment consisting of the remaining one-third of the tax on or before the 31st day of December of the same year. 2_ In case any installment is not paid on or before the dates herein specified, the said installment shall ba delinquent and the taxpayer shall be subject to the penalty provided by law. The taxpayer may make any pal·tial payment on any installment and in case of delinquency the penalty shall be collected only on the unpaid portion of the installment concerned_ 3. The rates of the real property tax for the year 1943 shall be the same as those in force during the year 1942 in the provinces and cities where the tax is collected. Done in the City of Manila Philippines, this 12th day of January, 1943. (Sgd.) JORGE B. VARGAS APPROVED by the Cltai,.,,,an of the E xecutive Con",,·;••ion Director General of the Japanese Military Administration on January 7, 1943_

[21]


EXECUTIVE ORDER No. 124 FURTHER EXTENDING THE PERIOD FOR THE REGISTRATION OF RADIO RECEIVING SETS UNDER EXECUTIVE ORDER NO. 73. Pursuant to the authodty conferred upon me as Head of the Central Administrative Organization by Order No.1 in connection with Order No. 3 of the Commander·in·Chief of the Imperial Japanese Forces in the Philippines, and upon the recommendation of the Executive Commission, the period for the registration of radio receiving sets under Executive Order No. 73, dated Augmst 6, 1942, as extended by Executive Order No. 80, dated August 16, 1942, is hereby further extended to Pebruary 16, 1943. The provincial governors, the Metropolitan Constabulary Commander, and the city mayors concerned shall submit the reports of the registration in their provinces or cities, together with the originals of the registration forms duly accomplished, to the Commissioner of the Interior in time for the latter to receive the reports not later than February 28, 1943, and the Commissioner of the Interior shall submit the consolidated report to the Chairman of the Executive COIlll'lission not later than March 15, 1943. Done in the City of Manila, Philippines, this 16th day of January, 1943. (Sgd.) JORGE B. VARGAS Chai,-ma.n of the Executive Commi88ion APPROVED by the Director General of the Japanese Military Administration on January 16, 19~3.

EXECUTIVE ORDER No. 125 PROVIDING FOR THE EXPEDITIOUS DETERMINATION OF CRIMI· NAL CASES INVOLVING PUBLIC OFFICALS AND EMPLOYEES AND THE SUSPENSION OF ADMINISTRATIVE PROCEEDINGS IN· VOLVING SUCH CASES DURING THE PENDENCY THEREOF. Pursuant to the authodty conferred upon me as Head of the Central Administrative Ol'ganization by Orders Nos. 1 and 3 of the Commander·in· Chief of the Imperial Japanese Forces in the Philippines, and upon the reo commendaton of the Executive Commission, it is hereby ordered that-SECTION 1. Criminal cases against public officials or employees shall have prefel'ence over all other cases, save and except habeas corpus pro· ceedings and criminal cases where the accused are detention prisoners, when the officials and employees charged have not been suspended as a result of administrative charges. Those in which the accused have been suspended shall be heard and decided, in trial courts within three months from the date of the presentation of the complaint or information, and, in appellate courts within one month from the date of their submission thereto for decision.

[22]


SEC. 2. Any administrative proceeding against a public official or em· ployee for a cause of which he is accused before the courts, whether filed before or after the institution of the criminal case, shall be suspended until the criminal case is finally decided, but this shall not preclude the suspension of the official or employee concerned in proper cases, as provided in existing laws, orders, and regulations. SEC. 3. This Order shall take effect on its approval by the Commander· in·Chief of ·the Imperial Japanese Forces. Done in the City of Manila, Pbilippines, this 16th day of January, 1943. (Sgd.) JORGE B. VARGAS Chavrman of the E xecutive Commission APPROVED by the Commander·in·Chief of the Imperial Japanese Forces in the Philippines on January 16, 1943.

EXECUTIVE ORDER Np. 126 PRESCRIBING FILIPI 0 LANGUAGE OR TAGALOG EQUIVALENTS FOR ENGLISH TERMINOLOGIES AND EXPRESSIONS COMMONLY USED IN OFFICIAL CORRESPONDENCE. Pursuant to the authority conferred upon me as Head of the Centml Administrative Organization by Order No.1 in connection with Order No.3 of the Commander·in·Chief of the Imperial Japanese Forces in the Philip' pines, and upon the recommendation of the Commissioner of Education, Health, and Public Welfare and of the Director of the Institute of National Language, the attached Filipino language or Tagalog equivalents for English terminologies and expressions commonly used in official correspondence are hereby prescrihed. Additional lists containing such equivalents will be issued from time to time. All departments, bureaus and offices of the Centra l Administrative Or' ganization, including the judicial courts, the local governments and govern· ment-owned or controlled corporations, are enjoined to use the a ttached Fi· lipino language or Tagalog equivalents whenever necessary in the prepara· tion of official correspondence in the national language (Wikang Pilipino). Hereafter, Tagalog shall be referred to as the Filipino language. Done in the City of Manila, Philippines, this 23rd day of January, 1943. (Sgd.) JORGE B. VARGAS Chai,.,nan of the E xecutive Com1l,ission

[23]


Executive Order No. 126, January 23, 1943 English·Tagalog (Wikang Pilipino) Equivalents List No.1 English

Filipino

PHILIPPINE EXECUTIVE COM· MISSION Chairman of the Executive Commis· sion Executive Commission Members:Commissioner of the Interior Commissioner of Finance Commissioner of Agrciulture and Commerce Commissioner of Education, Health, and Public Welfare Commissioner of Public Works and Communications

SANGGUNIANG TAGAPAGPAGA· NAP NG PILIPINAS Pangulo ng Sangguniang Tagapagpa· ganap Sangguniang Tagapagpaganap Mga Kagawad:Komisyonado ng Kagawarang Panloob Komisyonado ng Pananalapi Komisyonado ng Pagsasaka at Pa· ngangalakal Komisyonado ng Pagtuturo, Sanidad at Kagalingang·Bayan Komisyonado ng Gawaing·bayan at Pahatiran

Assistant Commission . of the Inte· rior Assistant Commissioner of Finance

Pangalawang Komisyonado ng Kaga· 'farang Panloob Pangalawang Komisyonado ng Pana· nalapi Pangalawang Komisyonado ng Pagsasaka at Pangangalakal Pangalawang Komisyonado ng Pagtutul·O, Sanidad at Kagalingang· Bayan Pangalawang KomisyonadO ng Gawaing-bayan at Pahatiran

Assistant Commissioner of Agricul· ture and Commerce Assistant Commissioner of Educa tion, Health, and Public Welfare Assistant Commissioner of Public Works and Communications A. Executive Commission 1. Office of the Chairman Chairman of the Executive Com· mission Office of the Assistant to the Chairman (In charge of Govern· ment·owned or Controlled Corpo· rations) Assistant to the Chairman 2. Office of the Executive Secretary to the Commission

Sangguniang Tagapagpaganap Tanggapan ng Pangulo Pangulo ng Sangguniang Tagapagpa ganap Tanggapan ng Katulong ng Pangulo (Katiwala sa mga Samahang Ari 0 Pinangangasiwaan ng Pamahalaan) Katulong ng Pangulo Tanggapan ng Kalihim-Tagapagpaga · nap ng Sanggunian

[24]


F ilipino

English Executive Secretary Administrative Division Administrative Assistant and Chief of Divsion Assistant Gazette and Library Division Technical Assistant and Chief of Division Law Division Legal Assistant and Chief of Division Legislative Division Legislative Secretary (by detail) Secretary to the Council of State Office of the Financial Assistant Financial Assistant and Chief of Division 3. Budget and Auditing Office Auditor General and Director of the Budget Assistants Assistant Auditor Genel'al Assistant Director of the Budget Assistant to the Auditor General and Director of the Budget

Kalihim-Tagapagpaganap Dibisyong Pampangasiwaan Kawaning Tagapangasiwa at Puno ng Dibisyon Katulong, kawani, kasangguni, pangalawa Dibisyon ng Lathalaan at Aklatan Kasangguning Tekniko at Puno ng Dibisyon Dibisyon sa Batas Kasangguni sa Batas at Puno ng Di路 bisyon Dibisyon sa Pagbabatas Kalihim sa Pagbabatas (nakatalaga) l(alihim ng Sanggunian ng Bansa Tanggapan ng Kawani sa Pananalapi Kawani sa Pananalapi at Puno ng Dibisyo Tanggapan ng Badyet at PagsusuTi Tagasuring P anJahat at Patnugot ng Badyet Mga Katulong, kawani, kasangguni, pangalawa Pangalawang Tagasuring Panlahat Pangalawang Patnugot ng Badget KatuJong ng Tagasuring PanJahat at Patnugot ng Badyet

4. Bureau of Civil Service Chief of the Civil Service Assistant Chief of the Civil Service Boards of Examiners

Kawanihan ng Serbisyo Sibil Puno ng Serbisyo Sibil Pangalawang Puno ng Serbisyo Sibil

6. Bureau of Purchase and Supply

Kawanihan sa Kagamitan ng Pamahalsan P atnugot ng Kawaniban sa Kagamitan ng Pamahalsan Pangalawang Patnugot ng Kawanihan sa Kagamitan ng Pamahalaan

Director of Purchase and Supply Assistant Director of Purchase and Supply

Mga Lupong Tagasulit

[25]


E nglish

li'i li1,ino

6. Bureau of Pl'inting Director of Printing

Kawanihan ng Palimbagan P atnugot ng Kawanihan ng Palim· bagan Pangalawang Patnugot ng Kawaniban ng Palimbagan

Assistant Director of Printing 7. Government·owned or Controlled Corporations

Mga Samabang An 0 Pinangangasiwaan ng Pamahalaan

B. Department of the Interior

Kagawarang Panl06b

1. Office of the Commissioner

Tanggapan ng Komisyonado Komisyonado ng Kagawarang Panlo6b • Tanggapan ng Pa ngalawang Komisyonado Pangalawang Komisyonado ng Kaga. war ang PanJ06b

Commissioner of the Interior Off ice of the Assistant Commissioner Assist ant Commi ssioner of the Interior

Kawanihan ng mga PamahaJaangBayan Tanggapan ng Patnugot Pa tnugot Ta nggapan ng PangaJawang Patnu got Pangalawang Patnugot

2. Bureau of Local Governments Office of the Director Director Office of the Assistant Director Assistant Director

!C{nvanihan ng mga Kostable Tanggapan ng Patnugot Pa tnugot Ta nggapan ng mga KatuJong na Patnugot . Pangalawang Patnugot

3. Bureau of Constabulary Office of the Director Director Office of the Assistant Directors Assistant Director

Kawanihan sa mga Bagay-bagay ukol sa Relihy6n Patnugot P angaJawang Patnugot Punong Tagapangasiwa

4. Bureau of Religious Affa irs Director Assist ant Director Administrative Officer 5. Burea u of the Census and Statistics Office of the Director Director Assistant Director

Kawanihan ng Sen so at Bayan Tanggapan ng Patnugot Patnugot Pangalawang Patnugot

[26]

Talang-


Enq&h C. Department of Finance L Office of the Commissioner Commissioner of Finance Assistant Commissioner's Office Assistant Commissioner of Finance 2. Bureau of the Treasury National Treasurer 3. Bureau of Customs and Internal Revenue Director of Customs and Interna\ Revenue Assistant Director of Customs and Internal Revenue 4. Bureau of Financing Director Assistant Director 5. Public Employees Life Insurance Director and Actuary 6. Philippine Charity Sweepstakes Director Assistant Director D. Department of Justice L Office of the Commissioner Commissioner of Justice Office of the Assistant Commis· sioner Assistant Commissioner Division of Provincial Fiscals, Clerk of Courts and Sheriffs Code Committee Chairman Members S. Bureau of Justice Solicitor General First Assistant Solicitor General Solicitors

Kagawar{m ng Pananalapi Tanggapan ng Komisyonado Komisyonado ng Pananalapi Tanggapan ng Pangalawang Komisyo· nado Panagalawang Komisyonado ng Pa· nanalapi Kawanihan ng Ingatang·Yaman Tagaingat-Yamang Pambansa Kawanihan ng Adwana at Rentas Internas Patnugot ng Adwana at Rentas Intel'· nas Pangalawang Patnugot ng Adwana at Rentas Internas Kawanihan sa Pananalapi Patnugot Pangalawang Patnugot Pagpapasiguro sa mga Kawan! ng Pamahalaan Patnugot at Aktwaryo Tanggapan ng S\vipstek Patnugot Pangalawang Patnugot Kagawaran ng Katarungan Tanggapan ng Komisyonado Komisyonado ng Katarungan Tanggapan ng Pangalawang Komis· yonado Pangalawang Komisyonado Dibisyon ng mga Piskal ng Lalawi · gan, Kalihim ng Htikuman at Serip Lupon sa Kabatasan Pangulo Mga Kagawad Kawanihan ng Katarungan Tagausig ng Pamahalaan Unang Katulong na Tagausig ng Pamahalaan Mga Tagausig

[27]


English

Filipino

3. Bureau of Prisons Director of Prisons Assistant Director of Prisons Correctional Institution for Women Superintendent Davao Penal Colony Agricultural Division Industrial Supervisor

Kawanihan ng Bilangguan Patnugot ng Bilangguan Pangalawang Patnugot ng Bilangguan Bahay-Wastuan ng mga Babae Tagapanihala Bayanan ng mga Bilanggo sa Dabaw Dibisyon Sa Pagsasaka Tagamasid ng Yaring-Kamay

4. Court of Appeals Office of the Justices Pr2siding Justice Office of the Clerk of Court Deputy Clerk of Court Reporter's Divi sion

Hukuman sa Paghahabol Tanggapan ng mga Mahistl'ad o Nangungulong Mahistrado Tanggapan ng Kalihim ng Hukuman Pangalawang Kalihim ng Hukuman Dibisyon ng Tagakuhang-Tala

5. Courts of Firs Insta nce District I

Mga Htikumang Unang Dulugan Purok I

6. Justice of the Peace Courts Justices of the Peace Judges'at-Large

Mga Hukumang Pamayapa Mga Hukom Pamayapa Mga Hukom-Pangkahitsaan

E. Department of Commerce

Ag~'iculture

and

1. Office of the Commissioner

Commissioner of Department Office of the Assistant Commis路 sioner 2. BU1'eau of Agricultural Administration Director Administration and Proj ects Division Administl'ative Officer Agriculturist Rural Cooperative and Farm Security Division Senior Rural Economist

Rural Economist

Kagawaran ng Pagsasaka at Pangangalakal Tanggapan ng Komisyonado Komisyonado ng Kagawaran Ta nggapan ng Pangalawang Komisyonado Kliwanihan ng Pangangasiwa sa Pagsasaka Patnugot Dibisyon sa Pangasiwaan at mga Balak na Gawain Punong Tagapangasiwa Bihasa sa Pagsasaka Dibisyon sa Usungang Pagsasaka at mga Bukirin Pinunong Dalubhasa sa Kapamuhayan sa Pagsasaka Dalubhasa sa Kapamuhayan sa pagsasaka

[28]


Englu.h

Filipino

3. Bureau of Plant and Animal Industry Director Agronomy and Horticulture Division Animal Husbandry Division Seed Farms Division PI"nt Pest and Disease Division

Kawanihan ng Paghahalaman at Pag路 hahayupan Patnugot Dibisyon sa Paglulupa at Paghabalaman Dibisyon sa Pagpapalahi ng Hayop Dibisyon ng Palabinhian Dibisy6n sa mga Salot at Sakit ng Halaman Dibisy6n sa mga Sakit ng Hayop Dibisyon sa Karunungan sa Buhay at Data P at610g6 Bakteryolog6 Dibisyon sa mga Ani Dibisyon ukol sa Piikinabanging Galing路Hayop Beterinaryo T<iknik6 sa Laboratoryo Dibisyon sa Paghahayupan Dibisyon Tagasaliksik

Animal Disease Division Biologies and Parasiticides Division Pathologist Bacteriologist Plant Products Division Animal Products Division Veterinarian Laboratory Technician Livestock Service Divi on Research Division 4. Bureau of Lands Director Assistant Director Public Lands Division Friar Lands Section Homesteads and Free Patents Section Division of Surveys Cadastral Surveys Section

Kawanihan ng mga Lupain Patnugot Pangalawiing Patnugot Dibisyon ng mga Lupaing Bayan Pangkiit ng mga Lupang路Pryale Pangkiit sa mga Homsted at Patente

5. Bureau of Forestry and Fishery

Kawanihan ng Kagubatan at Pangisdaan Dibisy6n sa Pangangasiwa ng Kagubatan at P8..Iabuyang-Hayop Dibisy6n sa Pananaliksik at Pag-aaral ukol sa Kagubatan Dibisy6n ng mga Pangisdaan

Dibisyon sa Panunukat Pangkiit sa P agpapasukat-Lupii

Division of Forest and Range Management Division of Forest Studies and Research Division of Fisheries 6. Bureau of Science Clerical Sel'vice

Kawanihan ng Karunungan Plilingkurang Pangkawani

[29]


F,1ipmo

Research and Technical Service Power Plant Service Museum Service Library Service Miscellaneous Service 7. Bureau of Commerce and Industries Director Assistant Director Administrative Division Cash and Property Section Records Section Trade Regulation and Securities Division Retail Trade and Cooperative Division Commercial Intellig nee Division Indust r ial Division 8. Bureau of Mines Director Administrative Division Mining and Metallurgical Division Geology Division Mineral Lands Administration and Survey Division 9. Weather Bureau Director Office of the Director Meteorologist Observer Observer-Forecaster F. Department of Education, He.alth, and Public Welfare 1. Office of the Commissioner

Commissioner

Plilingkuran sa Pananaliksik at Teknik6 Palingkuran ng Planta Elektrikli Plilingkuran ng Museo Plilingkuran ng Aklatan Plilingkurang Pan sari-sa ring Bagay Kawanihlin ng Pangangalakal at Hanapbuhay Patnugot Pangalawling Patnugot Dibisy6ng Pampangasiwaan Pangkat ng Ingatang-Yaman at ArIarian Pangkat ng mga Kasulatan Dibisy6n ng Panutuhan sa Kalakalan at mga Paninindigan Dibisy6n sa Tingian at Usungan Dibisy6ng Tagasubaybay sa KalakaIan Dibisy6n sa Hanapbubay Kawanihan ng mga Mina Patnugot Dibisyong Pampangasiwaan Dibisy6n sa Pagmimina at Pagsusuri ng Metal Dibisy6n sa Pagsusuri ng Lupa Pangasiwaan ng Lupang may Mina at Dibisyon sa Panunukat Kawanihan ng Panah6n Patnugot Tanggapan ng Patnugot Dalubhasa sa Kalagayan ng Panahon Manghihimasfd Manghihimasfd-Manghihinula Kagawaran ng Pagtuturo, Sanidad at Kagalingang-Bayan Tanggapan ng Komisyonado Komisyonado

[30]


Filipino

English

Office of the Assistant Commissioner Assistant Commissioner

Tanggapan ng Pangalawang Komisyon ado Pangalawang Komisyonado

2_ Bureau of Public Instruction Director Assistant Director Curriculum and Instruction Division Vocational Division Field Personnel Division Superintendents

Kawanihan ng Pagtuturo Patnugot Pangalawang Patnugot Dibisyon ng Takdang-Aralin at P agtuturo Dibisyon sa Panghilig-Kabuhayan Tauhang P anIabas Mga Patnubay ng P aaralan

3_ Bureau of Private Education

K{l\vanihan ng P aaralang Pribado Patnugot Pangalawang P atnugot Patnubay sa mga Pagsusulit at Punong Tagapangasiwa Tagamasid ng mga Mababang PaaraIan

Director Assistant Director Superintendent f Examinations and AdministJ:a -ve Officer Supervisor of Elementary Schools 4_ Bureau of Physical Education

Kawanihan ng Palakasan

5_ Bureau of Health

KawaniMn ng Sanidad Mga Ispektor Pampurok Pangkat na Tagapangasiwa sa Sanitarya sa mga Lungsod at Lalawigan Pagsisiyasat sa Pagkain at Yaringgamot Pangkat ng Pag-aalaga ng Maysakit Dibisyon Laban sa Salot Pangkat sa Pagsugp6 ng Tisis Pangkat sa pagsugpo ng Ketong Pagamutan ng mga Ketongin sa KahigitJlaang Luson Bayanan ng mga Ketongin sa Kulyon Himipilang-Pagamutan sa Kabilrulan at lGinika sa Saklt ng Bal at sa AlMy Pangkat sa Pagsugp6 ng Malarya Pangkat sa Kalusugan ng Sangg61 at Ina

District Inspectors Section of Health Administration in Cities and Provinces Food and Drug Inspection Section of Nursing Division of Epidemiology Tuberculosis Control Section Section of Leprosy Control Central Luzon Leprosarium Culion Leper Colony Bicol Treabnent Station and Albay Skin Clinic Section of Malaria Control Section of Child and Maternal Health

[31]


English

Filipino

Section of Industrial Hygiene

Pangkat sa Ihiyeneng Panghanapbuhayan Pangkat sa Inhinyerya Sanitarya P angkat sa P agbibigay-Iaban sa Sakit Mga Pangkat na Tagapagbakuna Dibisyon ng mga P iigamutan Pambansang P agamutan ng mga Nasisiraang-Bait Pagalingan sa Paliguang-BukSl sa Sibol Dibisy6n ng Kwarentenas

Section of Sanitary Eng ineering Section of Immunization Vaccinating Parties Division of Hospitals National P sychopathic Hospital Sibul Springs Sanatorium Division of Quarantine 6. Bureau of Public Welfare Director Assistant Dil.:ector Tenement Houses Administration Di vision of General Welfare Public Assistance Section Employment Section Memorial Hospital for the Crippled and Infirmed Probation and P arole Unit Institutional Placement and Foster Home Care Welfareville Institutions Medical Service Educational Service 7. University of the Philippines Office of the President President Vice-President Administrative Division Grounds and buildings Superintendent of Grounds and Buildings Coll ege of Medicine

Kawanihan ng KagaJingang-Bayan Patnugot Pangalawang P atnugot Pangasiwaan ng mga Bahay-P iiupahan ng P amahalaan Dibisyon ng Kagalingang P anlahat P angkat sa Pagtulong na Pangmadl li Pangkat sa P agbibigay ng H anapbuhay Pang-alaalang P agamutan ng mga Lumpo at Mahihina Langkay ng Paglayang Subok at Pa nsamantalang Laya P agtataJaga sa mga Bahay-Ampunan at PagpapaunJad ng P angangalaga sa Pamamahay Mga Bahay-Ampunan sa Welfareville P alingkuran sa Panggagamot Palingkuran sa P agpapamul at P amantasan ng Pilipinas Tanggapan ng P angulo Pangulo Pangalawang-PanguJo Dibisy6ng P ampangasiwaan Mga Bakuran at mga Gusali Tagapanihala ng mga Bakuran at mga Gusali Dalubhasaan sa P anggagamot

[32]


Engli8k

Filipino

Clinical Studies and Research

Mga Pag-aaral sa Klinika at Pananaliksik

Anatomy Physiolog y and Biochemi stry Professor and head Pathology and Bacteriolo gy Phannaco logy Division of Physical Therapy Medicine Associate Professor and Chief, Clinical Laborato ries Chemist Research fellow Professor ial lecturer Division of Physical Therapy Surgery Obstetrics Pediatric s Gynecology Institute of Hygiene Director (by detail) Assistant Director (by detail) School of Dentistry College of Veterinar y Science College of Agricultu re Dean Secretary Director of Research (by detail) Departme nt of Agronom y Departme nt of Soils Departme nt of Animal Husbandr y Professor

Anatomy a Karunung ang ukol sa buhay at kimikang ukol sa buhay Propesor at puno Patolohya at Bakteryol ohya Parmakol ohya Dibisyon ng Pagbibiga y-Iunas sa mga Sakit Medisina Ka tulong na Propesol' at Puno ng mga Laborato ryong Pangklin ika Kimiko Dalubhas a ing mananali ksik Propesor na tagapana yam Dibi syon ng P agbibigay -Iunas sa mga Sakit Pagtistis Kal'unun gan sa Pagpapaa nak Kal'unung an sa Sakit ng mga Bata Karunung an sa Karamda man ng Babae Surian ng Ihiyene Patnugot (nakatala ga) Pangalaw ang Patnugot (nakatala ga) Paaralan sa Sakit ng Ngipin D:ilubhas aan sa Beterinar ya Dalubhas aan sa Pagsasak a Dekano Kalihim Patnugot sa P a na naliksik (nakatala ga) Sangay sa Paghahal ama n at Paglu lupa Sangay ukol sa mga Lupa Sangay sa Pagpapal ahi ng mga Hayop Propesor

[33]


Engltsh

Filiptno

Associate Professor Instructor Department of Rural Economics

Kasamang Propesor Guro Sangay sa Kapamuhayan sa Pagsasaka Paara){m ng Kagubatan Dekano at Propesor sa Karunungan sa PagdadaJig Katulong sa Pagkilala ng LamangGubat Katulong sa Pangangasiwa ng Kagubatan Katulong sa Pag-uri ng Kahoy Guro sa Katutubong Kasaysayan ng mga Halaman Guro sa Karunungan ukol sa mga Kulisap sa Gubat Pagamutan sa Los Banyos Dentista Mga nars Mga lingkod Tagapagluto Aklatang Pambansa Tanggapan ng Patnugot Pangalawang Patnugot at Dahil sa Katungkulan ay Puno ng TanghaIan ng Sining at Kasaysayan Dibisyon ng Pilipinyana Dibisyon ng Tanghalan ng Sining at Kasaysayan Dibisyong Ingatfm ng mga Kasulatang Pambayan Dibisyon sa Pagsangguni sa mga Aklat Katulong sa Aklatan Dibisyon sa Pagpapahirlim ng mga Aklat Katulong sa Pagpapahiram ng mga Akllit Dibisyon ng mga ayos na Tlilaan at Pagpapatala ng mga Pagkamayakda

School of Forestry Dean, Professor of Lumbering Assistant in Forest Botany Assistant in Forest Management Assistant in Wood Technology Instructor in Dendrology Instructor in

~orest

Entomology

Los Banos Infirmary Dentist Nurses Attendants Cook 8_ National Library Office of the Director Assistant Director (Ex-Officio Chief of Gallery of Art and History Division) Filipiniana Division Gallery of Art and History Division Division of Archives General Refel-ence Division Libl-ary Assistant Circulation Division Cil-culation Assistant Catalog and Copyright Division

[34]


Filipino

English 9, Institute of National Language

Director Secretary and Executive Officer Language Researcher tenographer Junior Language Researcher and Chief Clerk Junior Language Researcher, Librarian, and Property and DisbUl'sing Officer Emergency employees and laborers 10, Philippine General Hospital

Surian ng Wikang Pambansa Patuugot Kalihim at Punong-Tagapagpaganiip Mananaliksik ng Wika Takigrapo Pangalawiing Mananaliks!k ng Wika at Punong Kawan! Pangalawiing Mananaliks!k ng Wikii, Tagaingat-aklat, Katiwala ng Ariarian at Tagabayad Mga kawan! at manggagawang pangkagipitan P iigamutang Panlahat ng Pilipinas 'Ilanggapan ng Patnugot Patnugot Patnubay Sangay sa Panggagamot Pinur;lOng Na niniraha ng Manggagamot Kasamang Naninirahang Manggagamot Sangay sa Pagtistis Sangay sa Karamdaman ng Babae Sangay sa Pagpapaanak Sangay sa mga Sakit ng Bata Sangay sa Sakit sa Mata, Tainga, Dong, at Lalamunan Sangay ng mga Laboratoryo Surian sa Rayos-X at Radyoterapya

Office of the. Director Director Superintendent Department of M'edicine Senior Resident Ph sieian Associate Resident Physician Department of Surgery Department of Gynecology Department of Obstetrics Department of Pediatrics Department of Eye, Ear, Nose, and Throat Department of Laboratories Institute of X-Ray and Radium Therapy G, Department of Public Works and Communications

Kagawal'an ng Gawaing-Bayan at Piihatiran

L Office of the Commissioner

Tanggapan ng Komisyonado

Commissioner of Public Works and Comrnunica tions

Private Secretary Japanese Interpreter Stenographer Special Agent

Komisyonado ng Gawaing-Bnyan at Plihatiran Sariling Kalihim Interpreteng Hap6n Takigrapo Tanging KiitiwaJa

[35]


EnglUih

Filipino

Office of the Assistant Commis. sioner Assistant Commissioner

Tanggapan ng Pangalawang Komis. yonado Pangalawang Komisyonado

2. Bureau of Public Works Director Assistant Director Supervising Mechanical-Electrical Engineer Law-Clerk Division of Construction Supervising Engineer District Engineer Division of Bridges and Port Works

Kawanihang ng Gawaing-Bayan Patnugot Pangalawang Patnugot Tagamasid na Inhinyerong MekanikoEh\ktriko Kawaning Pambatas Dibisyon ng mga Payariin Inhinyerong Tagamasid Inhinyerong Pampurok Dibisyon ng mga Tul8.y at Gawain sa Daungan Dibisyon sa Padaluyang.tubig Puno ng Dibisyon Inhinyero sa Pagpaplano Inhinyerong Sibil Tagapag-anyo ng Plano Katulong na Tagapag-anyo ng Plano

Division of Hydraulics Chief of. Division Designing Enginee Civil Engineer Draftsman Assistant Draftsman 3. Bureau of Communications Director Assistant Director Post Office Service and Mail Transportation Division Superintendents Assistant Superintendent Postmaster Mail Supervisor Letter Carrier Electrical Communications Division Superintendent Assistant Superintendent Postal Savings Bank and Money Order Division 4. Bureau of Transportation Director

Kawanihan ng Pahatiran Patnugot Pangalawang Patnugot P alingkuran ng Kore6 at Dibisy6n 1!8 Pagpapahatid ng Liham Tagapanihala Pangalawang Tagapanihala Postmaster Tagamasid ng Kore6 Kartel'o Dibisyon ng mga Pahatiran sa ElektriM Tagapanihala Pangalawang Tagapanihala Bangko Postal at Dibisyon ng Hiro Postal Kawanihan ukol sa mga Sasakyan Patnugot

[36]


Filipino

English Assistant Director Division of Motor Vehicles Shipping Division Navigation Division Division of Hulls and Boilers Marine Construction and Repair Division Division of Animal Drawn Vehicles Division of Transportation Utilities 6. Bureau of Public Utilities Director Assistant Director Administrative and Records Division Chief of Division Cashier and Disbursing Officer Inspection, Engineering and Re路 search Division

Pangalawang Patnugot Dibisyon ng mga Sasakyang May路 MotOr Dibisyon ng mga Sasakyang-Dagat Dibisyon sa Paglalayag Dibisyon ng mga Lunas ng Daong at mga Kaldera Dibisyon sa mga Payariin sa Sasakyang-dagat at sa Pagpapaayos Dibisyon ng mga Sasakyang Hinfhila ng Hayop Dibisyon ng mga Kapakanan sa PanIulanan Kawanihiin ng Kapakanang-Bayan Patnugot Pangalawang Patnugot Dibisy6ng Pampangasiwaan at ng mga Kasulatan Puno ng Dibisyon Kahel10 at Tagabayad Dibisyon ng Pagsisiyasat, Inhinyerya at Pananaliksiik

E. Supreme Court of the Philippines

Kataastaasang Hukuml\n ng Pilipinas

1. Office of the Chief Justice The Chief Justice Office of the Justices Associate Justices Clerk of Court Calendar Clerk Judgment Clerk Docket Clerk Bailiff

Tanggapan ng Panguiong Mahistrado Ang Pangulong Mahistrad o Tanggapan ng mga Mahistrado Mga Mahistrado Kalihim ng Hukuman Tagatala ng mga Araw ng Paglilitis Tagatala ng mga Hatol Tagatala ng mga Usapin Katulong ng Serip

Provincial Government Provincial Government ofProvincial Officials Provincial Governor Provincial Treasurer Provincial Fiscal

Pamahalaang Lalawigan Pamahalaang Lalawigan ngMga Punong Lalawigan Punong Lalawigan Tagaingat-yamang Lalawig,.n Piskal ng Lalawigan

t37]


English

Filipino

Provincial Board Provincial Board Members

Sanggiiniang Lalawigan Mga Kagawad ng Sanggiiniang Lalawigan Serip ng Lalawigan

Provincial Sheriff City of Manila Mayor of the City of Manila

Assistant Mayor for Manila Assistant Mayor for Pasay President of the Municipal Board of Manila City Fiscal City Treasurer City Engineer Chief of Police Judges of the Mu icipal Court City Health Officer Chief of the Fire Department City Assessor First Assistant City Fi scal Second Assistant City Fiscal City of Baguio Mayor of ...... ... . Members of the City Council .... City Attorney Municipal Government ofOffice of the Mayor Mayor Vice Mayor

Lungs6d ng Maynila Alkalde ng Lungs6d ng Maynila o Alkalde ng Maynila Katulong na Alkalde sa Maynila Katulong na Alkalde sa Pasay Pangulo ng Sanggiiniang Munisipel ng Maynila Piskel ng Lungs6d Tagaingat-yaman ng Lungs6d Inhinyero ng Lungs6d Puno ng Pulis Mga Huk6m sa Hiikumang Munisi路 pal Puno ng Sanidlid ng Lungs6d Puno ng Sangay ng Pamatay-Sunog Tagataya ng Lungs6d Unang Katulong ng Piskal ng Lungs6d Pangalawang Katulong na Piskel ng Lungs6d Lungs6d ng Bagy6 Alkalde ng .. .... . . _... . Mga Kagawad ng Sangguniang Munisipal ......... _.. . .. . Mananangg61 ng Lungs6d Pamahalaang Bayan ngTanggapan ng Alkalde Alkalde Pangalaweng Alkalde

Municipal Secretary Ml\nicipal Councilors

Kalihim ng Sanggunieng Bayan Mga Kagawad ng Sanggiiniang Bayan

Municipal Treasurer Chief of Police

Tagaingat-yamang Bayan Puno ng Pulis

[38]


Enulish

Filipin o

1st Indorsement Manila. . . ......... ...• 194---

Unang Paglilipat Maynila. . .. . __ . _....• 194---

Respectfully referred to the Honorable •.. . .......... .. .• Manila.

Mapitagang itinutukoy sa Marangru na ............• Maynila.

Respectfully referred to the Honorable. ... . ...........• Manila. Advice of the action taken hereon will he appreciated.

Mapitagang itinutukoy sa Marangal na ... . _. _.... _. _.. .• Maynila. Ang patalastas sa hakbanging iniukol dito ay paMhalagaMn.

Respectfully referred to the Honorable. . .... .... _. . . . . . . . . .• Manila. requesting appropriate action. advice of whlch will he appreciated.

Mapitagang itinutukoy sa Marangal na .. _......... _.....• Maynila. hinihingi ang tumpak na hakbangin. at ang .kaukulang patalastlis. ay pahahalagaMn.

Respectfully forwarded to His Excellency. the Chairman of the Executive Commission.

Mapitagang itinutul6y sa Kaniyang Ka mahalan. P a ngulo ng Sangguniang Tagapagpaganap .

RespectfuIly submitted to the Honorable. . .... .. __ . . . . ...... _.. . . . .

Mapitagang isinasailalim sa MarangaL na ... ... .. _.. . ... . . _..

Respectfully submitted to the Director, . . ..................... .. . .. .

M pitagang ipinadadala sa P atnugot•........ _.......... . o

Mapitagang inililipat sa Patnugot. Respectfully returned to the ..... . · .... . . . ..... _- ..... _. . .. with the information that .... _...... _... ... .

Mapitagang ipinababalik sa ..... . . . . . . . . . . . .• kalakip ang pagbibigayalam na ... . .... . _.... _.. .

RespectfuIly returned to the Administrative Officer. Department of · ... . ...... . .... . • contents noted.

Mapitagang ipinabiibalik sa Punong Tagapangasiwa. Kagawaran ng .. . . . . . . . . . . . . . .• na batid na ang nilalaman.

Respectfully referred to the Honorable. _..........• Manila. A copy of thls letter has been referred to the · ... .. ...... .. _. for his information and appropriate action, in connection with the request of the Wl'iter for reinstatement and payment of unpaid salaries. Advice of the action taken hereon will be appreciated.

Mapitagang itinutukoy sa Marangal na ............. . .. • Maynila . Ang isang salin ng liham na itO ay itinukoy sa .. _...... . ... _...• upang su makaalaman niya at mapagukulan ng tumpak na hakbangin hlnggfl sa kahilingan ng sumulat na mahalik sa kaniyang tungkulin at mlibayaran ang sahod na hindi pa naipagkakal06b. Ang patalastas sa hakbanging iniukol dito ay pahahalagaMn.

[39]


English

Filipino

Respectfully referred to the Honorable. _________ __ _______ • Manila. A

Mapitagang itinutukoy sa Marangal na ..... . ... . .......• Maynila. Ang isang salin ng liham na may lagda ng isang nagngangalang Juan de la Cruz ay itinukoy ngayon araw na ito sa Komisyonado ng Katarungan.

copy of the letter signed by one Juan de la Cruz has today been referred to the Commissioner of Justice. Respectfully referred to the Honorable. the ..........• Manila. for appropriate action and advice of find ings.

Mapitagang itinutukoy sa Marangiil na .... .. ...... .. .... Maynila. upiing miipag-ukulan ng tumpak na hakbangin at ipatalastas ang naging wakas ng pagsisiyasat.

Respectfully referred to the Honor· able. the . _............• Manila. for investigation and report.

Mapitagang itinutukoy sa Marangal na ..... . .......... Maynila. upang siyasatin at pag·ukulan ng ulat.

Respectfully referred to the Honorable. the ............• Manila. inviting attention to the contents of the within communica~on. and requesting appropriate action on the matter. The complainant has been advised of this reference.

Mapitagang itinutukoy sa Marangal na ........... . .... Maynila. at inaanyayahan ang kaniyiing pansin sa niliilaman ng liham na nasa loab nito. at hinihingi ang tumpak na hakbangin sa bagay na ito. Ang nagsusumbong ay pinatalastasan ng pagtukoy na ito.

Respectfully referred to the Honorable. the Commissioner of Education. Health. and Public Welfare. Manila. for his guidance in connection with the pending investigation now being conducted jointly by the l'epresentatives of the Bureau of Public Instruction and the Bureau of Civil Service on the same charges.

Mapitagang itinutukoy sa Marangal na Komisyonado ng Pagtuturo. Sanidad. at Kagalingang-Bayan. Maynila. upiing maging saligiin niyii sa nakatakdang pagsisiyasat na kasalukuyang isimlsagawa ng mga kinatawan ng Kawanihan ng Pagtuturo. at ng Ser· bisyo Sibil sa mga sumbang ding nasabi.

Respectfully referred to the Honorahle. . .............• Manila. in connection with our 1st indol'sement to him dated May 23. 1941. on the same matter. and requesting advice of the action taken thereon. The petitioners have been advised of this reference.

Mapltagang itinutukey sa Marangal na .. ............. Maynila. hinggil sa aming Unang Paglilipat sa kaniya noang ika 23 ng Mayo. 1941. ng nasabing bagay. at hlnihinging mangyaring ipatalastas ang hakbanging iniukol dito. Ang mga may-kahilingan ay pinagpatalastasan sa pagtukoy na ito.

[40]


English.

Filipirw

Respectfully transmitted to the Hon· orable, the .. . .. .... ..... .. ... , Ma· nila.

Mapitagang ipinadadala sa Mara· ngal na .............. , Maynila. o Mapitagang inililipat sa Marang8! na . ........ . .... , MayniJa.

Respectfully transmitted to the Honorable; the .. . .... . ....... , Ma· nila, requesting appropriate action and advice thereof, pursuant to Exe· cutive Order No. ........ series of 194 ..•.

Mapitagang ipinadadala sa Mara· ngal na .. . ... . ....... , Maynila, at hinihingi ang tumpak na hakbangin at patalastlis ukol dito, alinsunod sa Kautusang Tagapagpaganap BIg. ... . . .. . , taong 194 . . • . o Mapitagang inililipat sa Marangal na .............. , Maynila, at hinihingi ang tumpak na hakbangin at patalastas ukol dito, alinsunod sa Ka· utusang Tagapagpaganap BIg. taong 194 .....

EXECUTIVE ORDER

No. 127

RULES AND REGUDATIONS GOVERNING THE CONSTRUCTION, MAINTENANCE AND OPERATION OF CERTAIN FISHING GEAR FOR THE CATCHING OF FISH AND FISH fRY. Pursuant to the authority conferred upon me as Head of the Central Administrative Organization by Order No. 1 in connection with Order No. 3 of the Commander.in·Chief of the Imperial Japanese Forces in the Philip' pines, and upon the l'ecommendation of the Executive Commission, it is hereby ordered thatSECTION 1. No person, association or corporation shall construct, main· tain, and operate any fishing gear, device or apparatus \vithin the territorial waters of the Philippines for the catching of fish and fish fry, or for the handling (buying, transporting and selling) of such fry, \vithout securing the necessary license therefor from the Director of Forestry and Fishery, or his duly authorized representative. Such license shall be issued yearly and be subject to sucb rules or regulations as may be promulgated by the military or naval authorities. SEC. 2. Applicants for licenses shall submit the following information: (a) Name, nationality, a nd address. (b) Description of kind of fishery. or fishing. (c) Gross tonnage and horse·power ratings of fishing vessel or vessels employed. (For water·craft of under three tons the length and beam).

[ 41j


(d) Construction and size of fishing apparatus employed. (e) Amount of capital invested. (f) Place 01' area of operation. (g) E stimate tons 01' tiklis of annual catch of principal fishes. (h) Markets where fish are to be sold. SEC. 3. Before a license for the operation of a fishing gear may be issued, the applicant shall first pay the corresponding annual fees as provided below: ARONG .... . ... . . .. ... . .... .. ... . ....... . .. .. .... . P60.00 AZAR . .. . . ...... . . .... .....•. ... . . ........• . .. .... 5.00 BADIA . .. ....... .. . . ......... .. .. . . .... . .. .. . .... . 8.00 BAJAN ..... . . .... ... . ....... ... ........... .. .... ,. 40.00 BAKLAD in inland, inshore, and off·shore waters, ex· cepting in Pansipit River, outlet of Taal Lake; in Butas River, outlet of Nauj an Lake ; and in Lake Mainit \vith its outlet: 10.00 For 3 meters deep and less .... . .... . . .... .... . .... . 25.00 Over 3 meters but not exceeding 5 meters deep .. . ... . 50.00 Over 5 meters deep ............ . ... . .... .. . . ..... . 30.00 BALING (Baring) . ........ .. .... . ................. . 6.00 BANUAR . . . . . ............... .... . .. . .......... . . . BASNIG : 70.00 F or 5 to 7 br zas long . . . . . . . . .. . . ........ . ..... . . Over 7 to 9 brl/zas long ...... .. . .. ................ . 100.00 Over 9 brazas long .... . ........... .. .....•... . . .. . 150.00 25.00 BATING ...... ... ......... . .. .. .. .. .. . .. . . .... . . .. . 60.00 BAYACOS . . . . .. . ............... .. ...•.. ... ........ 50.00 BAYOT ........... ..... .. . . .......... . .. .... .... . . . BIRA Y CON DACLIS .................. .. .......... . 300.00 6.00 BITANA (Camlad) .. . . .......... . . . .. ... . . . ....... . 40.00 BOTICHE ... .. ... . .. . . . . ....... . ................. . 8.00 BUGCAT ... . ... . .. . .. .. . , .. . .. .. ....... . . . .... ... . 40.00 BUNTOG .. ..... ....... .. ... . ....•........ .. . ... ... 80.00 CABIAO ... .. .. . . . .. . .... ... .. ... ... ... .. ........ . . 6.00 CAMLAD (Bitana) ..... . ...•....... .. . .. . .. ... .... . 18.00 CARAINAS ... . .. . ..... ..... . ... .. ........ ... ..... . CAROD COD : 5.00 Up to 100 meters long ...... ..... .. ..... ... ....... . 10.00 Over 100 to 200 meters long ... . .... . . .... .. . ...... . 15.00 Over 200 to 300 meters long . ... . . .. . ..... . .... . ... . 25.00 Over 300 meters long .... .. .............. ......... . CAYACAS: F rom 50 to 100 meters long ................. . ..... . 100.00 Over 100 to 200 meters long ....... . .. .... . . . .. . .. . . 200.00 Over 200 meters long .. ... . . .. . • . . . . ....... . ....... 400.00 CHINCHORRO: 60.00 F rom 30 to 50 meters long ..... . .... ... ....... ... .. .

[42]


Over 50 to 100 meters long . . ... ... ......... . ...... . 100.00 Over 100 meters long ... . ..... . ..... . ..... •.... .... 150.00 COLOCOTOC .. .. . . ........ ... . .. ........ .... ... •... 12.00 CONAY . . . ....... . .. .. . .... •.. ... ....•.... ... ..•... 40.00 CUBCUB: Up to 16 brazas long . .........•........... . .... . ... 50.00 Over 16 br azas long ... . ...• .. ......... . •.. .. ...... 100.00 DACLIS DE IPON: Up to 75 meter s long . . . .... . ..... . .. .. ...... . .. . . . 22.00 Over 75 to 100 meters long .. . . ..... .. •... .... ..•... 50.00 Over 100 to 150 meters long .. .. . .. .... .... . ....•... 70.00 Over 150 meters long .... . ........ ... • .. . ... • ...... 90.00 DIACOS (Dayacos) .. ..... .. ... ...... . . •. . •...•..•. . 10.00 DAYACOS (Diacos ) ... ... . . . ..........•............ 10.00 DONDON .............. . . . .. .... . . .•. ... . ....• .. •.. 10.00 HOOK AND LINE with light . ......... . ............ . 10.00 IW AG (Lawag, sapiao con luces) . ... . ... . . .•. .....•. . 250.00 JALANG .. .. . ...... .. ..... .. .. .... .. .......... ... . 40.00 LABAC . . ......... .....................•........... 10.00 LARGARETE ....... . .. . . .. .. .. ......... . .•... .. ... 25.00 LAW AG (Iwag, sapiao Con luces) ...... . . .. . ........ . 250.00 LIGCUP ...... ...... .. . .. . . ... . ... ..• . ...... ....... 20.00 MUROAMI .. . . ........ . . .... . . •........•. ... .... 100.00 OANGA . .. ..... .... . . . • . . . . .. . ... . ..... . ...•. . •. 10.00 ODAOD ...... . . ... ..... . ... ................ . ..... . 8.00 PABHAS ...... .. .... . ..... ... .. .. ............... . 16.00 PALALANG .... ........... . ........... . .. . ....... . 140.00 PALNED (Bintol ) .......................... .. ..... . 6.00 PALOCSO ... .... ... . ... .. . . . .. . ....... .. ....... . . . 40.00 PANG·ILAW . . ........... ... ..... .. . . .... . ........ . 30.00 PANGILID . .... . ...... .... . ...... . .... .. .. .. ... .. . 5.00 PANTE ANOD .... . ..... . ..... . ..... . . .. .... . .... . 20.00 PANTE PAGIBAS: From 10 to 50 meters long .. .........•...... .... ... . 6.00 Over 50 to 100 meters long . .... . ........... . .. .. .•. 15.00 Over 100 to 200 meters long .... . .. .. . ... . . . ....... . 30.00 Over 200 meters long .. ... . ......................•. 50.00 PANTE PANG TANI GUE ... ..... .. .. .. .. . ........ . 5.00 PARAYPARAY .......... . .. . .... . ....... . . .. . .... . 5.00 PASABING ............ ........... . . .... . ...... . .. . 10.00 6.00 POBOT . .............. •..• .. •.. .. ... . .... .. .. .. ... . POCOTAN ...... .... ... . . .. . ... .. . . .. .. ..... . . .. . . . 24.00 PONGPONG ........ .. . . . . ... .. ...... . ...... .. .... . 40.00 6.00 POTOS ............... .... .. .. .. .. ... ............. . PUKOT DALAG . . .......... .... . . .. . ......... .. .. . 20.00

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PUKOT KANDULE: From 4 to 7 meters long .. . . . ..... ... .......... . . . . 30.00 Over 7 meters long ... . ..... . .. .. . .... •. . .. . . . .. ... 40.00 SADING .... . ... .. ..... ..... . . . . .. . . .. . •. . ... . .. ... 6.00 SA LAP P AMBALAO . . ... . ... .. . . • .... . . .. .. .... •.. 20.00 SALAP (Sarap): F rom 7 to 15 meters long . . . . ...... . .... . .... . .. .. . 10.00 Over 16 to 40 meters long . ... . . . .. ... .. .. .. . .. .... . 20.00 Over 40 to 50 meters long ...... . . .. . . .. . .. . . . ... .. . 30.00 Over 60 to 100 meters long . .. .. ....... .. . .. . ...... . 50.00 Over 100 meters long .. . . ... . ... . .... .. .. .. ... ... . . 100.00 SALAPAN . . .... ...... .... . .... : ... . . . ... .. .. .. . . . . 20.00 SANAPLIT . .. ......... ..... . .. . .. . . ....... . ... . . . . 10.00 SAPIAO CON LUCES (Lawag, iwag) ... ...... . . . .. . 250.00 20.00 SARAP BANATA .......... . . . ..... . . .. .......... . . 6.00 SIBIDSIBID (Sibidsibiran) . . . .. .. . . . . ....... . ..... . 6.00 SIGAY . ... .. . .. . . . . . .... .... . . . •. . . .... . .... . . ... . 5.00 SILOT .... . ............ . .. . . .. . . ... ..... .. .. ...... . 40.00 SUAL CON LUCES . . .... .... . .. ... . . . . . . ... . .... . . 12.00 TABUG . . .... . . . . .... . .... . . .... .. . . .. ..... .. .. . . . . 10.00 TACSAY ..... . . ... . .• . ... .. . . . . .. . . .... . .... . ... . 80.00 TALACUB .. . . . . .. . . .. .. . .. . . .. . . .. ..... .. .. . .. .. . . 6.00 TAN GAR ... ....... . . .. .. . .. . ... ... ... . . ... .. . . .. . 30.00 TAQUILES . ... . ... . .. . ......... . .... .•. ... . .... . 5.00 TI ·ID .. .... .. .. ....... . .... . .. . . .. . .... . . .... . . ... . UTASE . . .... . . . . . .. . . . . . . ..... . . .... . . . .... .... .. . 100.00 For the use or operation of fishing gear or apparatus not enumerated in this section, applicat ions shall be fil ed, giving thel'ein a complete description and dimensions of the gear to be used upon which, if found simHar to any of the fi shing gear or apparatus mentioned above, shall be levied and col· lected the corresponding annual fee. For the privilege of handling (buying, transporting, and selling) of fish fry, an annual license fee of P20.00 shall be collected. No fi sh cor rals or set nets shall be constructed or placed within two hundred (200) met ers of each other in marine fish eries or one hundred (100) meters in fresh·water fi sheries, unl ess they belong to the same licensee and previously approved by the Director of Forestry and Fishery. SEC. 4. The exclusive privilege of erecting fish corrals in Taal Lake and its outlet, Pansipit River; Lake Na ujan and its outlet, Butas·Lumang· bayan River; Lake Mainit and its outlet and in other waters, as may be found necessary, and of catching fish fry, for such period of time as may be deter· mined by the Director of Forestry and Fishery, shall be awarded to the higb · est bidder in a public auction to be conducted by the said Director or his duly authorized representative, at designated times and places. All bids must be sealed and must have enclosed therewith cash or certified check for ten per centum of the amount of the bid, which amount shall be retained in case the bid is accepted, as part payment of the fee. The advertisement or

[44]


notice calling for bids sball contain tbe location of fisb corrals or fisb -fry ground, the date and exact time when the bids received sball be opened and considered and otber particulars regarding the matter. Absolutely no bids shall be accepted afte{t路 the time limit fixed in the advertisement or notice ~hall bave expired. Tbe advertisement herein required sbould he given tbe greatest possible publicity by printing tbe same in the Official Gazette or in a local newspaper baving a ,vide circulation for not less than six days or by posting it for a like period in at least four public places in the community where tbe contract shall be executed or enforced. In addition, copies of such advertisement sbould be mailed to parties likely to be interested therein in order to invite the necessary competition, and thus be able to obtain the most satisfactory bid. Tbe Director of Forestt路y and Fishery may requi re the contractor to give an adequate bond to secure proper compliance with tbe terms of the contract and with the provisions of existing laws and regulations. SEC. 5. Any person, association or corporation operating a fisbing gear or handling fish fry shall, in addition to the payment of tbe license fees provided in Section 3 of tbis Order, pay a fee of P1.00 per ton of fisb caught or P1.00 per 10,000 fry in the case of fish fry. The operator shall make a daily record of the tonnage of fish or numper of fish fry caught, whicb shall be submitted month! to the municipal treasurer of t he locality or to the Bureau of Forestry and Fishery, Manila, and of the corresponding fees paid therefor. The fee shall be paid not later than the 10th day of the month: P"ovided, That, if the tOtal gllOSS tonnage during the month for which payment is being made does not exceed one ton, such person, association or corporation operating a fishing gear shall be exempt from the payment of the tonnage fee herein required. SEC. 6. The fees required in this Order shall be paid to the treaSUl"er of the city or municipality where the licensee or operator resides, or to the Bureau of Foresh'y and Fishery, Manila: P".ovided, That only one payment and only in one place shall be made for a given fiscal year: and P.rovided, further, That no other taxes or fees, a side from those required in this Order, sball be levied upon, or collected from, licensees or operators of fisbing boats, gear, devices or apparatus, or handlers of fish fry. SEC_ 7. All fees collected as prescribed in Section 3, paragraph 1 of this Order ,vith the exception of those for IWAG, LAWAG, SAPIAO CON LUGES, UTASE and similar fishing gear or apparatus as provided for in paragraph 2 of the same Section, shall accrue to the municipality wherein the licensee is resident or in the case of concession, to the municipality wherein the concession is located. All fees collected in accordance with this Order excepting those as provided for in tbe foregoing paragraph sball accrue to the CentI'a! Administra tive Organization. SEC. 8. Fishing gear, devices or apparatus operated by persons, asso. ciations or corporations who refuse or f a il to obtain or renew the r equired license on or before June 30tb of each year or to pay the fees required in Section 5 hereof on or before the date fixed therein sha ll be subj ect to confis-

[45]


cation by the Govel·nment. The operator or operators of such fishing gear, devices or implements and, in case of associations or corporations, the presi· dent or manager of same shall be subject to a fine of not exceeding two hundred pesos, or imprisonment of not more than six months, or both, in the discretion of the court. SEC. 9. For the purpose of enforcing the provisions of this Order and the Fishery Laws, provincial govel'nors, provincial treasurers, city mayors, city treasurers, municipal mayors, and municipal treasurers are hereby de· signated as deputies of the Director of Forestry and Fishery. In the enforce· ment of this Order and the Fishel'y Laws, the deputies designated herein shall act in accordance ,vith the instructions of the Director of Forestry and Fishery provided they are not inconsistent with the present circumstances. The proVincial governor or the municipal mayor concerned acting as his de· puty shall continue to issue permits for fishing in fishponds or fish beds owned by private persons or for selling fish caught therein or in any territorial waters in the Philippines: P"ovided, That in the issuance of such per· mita they shall, as provided in Executive Order NIO. 81, dated August 26, 1942, be guided by the needs of the Imperial Japanese Forces who shall have priority in buying fish. SEC. 10. All Ol'ders, regulations and municipal ordinances or resolutions, or parts thereof, i consistent ,vith the provisions of this Executive Order, are hm:eby revoked. Contracts or agreements entered into by and between municipal officials an third parties relative to the grants of exclusive privilege in fishing over any portion of the terl'itol'ial waters of the Philippines shall automatically terminate one year after the promulgation of this Executive Order unless such contract or agreement expires before such date. SEC. 11. This Order shall take effect upon its approval by the Commander-in-Chief of the Imperial Japanese Forces. Done in the City of Manila, Philippines, this 23rd day of January, 1943. (Sgd_) JORGE B. VARGAS APPROVED by the Chai1"1nan of the Executive Commission Dit'ector General of the Japanese Military Administration on January 22, 1943.

EXECUTIVE

ORDER

No. 128

RULES AND REGULATIONS PRESCRIBING CITATIONS, REWARDS OR DECORATIONS OF PEACE OFFICERS Pursuant to the authority conferred upon me as Head of the Central Administrative Organization by Order No.1 in connection with Order No.3 of the Commander-in-Chief of the Imperial Japanese Forces in the Philippines and upon recommendation of the Executive Commission, it is hereby ordered that-

[46]


SECTION 1. The Commissioner of the Interior, the Mayor of the CiSy of Manila, or the Provincial Governor concerned shall decorate, grant rewards to, or make citations of, any peace officer who is considered a model of gallantry and devotion to duty for special meritorious sel'vices rendered in connection with the following: (a) In arresting, killing or pacifying any bandit or bandits or in searching or an'esting any felonious criminal or criminals; (b) In saving the life of a Japanese or a Filipino who is a man of importance and entrusted with an impol·tant mission; (c) In Pl'otecting an important article, installation or establish· ment, or in stabilizing the popular sentiment with a view to maintaining peace and order; a nd (d) In accomplishing his duty, braving all sorts of danger, in time of emergency or calamity. SEC. 2. The exaltation of the meritorious services of peace officers con· templated in this Order shall consist of the following: (a) Citation; (b) Citation ,vith reward; and (c) Distinguished service medal and diligence chevron. SEC. 3. The citation shall be made by the Mayor of the City of Manila or the provincial governor concerned upon the recommendation of the corre· sponding senior inspector of Constabulary. The citation ,vith reward shall likewise be granted by the Mayor of the City of Manila or the governor concerned upon similar l' commendation when the amount of the reward does not exceed 1'50.00. When the Mayor of the City of Manila or the governor concerned considers it necessary to grant a reward exceeding, 1'50.00, he may recommend the case to tbe Commissioner of the Interior who, upon the recommendation of the Director of Constabulary, may authorize the reward in an amount not exceeding 1'100.00. SEC. 4. The distinguished service medal shall be bestowed upon any peace officer rendering meritorious services of extraordinary character who may be a model of gallantry and devotion to duty. Such medal shall be worn by the recipient at the right breast of his tunic. Any peace officer receiving a distinguished service medal may, however, be granted simulta· neously the citation with reward. The distinguished service medal may be conferred by the Commissioner of the Interior upon the recommendation of the Director of the Constabulary and the Mayor of the City of Manila or the provincial governor concerned. An additional allowance not exceeding 1'10.00 per month shall be granted to any peace officer who is the recipient of the distinguished service medal. SEC. 5. The diligence chevron shall be bestowed by the Commissioner of the Interior, upon the recommendation of tbe Director of the Constabulary and the Mayor of the City of Manila or the provincial governor concerned, on any peace officer who has served more than three consecutive years and who comes within the purview of the following: (a) Good moral character and right conduct;

[47]


(b) Diligence in the performance of his duties; and (c) Proficiency in the discharge of police matters. Tbe diligence chevron shall be worn by the recipient in the right upper arm of his uniform. An additional allowance not exceeding PlO.OO per month may, in the discretion of the Commissioner of the Interior, be granted to the recipient of the chevron, who has served more than five consecutive yea.rs. SEC. 6. The form of the distinguished service medal and diligence chevron shall be provided for separately by the Commissioner of the Interior upon the recommendation of the Director of the Constabulary. SEC. 7. In the case of the City of Manila, the rewards and additional monthly allowances provided for in this Order shall be paid from the funds of the City. ' SEC. 8. The rules and regulations provided herein shall be enforced be路 ginning January 10, 1943, and any peace officer coming within the purview hereof as of January 2, 1942, may be decorated or granted reward or citation in accordance with the rules and regulations provided herein. Done in the City of Manila, Philippines, this 25th day of January, 1943. (Sgd.)

JORGE B. VARGAS

Chai?"mClllt of the Execuf:i1Je Commis8ion

APPROVED by the Commander路in路Chief of the Imperial Japanese Forces in the Philippines on January 25, 19~.

EXECUTIVE ORDER NO. 129

DECLARING MONDAY, FEBRUARY 8, 1949, A SPECIAL PUBLIC HOLIDAY WHEREAS, on January 28, 1943, Premier General Hideki Tozyo in his address befol'e the 81st Imperial Diet made the solemn declaration tpat "on condition that further tangible evidence of cooperation is actively demonstrated it is contemplated to put into effect the statement made previously on the question of Philippine Independence in the shol'test possible time"; WHEREAS, this declaration reaffirms in a most solemn manner his former statement of January 21, 1942, as to Japan's policy to grant independ, ence to the Philippines; WHEREAS, the freedom and independence of the Philippines are and have always been the supreme aspiration of the Filipino people; and WHEREAS, it is but fitting and proper that the Filipino people as a whole, should express their sincere appreciation of and profound gratitude for this declaration of the illustrious Premier of Japan and that a day be set aside for this purpose; NOW, THEREFORE, pursuant to the authority conferred upon me as Head of the CEmtl'al Administrative Organization by Order No. 1 of the

[48]


Commander-in-Chief of the Imperial Japanese Forces in the P hilippines, and upon the recommendation of the Executive Commission, I do hereby declare Monday, February 8, 1943, a special public holiday in order to enable the officials and employees and the public at large to properly observe the day_ Done in the City of Manila, Philippines, this 1st day of February, 1943_ (Sgd_) JORGE B. VARGAS Chadrman of the Executive Commission APPROVED by the Director General of the Japanese Military Administration on February I, 1943_

EXECUTIVE ORDER NO. 130

PRESCRIBING' THE LEGAL FEES IN THE JUDICIAL COURTS Pursuant to t e authority conferred upon me as Head of tbe Central Administrative Organization by Order No.1 in connection with Order No.3 of the Commander-in-Chief 0 the Imperial Japanese Forces in the Philippines, and upOn the recommendation of the Exec~tive Commission, the following regulations governing t e collection of legal fees in the Judicial Courts, are hereby promulgated: SECTION 1. Fees in h. Cow-t of Appeals and in the Sup'-Mne Cow-t shall be as follows.(a) For filing an action, proceeding, records on appeal, entering appearance of the parties, entering orders of the Court, filing and docketing all motions, docketing of case on all proper dockets, and indexing the same, entering, recol'ding and certification of judgment to the lower court, taxing the costs, administering all necessary oaths 01' affirmation in the action or proceeding, recording the opinion of the court, and issuing all necessary process in the action or proceeding not herein otherwise pl'ovided for, each action 01' special proceeding, thirty pesos. (b) For furnishing transcripts of the record or copies of any record, judgment, or entry of which any person is entitled to demand and receive a copy, for each one hundred words, twenty centavos. (c) For each certificate not on process, one peso_ (d) For every search for anything above a year's standing and reading the same, one peso. (e) For a commission on all money coming into the hands of the Clerk of Court by law, rule or order of the court and caring for the same, one-half of one per cent on all sums not exceeding two thousand pesos and one-quarter of one per cent upon aU sums in excess of two thousand pesos, and one-eight of one per cent on aU sums in excess of twenty thousand pesos.

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SEC. 2. Fees in the Courts of First Instance shalt be as follows : (a) For filing an action or pl'oceeding a nd for all services in the same, if the sum claimed, exclusive of interest a nd damages, or the value of the property in litigation, or the value of the estate, is: (1) Less than 1'200 .................. .. ..... . ......... . P 8.00 (2) 1'200 or more but less than 1'600 .................... . 10.00 (3) 1'600 or more but less than 1'1,000 . ................. . 12.00 (4) 1'1,000 or more but less than 1'2,000 ................. . 14.00 (5) 1'2,000 or more but less than 1'3,000 ........•.... . .... 16.00 (6) 1'3,000 or more but Jess tban 1'5,000 ......... . ...•.... 26.00 (7) 1'5,000 or more but less than 1'10,000 . .. . .. . ........ . 30.00 (8) 1'10,000 or more but less than 1'20,000 .......•........ 36.00 (9) 1'20,000 or more but less than 1'30,000 ... . ...... . .... . 40.00 (10) 1'30,000 or more but less tban 1'40,000 ...... . ........ . 46.00 (11) 1'40,000 or more but ~ess than 1'50,000 .... . ....... . .. . 60.00 (12) 1'50,000 or mor but less than 1'60,000 .... . ......... . 76.00 (13) 1'60,000 or more but less tban 1'70,000 ................ . 80.00 (14) 1'70,000 or more but less than 1'80,000 ..... : .... . ... . 110.00 (15) 1'80,000 or more but Jess than 1'90,000 ...........•.... 130.00 (16) 1'90,000 or more but less than 1'100,000 ......... .. .. . 160.00 (17) And for eacb 1'1,000.00 in excess of 1'100,000 ..... . .. . 2.00 (18) When the value of tbe case cannot be estimated . .... . 160.00 (19) When the case does not concern property (naturalization, adoption, divorce, etc.) .............. . ............ 30.00

P"ovided, how eve,., That all cases of guardianship proceedings in which the gross value of the estate involved does not exceed thl'ee hundred pesos, sball be exempt from any payment of filling fees and other expenses. If the case concerns real estate, the assessed value thereof shall be considered in computing the fees. In case the value of the pt'operty or estate or the sum claimed is less op more in accordance with the appraisal of the court, the difference of fee shall be refunded or paid as the case may be. (b) For certifying the official act of a justice of the peace or other certificate, with seal, two pesos. (c) For certified copies of any paper, record, decree, judgment of entry of which any person is entitled to demand and receive a copy, for each one hundt'ed words, twenty centavos. (d) For the services of all clerks of court in the performance of their duties in all criminal proceedings, twenty pesos shall be collected. (e) For all clerical services in the allowance of \viUs, granting letters of administration, appointment of guardians, trustees, settle· ment of the accounts of executors, administrators, guardians, trustees, and recording final and interlocutory orders and judgments therein, filing of inven tory and appraisements, and for all other work ' as clerk

[50]


pertaining to anyone estate, fees payable out of the estate shall be collected in accordance with the value of the property involved in the proceedings as follows: (1) Less t han P3,000 .. . ........... . .............. . ... . P 16.00 (2) P3,000 or more but less t han P5,000 .... . ..... . .... . .. . 25.00 (3) P5,000 or more but less than PlO,OOO ......... . . . ... . . 30.00 (4) P10,000 or more but less than P20,000 • . .•..•.••. . . •.. 50.00 (5) P20,000 or more but less than P30,000 . . ..•. ..... . .... 100.00 150.00 (6) P30,000 or more but less than P40,000 ....•.....•...•. (7) P40,000 or more but less than P50,000 .. . ............ . 200.00 250.00 (8) P50,000 or more but less than P60,000 ... . •. .. ..... .• . 300.00 (9) P60,000 or more but less than P70,000 . . ............. . (10) P70,000 or more but less than P80,000 . . .. ........ . .. . 350.00 (11) PSO,OOO or more but less than P90,000 ........... • . .. . 400.00 (12) P90,000 or more but less than P100,000 .............. . 450.00 (13) And PlOO,OOO ..... .. ................... . ... ...... . . 500.00 plus one peso for each one thousand in excess. If the va lue of the estate as definitely a ppl'aised by the court, after deducting the a mount of the claims allowed against it, is more or less than the value declared in the application, the difference of the fee shall be paid or l'efunded as the case may be. (f) For a commission on all money coming into the hands of the Clerk of Court by law, rule or order of court a nd caring for the same, one· half of one per centum on all sums not exceeding two t housand pesos, and one·qua1·tel· of one per centum upon all sums in excess of two thousand pesos, but not in excess of twenty thousand pesos, a nd one'eighth of one per centum on a ll sums in excess of twenty thousand pesos. For any other services as clerk, not provided for in t his section, if such there be, such sum as the Commissioner of Justice may fix. SEC. 3. Fees in the J"sUee of the Peace and Municipal Cow·tIl shall be as folLows: (a) For each criminal proceeding, including preliminary in' vestigations, five pesos, to be paid by the accused upon conviction. (b) For each civil action, f ive pesos, but all cases of summa ry settlement of estates of deceased persons in which the gl'oss value of the estate involved does not exceed three hundred pesos, shall be exempt from the payment of filing fees and other expenses. (c) For taking affidavit, one peso. (d) For taking acknowledgment, one peso and fifty centavos. (e) For writing and certifying depositions, including oath, per one hundred words, or fractional part thereof, twenty centavos. (f) For certified copies of any r ecor d, per one hundred words, or fractional part thereof, twenty centavos. (g) For stamping and r egistel;ng books, as required by articles nineteen and thirty·six of the Code of Commerce, each book two pesos.

[51]


(h) For performing notarial 路 acts for which fees are not specifically fixed in this section, the same fees which notaries public are entitled to receive.

The foregoing fee schedule shall be posted in a conspicuous place in the office of every justice of the peace or municipal judge_ SEC. 4. Effectivity.-This Order shall take effect upon its approval by the Commander-in-Chief of the Imperial Japanese Forces in the Philippines. Done in the City of Manila, Philippines, this 1st day of February, 1943_ (Sgd.) JORGE B. VARGAS Ghai1-man of the Erx:ecutive Gommis"ion APPROVED by the Commander-in-Chief of the Imperial Japanese Forces in the Philippines on February 1, 1943_

[52]


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Hi. Excellency, Lieutenant-Ge,.eral Sizuiti Tanaka, Commande,. in -Chief of the hn'Pe,--ial, JapanÂŁ.e F01-ce. in the Philippine., leads the chee,-. for the rap1d establWtment of a rejuvenated Philippine. ",t the ceremony commemorating the First A nniveTsa", of the Establi.hment ~f tlte Philippine E x ecutiv e Co"""i.sion_


The Di"eotor'General of the Japanese Milita'"1J Administ"ation makeB an offering to the spirits of war dead on the F irBt Attniver路 Bat"jJ of the Occupation of Mattila, Januat"jJ 2, 191.11.


The Commander-in-Chief of the bnperial Japanese F orces in tk e P hilippines and the Command",,- -in-Chiej oj the !?nperial Japwnese Navy in Ph:ilippine Waters acknowledge the felicitations of Ma,1'ila ,-esidents on the occasion 0/ the second New Yea,-'s Day celeb,-ation held by the ImlJ erial J apanese FOl-ces_

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Profile for Filipiniana Online

Official Journal of the Japanese Military Administration Vol. No. 9  

Official Journal of the Japanese Military Administration Vol. No. 9