Page 1

45 th Anniversary Special Edition

FIELDING ADVANCES


2

FIELDING ADVANCES | 2019

FIELDING GRADUATE UNIVERSITY | www.fielding.edu

3

FOCUS Winter 2019

President Katrina S. Rogers, PhD Associate Director, Media & Communications Starshine Roshell Art Director Audrey Ma FOCUS is published by Fielding Graduate University 2020 De la Vina St. Santa Barbara, CA 93105

INSIDE THIS ISSUE

FIELDING.EDU Please send reader responses to Starshine Roshell at sroshell@fielding.edu © 2019 Fielding Graduate University. All rights reserved. No portion of this publication may be reproduced in any form without prior written permission from Fielding Graduate University.

4

BOARD OF TRUSTEES

5

ABOUT FIELDING

6

10

INSTITUTE FOR SOCIAL INNOVATION

11

A STUDENT AT THE START

SCHOOLS & PROGRAMS

12

7

14

FIELDING BY THE NUMBERS

8

TIMELINE

ACHIEVEMENTS

OUR COLORFUL HISTORY

16

FIELDING UNIVERSITY PRESS

18

ALONSO CENTER FOR PSYCHODYNAMIC STUDIES

19

BROADENING PARTICIPATION IN STEM DEVELOPMENT

20

WHERE MY PASSIONS ARE

21

FIRST-TIMESCHOLARSHIP

21

ALUM DONATES $1 MILLION FOR LIBRARY

22

FIELDING SUPPORTERS

23

FROM RECIPIENT TO DONOR

24

COMMITTING NOW FOR A BETTER FUTURE

25

MASTER’S & CERTIFICATE GRADUATES

26

DOCTORAL GRADUATES

I

A Letter from the President

n research, there is a moment when the data begins to reveal a pattern. What an exciting moment this is! If you have experienced this feeling while conducting research at Fielding, I invite you to remember the joy of seeing your research question begin to connect to real social phenomena. Patterns are what help us make sense of the world around us. My mother sewed. She sewed our clothes; she sewed for other families. Occasionally, she bought a store bought pattern, usually Butterick or McCall. Once, as I was struggling to get a pattern aligned with the fabric, she reminded me that the magic of sewing lies not in precision, but in thinking of oneself as the conduit between the whole cloth and the dress it could become. The pattern, she said, is the way to make sense of what is underneath, but it is not the only story. Patterns, she went on, are a guide but not a precise roadmap. I recently recalled this wisdom while reading about the sculptor Michelangelo. He was often heard to remark that one doesn’t create a sculpture from stone, but rather a sculpture reveals itself through careful observation and “listening” to the stone.

“Fielding is a sculpture in progress; a set of data in which patterns are revealed.”

Similarly, Fielding is a sculpture in progress; a dress being made; a set of data in which patterns are revealed. As we enter our 45th anniversary year, what is being revealed is the essential quality of our fabric, a beautiful, shimmering piece of cloth in whose creation we are all participating—not necessarily in a precise way, but certainly in a loving one. The stories told here in this issue show how our work is evolving. Faculty are exploring new areas of scholarship that provide new patterns for practice; new projects are designed using our strengths in psychology, human development, leadership, and educational leadership for change. The pattern that emerges time and again from Fielding is how our core work in scholarship leads to more opportunities for our students, graduates, and faculty. These opportunities strengthen the bonds of our community and release our collective talents to do the essential work necessary to create more humane, just, and sustainable societies.

KATRINA S. ROGERS, PHD President


2

FIELDING ADVANCES | 2019

FIELDING GRADUATE UNIVERSITY | www.fielding.edu

3

FOCUS Winter 2019

President Katrina S. Rogers, PhD Associate Director, Media & Communications Starshine Roshell Art Director Audrey Ma FOCUS is published by Fielding Graduate University 2020 De la Vina St. Santa Barbara, CA 93105

INSIDE THIS ISSUE

FIELDING.EDU Please send reader responses to Starshine Roshell at sroshell@fielding.edu © 2019 Fielding Graduate University. All rights reserved. No portion of this publication may be reproduced in any form without prior written permission from Fielding Graduate University.

4

BOARD OF TRUSTEES

5

ABOUT FIELDING

6

10

INSTITUTE FOR SOCIAL INNOVATION

11

A STUDENT AT THE START

SCHOOLS & PROGRAMS

12

7

14

FIELDING BY THE NUMBERS

8

TIMELINE

ACHIEVEMENTS

OUR COLORFUL HISTORY

16

FIELDING UNIVERSITY PRESS

18

ALONSO CENTER FOR PSYCHODYNAMIC STUDIES

19

BROADENING PARTICIPATION IN STEM DEVELOPMENT

20

WHERE MY PASSIONS ARE

21

FIRST-TIMESCHOLARSHIP

21

ALUM DONATES $1 MILLION FOR LIBRARY

22

FIELDING SUPPORTERS

23

FROM RECIPIENT TO DONOR

24

COMMITTING NOW FOR A BETTER FUTURE

25

MASTER’S & CERTIFICATE GRADUATES

26

DOCTORAL GRADUATES

I

A Letter from the President

n research, there is a moment when the data begins to reveal a pattern. What an exciting moment this is! If you have experienced this feeling while conducting research at Fielding, I invite you to remember the joy of seeing your research question begin to connect to real social phenomena. Patterns are what help us make sense of the world around us. My mother sewed. She sewed our clothes; she sewed for other families. Occasionally, she bought a store bought pattern, usually Butterick or McCall. Once, as I was struggling to get a pattern aligned with the fabric, she reminded me that the magic of sewing lies not in precision, but in thinking of oneself as the conduit between the whole cloth and the dress it could become. The pattern, she said, is the way to make sense of what is underneath, but it is not the only story. Patterns, she went on, are a guide but not a precise roadmap. I recently recalled this wisdom while reading about the sculptor Michelangelo. He was often heard to remark that one doesn’t create a sculpture from stone, but rather a sculpture reveals itself through careful observation and “listening” to the stone.

“Fielding is a sculpture in progress; a set of data in which patterns are revealed.”

Similarly, Fielding is a sculpture in progress; a dress being made; a set of data in which patterns are revealed. As we enter our 45th anniversary year, what is being revealed is the essential quality of our fabric, a beautiful, shimmering piece of cloth in whose creation we are all participating—not necessarily in a precise way, but certainly in a loving one. The stories told here in this issue show how our work is evolving. Faculty are exploring new areas of scholarship that provide new patterns for practice; new projects are designed using our strengths in psychology, human development, leadership, and educational leadership for change. The pattern that emerges time and again from Fielding is how our core work in scholarship leads to more opportunities for our students, graduates, and faculty. These opportunities strengthen the bonds of our community and release our collective talents to do the essential work necessary to create more humane, just, and sustainable societies.

KATRINA S. ROGERS, PHD President


4

FIELDING ADVANCES | 2019

FIELDING GRADUATE UNIVERSITY | www.fielding.edu

Karen Bogart, PhD Chair

President, Smith Bogart Consulting, Santa Barbara, CA

Student Body

Gary Wagenheim, PhD Vice-Chair

Demographics

Adjunct Professor, Beedie School of Business, Simon Fraser University, Vancouver, BC

Manley Begay, PhD Treasurer

Professor, North Arizona University, Flagstaff, AZ

Board of

Trustees

Patricia Zell, JD Secretary

Partner, Zell & Cox Law, Santa Barbara, CA

Nancy Baker, PhD

Diplomate in Forensic Psychology, Half Moon Bay, CA

Karin Bunnell, PhD

Principal, Hatteras Consulting, LLC, Pleasanton, CA

Keith Earley, PhD, JD

Principal, Early Interventions, LLC, Rockville, MD

Anthony Greene, PhD

Faculty Member, Gainesville, FL

Garry Hare, PhD

Faculty Member, Goleta, CA

Linda Honold, PhD

Principal, Strategic Vision In Action, Milwaukee, WI

1% 4%

Asian

Black or African American

12%

Hispanic or Latino

50% 6%

White

Two or More Races

Judith Katz, EdD

5%

Race/Ethnicity Unknown

Tomás Leal, MS

8%

International Students

Executive Vice President, The Kaleel Jamison Consulting Group Washington, DC Senior Director, Research & Development Inclusion Strategy Lead, GlaxoSmithKline, Philadelphia, PA

ABOUT FIELDING

American Indian or Alaska Native

14%

Vision

Educating leaders, scholars, and practitioners for a more just and sustainable world.

Values ACADEMIC EXCELLENCE: We commit to the highest quality scholarship, research, and practice.

Mission

Otto Lee, EdD

President, Los Angeles Harbor College, Wilmington, CA

We provide exemplary interdisciplinary programs within a distributed and relational learning model grounded in student-driven inquiry and leading to enhanced knowledge. This community of scholar-practitioners addresses personal, organizational, societal, ecological, and global concerns in pursuit of a more just and sustainable world.

Shalynda McIvory, MS

Student Member, Snellville, GA

Wayne Patterson, PhD

Professor, Computer Science, Howard University Washington, DC

Katrina S. Rogers, PhD ex officio

President, Fielding Graduate University, Santa Barbara, CA

Sushma Sharma

CEO, Resonate Consulting, New Delhi, India

TRUSTEE EMERITI Michael Goldstein Russ Goodman Bo Gyllenpalm E. Nancy Markle Fred Phillips Connie Shafran Nancy Shapiro

Students

957 Women: 75% Men: 25% Age Range 23 –82 Enrollment:

5

Faculty Total Faculty: 190 Total Staff: 79 Students-to-Faculty:

5:1 Source: Fall 2017 data provided by the Office of Institutional Research

COMMUNITY: We support a collaborative learning environment built on inclusion and mutual respect. DIVERSITY: We commit to having a faculty, staff, and student body that is diverse and inclusive. We embrace and celebrate the wisdom, knowledge, and experiences of our diverse community. LEARNER-CENTERED EDUCATION: We create an interactive experience that responds to the interrelated personal and professional lives of our students. SOCIAL JUSTICE: We commit to advancing equality and justice in our University, and in the local, national, and global communities impacted by our work. TRANSFORMATIONAL LEARNING: We inspire a re-examination of one’s world view and underlying assumptions to enable a deeper understanding of self and society.


4

FIELDING ADVANCES | 2019

FIELDING GRADUATE UNIVERSITY | www.fielding.edu

Karen Bogart, PhD Chair

President, Smith Bogart Consulting, Santa Barbara, CA

Student Body

Gary Wagenheim, PhD Vice-Chair

Demographics

Adjunct Professor, Beedie School of Business, Simon Fraser University, Vancouver, BC

Manley Begay, PhD Treasurer

Professor, North Arizona University, Flagstaff, AZ

Board of

Trustees

Patricia Zell, JD Secretary

Partner, Zell & Cox Law, Santa Barbara, CA

Nancy Baker, PhD

Diplomate in Forensic Psychology, Half Moon Bay, CA

Karin Bunnell, PhD

Principal, Hatteras Consulting, LLC, Pleasanton, CA

Keith Earley, PhD, JD

Principal, Early Interventions, LLC, Rockville, MD

Anthony Greene, PhD

Faculty Member, Gainesville, FL

Garry Hare, PhD

Faculty Member, Goleta, CA

Linda Honold, PhD

Principal, Strategic Vision In Action, Milwaukee, WI

1% 4%

Asian

Black or African American

12%

Hispanic or Latino

50% 6%

White

Two or More Races

Judith Katz, EdD

5%

Race/Ethnicity Unknown

Tomás Leal, MS

8%

International Students

Executive Vice President, The Kaleel Jamison Consulting Group Washington, DC Senior Director, Research & Development Inclusion Strategy Lead, GlaxoSmithKline, Philadelphia, PA

ABOUT FIELDING

American Indian or Alaska Native

14%

Vision

Educating leaders, scholars, and practitioners for a more just and sustainable world.

Values ACADEMIC EXCELLENCE: We commit to the highest quality scholarship, research, and practice.

Mission

Otto Lee, EdD

President, Los Angeles Harbor College, Wilmington, CA

We provide exemplary interdisciplinary programs within a distributed and relational learning model grounded in student-driven inquiry and leading to enhanced knowledge. This community of scholar-practitioners addresses personal, organizational, societal, ecological, and global concerns in pursuit of a more just and sustainable world.

Shalynda McIvory, MS

Student Member, Snellville, GA

Wayne Patterson, PhD

Professor, Computer Science, Howard University Washington, DC

Katrina S. Rogers, PhD ex officio

President, Fielding Graduate University, Santa Barbara, CA

Sushma Sharma

CEO, Resonate Consulting, New Delhi, India

TRUSTEE EMERITI Michael Goldstein Russ Goodman Bo Gyllenpalm E. Nancy Markle Fred Phillips Connie Shafran Nancy Shapiro

Students

957 Women: 75% Men: 25% Age Range 23 –82 Enrollment:

5

Faculty Total Faculty: 190 Total Staff: 79 Students-to-Faculty:

5:1 Source: Fall 2017 data provided by the Office of Institutional Research

COMMUNITY: We support a collaborative learning environment built on inclusion and mutual respect. DIVERSITY: We commit to having a faculty, staff, and student body that is diverse and inclusive. We embrace and celebrate the wisdom, knowledge, and experiences of our diverse community. LEARNER-CENTERED EDUCATION: We create an interactive experience that responds to the interrelated personal and professional lives of our students. SOCIAL JUSTICE: We commit to advancing equality and justice in our University, and in the local, national, and global communities impacted by our work. TRANSFORMATIONAL LEARNING: We inspire a re-examination of one’s world view and underlying assumptions to enable a deeper understanding of self and society.


6

FIELDING ADVANCES | 2019

FIELDING GRADUATE UNIVERSITY | www.fielding.edu

SCHOOL OF PSYCHOLOGY

FIELDING

Doctoral Degrees

PhD, Clinical Psychology Concentrations Forensic Psychology Health Psychology Neuropsychology Parent-Infant Mental Health Social Justice & Diversity

528

cookies ordered and consumed per day at National Session

40

PhD, Media Psychology

Concentrations

Brand Psychology & Audience Engagement Positive Psychology & Media Social Impact of Mobile Media & Immersive Technology

Master’s Degrees

alumni gatherings in the last year

MA, Media Psychology

Certificates

Clinical Psychology, Postbaccalaureate Media Psychology (Media Neuroscience or Brand Psychology & Audience Engagement) Neuropsychology, Postdoctoral Respecialization in Clinical Psychology, Postdoctoral

SCHOOL OF LEADERSHIP STUDIES

CENTERS & INITIATIVES

Doctoral Degrees

The Institute for Social Innovation helps individuals, nonprofits, businesses and government organizations create effective, efficient, sustainable and just solutions to societal problems via research, leadership, and organizational development.

EdD, PhD, PhD, PhD,

Leadership for Change Human Development Infant & Early Childhood Development Organizational Development & Change

Concentrations

Community College Leadership for Change Creative Longevity & Wisdom Dual Language Evidence Based Coaching Inclusive Leadership for Social Justice Leadership for Social & Ecological Sustainability Leadership of Higher Education Systems Media, Technology, & Innovation Organization Development Reflective Practice/Supervision Somatics, Phenomenology, & Communicative Leadership

Master’s Degrees MA, MA, MA, MA, MA,

Digital Teaching and Learning Clinical Mental Health Counseling Couples/Marriage & Family Therapy Infant & Early Childhood Development Organizational Development & Leadership

Certificates

Comprehensive Evidence Based Coaching Educational Administration Evidence Based Coaching for Organization Leadership Organizational Consulting Organizational Development & Leadership Reflective Practice/Supervision

The Marie Fielder Center for Democracy, Leadership, and Education is a multidisciplinary research and advocacy center aimed at advancing diversity and inclusion throughout society.

7

45 students in 11 programs eligible for tuition benefits from the Veterans Administration

$4,716,124

80,000

in grants received at Fielding since 2016

cups of coffee brewed at the Santa Barbara office every year

57

275

National Sessions organized by Debbie Lemke!

grant proposal pages submitted to the National Science Foundation in 2018

The Alonso Center for Psychodynamic Studies aims to expand the application of psychodynamic ideas, treatments, and principles both within the Fielding community and the larger society.

48

countries that Fielding alumni call home

467

Zoom advising appointments with students in last 12 months


6

FIELDING ADVANCES | 2019

FIELDING GRADUATE UNIVERSITY | www.fielding.edu

SCHOOL OF PSYCHOLOGY

FIELDING

Doctoral Degrees

PhD, Clinical Psychology Concentrations Forensic Psychology Health Psychology Neuropsychology Parent-Infant Mental Health Social Justice & Diversity

528

cookies ordered and consumed per day at National Session

40

PhD, Media Psychology

Concentrations

Brand Psychology & Audience Engagement Positive Psychology & Media Social Impact of Mobile Media & Immersive Technology

Master’s Degrees

alumni gatherings in the last year

MA, Media Psychology

Certificates

Clinical Psychology, Postbaccalaureate Media Psychology (Media Neuroscience or Brand Psychology & Audience Engagement) Neuropsychology, Postdoctoral Respecialization in Clinical Psychology, Postdoctoral

SCHOOL OF LEADERSHIP STUDIES

CENTERS & INITIATIVES

Doctoral Degrees

The Institute for Social Innovation helps individuals, nonprofits, businesses and government organizations create effective, efficient, sustainable and just solutions to societal problems via research, leadership, and organizational development.

EdD, PhD, PhD, PhD,

Leadership for Change Human Development Infant & Early Childhood Development Organizational Development & Change

Concentrations

Community College Leadership for Change Creative Longevity & Wisdom Dual Language Evidence Based Coaching Inclusive Leadership for Social Justice Leadership for Social & Ecological Sustainability Leadership of Higher Education Systems Media, Technology, & Innovation Organization Development Reflective Practice/Supervision Somatics, Phenomenology, & Communicative Leadership

Master’s Degrees MA, MA, MA, MA, MA,

Digital Teaching and Learning Clinical Mental Health Counseling Couples/Marriage & Family Therapy Infant & Early Childhood Development Organizational Development & Leadership

Certificates

Comprehensive Evidence Based Coaching Educational Administration Evidence Based Coaching for Organization Leadership Organizational Consulting Organizational Development & Leadership Reflective Practice/Supervision

The Marie Fielder Center for Democracy, Leadership, and Education is a multidisciplinary research and advocacy center aimed at advancing diversity and inclusion throughout society.

7

45 students in 11 programs eligible for tuition benefits from the Veterans Administration

$4,716,124

80,000

in grants received at Fielding since 2016

cups of coffee brewed at the Santa Barbara office every year

57

275

National Sessions organized by Debbie Lemke!

grant proposal pages submitted to the National Science Foundation in 2018

The Alonso Center for Psychodynamic Studies aims to expand the application of psychodynamic ideas, treatments, and principles both within the Fielding community and the larger society.

48

countries that Fielding alumni call home

467

Zoom advising appointments with students in last 12 months


8

FIELDING ADVANCES | 2019

TIME LINE ADVANCING THROUGH THE DECADES

FIELDING GRADUATE UNIVERSITY | www.fielding.edu

Fielding links its computer system to network at UC Santa Barbara via Ethernet for data retrieval and student research

1987

William Maehl named president in January; serves until 1992

Sara Miller McCune named president; serves until 2000

2002

Fielding earns Carnegie Foundation for Advancement of Teaching’s competitive Community Engagement classification Richard Meyers named president in July; serves until 2013

Human Development program founded by Don Bushnell with MA, DHS, & PhD

Fielding Electronic Network (FEN) is developed, allowing staff, students, & faculty to connect anytime, anywhere – electronically

Initiation of MA Plan 3, preparing enrollees for Psychology Doctoral Program

Western Association of Schools & Colleges (WASC) accredits Fielding in June

American Psychological Association accredits Fielding’s Clinical Psychology program in July

  

Donald MacIntyre named president in June; serves until 1999

Fielding and three other higher-ed institutions launch the Center for Advancing STEM Leadership (see p. 19)

2017

2000 2003 2013

Fielding University Press launches to publish books by faculty and alumni (see p. 16)

Fielding publishes A Passion for Adult Learning about Fielding’s history and learning model, by faculty member Keith Melville

Dean Charles McClintock and HOD program founder Don Bushnell create Center for Innovation; later becomes Institute for Social Innovation (see p. 10)

Fielding alum and former trustee Salud Carbajal elected to the United States Congress

  

Alonso Center for Psychodynamic Studies established at Fielding through gift from Anne Alonso (see p. 18)

Fielding acquires Santa Barbara’s historic Hodges Mansion, built in 1921

More than 100 students, faculty, and staff attend Psychology Summer Session at La Casa de Maria in hills above Santa Barbara for first final oral review and Psychology graduation.

First students from partnership with Navajo Nation graduate from Educational Leadership & Change Fielding Institute renamed Fielding Graduate Institute in July

Using Prior Learning Assessment, several students earn their PhDs in education: Peter Gibson, Marvin Kahn, Larraine Matusak, Stanford McDonald, & Reid Strieby

Joseph Handlin becomes Founding Dean for clinical psychology program

  

1978 1991 1976 1974 1982 1977 1993 The Fielding Institute is founded by Frederic Hudson, Hallock Hoffman, and Renata Tesch based on adult learning principles of self-education and experience-based knowledge.

1999 2001 2009 2016

Human & Organizational Development program ranked No. 1 in student satisfaction; Psychology program ranked No. 2, by National Association of Graduate Professional Students Judith Kuipers named president in August; serves until 2009  

First students enrolled in PhD in Media Psychology, first of its kind

Katrina Rogers named president in November

Fielding’s Worldwide Network for Gender Empowerment (WNGE) launches

Fielding’s Inclusion Council formed to strengthen inclusion and diversity throughout university Fielding joins with University of the Virgin Islands for first partnered doctoral program in creative leadership

2005 2018 2014 2006 2015  

Fielding Graduate Institute renamed Fielding Graduate University

Fielding announces MOU with University of District Columbia to create doctoral program in Urban Leadership & Entrepreneurship

Frederic Hudson is named the first university president in March; serves until 1986

1996

First students enrolled in Doctor of Education program in July Anna DiStefano named first provost

Certificate in Evidence-Based Coaching launches in response to demand that coaching become more grounded in theory and research

Fielding acquires doctoral program in infant and early childhood development with emphasis in developmental disorders

National Science Foundation awards nearly $10 million in grants to Fielding and project partners for STEM leadership research/training Alum Dianne Kipnes donates $1 million to support the Fielding library (see p. 21)

Marie Fielder Center for Democracy, Leadership, & Education founded in honor of founding trustee and legendary California educator

9


8

FIELDING ADVANCES | 2019

TIME LINE ADVANCING THROUGH THE DECADES

FIELDING GRADUATE UNIVERSITY | www.fielding.edu

Fielding links its computer system to network at UC Santa Barbara via Ethernet for data retrieval and student research

1987

William Maehl named president in January; serves until 1992

Sara Miller McCune named president; serves until 2000

2002

Fielding earns Carnegie Foundation for Advancement of Teaching’s competitive Community Engagement classification Richard Meyers named president in July; serves until 2013

Human Development program founded by Don Bushnell with MA, DHS, & PhD

Fielding Electronic Network (FEN) is developed, allowing staff, students, & faculty to connect anytime, anywhere – electronically

Initiation of MA Plan 3, preparing enrollees for Psychology Doctoral Program

Western Association of Schools & Colleges (WASC) accredits Fielding in June

American Psychological Association accredits Fielding’s Clinical Psychology program in July

  

Donald MacIntyre named president in June; serves until 1999

Fielding and three other higher-ed institutions launch the Center for Advancing STEM Leadership (see p. 19)

2017

2000 2003 2013

Fielding University Press launches to publish books by faculty and alumni (see p. 16)

Fielding publishes A Passion for Adult Learning about Fielding’s history and learning model, by faculty member Keith Melville

Dean Charles McClintock and HOD program founder Don Bushnell create Center for Innovation; later becomes Institute for Social Innovation (see p. 10)

Fielding alum and former trustee Salud Carbajal elected to the United States Congress

  

Alonso Center for Psychodynamic Studies established at Fielding through gift from Anne Alonso (see p. 18)

Fielding acquires Santa Barbara’s historic Hodges Mansion, built in 1921

More than 100 students, faculty, and staff attend Psychology Summer Session at La Casa de Maria in hills above Santa Barbara for first final oral review and Psychology graduation.

First students from partnership with Navajo Nation graduate from Educational Leadership & Change Fielding Institute renamed Fielding Graduate Institute in July

Using Prior Learning Assessment, several students earn their PhDs in education: Peter Gibson, Marvin Kahn, Larraine Matusak, Stanford McDonald, & Reid Strieby

Joseph Handlin becomes Founding Dean for clinical psychology program

  

1978 1991 1976 1974 1982 1977 1993 The Fielding Institute is founded by Frederic Hudson, Hallock Hoffman, and Renata Tesch based on adult learning principles of self-education and experience-based knowledge.

1999 2001 2009 2016

Human & Organizational Development program ranked No. 1 in student satisfaction; Psychology program ranked No. 2, by National Association of Graduate Professional Students Judith Kuipers named president in August; serves until 2009  

First students enrolled in PhD in Media Psychology, first of its kind

Katrina Rogers named president in November

Fielding’s Worldwide Network for Gender Empowerment (WNGE) launches

Fielding’s Inclusion Council formed to strengthen inclusion and diversity throughout university Fielding joins with University of the Virgin Islands for first partnered doctoral program in creative leadership

2005 2018 2014 2006 2015  

Fielding Graduate Institute renamed Fielding Graduate University

Fielding announces MOU with University of District Columbia to create doctoral program in Urban Leadership & Entrepreneurship

Frederic Hudson is named the first university president in March; serves until 1986

1996

First students enrolled in Doctor of Education program in July Anna DiStefano named first provost

Certificate in Evidence-Based Coaching launches in response to demand that coaching become more grounded in theory and research

Fielding acquires doctoral program in infant and early childhood development with emphasis in developmental disorders

National Science Foundation awards nearly $10 million in grants to Fielding and project partners for STEM leadership research/training Alum Dianne Kipnes donates $1 million to support the Fielding library (see p. 21)

Marie Fielder Center for Democracy, Leadership, & Education founded in honor of founding trustee and legendary California educator

9


10

FIELDING ADVANCES | 2019

FIELDING GRADUATE UNIVERSITY | www.fielding.edu

Striving for Solutions The Institute for Social Innovation supports problem-solving research & training

E

stablished in 2002, Fielding’s Institute for Social Innovation was created to support research, professional development, and organizational consulting projects with more effective, sustainable, or just solutions than current approaches.

“Fielding needed a university-wide unit that could assist in seeking external funding, supporting alumni in their post-graduate scholarship, and experimenting with new ideas for continuing education and consulting,” said Charles McClintock, PhD, dean emeritus and director of the Institute. With a mission to turn knowledge into action, the Institute taps Fielding faculty, students, and alumni across the globe to create opportunities for professionals to create sustainable change in their workplaces and communities. ISI also serves as an incubator for Fielding programs; the university’s successful Evidence Based Coaching program was born out of the Institute for Social Innovation (ISI) in 2005. Because they demonstrated community impact and a strong relationship to student learning, ISI projects were instrumental in earning Fielding the Carnegie Foundation’s esteemed designation in 2005 as an institution of Community Engagement – and Fielding is the first standalone graduate university in the US to earn that distinction. Over the years, ISI has sponsored over 60 projects in Santa Barbara as well as nationally and internationally, drawing upon the globally distributed nature of faculty, students, and alumni. Examples include comparative national research on food assistance programs to measure the performance of Foodbank of Santa Barbara County; professional development via Sustainability Leadership Workshops at the United Nations in Geneva, Switzerland; and organizational consulting to support the development of treatment for combat veterans suffering from PTSD who enter the criminal justice system. Their funding came from more than 30 foundations, corporations, and community agencies, as well as individual donor contributions. ISI also operates a Fellows program offering alumni an academic partner to secure funding or other support for projects that dovetail with ISI’s mission. Current Fellows are working in human development, leadership, media and education, mental and physical health, organizational development and change, sustainability, and diversity and inclusion (see sidebar). In 2014, ISI handed off grant and contract work to Fielding’s Office of Strategic Initiatives and Research, which has expanded the university’s national profile through partnerships and extramural funding from the National Science Foundation and other government agencies. ISI will continue its efforts to support alumni in their post-graduate professional work and to incubate innovative ideas for new programs at Fielding. •

ISI Fellows and alumni (L-R) Kerul Kassel, Trustee Karin Bunnell, Dohrea Bardell, Rebecca Stafford, Gayla Napier, Marie Sonnet, Director of Alumni Relations Hilary Molina, and ISI Director Charles McClintock.

SOCIAL INNOVATION IN ACTION Examples of projects by ISI Fellows over the past few years:

HUMAN DEVELOPMENT

REBECCA STAFFORD, PHD, ’17, HUMAN DEVELOPMENT The Whistleblowers Post-Trauma Recovery Assessment Project LEADERSHIP

A STUDENT AT THE START JERRY JONNSON, PHD, ATTENDED FIELDING IN ITS VERY FIRST YEAR

J

erry Jonnson, PhD, attended Fielding from 1974 to 1976, earning his PhD in Education. He was an adjunct professor in early childhood education at the University of Nevada-Reno and Nevada State Head Start Training Officer when he applied to Fielding. After graduating, he became an evaluation specialist for the National Head Start Office of Child Development, wrote the book Living in Balance: Reshaping the You Within and spoke to numerous organizations on the topic, and consulted throughout the U.S. for the Direct Selling Association.

CARRIE ARNOLD, PHD, ’17, HUMAN DEVELOPMENT The Silenced Female Leader

He is now one of only four certified Tai Chi Chih instructors in the United Kingdom, where he has lived and taught for a year and a half.

MEDIA & EDUCATION

Dr. Jonnson shared some memories of his time at the fledgling Fielding Institute.

CYNTHIA VINNEY, PHD, ’16, MEDIA PSYCHOLOGY The Role of Media in Narrative Identity MENTAL & PHYSICAL HEALTH

ANITA CHAMBERS, PHD, ’09, HUMAN DEVELOPMENT Creating Effective Healthcare Delivery Systems for Developing Countries

ing (If I am not mistaken, there were only five or six) were met by Frederick, Renata and Hallock. I remember their compassionate, intellectual, and challenging input. They were SO good!! Renata was my direct supervisor/guide. To me she was compassionate, understanding, tough (she always strived for perfection—that’s what I loved about her) and she was brilliant in the area of statistics. I can still hear her today, the way she would approach input on my subject matter: always straightforward, with that German accent. I had immense respect for her and the passion she had for her discipline. I was so lucky to have her guidance. Hallock was a hugger; he exuded love and compassion to us. He was a most compassionate man who never, ever raised his voice, regardless of the situation. He was always the calm in the midst of the storm.

WHAT BROUGHT YOU TO FIELDING 45 YEARS AGO? I was looking for a doctor-

ate program that I could participate in and maintain my working profession at the same time. I primarily studied human development/early childhood development.

ORGANIZATIONAL DEVELOPMENT & CHANGE

EKIKA JACOBI, PHD, ’18, ORGANIZATIONAL DEVELOPMENT & CHANGE Cognitive Linguistic Identity Dynamics in Successful and Struggling Organizations SUSTAINABILITY

KERUL KASSEL, PHD, ’11, HUMAN DEVELOPMENT Environmental and Social Sustainability

WHAT WERE FIELDING’S ACADEMICS LIKE BACK THEN? Demanding, yet

accommodating – with the opportunity to study/grow with like-minded/experienced professionals who had a wide Jerry Jonnson and his wife, Daryll swath of background experience in their specialty. Some of my fondest memories are the times when we all would come together to discuss our individual passions. WHAT DO YOU RECALL ABOUT THE FACULTY?

DIVERSITY & INCLUSION

PAM KENNEBREW, EDD, ’15, LEADERSHIP FOR CHANGE Mitigating the Consequences of Incarceration for African American Women

11

Demanding! Compassionate! Understanding!

They were brilliant!

YOU STUDIED WITH FIELDING’S FOUNDERS, FREDERIC HUDSON, HALLOCK HOFFMAN AND RENATA TESCH. WHAT DO YOU REMEMBER ABOUT THEM? The very first small group of students that came to Field-

And I think he did, too.

I had a passion for tennis, as did Frederic. He was a fierce competitor on the court, as was I. We both hated to lose. I have such fond memories of each of us (like combatants) trying to blow the other off the court. I can see him now as I write this, glaring back at me when I won a point. I loved it!

HOW DID THE KNOWLEDGE AND EXPERIENCE YOU GAINED AT FIELDING IMPACT YOUR LIFE? I firmly believe where I am today is, in large

part, due to the experience and guidance given to me by these three influential people. They gave me the roadmap to all the experiences I have encountered in my personal and professional life. They taught me discipline and a commitment to carry forward their wisdom to all those children, families, and audiences that I have spoken my truth to. •


10

FIELDING ADVANCES | 2019

FIELDING GRADUATE UNIVERSITY | www.fielding.edu

Striving for Solutions The Institute for Social Innovation supports problem-solving research & training

E

stablished in 2002, Fielding’s Institute for Social Innovation was created to support research, professional development, and organizational consulting projects with more effective, sustainable, or just solutions than current approaches.

“Fielding needed a university-wide unit that could assist in seeking external funding, supporting alumni in their post-graduate scholarship, and experimenting with new ideas for continuing education and consulting,” said Charles McClintock, PhD, dean emeritus and director of the Institute. With a mission to turn knowledge into action, the Institute taps Fielding faculty, students, and alumni across the globe to create opportunities for professionals to create sustainable change in their workplaces and communities. ISI also serves as an incubator for Fielding programs; the university’s successful Evidence Based Coaching program was born out of the Institute for Social Innovation (ISI) in 2005. Because they demonstrated community impact and a strong relationship to student learning, ISI projects were instrumental in earning Fielding the Carnegie Foundation’s esteemed designation in 2005 as an institution of Community Engagement – and Fielding is the first standalone graduate university in the US to earn that distinction. Over the years, ISI has sponsored over 60 projects in Santa Barbara as well as nationally and internationally, drawing upon the globally distributed nature of faculty, students, and alumni. Examples include comparative national research on food assistance programs to measure the performance of Foodbank of Santa Barbara County; professional development via Sustainability Leadership Workshops at the United Nations in Geneva, Switzerland; and organizational consulting to support the development of treatment for combat veterans suffering from PTSD who enter the criminal justice system. Their funding came from more than 30 foundations, corporations, and community agencies, as well as individual donor contributions. ISI also operates a Fellows program offering alumni an academic partner to secure funding or other support for projects that dovetail with ISI’s mission. Current Fellows are working in human development, leadership, media and education, mental and physical health, organizational development and change, sustainability, and diversity and inclusion (see sidebar). In 2014, ISI handed off grant and contract work to Fielding’s Office of Strategic Initiatives and Research, which has expanded the university’s national profile through partnerships and extramural funding from the National Science Foundation and other government agencies. ISI will continue its efforts to support alumni in their post-graduate professional work and to incubate innovative ideas for new programs at Fielding. •

ISI Fellows and alumni (L-R) Kerul Kassel, Trustee Karin Bunnell, Dohrea Bardell, Rebecca Stafford, Gayla Napier, Marie Sonnet, Director of Alumni Relations Hilary Molina, and ISI Director Charles McClintock.

SOCIAL INNOVATION IN ACTION Examples of projects by ISI Fellows over the past few years:

HUMAN DEVELOPMENT

REBECCA STAFFORD, PHD, ’17, HUMAN DEVELOPMENT The Whistleblowers Post-Trauma Recovery Assessment Project LEADERSHIP

A STUDENT AT THE START JERRY JONNSON, PHD, ATTENDED FIELDING IN ITS VERY FIRST YEAR

J

erry Jonnson, PhD, attended Fielding from 1974 to 1976, earning his PhD in Education. He was an adjunct professor in early childhood education at the University of Nevada-Reno and Nevada State Head Start Training Officer when he applied to Fielding. After graduating, he became an evaluation specialist for the National Head Start Office of Child Development, wrote the book Living in Balance: Reshaping the You Within and spoke to numerous organizations on the topic, and consulted throughout the U.S. for the Direct Selling Association.

CARRIE ARNOLD, PHD, ’17, HUMAN DEVELOPMENT The Silenced Female Leader

He is now one of only four certified Tai Chi Chih instructors in the United Kingdom, where he has lived and taught for a year and a half.

MEDIA & EDUCATION

Dr. Jonnson shared some memories of his time at the fledgling Fielding Institute.

CYNTHIA VINNEY, PHD, ’16, MEDIA PSYCHOLOGY The Role of Media in Narrative Identity MENTAL & PHYSICAL HEALTH

ANITA CHAMBERS, PHD, ’09, HUMAN DEVELOPMENT Creating Effective Healthcare Delivery Systems for Developing Countries

ing (If I am not mistaken, there were only five or six) were met by Frederick, Renata and Hallock. I remember their compassionate, intellectual, and challenging input. They were SO good!! Renata was my direct supervisor/guide. To me she was compassionate, understanding, tough (she always strived for perfection—that’s what I loved about her) and she was brilliant in the area of statistics. I can still hear her today, the way she would approach input on my subject matter: always straightforward, with that German accent. I had immense respect for her and the passion she had for her discipline. I was so lucky to have her guidance. Hallock was a hugger; he exuded love and compassion to us. He was a most compassionate man who never, ever raised his voice, regardless of the situation. He was always the calm in the midst of the storm.

WHAT BROUGHT YOU TO FIELDING 45 YEARS AGO? I was looking for a doctor-

ate program that I could participate in and maintain my working profession at the same time. I primarily studied human development/early childhood development.

ORGANIZATIONAL DEVELOPMENT & CHANGE

EKIKA JACOBI, PHD, ’18, ORGANIZATIONAL DEVELOPMENT & CHANGE Cognitive Linguistic Identity Dynamics in Successful and Struggling Organizations SUSTAINABILITY

KERUL KASSEL, PHD, ’11, HUMAN DEVELOPMENT Environmental and Social Sustainability

WHAT WERE FIELDING’S ACADEMICS LIKE BACK THEN? Demanding, yet

accommodating – with the opportunity to study/grow with like-minded/experienced professionals who had a wide Jerry Jonnson and his wife, Daryll swath of background experience in their specialty. Some of my fondest memories are the times when we all would come together to discuss our individual passions. WHAT DO YOU RECALL ABOUT THE FACULTY?

DIVERSITY & INCLUSION

PAM KENNEBREW, EDD, ’15, LEADERSHIP FOR CHANGE Mitigating the Consequences of Incarceration for African American Women

11

Demanding! Compassionate! Understanding!

They were brilliant!

YOU STUDIED WITH FIELDING’S FOUNDERS, FREDERIC HUDSON, HALLOCK HOFFMAN AND RENATA TESCH. WHAT DO YOU REMEMBER ABOUT THEM? The very first small group of students that came to Field-

And I think he did, too.

I had a passion for tennis, as did Frederic. He was a fierce competitor on the court, as was I. We both hated to lose. I have such fond memories of each of us (like combatants) trying to blow the other off the court. I can see him now as I write this, glaring back at me when I won a point. I loved it!

HOW DID THE KNOWLEDGE AND EXPERIENCE YOU GAINED AT FIELDING IMPACT YOUR LIFE? I firmly believe where I am today is, in large

part, due to the experience and guidance given to me by these three influential people. They gave me the roadmap to all the experiences I have encountered in my personal and professional life. They taught me discipline and a commitment to carry forward their wisdom to all those children, families, and audiences that I have spoken my truth to. •


12

FIELDING ADVANCES | 2019

FIELDING GRADUATE UNIVERSITY | www.fielding.edu

ACHIEVEMENTS GRA N T Student Erek Ostrowski received the Institute of Coaching’s Harnisch Grant for his research on The Experience of Group Coaching as a Setting for Entrepreneurial Learning and Change, March 2018

AWA R D Clinical Psychology faculty member Ruthellen Josselson won the Distinguished Contribution to Qualitative Research Award at the APA Convention, March 2018

R ECOG NITI O N Fielding’s Conclave Leadership Academy was named an Inspiring Program in STEM by Insight into Diversity Magazine, August 2018

AWARD Alum Luis González López was named Inspiring Professor at Tecnologico de Monterrey, the university in Mexico where he teaches, August 2018

AWARD Faculty Fellow Patricia Arredondo was named a Woman of Color Changemaker by the American Psychological Association, August 2018

BOOK ELC faculty member Four Arrows is the subject of a book, The Fearless Engagement of Four Arrows, September 2018

BO O K Alum, adjunct faculty, and ISI Fellow Kerul Kassel authored Developing a Sustainability Mindset in Management Education, April 2018

BOOK Alum and adjunct faculty Christophe Morin authored The Persuasion Code: How Neuromarketing Can Help You Persuade Anyone, Anywhere, Anytime, September 2018

INDUC TION Alum and adjunct faculty Henry Fowler was inducted into the Navajo Nation Hall of Fame, August 2018

BOOK Alum Ilene Wasserman co-authored Peer Coaching at Work: Principles and Practices¸ April 2018

AWA R D Student Franklin Elliott was named Faculty Member of the Year at Navajo Tech, May 2018

AWA R D Students Iya Ritchie, Sonia Rodrigues-Marto, Emily Sinclair, Theresa Southam, and Ashley Roth had the winning research posters at Fielding Summer Session, July 2018

B OOK Alum and adjunct faculty Susan Stillman co-authored The EQ Educator: Integrating Social Emotional Learning into Schools, August 2018

AWA RD Alum Gregory Woo won the Stanley N. Roscoe Aviation Human Factors Award for paper on visual detection of small drones, June 2018

RECO GN ITIO N Fielding was named an Age Friendly University by the Academy of Gerontology in Higher Education, July 2018

13

BOOK Trustee Judith Katz wrote Safe Enough to Soar: Accelerating Trust, Inclusion & Collaboration in the Workplace. November 2018 AWARD Media Psychology student Tatyana El-Kour won Division 52’s Travel Grant for International Psi Chi students at the APA conference, August 2018

BOOK Alum Nora Lester Murad published Rest in My Shade, a book-length poem about displacement featuring Palestinian artists, November 2018

GRANT Student Dawn Murphy was awarded a Corporation for National and Community Service grant for her “Leading from the Roots” folk-school study, October 2018

BO O K Alum Randal Joy Thompson published Leadership & Power in International Development: Navigating the Intersections of Gender, Culture, Context & Sustainability, October 2018

BOOK Alum Diana Graber published Raising Humans in a Digital World: Helping Kids Build a Healthy Relationship with Technology, November 2018


12

FIELDING ADVANCES | 2019

FIELDING GRADUATE UNIVERSITY | www.fielding.edu

ACHIEVEMENTS GRA N T Student Erek Ostrowski received the Institute of Coaching’s Harnisch Grant for his research on The Experience of Group Coaching as a Setting for Entrepreneurial Learning and Change, March 2018

AWA R D Clinical Psychology faculty member Ruthellen Josselson won the Distinguished Contribution to Qualitative Research Award at the APA Convention, March 2018

R ECOG NITI O N Fielding’s Conclave Leadership Academy was named an Inspiring Program in STEM by Insight into Diversity Magazine, August 2018

AWARD Alum Luis González López was named Inspiring Professor at Tecnologico de Monterrey, the university in Mexico where he teaches, August 2018

AWARD Faculty Fellow Patricia Arredondo was named a Woman of Color Changemaker by the American Psychological Association, August 2018

BOOK ELC faculty member Four Arrows is the subject of a book, The Fearless Engagement of Four Arrows, September 2018

BO O K Alum, adjunct faculty, and ISI Fellow Kerul Kassel authored Developing a Sustainability Mindset in Management Education, April 2018

BOOK Alum and adjunct faculty Christophe Morin authored The Persuasion Code: How Neuromarketing Can Help You Persuade Anyone, Anywhere, Anytime, September 2018

INDUC TION Alum and adjunct faculty Henry Fowler was inducted into the Navajo Nation Hall of Fame, August 2018

BOOK Alum Ilene Wasserman co-authored Peer Coaching at Work: Principles and Practices¸ April 2018

AWA R D Student Franklin Elliott was named Faculty Member of the Year at Navajo Tech, May 2018

AWA R D Students Iya Ritchie, Sonia Rodrigues-Marto, Emily Sinclair, Theresa Southam, and Ashley Roth had the winning research posters at Fielding Summer Session, July 2018

B OOK Alum and adjunct faculty Susan Stillman co-authored The EQ Educator: Integrating Social Emotional Learning into Schools, August 2018

AWA RD Alum Gregory Woo won the Stanley N. Roscoe Aviation Human Factors Award for paper on visual detection of small drones, June 2018

RECO GN ITIO N Fielding was named an Age Friendly University by the Academy of Gerontology in Higher Education, July 2018

13

BOOK Trustee Judith Katz wrote Safe Enough to Soar: Accelerating Trust, Inclusion & Collaboration in the Workplace. November 2018 AWARD Media Psychology student Tatyana El-Kour won Division 52’s Travel Grant for International Psi Chi students at the APA conference, August 2018

BOOK Alum Nora Lester Murad published Rest in My Shade, a book-length poem about displacement featuring Palestinian artists, November 2018

GRANT Student Dawn Murphy was awarded a Corporation for National and Community Service grant for her “Leading from the Roots” folk-school study, October 2018

BO O K Alum Randal Joy Thompson published Leadership & Power in International Development: Navigating the Intersections of Gender, Culture, Context & Sustainability, October 2018

BOOK Alum Diana Graber published Raising Humans in a Digital World: Helping Kids Build a Healthy Relationship with Technology, November 2018


14

FIELDING ADVANCES | 2019

Our Colorful History

FIELDING GRADUATE UNIVERSITY | www.fielding.edu

15


14

FIELDING ADVANCES | 2019

Our Colorful History

FIELDING GRADUATE UNIVERSITY | www.fielding.edu

15


16

FIELDING ADVANCES | 2019

FIELDING GRADUATE UNIVERSITY | www.fielding.edu

A Pressing Need

Living Well, Dying Well: A practical guide to choices, costs, and consequences by Judy Stevens-Long and Dohrea Bardell

O

The story of Fielding University Press begins in 2013, when School of Leadership Studies faculty member Jean-Pierre Isbouts, D.Litt., proposed the idea to President Katrina Rogers. “We need to create a platform where our graduates can publish their work,” he recalls saying. “It’s part of our responsibility of helping our students become change agents. They can’t do that if they’re not published.” An academic press had always been a luxury only large, wealthy universities could afford. The cost of printing was prohibitive for small schools, as any publication required a print run of 3,000 to 5,000 copies – and the space the store them. Jean-Pierre Isbouts with faculty member Valerie Bentz and her book

“But when Amazon introduced its direct-to-print technology, it transformed the whole book business,” said Dr. Isbouts, who has had a long career in media and publishing. With print-on-demand publishing, “small presses like ours don’t have to build and store an inventory. We can simply say, there’s a buyer who’d like to have a copy – and Amazon prints it.” President Rogers liked the idea and asked Dr. Isbouts to work with then-Provost Gerald Porter, PhD, to launch Fielding University Press. “As a graduate institution, especially a doctoralgranting institution, it is imperative that Fielding demonstrate to the world our intellectual and academic excellence,” Dr. Porter said. “A university press is one of the best ways for an institution to connect to the larger academic community of scholars and showcase its expertise in particular subject-matter areas.” Dr. Isbouts agrees that the press’ primary mission is to evangelize Fielding’s research – an area in which other distributed universities don’t tend to perform well.

“None of the other distributed universities that I know of have a university press,” he says. “We’ve shown that it can be done, and on a cost-effective level.” Indeed, after creating an editorial process, production process, and peer-review board for articles, the Fielding University Press published its first monograph in 2014, Social Change in the Workplace. A monograph is a collection of articles with a common theme written by different scholars on a related subject. “It brings together multiple perspectives,” says Dr. Isbouts. “That’s why it’s such a powerful medium for us; we are multidisciplinary and interested in diversity of viewpoints.” Our monographs are comprised of articles from student dissertations, which solves a problem that Dr. Isbouts recognized. “The demand for publishing space is much larger than what journals can actually accommodate,” he said. “I saw a real need among my students, who were running into road blocks trying to get their dissertations published – even dissertations of tremendous import.”

Archetype of the Absolute: The unity of opposites in mysticism, philosophy, and psychology by Sanford Drob

May Fielding University Press live happily ever after. •

Veteran and Family Reintegration: Identity, healing, and reconciliation monograph Clinical Health Psychology: Cultural perspectives monograph

2015

Understanding the Frontal Lobe of the Brain: Fractioning the prefrontal lobes and the associated executive functions monograph

Leadership Studies in Healthcare monograph Digital Citizenship in the 21st Century monograph Expressions of Phenomenological Research: Conscious and lifeworld studies monograph Women Called to Lead: Empowering Women of Color in Academic Leadership by Kimarie Engerman and Stephanie Luster-Teasley, editors

“Much credit goes to Professor Isbouts,” Dr. Porter said, “who as editor has contributed a guiding vision made real with capable management.”

“This is one of the most fulfilling things I’ve ever done,” says Dr. Isbouts. “Hopefully we can do this for many years to come.”

2016

2017

Fielding University Press has now published more than 60 articles from student dissertations, and 17 books – in just four years. That’s an aggressive number for a small press like ours.

Dr. Isbouts offers a course on “Writing an Article for Publication” to help students and alumni turn their dissertations into monograph material. And he’s currently working on the Fielding 45th Anniversary monograph, to be edited by President Rogers and VPs Monique Snowden, PhD, and Orlando Taylor, PhD, which aims to capture the ways that Fielding has transformed the work of its students, faculty, alumni, and staff. It will be published in June – with more books to follow, to be sure.

Fielding University Press publications to date:

Women Having Impact: How women of color are making a difference in STEM at minority serving institutions by Kimarie Engerman, Tamara Floyd Smith, and Stephanie LusterTeasley, editors

F I E LDI NG U NI V E RSITY P RESS SHOWCASES STU D EN T, FACU LTY R ESEAR C H nce upon a time, there was a small, distributed university full of passionate students and faculty doing important, impactful research … but with few opportunities for publication.

2018

17

Leadership for Social Change: A cultural perspective monograph Sustainability Leadership: Integrating values, meaning, and action monograph

2014 2016 Contemplative Social Research: Caring for Self, Being and Lifeworld monograph A Passion for Adult Learning: How the Fielding model is transforming doctoral education by Keith Melville

The Psychotherapy Relationship: Cultural influences monograph New Directions in Media Psychology monograph Social Change in the Modern Workplace: New research and scholarly reflections monograph


16

FIELDING ADVANCES | 2019

FIELDING GRADUATE UNIVERSITY | www.fielding.edu

A Pressing Need

Living Well, Dying Well: A practical guide to choices, costs, and consequences by Judy Stevens-Long and Dohrea Bardell

O

The story of Fielding University Press begins in 2013, when School of Leadership Studies faculty member Jean-Pierre Isbouts, D.Litt., proposed the idea to President Katrina Rogers. “We need to create a platform where our graduates can publish their work,” he recalls saying. “It’s part of our responsibility of helping our students become change agents. They can’t do that if they’re not published.” An academic press had always been a luxury only large, wealthy universities could afford. The cost of printing was prohibitive for small schools, as any publication required a print run of 3,000 to 5,000 copies – and the space the store them. Jean-Pierre Isbouts with faculty member Valerie Bentz and her book

“But when Amazon introduced its direct-to-print technology, it transformed the whole book business,” said Dr. Isbouts, who has had a long career in media and publishing. With print-on-demand publishing, “small presses like ours don’t have to build and store an inventory. We can simply say, there’s a buyer who’d like to have a copy – and Amazon prints it.” President Rogers liked the idea and asked Dr. Isbouts to work with then-Provost Gerald Porter, PhD, to launch Fielding University Press. “As a graduate institution, especially a doctoralgranting institution, it is imperative that Fielding demonstrate to the world our intellectual and academic excellence,” Dr. Porter said. “A university press is one of the best ways for an institution to connect to the larger academic community of scholars and showcase its expertise in particular subject-matter areas.” Dr. Isbouts agrees that the press’ primary mission is to evangelize Fielding’s research – an area in which other distributed universities don’t tend to perform well.

“None of the other distributed universities that I know of have a university press,” he says. “We’ve shown that it can be done, and on a cost-effective level.” Indeed, after creating an editorial process, production process, and peer-review board for articles, the Fielding University Press published its first monograph in 2014, Social Change in the Workplace. A monograph is a collection of articles with a common theme written by different scholars on a related subject. “It brings together multiple perspectives,” says Dr. Isbouts. “That’s why it’s such a powerful medium for us; we are multidisciplinary and interested in diversity of viewpoints.” Our monographs are comprised of articles from student dissertations, which solves a problem that Dr. Isbouts recognized. “The demand for publishing space is much larger than what journals can actually accommodate,” he said. “I saw a real need among my students, who were running into road blocks trying to get their dissertations published – even dissertations of tremendous import.”

Archetype of the Absolute: The unity of opposites in mysticism, philosophy, and psychology by Sanford Drob

May Fielding University Press live happily ever after. •

Veteran and Family Reintegration: Identity, healing, and reconciliation monograph Clinical Health Psychology: Cultural perspectives monograph

2015

Understanding the Frontal Lobe of the Brain: Fractioning the prefrontal lobes and the associated executive functions monograph

Leadership Studies in Healthcare monograph Digital Citizenship in the 21st Century monograph Expressions of Phenomenological Research: Conscious and lifeworld studies monograph Women Called to Lead: Empowering Women of Color in Academic Leadership by Kimarie Engerman and Stephanie Luster-Teasley, editors

“Much credit goes to Professor Isbouts,” Dr. Porter said, “who as editor has contributed a guiding vision made real with capable management.”

“This is one of the most fulfilling things I’ve ever done,” says Dr. Isbouts. “Hopefully we can do this for many years to come.”

2016

2017

Fielding University Press has now published more than 60 articles from student dissertations, and 17 books – in just four years. That’s an aggressive number for a small press like ours.

Dr. Isbouts offers a course on “Writing an Article for Publication” to help students and alumni turn their dissertations into monograph material. And he’s currently working on the Fielding 45th Anniversary monograph, to be edited by President Rogers and VPs Monique Snowden, PhD, and Orlando Taylor, PhD, which aims to capture the ways that Fielding has transformed the work of its students, faculty, alumni, and staff. It will be published in June – with more books to follow, to be sure.

Fielding University Press publications to date:

Women Having Impact: How women of color are making a difference in STEM at minority serving institutions by Kimarie Engerman, Tamara Floyd Smith, and Stephanie LusterTeasley, editors

F I E LDI NG U NI V E RSITY P RESS SHOWCASES STU D EN T, FACU LTY R ESEAR C H nce upon a time, there was a small, distributed university full of passionate students and faculty doing important, impactful research … but with few opportunities for publication.

2018

17

Leadership for Social Change: A cultural perspective monograph Sustainability Leadership: Integrating values, meaning, and action monograph

2014 2016 Contemplative Social Research: Caring for Self, Being and Lifeworld monograph A Passion for Adult Learning: How the Fielding model is transforming doctoral education by Keith Melville

The Psychotherapy Relationship: Cultural influences monograph New Directions in Media Psychology monograph Social Change in the Modern Workplace: New research and scholarly reflections monograph


18

FIELDING ADVANCES | 2019

FIELDING GRADUATE UNIVERSITY | www.fielding.edu

UNDERSTANDING

OURSELVES THE ALONSO CENTER FOR PSYCHODYNAMIC STUDIES PROMOTES FREUD’S THEORY

I

In a quiet, comfortable room, the patient shares her feelings; the psychologist listens intently, notepad in hand. It’s how we define “therapy” today. And it dates back to the early 20th century, when Sigmund Freud proposed his Psychoanalytic Theory – the idea that our personalities are shaped by early attachment experiences, repressed and forbidden memories and feelings, and the impulses of a dynamic unconscious, and that talking through it with a person who knows how to listen could offer a release from a prison of the past. “Freud systematized the idea that there’s an unconscious, meaning, in part, that what we consciously know about ourselves in the world is not the whole picture,” says Margaret Cramer, PhD, ABPP, a faculty member in Fielding’s Clinical Psychology program. “The psychodynamic psychotherapist listens for the way the individual has inadvertently but reliably re-created the past in the present. It’s the oldest and most longstanding form of talk therapy that we know of. All the other therapies come from this basic work.” Anne Alonso with Fielding founding faculty Marie Fielder

Dr. Cramer is also director of Fielding’s Alonso Center for Psychodynamic Studies, a scholarly resource established in 2001, to support the study and application of psychodynamic ideas and treatments. Fielding has just launched an expanded Alonso Center membership, open to anyone at all – within or outside of Fielding – with an interest in understanding, and encouraging others to better understand, the value of contemporary psychodynamic psychotherapy. The Center is named for Anne Alonso, PhD, a psychologist who was not only an early Fielding graduate, but went on to serve as faculty from 1983 to 2001, as well as becoming a trustee and generous donor. Dr. Alonso along with her husband Ramon established the endowment that funded the Alonso Center when she retired from Fielding. “She’s an exemplar of Fielding,” said Dr. Cramer of Dr. Alonso, who passed away in 2007. “She combined clinical skills, scholarly interests and entrepreneurial spirit. When she wanted to solve a problem, she did it by making something, like: ‘We need more public awareness of psychodynamic theory? OK, we’ll fund an endowment, and together create a center.’ She was a real can-do person.” The goal of the center has always been to support the teaching of “the talking therapies,” to train students and mental health professionals in contemporary psychodynamic psychotherapy, and to sponsor cross-discipline opportunities for scholars, practitioners, and educators to come together to discuss the integration of psychodynamic theory and practice in mental health, organizational development, education, and community building.

Over the years, the Alonso Center has offered an annual Frieda Fromm-Reichman Award of up to $1000 to a Clinical Psychology student who has demonstrated excellence in psychodynamic scholarship; 16 students have benefitted from it to date. Former Director and faculty emeritus Sam Osherson, PhD, and his brother established the Louis & Adele Osherson Fellowship in memory of their parents to invite mental health practitioners and other professionals outside of Fielding to take part in National Session. Osherson fellows travel to Winter Session in Santa Barbara and spend the week participating in seminars, mingling with students and faculty, and exploring psychodynamic ideas. The Center has often brought films and speakers to Winter Session on psychodynamic themes. This year it will host speaker Donna Orange, PhD, PsyD, author of Climate Crisis, Psychoanalysis, and Radical Ethics on Friday, Jan. 18, in Santa Barbara. Dr. Cramer is also excited about organizing conversation hours, poster sessions, and Zoom webinars for new members – and a reprint later this year of Dr. Alonso’s book, The Quiet Profession. “The more we understand psychodynamic theory,” she said, “the more we understand ourselves. “The goal of dynamic therapies is not so much to solve problems or learn skills, but to understand individuals and to help them understand themselves with depth and compassion,” she said. “Being deeply understood profoundly changes people’s lives, and that’s an idea that is too easily lost in this increasingly transactional world.” •

BECOME A MEMBER of the Alonso Center for free to take part in events

weblink.donorperfect.com/alonsocenter

19

BROADENING PARTICIPATION

IN STEM

NATIONAL SCIENCE FOUNDATION GRANTS NEARLY $10 MILLION TO FIELDING PROJECTS

T

he National Science Foundation (NSF) awarded two grants this year for projects through Fielding’s Marie Fielder Center for Democracy, Leadership, & Education that aim to increase diversity in the nation’s higher-education STEM programs.

A grant of $9 million was awarded to the Center for the Advancement of STEM Leadership (CASL) to study how leadership at Historically Black Colleges & Universities (HBCUs) has been exceptionally successful in increasing and broadening participation of underrepresented groups in Science, Technology, Engineering, & Math (STEM) — and ultimately in producing work that enables others to follow in their footsteps. The project, to be conducted over five years, involves four higher education institutions: The University of the Virgin Islands, an HBCU, will lead the research efforts, looking at the traits of successful STEM leaders in the context of HBCUs; North Carolina A&T State University, another HBCU, will team with Fielding, long known for its leadership development, to lead the education component, turning the research into professional development for future leaders; the Association of American Colleges & Universities will lead the outreach, dissemination, and knowledge transfer, turning what is learned in the research and education components into practice across HBCUs and throughout higher education. “I am thrilled that we were able to fund the first Broadening Participation Research Center, which will put HBCUs at the forefront in education research on what contributes to the success of these institutions in producing African American STEM majors,” said Claudia Rankins, PhD, program director for the National Science Foundation HBCU – Undergraduate Program. “Their framework is what makes the work of this center unique, necessary, and ground-breaking.” The NSF has granted an additional $767,000 to Fielding to offer intensive Leadership Academies and other professional development

opportunities over the next two years for STEM women faculty of color at all types of colleges and universities who aspire to leadership roles. These activities will be offered in conjunction with the Society of STEM Women of Color, including events at the Society’s Annual Conclave. Fielding will also provide authorship development institutes and wellbeing workshops for the Society’s members from throughout the country, including STEM faculty of color from many HBCUs, Tribal Colleges, and Hispanic-Serving Institutions. The project is called Sankofa, an African word that means to “go back and get it.” Represented as a bird who flies forward but looks backward, Sankofa means building the future with an eye on the history, culture, and legacy of the past. “Together, the two grants are among the latest initiatives launched at Fielding to fulfill its historic mission of advancing social justice through education, research, and practice,” said Orlando Taylor, PhD, Fielding’s vice president for strategic initiatives and research. “It is most fitting that each is housed in the university’s recently established Marie Fielder Center for Democracy, Leadership and Education, a cross-institutional entity designed to bring together scholars and practitioners across the disciplines to transform Fielding’s longstanding mission and core values into fundable, national efforts to create a more just and inclusive society.”• A Society of STEM Women of Color workshop


18

FIELDING ADVANCES | 2019

FIELDING GRADUATE UNIVERSITY | www.fielding.edu

UNDERSTANDING

OURSELVES THE ALONSO CENTER FOR PSYCHODYNAMIC STUDIES PROMOTES FREUD’S THEORY

I

In a quiet, comfortable room, the patient shares her feelings; the psychologist listens intently, notepad in hand. It’s how we define “therapy” today. And it dates back to the early 20th century, when Sigmund Freud proposed his Psychoanalytic Theory – the idea that our personalities are shaped by early attachment experiences, repressed and forbidden memories and feelings, and the impulses of a dynamic unconscious, and that talking through it with a person who knows how to listen could offer a release from a prison of the past. “Freud systematized the idea that there’s an unconscious, meaning, in part, that what we consciously know about ourselves in the world is not the whole picture,” says Margaret Cramer, PhD, ABPP, a faculty member in Fielding’s Clinical Psychology program. “The psychodynamic psychotherapist listens for the way the individual has inadvertently but reliably re-created the past in the present. It’s the oldest and most longstanding form of talk therapy that we know of. All the other therapies come from this basic work.” Anne Alonso with Fielding founding faculty Marie Fielder

Dr. Cramer is also director of Fielding’s Alonso Center for Psychodynamic Studies, a scholarly resource established in 2001, to support the study and application of psychodynamic ideas and treatments. Fielding has just launched an expanded Alonso Center membership, open to anyone at all – within or outside of Fielding – with an interest in understanding, and encouraging others to better understand, the value of contemporary psychodynamic psychotherapy. The Center is named for Anne Alonso, PhD, a psychologist who was not only an early Fielding graduate, but went on to serve as faculty from 1983 to 2001, as well as becoming a trustee and generous donor. Dr. Alonso along with her husband Ramon established the endowment that funded the Alonso Center when she retired from Fielding. “She’s an exemplar of Fielding,” said Dr. Cramer of Dr. Alonso, who passed away in 2007. “She combined clinical skills, scholarly interests and entrepreneurial spirit. When she wanted to solve a problem, she did it by making something, like: ‘We need more public awareness of psychodynamic theory? OK, we’ll fund an endowment, and together create a center.’ She was a real can-do person.” The goal of the center has always been to support the teaching of “the talking therapies,” to train students and mental health professionals in contemporary psychodynamic psychotherapy, and to sponsor cross-discipline opportunities for scholars, practitioners, and educators to come together to discuss the integration of psychodynamic theory and practice in mental health, organizational development, education, and community building.

Over the years, the Alonso Center has offered an annual Frieda Fromm-Reichman Award of up to $1000 to a Clinical Psychology student who has demonstrated excellence in psychodynamic scholarship; 16 students have benefitted from it to date. Former Director and faculty emeritus Sam Osherson, PhD, and his brother established the Louis & Adele Osherson Fellowship in memory of their parents to invite mental health practitioners and other professionals outside of Fielding to take part in National Session. Osherson fellows travel to Winter Session in Santa Barbara and spend the week participating in seminars, mingling with students and faculty, and exploring psychodynamic ideas. The Center has often brought films and speakers to Winter Session on psychodynamic themes. This year it will host speaker Donna Orange, PhD, PsyD, author of Climate Crisis, Psychoanalysis, and Radical Ethics on Friday, Jan. 18, in Santa Barbara. Dr. Cramer is also excited about organizing conversation hours, poster sessions, and Zoom webinars for new members – and a reprint later this year of Dr. Alonso’s book, The Quiet Profession. “The more we understand psychodynamic theory,” she said, “the more we understand ourselves. “The goal of dynamic therapies is not so much to solve problems or learn skills, but to understand individuals and to help them understand themselves with depth and compassion,” she said. “Being deeply understood profoundly changes people’s lives, and that’s an idea that is too easily lost in this increasingly transactional world.” •

BECOME A MEMBER of the Alonso Center for free to take part in events

weblink.donorperfect.com/alonsocenter

19

BROADENING PARTICIPATION

IN STEM

NATIONAL SCIENCE FOUNDATION GRANTS NEARLY $10 MILLION TO FIELDING PROJECTS

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he National Science Foundation (NSF) awarded two grants this year for projects through Fielding’s Marie Fielder Center for Democracy, Leadership, & Education that aim to increase diversity in the nation’s higher-education STEM programs.

A grant of $9 million was awarded to the Center for the Advancement of STEM Leadership (CASL) to study how leadership at Historically Black Colleges & Universities (HBCUs) has been exceptionally successful in increasing and broadening participation of underrepresented groups in Science, Technology, Engineering, & Math (STEM) — and ultimately in producing work that enables others to follow in their footsteps. The project, to be conducted over five years, involves four higher education institutions: The University of the Virgin Islands, an HBCU, will lead the research efforts, looking at the traits of successful STEM leaders in the context of HBCUs; North Carolina A&T State University, another HBCU, will team with Fielding, long known for its leadership development, to lead the education component, turning the research into professional development for future leaders; the Association of American Colleges & Universities will lead the outreach, dissemination, and knowledge transfer, turning what is learned in the research and education components into practice across HBCUs and throughout higher education. “I am thrilled that we were able to fund the first Broadening Participation Research Center, which will put HBCUs at the forefront in education research on what contributes to the success of these institutions in producing African American STEM majors,” said Claudia Rankins, PhD, program director for the National Science Foundation HBCU – Undergraduate Program. “Their framework is what makes the work of this center unique, necessary, and ground-breaking.” The NSF has granted an additional $767,000 to Fielding to offer intensive Leadership Academies and other professional development

opportunities over the next two years for STEM women faculty of color at all types of colleges and universities who aspire to leadership roles. These activities will be offered in conjunction with the Society of STEM Women of Color, including events at the Society’s Annual Conclave. Fielding will also provide authorship development institutes and wellbeing workshops for the Society’s members from throughout the country, including STEM faculty of color from many HBCUs, Tribal Colleges, and Hispanic-Serving Institutions. The project is called Sankofa, an African word that means to “go back and get it.” Represented as a bird who flies forward but looks backward, Sankofa means building the future with an eye on the history, culture, and legacy of the past. “Together, the two grants are among the latest initiatives launched at Fielding to fulfill its historic mission of advancing social justice through education, research, and practice,” said Orlando Taylor, PhD, Fielding’s vice president for strategic initiatives and research. “It is most fitting that each is housed in the university’s recently established Marie Fielder Center for Democracy, Leadership and Education, a cross-institutional entity designed to bring together scholars and practitioners across the disciplines to transform Fielding’s longstanding mission and core values into fundable, national efforts to create a more just and inclusive society.”• A Society of STEM Women of Color workshop


DOC TORAL STUDENT NAMED FIRST RECIPIENT OF HUDSO N SC H OL AR SH IP

What was your first gift to a charity – and what inspired you? While my family does not have much wealth, we have always had an abundance of love and care. I grew up with the belief that we are not here to just receive from the world, but also to give to it. The verse “to whom much is given, much is required” is the foundation of my stewardship. My philosophy is based on collective and balanced giving of the three Ts: time, talent, and treasure. In my youth, my giving was primarily that of time, in terms of volunteering in the local community. During my collegiate years and early career, in addition to time, I directed my talents in service to organizations like the Lions Clubs International and Alpha Kappa Alpha Sorority, Inc. As I advanced in my career, expanded earnings created financial capacity for giving of my treasures. I then started supporting and serving on nonprofit boards and making charitable contributions to causes that inspire me.

What scholarships and funds have you contributed to at Fielding, and why?

What do you like best about Fielding? Fielding is a university without walls and borders. It has always been a place for those who thought they had few, if any, graduate educa-

for Library

Frederic Hudson was the founding president of Fielding and helped establish the values that distinguish the university today. Dr. Hudson’s widow Pamela McLean, PhD – also a Fielding alum – and the Hudson family helped fund the $100,000 endowed scholarship, which will be an annual award to a Fielding doctoral student preparing research in the area of coaching.

MONTHLY DONOR

I prefer to give through payroll deduction, because a larger annual amount is felt less over the course of a year. I usually plan on how much I can give at the end of each calendar year. Causes that have deep meaning for me guide my philanthropy. For example, the Ethnic Minority Dissertation Scholarship at Fielding was low on funds just before its scheduled award cycle, so, I pulled out my checkbook and made a contribution. I have supported student-led fundraising initiatives such as Magic Feet in the Clinical Psychology program. I have also contributed to the Marie Fielder Center to honor the legacy of Dr. Fielder; Dr. Orlando Taylor’s leadership and personal gift to the Center inspired my gift. This year, I am supporting the Ernestine Magagna Baker Endowed Scholarship, established by Fielding Trustee and Faculty Emerita Nancy Baker, PhD, and her late brother C. Edwin Baker, JD, in honor of their mother. Personally, I wanted to honor Nancy and her philanthropic leadership at Fielding, which I know is inspired by her mother’s influence and further motivated by her brother’s legacy.

T

M ON I Q U E S NOW D E N, I NT E R IM P ROVOST & SEN IO R VP

M

DEVELOPMENT

$1 Million

his year, Fielding doctoral student Kristina Wagner was named the first recipient of the university’s Frederic M. Hudson Endowed Scholarship.

Are

onique Snowden, PhD, joined Fielding in 2009, and has served in multiple institutional roles over the years. She is passionate about philanthropy, including giving to Fielding. Snowden credits her mother, Paulette W. Snowden, as having a major influence on shaping her core values, including giving back.

Alum Donates

Dr. Monique Snowden, right, and her mother, Paulette

tion opportunities as mid-career professionals. Our programs stress the importance of critical thinking, which is essential when learning in adulthood. Why do you believe education matters? Education is essential in diminishing social stratification. In the U.S. we are led to believe that no matter one’s beginnings, we can achieve our full potential. This simply does not hold true for many who lack equal access and opportunity to quality education in general, and particularly higher education. On the matter, funding scholarships for prospective and current Fielding students must remain an institutional priority. •

Kristina Wagner, a graduate student in the Leadership for Change Program, is grateful to the donors who helped establish this scholarship. “Working in the field of career development, I am familiar with Dr. Hudson’s important contributions to the areas of Adult Learning, Coaching, and Transition Management,” she said. “It is an honor to receive this scholarship. Being a mid-life career changer, this award is especially meaningful.” Kristina said that her academic experience with Fielding has helped define her scholarly interest in conducting research on the connections between coaching and andragogy. One of her goals is to increase people’s awareness of coaching as a progressive tool for learning. “The Frederic M. Hudson Scholarship, along with the guidance, collaboration, and support from Fielding faculty, will help me achieve my vision of creating change in higher education and in broader learning communities,” she said, “by implementing coaching as a model for effective learning.” •

F

ielding, unlike many campus-based programs, is a university that transcends geography and borders. The same is true of our university library. Whether traveling in a van while completing your dissertation, working in the kitchen late at night after your kids are in bed, or enjoying Saturday-morning coffee with your pet while watching New Zotero Video Tutorial Series on the library blog, you know that Fielding’s library – a collection of 228,239 books, 51,467 journals, and so much more – is always open. In September, Fielding received a gift of $1,000,000 from Dianne Kipnes, a 1998 PhD alum from the School of Psychology, to support our library operational needs, from online subscription services and additional volumes on psychodynamic psychotherapy to books for the new masters programs in Couples/Marriage & Family Therapy and Clinical Mental Health Counseling. In recognition of this generous gift, the library was renamed the Dr. Dianne Kipnes Library. “This gift is a wonderful example of alumni who remain committed to the success of the scholarship of our stu-

dents,” said President Katrina Rogers, “which shows the value of a Fielding education in people’s lives long after they’ve graduated.” Dr. Kipnes believes it’s crucial that researchers to have access to the knowledge upon which academic and psychological theories are based. “It is only then that we can build on those ideas, both rejecting and adopting new concepts, and proceed with our major goal: to help people advance towards a healthier life,” said Dr. Kipnes, who was the convocation speaker for Fielding’s summer 2016 graduation ceremony. “Libraries are an essential component of that objective. I am therefore delighted to name this library and contribute towards the learning of future Fielding students.” Dean of Student Development “Dr. Dang” Chonwerawong, PhD, said the gift will “allow us to expand our online databases and provide better access to information to support the research interests of our students and faculty.” If you have any questions about this news, contact Elena Nicklasson, director of Development, at giving@fielding.edu or 805-898-2926. •

DEVELOPMENT

‘ Passions ’ Where My

FIRST-TIME SCHOLARSHIP


DOC TORAL STUDENT NAMED FIRST RECIPIENT OF HUDSO N SC H OL AR SH IP

What was your first gift to a charity – and what inspired you? While my family does not have much wealth, we have always had an abundance of love and care. I grew up with the belief that we are not here to just receive from the world, but also to give to it. The verse “to whom much is given, much is required” is the foundation of my stewardship. My philosophy is based on collective and balanced giving of the three Ts: time, talent, and treasure. In my youth, my giving was primarily that of time, in terms of volunteering in the local community. During my collegiate years and early career, in addition to time, I directed my talents in service to organizations like the Lions Clubs International and Alpha Kappa Alpha Sorority, Inc. As I advanced in my career, expanded earnings created financial capacity for giving of my treasures. I then started supporting and serving on nonprofit boards and making charitable contributions to causes that inspire me.

What scholarships and funds have you contributed to at Fielding, and why?

What do you like best about Fielding? Fielding is a university without walls and borders. It has always been a place for those who thought they had few, if any, graduate educa-

for Library

Frederic Hudson was the founding president of Fielding and helped establish the values that distinguish the university today. Dr. Hudson’s widow Pamela McLean, PhD – also a Fielding alum – and the Hudson family helped fund the $100,000 endowed scholarship, which will be an annual award to a Fielding doctoral student preparing research in the area of coaching.

MONTHLY DONOR

I prefer to give through payroll deduction, because a larger annual amount is felt less over the course of a year. I usually plan on how much I can give at the end of each calendar year. Causes that have deep meaning for me guide my philanthropy. For example, the Ethnic Minority Dissertation Scholarship at Fielding was low on funds just before its scheduled award cycle, so, I pulled out my checkbook and made a contribution. I have supported student-led fundraising initiatives such as Magic Feet in the Clinical Psychology program. I have also contributed to the Marie Fielder Center to honor the legacy of Dr. Fielder; Dr. Orlando Taylor’s leadership and personal gift to the Center inspired my gift. This year, I am supporting the Ernestine Magagna Baker Endowed Scholarship, established by Fielding Trustee and Faculty Emerita Nancy Baker, PhD, and her late brother C. Edwin Baker, JD, in honor of their mother. Personally, I wanted to honor Nancy and her philanthropic leadership at Fielding, which I know is inspired by her mother’s influence and further motivated by her brother’s legacy.

T

M ON I Q U E S NOW D E N, I NT E R IM P ROVOST & SEN IO R VP

M

DEVELOPMENT

$1 Million

his year, Fielding doctoral student Kristina Wagner was named the first recipient of the university’s Frederic M. Hudson Endowed Scholarship.

Are

onique Snowden, PhD, joined Fielding in 2009, and has served in multiple institutional roles over the years. She is passionate about philanthropy, including giving to Fielding. Snowden credits her mother, Paulette W. Snowden, as having a major influence on shaping her core values, including giving back.

Alum Donates

Dr. Monique Snowden, right, and her mother, Paulette

tion opportunities as mid-career professionals. Our programs stress the importance of critical thinking, which is essential when learning in adulthood. Why do you believe education matters? Education is essential in diminishing social stratification. In the U.S. we are led to believe that no matter one’s beginnings, we can achieve our full potential. This simply does not hold true for many who lack equal access and opportunity to quality education in general, and particularly higher education. On the matter, funding scholarships for prospective and current Fielding students must remain an institutional priority. •

Kristina Wagner, a graduate student in the Leadership for Change Program, is grateful to the donors who helped establish this scholarship. “Working in the field of career development, I am familiar with Dr. Hudson’s important contributions to the areas of Adult Learning, Coaching, and Transition Management,” she said. “It is an honor to receive this scholarship. Being a mid-life career changer, this award is especially meaningful.” Kristina said that her academic experience with Fielding has helped define her scholarly interest in conducting research on the connections between coaching and andragogy. One of her goals is to increase people’s awareness of coaching as a progressive tool for learning. “The Frederic M. Hudson Scholarship, along with the guidance, collaboration, and support from Fielding faculty, will help me achieve my vision of creating change in higher education and in broader learning communities,” she said, “by implementing coaching as a model for effective learning.” •

F

ielding, unlike many campus-based programs, is a university that transcends geography and borders. The same is true of our university library. Whether traveling in a van while completing your dissertation, working in the kitchen late at night after your kids are in bed, or enjoying Saturday-morning coffee with your pet while watching New Zotero Video Tutorial Series on the library blog, you know that Fielding’s library – a collection of 228,239 books, 51,467 journals, and so much more – is always open. In September, Fielding received a gift of $1,000,000 from Dianne Kipnes, a 1998 PhD alum from the School of Psychology, to support our library operational needs, from online subscription services and additional volumes on psychodynamic psychotherapy to books for the new masters programs in Couples/Marriage & Family Therapy and Clinical Mental Health Counseling. In recognition of this generous gift, the library was renamed the Dr. Dianne Kipnes Library. “This gift is a wonderful example of alumni who remain committed to the success of the scholarship of our stu-

dents,” said President Katrina Rogers, “which shows the value of a Fielding education in people’s lives long after they’ve graduated.” Dr. Kipnes believes it’s crucial that researchers to have access to the knowledge upon which academic and psychological theories are based. “It is only then that we can build on those ideas, both rejecting and adopting new concepts, and proceed with our major goal: to help people advance towards a healthier life,” said Dr. Kipnes, who was the convocation speaker for Fielding’s summer 2016 graduation ceremony. “Libraries are an essential component of that objective. I am therefore delighted to name this library and contribute towards the learning of future Fielding students.” Dean of Student Development “Dr. Dang” Chonwerawong, PhD, said the gift will “allow us to expand our online databases and provide better access to information to support the research interests of our students and faculty.” If you have any questions about this news, contact Elena Nicklasson, director of Development, at giving@fielding.edu or 805-898-2926. •

DEVELOPMENT

‘ Passions ’ Where My

FIRST-TIME SCHOLARSHIP


DEVELOPMENT

DEVELOPMENT

THANK YOU,

Fielding Supporters! We are grateful for your support of our students, alumni, and the university as a whole. The following list in alphabetical order reflects all contributions and pledges received from March 16 to October 1, 2018. Please contact Elena Nicklasson at giving@fielding.edu with any feedback or questions.

Suzanne Baer Nancy Baker Evelyn Beck Sandra Biela Karen & Zac Bogart Alma Boutin-Martinez Barton Buechner Joseph Bush & Janet S. Hartin Don D. Bushnell Fredrick Chapel Connie Corley Keith Earley Jessica Emick-Seibert & Todd M. Seibert April Fallon Jennifer Fleming John Fox Krista Freece Anthony Greene Carlos Grijalva Elizabeth A. Hardy & Rick Omlor Laura Hardy Lawrence Hardy Nancy Hardy Kimberly & Don Harrison Juliet Hatcher-Ross Sharon Hawley Lenneal & Joyce Henderson Daniel & Deidra Holland Cary Holt Linda & Reynolds Honold Michelle Horowitz Kristine Jacquin Nancy Johnson Jim Jones Kerul Kassel Judith Katz & David Levine Bryn Kelly June Klein Toni Knott Shelley Lafler Lois LaShell & Alan Guskin Tomás Leal

Otto W.K. Lee Toni MacIntyre Myrna Marcus Pamela McLean Susan Mickel Juliana Minsky Hilary Molina Janice Morgan Lynn & Andrew Newman Elena Nicklasson Beverly Palley Teresa Patton Michael Pelz-Sherman Maria Jose Prieto de Estebecorena Joan Read Margery Regalado-Rodriguez Eli Rodriguez Katrina Rogers & William A. Cherry Chaya Rubin Jacqueline Ryle Judith Schoenholtz-Read Constance & Jay Shafran Sushma Sharma Tom & Ronna Sherman Nicola Smith Monique Snowden Jonathan Specktor Leila Sullivan Orlando Taylor Michael Theodore Amanda & Barry Trosten-Bloom Raymond & Sandra Trybus Nancy and Sidney Unobskey Mary Jean Vignone Virginia VonReichbauer Manuela Waddell Linda Watkins Dennis White Irene Won Lynda Won-Chung Tracy Zemansky

HON ORARY AN D ME MOR I AL GI F TS AC KN OWLE DGE IMP ORTANT P EO P L E IN OUR LIVE S AN D IN T H E F I E L DI NG COMMUN ITY.

In Honor of: Valerie Bentz Don Bushnell Anna DiStefano Sherry Hatcher Sheldon Marcus Mike, Teresa, and Rianna Neal In Memory of: Ernestine Magagna Baker Dolores Corley Lee Mahon Bob Montgomery W. Barnett Pearce Dori Pelz-Sherman Fred Phillips Gerald Porter Jack and Harriett Savage Charlie Seashore Carrie C. Won Sculpture at Fielding’s McCune House

From Recipient to Donor

B AR T B UEC H NER , PH D, 2014 H OD ALUM

ALUM DONOR

B

art Buechner is a strong believer in giving back as a way of paying forward.

Last year, when Fielding’s office of development ran a $10,000 fundraising marathon for the scholarship that honors Fielding Founding Dean Don Bushnell, we reached out for a testimonial from Bart, who was one of the scholarship’s early recipients. “When I received the Bushnell award, it was an incentive to get to know more about his contributions to the Fielding culture,” Bart said. “I received two Fielding scholarships while I was working on my doctorate at Fielding, and these were both sustaining and motivating, far beyond the dollar value.” After graduating from Fielding in 2014 with a doctoral degree in human and organizational development, Bart continues to be involved at Fielding in many ways. He is also an active board member with the CMM Institute for Personal and Social Evolution, a group that includes many Fielding alumni and aims to sustain the teaching and usage of the Coordinated Management of Meaning (CMM) theory pioneered by the late W. Barnett Pearce, a Fielding faculty member. Bart also helps coordinate the monthly meetings for Fielding’s concentration in Somatics, Phenomenology, and Communicative Leadership (SPCL), attended by a growing cohort of Fielding students, faculty members, and alumni. Along with faculty member Valerie Bentz, PhD, Bart is also co-teaching an SPCL-based curriculum at the University of the Virgin Islands and the University at Buffalo, NY. A veteran of the Navy, where he had a 30-year career, Bart continues

to be involved in Fielding’s Veterans Connections group. “The group’s founding faculty sponsor is Miguel Guilarte , PhD, who was affected as a child in Cuba by war, but was not directly involved with the military. This reflects the group’s ethos, which has always been that all are welcome, and we don’t have a fixed structure or agenda.” The group has organized workshops that brought in national leaders of veterans’ groups, including the US Department of Veterans Affairs, the Wounded Warrior Project, the National Veterans’ Foundation, and the Adler University Military Psychology program, where Bart is an adjunct faculty member. Over the years, these workshops have showcased Fielding initiatives such as a veterans’ court project in Santa Barbara; a digital veterans’ memorial project created by Fielding’s Media Psychology program, and an evening lecture by Army veteran Paul Chappell, who now leads an international anti-war movement. The Fielding Veterans Connection group also served as the organizing nexus for the 2016 Fielding monograph, Military and Family Reintegration: Identity, Healing, and Reconciliation, co-edited by Miguel and Bart with substantive articles by six Fielding alumni. Last year, Bart made generous gifts to support a Fielding scholarship in honor of Dr. W. Barnett Pearce, and the Dr. Valerie Bentz Endowment Fund. “The pioneering work of Barnett Pearce in social construction in communication through his CMM body of theory lives on through his strong influence and patient mentoring of so many students during his time at Fielding, and Dr. Valerie Bentz with Dr. David Rehorick have likewise sustained the teaching of phenomenology at Fielding and taken it into a transformational direction,” Bart says. “Both phenomenology and CMM are parts of the rich philosophical and interdisciplinary heritage of Fielding, and the scholarships in their honor will hopefully keep that going.” •


DEVELOPMENT

DEVELOPMENT

THANK YOU,

Fielding Supporters! We are grateful for your support of our students, alumni, and the university as a whole. The following list in alphabetical order reflects all contributions and pledges received from March 16 to October 1, 2018. Please contact Elena Nicklasson at giving@fielding.edu with any feedback or questions.

Suzanne Baer Nancy Baker Evelyn Beck Sandra Biela Karen & Zac Bogart Alma Boutin-Martinez Barton Buechner Joseph Bush & Janet S. Hartin Don D. Bushnell Fredrick Chapel Connie Corley Keith Earley Jessica Emick-Seibert & Todd M. Seibert April Fallon Jennifer Fleming John Fox Krista Freece Anthony Greene Carlos Grijalva Elizabeth A. Hardy & Rick Omlor Laura Hardy Lawrence Hardy Nancy Hardy Kimberly & Don Harrison Juliet Hatcher-Ross Sharon Hawley Lenneal & Joyce Henderson Daniel & Deidra Holland Cary Holt Linda & Reynolds Honold Michelle Horowitz Kristine Jacquin Nancy Johnson Jim Jones Kerul Kassel Judith Katz & David Levine Bryn Kelly June Klein Toni Knott Shelley Lafler Lois LaShell & Alan Guskin Tomás Leal

Otto W.K. Lee Toni MacIntyre Myrna Marcus Pamela McLean Susan Mickel Juliana Minsky Hilary Molina Janice Morgan Lynn & Andrew Newman Elena Nicklasson Beverly Palley Teresa Patton Michael Pelz-Sherman Maria Jose Prieto de Estebecorena Joan Read Margery Regalado-Rodriguez Eli Rodriguez Katrina Rogers & William A. Cherry Chaya Rubin Jacqueline Ryle Judith Schoenholtz-Read Constance & Jay Shafran Sushma Sharma Tom & Ronna Sherman Nicola Smith Monique Snowden Jonathan Specktor Leila Sullivan Orlando Taylor Michael Theodore Amanda & Barry Trosten-Bloom Raymond & Sandra Trybus Nancy and Sidney Unobskey Mary Jean Vignone Virginia VonReichbauer Manuela Waddell Linda Watkins Dennis White Irene Won Lynda Won-Chung Tracy Zemansky

HON ORARY AN D ME MOR I AL GI F TS AC KN OWLE DGE IMP ORTANT P EO P L E IN OUR LIVE S AN D IN T H E F I E L DI NG COMMUN ITY.

In Honor of: Valerie Bentz Don Bushnell Anna DiStefano Sherry Hatcher Sheldon Marcus Mike, Teresa, and Rianna Neal In Memory of: Ernestine Magagna Baker Dolores Corley Lee Mahon Bob Montgomery W. Barnett Pearce Dori Pelz-Sherman Fred Phillips Gerald Porter Jack and Harriett Savage Charlie Seashore Carrie C. Won Sculpture at Fielding’s McCune House

From Recipient to Donor

B AR T B UEC H NER , PH D, 2014 H OD ALUM

ALUM DONOR

B

art Buechner is a strong believer in giving back as a way of paying forward.

Last year, when Fielding’s office of development ran a $10,000 fundraising marathon for the scholarship that honors Fielding Founding Dean Don Bushnell, we reached out for a testimonial from Bart, who was one of the scholarship’s early recipients. “When I received the Bushnell award, it was an incentive to get to know more about his contributions to the Fielding culture,” Bart said. “I received two Fielding scholarships while I was working on my doctorate at Fielding, and these were both sustaining and motivating, far beyond the dollar value.” After graduating from Fielding in 2014 with a doctoral degree in human and organizational development, Bart continues to be involved at Fielding in many ways. He is also an active board member with the CMM Institute for Personal and Social Evolution, a group that includes many Fielding alumni and aims to sustain the teaching and usage of the Coordinated Management of Meaning (CMM) theory pioneered by the late W. Barnett Pearce, a Fielding faculty member. Bart also helps coordinate the monthly meetings for Fielding’s concentration in Somatics, Phenomenology, and Communicative Leadership (SPCL), attended by a growing cohort of Fielding students, faculty members, and alumni. Along with faculty member Valerie Bentz, PhD, Bart is also co-teaching an SPCL-based curriculum at the University of the Virgin Islands and the University at Buffalo, NY. A veteran of the Navy, where he had a 30-year career, Bart continues

to be involved in Fielding’s Veterans Connections group. “The group’s founding faculty sponsor is Miguel Guilarte , PhD, who was affected as a child in Cuba by war, but was not directly involved with the military. This reflects the group’s ethos, which has always been that all are welcome, and we don’t have a fixed structure or agenda.” The group has organized workshops that brought in national leaders of veterans’ groups, including the US Department of Veterans Affairs, the Wounded Warrior Project, the National Veterans’ Foundation, and the Adler University Military Psychology program, where Bart is an adjunct faculty member. Over the years, these workshops have showcased Fielding initiatives such as a veterans’ court project in Santa Barbara; a digital veterans’ memorial project created by Fielding’s Media Psychology program, and an evening lecture by Army veteran Paul Chappell, who now leads an international anti-war movement. The Fielding Veterans Connection group also served as the organizing nexus for the 2016 Fielding monograph, Military and Family Reintegration: Identity, Healing, and Reconciliation, co-edited by Miguel and Bart with substantive articles by six Fielding alumni. Last year, Bart made generous gifts to support a Fielding scholarship in honor of Dr. W. Barnett Pearce, and the Dr. Valerie Bentz Endowment Fund. “The pioneering work of Barnett Pearce in social construction in communication through his CMM body of theory lives on through his strong influence and patient mentoring of so many students during his time at Fielding, and Dr. Valerie Bentz with Dr. David Rehorick have likewise sustained the teaching of phenomenology at Fielding and taken it into a transformational direction,” Bart says. “Both phenomenology and CMM are parts of the rich philosophical and interdisciplinary heritage of Fielding, and the scholarships in their honor will hopefully keep that going.” •


DEVELOPMENT

FIELDING GRADUATE UNIVERSITY | www.fielding.edu

Committing

Now for a Better Future

25

PATRICIA ZELL, JD, TRU STEE

LEGACY DONOR

D

iversity. Social justice. Learner-centered education. Fielding’s values are what drew Patricia Zell, a veteran of the U.S. Senate’s Committee on Indian Affairs, to become a Fielding trustee in 2016. “Fielding’s vision and values are consistent with mine,” she says, “and this is just one of the many reasons that I want to support Fielding’s mission of assisting future generations of adult learners. “This is a university in which I want to invest my energy and resources.” Introduced to Fielding by another trustee, her colleague from the National Museum of the American Indian, Manley Begay, EdD, Patricia is a graduate of Georgetown University Law Center and is a partner in Zell & Cox Law, P.C., a Native Law Practice Group. She retired from Federal public service in 2005, following 25 years of service on the Senate’s Committee on Indian Affairs, where she was Democratic Staff Director and Chief Counsel for 19 years. Prior to her Senate service, she worked for the U.S. Commission on Civil Rights, the American Indian Policy Review Commission, and the American Psychological Association. Patricia also serves on the International Advisory Council of the Native Nations Institute at the University of Arizona. During her service on the U.S. Senate Committee on Indian Affairs, Patricia was involved in working with Native American

tribally controlled colleges to receive the same status as other land-grant institutions. As a result, more funding became available to these colleges and more students from across Indian country received access to quality education. “I have witnessed how education that meets the individual needs of students,” she says, “serves as a springboard for them, their families, and their communities.” During her academic career, Patricia attended traditional brick and mortar schools, where the educational process is formal and structured. Unlike students at Fielding, she could not shape her educational experience. “I am impressed with Fielding’s educational principles and its outreach to Native American and other minority communities. People with busy lives and in mid-career are afforded opportunities to pursue higher education, and at Fielding they can shape their educational experience in their own ways, to meet their needs and aspirations.” A year ago, Patricia joined the Fielding Founders Circle by making a planned gift to our university. “A legacy gift is something I can commit to now,” she said. “My dream is to see Fielding thrive, and be acknowledged at the national and international levels for its quality of education and commitment to social justice.” If you are interested in making a bequest or a planned gift to Fielding, email giving@fielding.edu

G RAD UAT ES MAY 1, 2018 – NOVEMBER 1, 2018

SCHOOL OF LEADERSHIP STUDIES MASTER OF ARTS IN COLLABORATIVE EDUCATIONAL LEADERSHIP James Bedard Maricela Campos Steven M. Dugan Nathan Dunlap MASTER OF ARTS IN ORGANIZATIONAL DEVELOPMENT & LEADERSHIP Asma Batool Laura C. Cofino Kaitlyn M. Daubenmire Jeanette Ebalo-Gangoy Christina C. Hartigan Tammy S. Holzer Nicole J. Lomibao John K. Schmidt CERTIFICATE IN COMPREHENSIVE EVIDENCE BASED COACHING Catherine D. Barnes Wendy Hirsch Joshua P. Rogers Maria Claudia J. Siqueira Deborah J. Stephens Stauffer

SCHOOL OF PSYCHOLOGY MASTER OF ARTS IN MEDIA PSYCHOLOGY Joshua D. Cohen Shaun Taylor Duvall Bonnie J. Zappacosta CERTIFICATE IN MEDIA PSYCHOLOGY WITH AN EMPHASIS IN BRAND PSYCHOLOGY AND AUDIENCE ENGAGEMENT Maura McGlynn CERTIFICATE IN MEDIA PSYCHOLOGY WITH AN EMPHASIS IN MEDIA NEUROSCIENCE Jason McAllister Perry Reed CERTIFICATE IN CLINICAL NEUROPSYCHOLOGY Robin L. Bertuglia Matthew R. Kadrich Maureen D. Sanford CERTIFICATE OF RESPECIALIZATION IN CLINICAL PSYCHOLOGY Norma P. Fernandez Beth M. Lavin

POSTBACCALAUREATE CERTIFICATE IN CLINICAL PSYCHOLOGY Jaqueline R. Baurer Godhuli Bhattacharya Erinn C. Cameron Taylor Clark Patrice A. Hamilton Samantha Hemingway Mortimer S. LeCote, III Mariah J. Moon Ben Mor Lindsey-Ann M. Przylepa Sherri L. Tschida Lotricia C. Walker


DEVELOPMENT

FIELDING GRADUATE UNIVERSITY | www.fielding.edu

Committing

Now for a Better Future

25

PATRICIA ZELL, JD, TRU STEE

LEGACY DONOR

D

iversity. Social justice. Learner-centered education. Fielding’s values are what drew Patricia Zell, a veteran of the U.S. Senate’s Committee on Indian Affairs, to become a Fielding trustee in 2016. “Fielding’s vision and values are consistent with mine,” she says, “and this is just one of the many reasons that I want to support Fielding’s mission of assisting future generations of adult learners. “This is a university in which I want to invest my energy and resources.” Introduced to Fielding by another trustee, her colleague from the National Museum of the American Indian, Manley Begay, EdD, Patricia is a graduate of Georgetown University Law Center and is a partner in Zell & Cox Law, P.C., a Native Law Practice Group. She retired from Federal public service in 2005, following 25 years of service on the Senate’s Committee on Indian Affairs, where she was Democratic Staff Director and Chief Counsel for 19 years. Prior to her Senate service, she worked for the U.S. Commission on Civil Rights, the American Indian Policy Review Commission, and the American Psychological Association. Patricia also serves on the International Advisory Council of the Native Nations Institute at the University of Arizona. During her service on the U.S. Senate Committee on Indian Affairs, Patricia was involved in working with Native American

tribally controlled colleges to receive the same status as other land-grant institutions. As a result, more funding became available to these colleges and more students from across Indian country received access to quality education. “I have witnessed how education that meets the individual needs of students,” she says, “serves as a springboard for them, their families, and their communities.” During her academic career, Patricia attended traditional brick and mortar schools, where the educational process is formal and structured. Unlike students at Fielding, she could not shape her educational experience. “I am impressed with Fielding’s educational principles and its outreach to Native American and other minority communities. People with busy lives and in mid-career are afforded opportunities to pursue higher education, and at Fielding they can shape their educational experience in their own ways, to meet their needs and aspirations.” A year ago, Patricia joined the Fielding Founders Circle by making a planned gift to our university. “A legacy gift is something I can commit to now,” she said. “My dream is to see Fielding thrive, and be acknowledged at the national and international levels for its quality of education and commitment to social justice.” If you are interested in making a bequest or a planned gift to Fielding, email giving@fielding.edu

G RAD UAT ES MAY 1, 2018 – NOVEMBER 1, 2018

SCHOOL OF LEADERSHIP STUDIES MASTER OF ARTS IN COLLABORATIVE EDUCATIONAL LEADERSHIP James Bedard Maricela Campos Steven M. Dugan Nathan Dunlap MASTER OF ARTS IN ORGANIZATIONAL DEVELOPMENT & LEADERSHIP Asma Batool Laura C. Cofino Kaitlyn M. Daubenmire Jeanette Ebalo-Gangoy Christina C. Hartigan Tammy S. Holzer Nicole J. Lomibao John K. Schmidt CERTIFICATE IN COMPREHENSIVE EVIDENCE BASED COACHING Catherine D. Barnes Wendy Hirsch Joshua P. Rogers Maria Claudia J. Siqueira Deborah J. Stephens Stauffer

SCHOOL OF PSYCHOLOGY MASTER OF ARTS IN MEDIA PSYCHOLOGY Joshua D. Cohen Shaun Taylor Duvall Bonnie J. Zappacosta CERTIFICATE IN MEDIA PSYCHOLOGY WITH AN EMPHASIS IN BRAND PSYCHOLOGY AND AUDIENCE ENGAGEMENT Maura McGlynn CERTIFICATE IN MEDIA PSYCHOLOGY WITH AN EMPHASIS IN MEDIA NEUROSCIENCE Jason McAllister Perry Reed CERTIFICATE IN CLINICAL NEUROPSYCHOLOGY Robin L. Bertuglia Matthew R. Kadrich Maureen D. Sanford CERTIFICATE OF RESPECIALIZATION IN CLINICAL PSYCHOLOGY Norma P. Fernandez Beth M. Lavin

POSTBACCALAUREATE CERTIFICATE IN CLINICAL PSYCHOLOGY Jaqueline R. Baurer Godhuli Bhattacharya Erinn C. Cameron Taylor Clark Patrice A. Hamilton Samantha Hemingway Mortimer S. LeCote, III Mariah J. Moon Ben Mor Lindsey-Ann M. Przylepa Sherri L. Tschida Lotricia C. Walker


26

FIELDING ADVANCES | 2019

FIELDING GRADUATE UNIVERSITY | www.fielding.edu

SCHOOL OF PSYCHOLOGY PSYCHOLOGY WITH AN EMPHASIS IN CLINICAL PSYCHOLOGY

Oluwatosin Alabi, PhD

Adolescent Social Network Types, Socio-affective Engagement, & Health Behaviors in African Americans: A Longitudinal Analysis

Lyndse S. Anderson, PhD

Racial Bias in Perspective-Taking: A Moderation Analysis of Ethnocultural Empathy

5.1.2018 – 11.1.2018

Fanta K. Atkinson, PhD

Maternal Bereavement After the Non-Familial Homicide of a Child

SCHOOL OF LEADERSHIP STUDIES LEADERSHIP FOR CHANGE

Katherine A. Baker, EdD

Principal Stories: Revelations of the Unseen Space of Leadership

Willis Blake, EdD

A Study of the Intrinsic Value of CommunityBased Learning Skills among African American Males

Hector De Jesus, EdD

Appreciative Exploration of Experiences Assoc. w/ Successful Societal Reentry: Voiced by ExOffending African American & Latino Males

Michael C. Doody, EdD

HUMAN DEVELOPMENT

Kathleen Gillet, PhD

“Diving into the Wreck:” The Embodied Experience of White Women Investigating Privilege as a Catalyst for Social Change

Clara A. Holland-Mennenga, PhD

Phenomenological Study of Lived Experience of Professionals Who Have Transitioned from Working in Organization to … Sole Practitioner

Louise Annette Korver, PhD

Markers of Successful Global Leaders: What Accounts for Their Capacity to Navigate the Complexity of Their Roles? HUMAN & ORGANIZATIONAL SYSTEMS

Susan Margaret Alexander, PhD

Maintaining an Organizational Culture of Humanism & Respect: An Appreciative Inquiry Action-Oriented Study

Intellectual Capital & the Future of Luxembourg

Juanita C. Holtyn, EdD

Stanley D. Augustine, PhD

Since Time Immemorial: An Appreciative Inquiry of Washington State’s Curriculum for Indigenous Studies

An Intersectional Cross-Case Study of Low Socioeconomic Status Pediatric Cochlear Implant Patients in Los

Matthew J. Lopez-Phillips, EdD

Jacquelyn M. Bsharah, PhD

California State University’s Graduate Initiative & the Common Good: A Critical Study

Brandi Patterson Roberts, EdD

Older Adult Volunteer Mentors: Examining Their Experiences of Mentoring Youth

Susan P. Trageser, EdD

A Case Study of the Impacts of Case Management Practices on High-Risk Students at a Rural University

Understanding Developmental Readiness for the Process of Executive Coaching: Stakeholders Views

Angela Chimboza, PhD

Tomoaki L. Hayashi, PhD

Exploring the Developmental Influence of Mentoring on the Positive Career Outcomes of Asian Pacific Islander Professionals

Millicent K. Mocodean, PhD

Does Cognitive Awareness Training Impact How Professionals Approach Their Practice?

Ann S. Ritter, PhD

Maria N. Berardi, PhD

Differences in Grief Reactions Among European Americans & Latino Americans Following the Death of a Loved One

Leslie P. Carrion, PhD

The WISC-IV as a Neuropsychological Measure: Examining the Underlying Constructs

Deborah K. Crush, PhD

Spiritual Consciousness and Direct Experiences of the Divine within the Quaker Lineage

African American Women & Depression: Do Family Cohesion & Positive Private Regard Moderate the Effects of Racism & Sexism?

Alyea Sandovar, PhD

Ashley S. Davis, PhD

Understanding Game Designers & Their Creations: Cultural Narratives of Independent Game Production

Catherine A. Sikerbol, PhD

Relational Equality or Moral Distress? How Academic Managers Make Sense of Speaking Up ORGANIZATIONAL DEVELOPMENT & CHANGE

Trevor B. Maber, PhD

A Phenomenographic Study of Relational Aspects within the Art of Hosting

Zoe M. MacLeod, PhD

Thriving in Higher Education: Coaching Women Leaders

Perceived Social Support, Affect Regulation, & Self-Awareness Mediate the Relationship Between Childhood Trauma & Self-Efficacy

Gabriel Dominguez-Pereira, PhD

Attachment Style, Fear of Intimacy, & Romantic Jealousy

Dominique Eugene, PhD

Predicting Violence in Intimate Relationships by Women Exposed to Childhood Maltreatment

Daniel M. Fishman, PhD

Depression, Anxiety, & Stress as Predictors of Pain & Functioning in Post-Laminectomy Patients Undergoing Interdisciplinary Treatment

Shani S. Grunsfeld, PhD

A Qualitative Study into the Role of Organizational Readiness for Change Implementation

Role of Maternal Risk Factors in Intergenerational Transmission of Child Sexual Abuse from Longitudinal Studies of Child Abuse & Neglect

Erin-Lee Hairston, PhD

Claudia Hinojosa, PhD

Black Giving Matters: Philanthropic Thinking & Praxis of Black Philanthropoids

Learning from Therapy Clients in Mexico & the U.S. Shedding Light on the Professional World of Bicultural Hispanic Psychotherapists

Lisa N. Hubbard, PhD

College Students’ Likability Ratings of Elder Lesbians & Gay Men: The Impact of Attitudes Towards Aging & Homosexuality

Kirsten D. Hunter, PhD

Company Familiarity Moderates Anti-Corporate Bias & Jurors’ Compesatory Award Amounts

27

Heather M. Sheafer, PhD

The Psychological Experiences of Women in Long-term Relationships with Men with Narcissistic Traits

Barbara J. Jenkins, PhD

Factors that Contribute to Symptoms of Psychosis in Latino American Immigrants

Eric R. Johnson, PhD

Ethnic Differences in Risk Assessment of Chronic Violence: Building Risk and Resilience Models for African American & White Youth

Pavel Y. Litvin, PhD

The Semantic Network & Functional Compromise

Abram D. Milton, PhD

Suicide & Religiosity Within a Russian Adolescent Population Using the Russian Language MMPI-A

D. Kenneth Montfort, PhD

Family & Adaptive Functioning of Children, Adolescents, & Young Adults with Autism Spectrum Disorder

Brittney M. Otruba, PhD

Premorbid Mental Health Impact upon Post-Injury Perceived Life Satisfaction: Spinal Cord Injury Versus Concomitant Traumatic Brain Injury

Susanne L. Palmer, PhD

Parental & Peer Support as Moderators of Objective & Perceived Weight & of Sexual Risk-Taking Behaviors in Late-Adolescent Girls

Joseph D. Salande, PhD

Object Relations & the Unwanted Pursuit of Intimacy: A Study of Early Memories

Andrea D. Temple, PhD

The Effects of Various Factors on Suicidal Ideation in a Russian Adolescent Population

Patricia A. Velazquez, PhD

Crossing the Invisible Fence: The Quality of Mentoring Relationships in the Career of Successful Women

Vera Voroskolevska, PhD

Relationship betw. Attitudes towards Substances & Organizational/Professional Commitment among Substance Use Counsellors in U.S. & Canada PSYCHOLOGY WITH AN EMPHASIS IN MEDIA PSYCHOLOGY

Leslie Jennings Rowley, PhD

Let Me Be a Part of the Narrative: Effects of Exposure to Musical Theater Production “Hamilton” on Adolescent National Identity

Lisa F. Swain, PhD What Is God Saying? Navigating Scriptural Interpretation on Social Media Blogs

Jedediah L. Walls, PhD

Identifying Human Values in “Digitoral” Marketing Campaigns


26

FIELDING ADVANCES | 2019

FIELDING GRADUATE UNIVERSITY | www.fielding.edu

SCHOOL OF PSYCHOLOGY PSYCHOLOGY WITH AN EMPHASIS IN CLINICAL PSYCHOLOGY

Oluwatosin Alabi, PhD

Adolescent Social Network Types, Socio-affective Engagement, & Health Behaviors in African Americans: A Longitudinal Analysis

Lyndse S. Anderson, PhD

Racial Bias in Perspective-Taking: A Moderation Analysis of Ethnocultural Empathy

5.1.2018 – 11.1.2018

Fanta K. Atkinson, PhD

Maternal Bereavement After the Non-Familial Homicide of a Child

SCHOOL OF LEADERSHIP STUDIES LEADERSHIP FOR CHANGE

Katherine A. Baker, EdD

Principal Stories: Revelations of the Unseen Space of Leadership

Willis Blake, EdD

A Study of the Intrinsic Value of CommunityBased Learning Skills among African American Males

Hector De Jesus, EdD

Appreciative Exploration of Experiences Assoc. w/ Successful Societal Reentry: Voiced by ExOffending African American & Latino Males

Michael C. Doody, EdD

HUMAN DEVELOPMENT

Kathleen Gillet, PhD

“Diving into the Wreck:” The Embodied Experience of White Women Investigating Privilege as a Catalyst for Social Change

Clara A. Holland-Mennenga, PhD

Phenomenological Study of Lived Experience of Professionals Who Have Transitioned from Working in Organization to … Sole Practitioner

Louise Annette Korver, PhD

Markers of Successful Global Leaders: What Accounts for Their Capacity to Navigate the Complexity of Their Roles? HUMAN & ORGANIZATIONAL SYSTEMS

Susan Margaret Alexander, PhD

Maintaining an Organizational Culture of Humanism & Respect: An Appreciative Inquiry Action-Oriented Study

Intellectual Capital & the Future of Luxembourg

Juanita C. Holtyn, EdD

Stanley D. Augustine, PhD

Since Time Immemorial: An Appreciative Inquiry of Washington State’s Curriculum for Indigenous Studies

An Intersectional Cross-Case Study of Low Socioeconomic Status Pediatric Cochlear Implant Patients in Los

Matthew J. Lopez-Phillips, EdD

Jacquelyn M. Bsharah, PhD

California State University’s Graduate Initiative & the Common Good: A Critical Study

Brandi Patterson Roberts, EdD

Older Adult Volunteer Mentors: Examining Their Experiences of Mentoring Youth

Susan P. Trageser, EdD

A Case Study of the Impacts of Case Management Practices on High-Risk Students at a Rural University

Understanding Developmental Readiness for the Process of Executive Coaching: Stakeholders Views

Angela Chimboza, PhD

Tomoaki L. Hayashi, PhD

Exploring the Developmental Influence of Mentoring on the Positive Career Outcomes of Asian Pacific Islander Professionals

Millicent K. Mocodean, PhD

Does Cognitive Awareness Training Impact How Professionals Approach Their Practice?

Ann S. Ritter, PhD

Maria N. Berardi, PhD

Differences in Grief Reactions Among European Americans & Latino Americans Following the Death of a Loved One

Leslie P. Carrion, PhD

The WISC-IV as a Neuropsychological Measure: Examining the Underlying Constructs

Deborah K. Crush, PhD

Spiritual Consciousness and Direct Experiences of the Divine within the Quaker Lineage

African American Women & Depression: Do Family Cohesion & Positive Private Regard Moderate the Effects of Racism & Sexism?

Alyea Sandovar, PhD

Ashley S. Davis, PhD

Understanding Game Designers & Their Creations: Cultural Narratives of Independent Game Production

Catherine A. Sikerbol, PhD

Relational Equality or Moral Distress? How Academic Managers Make Sense of Speaking Up ORGANIZATIONAL DEVELOPMENT & CHANGE

Trevor B. Maber, PhD

A Phenomenographic Study of Relational Aspects within the Art of Hosting

Zoe M. MacLeod, PhD

Thriving in Higher Education: Coaching Women Leaders

Perceived Social Support, Affect Regulation, & Self-Awareness Mediate the Relationship Between Childhood Trauma & Self-Efficacy

Gabriel Dominguez-Pereira, PhD

Attachment Style, Fear of Intimacy, & Romantic Jealousy

Dominique Eugene, PhD

Predicting Violence in Intimate Relationships by Women Exposed to Childhood Maltreatment

Daniel M. Fishman, PhD

Depression, Anxiety, & Stress as Predictors of Pain & Functioning in Post-Laminectomy Patients Undergoing Interdisciplinary Treatment

Shani S. Grunsfeld, PhD

A Qualitative Study into the Role of Organizational Readiness for Change Implementation

Role of Maternal Risk Factors in Intergenerational Transmission of Child Sexual Abuse from Longitudinal Studies of Child Abuse & Neglect

Erin-Lee Hairston, PhD

Claudia Hinojosa, PhD

Black Giving Matters: Philanthropic Thinking & Praxis of Black Philanthropoids

Learning from Therapy Clients in Mexico & the U.S. Shedding Light on the Professional World of Bicultural Hispanic Psychotherapists

Lisa N. Hubbard, PhD

College Students’ Likability Ratings of Elder Lesbians & Gay Men: The Impact of Attitudes Towards Aging & Homosexuality

Kirsten D. Hunter, PhD

Company Familiarity Moderates Anti-Corporate Bias & Jurors’ Compesatory Award Amounts

27

Heather M. Sheafer, PhD

The Psychological Experiences of Women in Long-term Relationships with Men with Narcissistic Traits

Barbara J. Jenkins, PhD

Factors that Contribute to Symptoms of Psychosis in Latino American Immigrants

Eric R. Johnson, PhD

Ethnic Differences in Risk Assessment of Chronic Violence: Building Risk and Resilience Models for African American & White Youth

Pavel Y. Litvin, PhD

The Semantic Network & Functional Compromise

Abram D. Milton, PhD

Suicide & Religiosity Within a Russian Adolescent Population Using the Russian Language MMPI-A

D. Kenneth Montfort, PhD

Family & Adaptive Functioning of Children, Adolescents, & Young Adults with Autism Spectrum Disorder

Brittney M. Otruba, PhD

Premorbid Mental Health Impact upon Post-Injury Perceived Life Satisfaction: Spinal Cord Injury Versus Concomitant Traumatic Brain Injury

Susanne L. Palmer, PhD

Parental & Peer Support as Moderators of Objective & Perceived Weight & of Sexual Risk-Taking Behaviors in Late-Adolescent Girls

Joseph D. Salande, PhD

Object Relations & the Unwanted Pursuit of Intimacy: A Study of Early Memories

Andrea D. Temple, PhD

The Effects of Various Factors on Suicidal Ideation in a Russian Adolescent Population

Patricia A. Velazquez, PhD

Crossing the Invisible Fence: The Quality of Mentoring Relationships in the Career of Successful Women

Vera Voroskolevska, PhD

Relationship betw. Attitudes towards Substances & Organizational/Professional Commitment among Substance Use Counsellors in U.S. & Canada PSYCHOLOGY WITH AN EMPHASIS IN MEDIA PSYCHOLOGY

Leslie Jennings Rowley, PhD

Let Me Be a Part of the Narrative: Effects of Exposure to Musical Theater Production “Hamilton” on Adolescent National Identity

Lisa F. Swain, PhD What Is God Saying? Navigating Scriptural Interpretation on Social Media Blogs

Jedediah L. Walls, PhD

Identifying Human Values in “Digitoral” Marketing Campaigns


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Focus Winter 2019: 45th Anniversary Special Edition FIELDING ADVANCES  

Focus Winter 2019: 45th Anniversary Special Edition FIELDING ADVANCES