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ge o r ge t own v i ew WE BUILD COMMUNITY

NOVEMBER 2021

HighPointe Estate SETTING THE STAGE

FOR EVERY MEMORABLE MOMENT

IN THIS ISSUE Light from Dark: Protecting Our Pets | 18 New Precinct 3 Constable: A Lawman's Lawman | 26 N O V E M B E R 2 0 2 1  G E O R G E TO W N V I E W Purple Heart Project: Going Above and Beyond for Veterans | 32

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georgetownview

INSIDE

THRIVING AFTER 55

FAVORITES

FEATURES COVER STORY 15 HighPointe Estate: Offering the Best For the High Points In Your Life WILLIAMSON COUNTY 26 Meet Constable Matt Lindemann VETERANS' DAY 32 Purple Heart Integration Project NON-PROFITS 38 ADRN—always prepared— brings relief during crises

ARTS 10 Festival of the Arts in Georgetown AROUND TOWN 18 Advocacy Group Making Changes to Protect Pets from Tragedy EVERYDAY HERO Upside Down Philanthropy

TOUR OF HOMES 48 Kiwanis Celebrates 20 Years of Holiday Tours PICKLEBALL 52 Fast-Growing and Raising Money

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PEOPLE 29 American Legion's New Command SHELTER STORIES 36 Keeping Pets Safe at the Holidays EDUCATION 42 Fashion Design for All Ages FOOD 54 Thanksgiving Change-ups POPPY TALKS The Real Issues

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PARTING SHOT High School Homecomings

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Visit our Facebook page for follow-ups to these stories, outtakes & hints to those upcoming... GeorgetownViewMagazine 2

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ON THE COVER HighPointe Estate—on track to be Central Texas' premier event venue. p. 15 photo by Splashes in Time Photography


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georgetownview Published by Optimus Media Group, LLC PUBLISHER | Cathy Payne

cathy@georgetownview.com

Like many of the best in her craft, Cathy has a specialized degree—in her case, hard science— and a gift for writing. She found her voice and fulfilment reporting and writing news and magazine features for a regional Central Texas audience. Along with serving as the publisher of the Georgetown View, Cathy oversees multiple news magazines, marketing campaigns, and books.

EDITOR | Ann Marie Kennon annmarie@georgetownview.com With a quarter-century of writing, reporting, and marketing behind her, Ann Marie enjoys sharing her vision and voice with a Central Texas audience. She believes being involved in and writing about local communities is the best way to show her affection and appreciation of everything Texan.

SENIOR WRITER Charlotte Kovalchuk CONTRIBUTING WRITERS Linda A. Thornton • Ruby Moseley • Cassidie Cox Sofia Elizando GRAPHICS & DESIGN Sandra Evans • Ann Marie Kennon CONTRIBUTING PHOTOGRAPHERS Rudy Ximenez • David Valdez • Todd White SOCIAL MEDIA DIRECTOR Jenny Campbell ACCOUNT SERVICES Debbie Tolliver IT / WEBMASTER Jesse Payne

EDITOR'S NOTE | ANN MARIE KENNON As we approach the holiday season, we tend to be mindful of all the needs in our community. Living in Georgetown, we are fortunate to have so many individuals and organizations that provide examples of and opportunities to give back. Renee Fox is a quintessential giver, not only sharing her personal provision, but also working with and encouraging others to simply make giving a part of daily life. For Veterans' Day, we're happy to share the Purple Heart Integration project which, given the chance, will provide a lifetime of skills and hope for wounded Veterans. Plus, don't miss the story about our local American Legion's first female commander, who has made a habit of breaking glass ceilings. Also, as is typical of Georgetown, good things always emerge when we need them. The Protect the Pets advocacy group is well on its way to making change and helping create legislation that may prevent another tragedy like we had in September. I am also so proud and pleased to write about Constable Pct. 3 Matt Lindemann. This dedicated public servant has done much for the city, county, and state, and there's not much I can write in a single story to thank him. It will be no surprise to me if he has a long tenure as Constable. In between, please enjoy our Thanksgiving ideas, satire and silliness, and don't forget to get your tickets for the Kiwanis tour of homes in Sun City. I enjoyed working on this month's magazines and I always appreciate the occasional celebrity perks that come with the job. I was delighted to meet Sunrise Spur (a.k.a. Bevo XV) (inset) and his roommate Two-Spot (below). Both are big ol' sweethearts and I think, if his horns were a little smaller, Two-Spot may have laid down in my lap for a nice ear scratch.

DISTRIBUTION David Schumacher CONSULTANT W. Ben Daniel

ADVERTISING Mark Elliott 512-240-2267 • 512-598-3500 mark@georgetownview.com

Georgetown View is an Optimus Media Group, LLC publication. Copyright © 2021 All rights reserved. Georgetown View is published monthly and individually mailed USPS, free of charge, to homes and businesses in Georgetown, TX zip codes. Mail may be sent to Georgetown View, P.O. Box 203, Jarrell, TX 76537. photo by John Baker

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arts

by Charlotte Kovalchuk • charlotte@georgetownview.com

photos courtesy Festival of the Arts

Festival of the Arts Returns for Final Season

O

ver the last 15 years, the Georgetown Festival of the Arts has transported listeners to classical music destinations around the world, from northern Europe to vibrant Latin America to our own backyard of American melodies. Now back for its final season, the festival will celebrate its music journey with three retrospective concerts. Members are looking forward to serenading Georgetown after last year's postponement. “What we need right now is the opportunity to be together in a beautiful space, with the opportunity to share some beautiful music, and enrich our souls,” pianist Toby Blumenthal says.

"It is wonderful to have live performances again, even with COVID protocols in place,” festival committee member Florence Gould says. “Performers need to perform, and everyone who enjoys classical music has missed sharing the experience. We hope new and old friends of the Festival of the Arts will welcome these retrospective concerts presented throughout the year. It will be a new classical series for everyone to look forward to.” The Festival of the Arts will also sponsor two concerts in the spring featuring the San Gabriel Chorale in March and the Central Texas Philharmonic in May. Visit sangabrielchorale. com and centraltexasphilharmonic.org for more information.

"Classical Sound" Hits the Right Note Last month, surrounded by art and serenaded by classical melodies, folks were treated to a unique music experience at the Tiemann Art Gallery. Carrie Tiemann, owner of the Tiemann Art Gallery, says, “The idea is to grow interest by playing outside traditional concert halls; in galleries, churches, or even bars and restaurants where people might be more comfortable.” She was swept away by featured pianist Toby Blumenthal and cellist Douglas Harvey, and says, “I had never listened to classical music close up like that. I loved the intimacy; it was extraordinary.” The brainchild of Carrie, Toby, and violist Bruce Williams, Classical Sound originated in Toby’s living room as a way to encourage out-of-work performers. “During COVID, when nobody was playing and musicians were getting depressed, I would invite my friends over to play,” she says.

CLASSICAL SOUND

March 27, 2022: 4pm • Tiemann Art Gallery, 1706 N Mays St, Round Rock. “Something in the Wind” featuring Ian Davidson, oboe, Stephen Girko, clarinet, Daniel Chrisman, bassoon, and Toby Blumenthal, piano. April 30, 2022: 7pm • Tiemann Art Gallery, “Enchanted Evening” featuring a mix of songs from Baroque to Broadway. Performers TBA

May 29, 2022: 4 p.m. at Tiemann Art Gallery, “The American Connection” featuring the Artisan String Quartet and Toby Blumenthal, piano. For information and tickets, visit tagroundrock.com or call 512-551-9774. Above: Toby Blumenthal, Patrice Calixte, Douglas Harvey at Tiemann Art Gallery. 10

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When the group outgrew her living room, Toby turned to the art gallery, a hidden treasure in an unassuming strip mall in Round Rock. Carrie was enthusiastic about Toby’s dream of making the gallery their new home, to connect listeners and performers in an intimate setting. “When you’re sitting close and listening and seeing what’s going on, it makes a big difference,” Toby says, emphasizing the value of small ensemble music. "The world's greatest composers wrote some of their best compositions for small ensembles—duos, trios, quartets, and quintets."


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CLASSICAL SOUND HOPES TO D E V E LO P C L A S S I C A L M U S I C A P P R E C I AT I O N I N AU D I E N C E S OF ALL AGES, AND INSPIRE THE N E X T G E N E R AT I O N T H R O U G H YO U T H CO N C E R T S A N D PERFORMANCES. SUNDAY, NOVEMBER 21, 2021 4pm San Gabriel Presbyterian Church 5404 Williams Drive. Performers include Patrice Calixte, violin, Kiyoshi Tamagawa, piano, Bruce Williams, viola, Douglas Harvey, cello, and Toby Blumenthal, piano. Compositions: Sonata in G Minor by George Frideric Handel, Song of the Birds by Pablo Casals, Piano Trio in G Major by Joseph Haydn, and Piano Quartet in C Minor by Johannes Brahms. This concert will be free.

 SUNDAY, FEBRUARY 20, 2022 4pm San Gabriel Presbyterian Church Performers include Patrice Calixte, violin, Kiyoshi Tamagawa, piano, Hai Zheng, cello, Bruce Williams, viola, Toby Blumenthal, piano, and Virginia Dupuy, mezzo-soprano.

 SUNDAY, APRIL 10, 2022 4pm San Gabriel Presbyterian Church Performers include Stephen Girko, clarinet, Bruce Cain, baritone, Lynn Mock, soprano, Patrice Calixte, violin, Kiyoshi Tamagawa, piano, Hai Zheng, cello, Bruce Williams, viola, and Toby Blumenthal, piano. Compositions: Marchenerzahlungen by Robert Schumann, Dos Canciones by Alberto Ginastera, I skogen (In the forest) by Wilhelm Stenhammar, So tag mit hjerte (Take away my heart) by Hugo Alfven, Tonerna (Music) by Carl Sjoberg, Cello Sonata in D Minor by Claude Debussy, Sonata for Clarinet and Piano by Leonard Bernstein, and Piano Trio No. 2 in C Minor by Felix Mendelssohn.

From top: Douglas Harvey (cello), Kiyoshi Tamagawa (piano), Patrice Calixte (violin), Bruce Williams (violin), Toby Blumenthal (piano)

Compositions: Sonatina No. 1 in D Major by Franz Schubert, Emily Dickinson songs by Aaron Copland, Cello Sonata in C Major by Ludwig van Beethoven, Romantic Piece by Antonin Dvorak, Morning Song by Edward Elgar, and Piano Trio No. 1 in D Minor by Anton Arensky. N O V E M B E R 2 0 2 1  G E O R G E TO W N V I E W

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Offering the best For Your Weddings and Events

When setting the stage for weddings and events, the team at HighPointe Estate is all about creating the perfect atmosphere for every memorable moment. Whether celebrating a couple’s wedding or anniversary, hosting a corporate event, or empowering a non-profit's mission, HighPointe Estate brings its best to every event.

B

Barbara says, “As a mom, I was thrilled to hear my daughter say, ‘This is the most perfect day I could have ever imagined.’ That is all you can hope for.”

arbara Bengford recognized this commitment shortly after she and her daughter walked through the doors of the venue last year. “Dawson made my daughter feel like she was his only bride,” she says of HighPointe Estate’s founder and creative director Dawson Clark, adding that the whole HighPointe team made Brooke and Craig’s big day special.

Hearing those words reminds Dawson why he does what he does. “It’s very satisfying at the end of the night when the bride and groom come to us and say, ‘It was perfect. It’s exactly what we wanted.’”

A CALLING In 2015, Dawson was just another father trying to figure out his role in his son's wedding. “We told our kids we thought we could design all the flowers. Fortunately, my daughter-inlaw said, ‘I trust you.’”

The Bengfords were excited about the exceptional floral displays—designed by HighPointe’s in-house floral team—as well as the personal attention they received from Dawson and his team. Barbara ended up inviting Dawson and his wife Leanne to the wedding because, “I couldn’t picture the wedding without him.”

The flowers were a hit, and it wasn’t long before Dawson’s keen eye for color and design caught the attention of several friends and family members who had weddings on the horizon. Soon, he found himself running a part-time wedding floral business out of their kitchen. Along the way, Dawson realized he was no longer satisfied with weddings being a part-time hobby.

Everything was perfectly choreographed, down to the ceremony music timing and the size of the dance floor carefully measured to ensure it, and all the guests, would fit.

Barbara Bengford and her daughter, Brooke

HighPointeEstate.com by Charlotte Kovalchuk • photos by Splashes in Time Photography

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UPLIFTING NONPROFITS

"I tell couples we got into the business because we wanted our son's wedding to be perfect. We want all our couples' weddings to be perfect too."

HighPointe Estate’s spot on the burgeoning Ronald Reagan Boulevard corridor between Georgetown and Liberty Hill serves a community that often has to travel an hour south to find a facility that meets their needs. “We feel particularly blessed to be centrally located in Williamson County and geographically attractive for families and nonprofit organizations seeking a location to draw people together,” Dawson says.

Williamson County Children’s Advocacy Center Executive Director Kerrie Stannell was grateful for that support. The WCCAC needed a venue for their Purse Bingo fundraiser to continue the organization’s mission of helping child victims of abuse. “HighPointe could not have been more warm and welcoming and just on board with making sure our event was socially and financially successful," she says. “We couldn’t have asked for a better event host.”

photo courtesy WCCAC

In 2016, Dawson left his position at a local nonprofit and embarked on a mission to build the perfect wedding venue. Designing HighPointe Estate, he drew on his experience in the wedding industry to address pain points families face in wedding planning. The most critical was the need for a dedicated indoor ceremony space to serve as a “Plan B” option for outdoor weddings, which led to the creation of the beautiful chapel at HighPointe Estate. “The Chapel has proven to be our Plan A ceremony option as 98 percent of our couples choose it over an outdoor ceremony,” he says.

Even though he no longer works in the nonprofit world, Dawson hasn’t lost his passion for philanthropy. Knowing nonprofits often struggle to find a place for fundraisers, he has provided event space for several nonprofits, including Seeds of Strength, Young Lives, Texas Baptist Children’s Home, and the Williamson County Children’s Advocacy Center. “I believe so strongly in our nonprofit sector and I understand the needs of these organizations. We provide a space for these amazing organizations to bring together their supporters, share a mission, explain the need, and just have fun,” he says. “I love the opportunity to host these nonprofits, celebrate what they do, and be part of their work.”

5 5 5 5 C o unty R oad 2 5 8 • Li bert y Hill, TX 786 4 2 • 512.6 36 .9 200 16

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around town

by Ann Marie Kennon • annmarie@georgetownview.com

Protecting and Advocating for the Pets

A

s so many in Georgetown mourned the 75 dogs lost in an accidental fire last month, a few pup parents channeled their emotions, and fortitude, to begin a movement that will hopefully ensure other pet owners never suffer the same kind of tragedy. After the fire, a social media and community movement grew and evolved into the Georgetown 75, a committee organized by a group of volunteers including Carlena Stearns, Maddy Jaeger, Charity Martinez, and Darla Bower. They are dedicated to honoring the animals, and working for change in regulations. This committed group of family members and community volunteers helped coordinate the Popptoberfest pup parade with Wag Heaven. Dozens of volunteers gathered photos of every pup and made signs to honor them during Popptoberfest. They also coordinated multiple ways for the community to support the families, including memorials and special gifts for their lost fur-family members. While City and fire department leadership continue to assess and inspect pet facilities city-wide, a large group of the families, determined to get laws on the books, established another group, a non profit called Protect the Pets, now chaired by Allen Craddock. The mission of Protect the Pets is to advocate for consumer

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awareness about the lack of pet care facility regulations and work to enact legislation at the local, state and national levels. Protect the Pets and the Georgetown 75 have since merged to move forward under one mission, combining the power of the community with the determination of the families. They are in the process of incorporating and submitting a 501(c)3 application.

THE MISSION Robin Eissler, a Protect the Pets' organizer, says, "Right now, we are focusing on learning everything we can and gathering data from other states about similar events. We are taking what we know about our own and educating people about the need for animal safety laws. This is a different case than animal welfare or cruelty, for which there are many laws—such as the proper way to tether animals—but nothing to protect them from fire. What we want is for pets to have the same protection a human would have in a hotel."


Facing page: Tribute to the pets at Popptoberfest. Left: Volunteers read the names of all the animals lost in the Sept. 18 fire to a crowd of several hundred.

Protect the Pets believes this can be achieved by establishing Occupant status for animals, which would require certain safety measures, and repercussions for non-compliance. "These fires are much more prevalent than people realize," Robin says. "Preliminary searches revealed there have been many incidents, even in Texas. Many happen in shelters and those animals did not have owners or advocates so the message doesn't get out." The group's goal, however, is to start by creating safer environments in pet businesses and extend the same protections to shelters.

THE CHANGE PETS NEED T H E S I N G L E M O S T I M P O R TA N T P R OT E C T I O N I S SUPERVISED FIRE DETECTION SYSTEMS. "Pet facilities need smoke and temperature detectors that automatically dial 9-1-1," Robin says. "The problem is that when unattended, there is no first responder alert and no egress for the animals in the meantime." This is the first level of gold-standard protection, she adds. Beyond that, the ideal system would include sprinklers, 24-hour staffing, and safe zones that enable animals to get outside. Their research indicates the mechanics and complete installation of such a system is about $20,000, which should not be considered an unreasonable cost over the lifespan of a business.

LEADERSHIP SUPPORT Since the event, District 20 Rep. Terry Wilson has filed HR38, a memorial resolution on behalf of the all animals. He recognized them and committed to work with families to move safety items into committee for the next regular session. As well, District 52 Rep. James Talarico filed a bill calling for sprinkler systems and 24-hour staffing. Protect the Pets is also working with the city and GFD Chief John Sullivan to update the fire code and raise consumer awareness about the dearth of regulations in the pet care space. Robin says, "We simply want people to ask the questions. Do you have an evacuation plan, do you have monitors, etc. When consumers ask questions, businesses make changes."

GET INVOLVED FOR PETS Protect the Pets will be creating various committees and volunteer opportunities to support their programs and meet with city and state officials. They also have a donation platform on their website to help fund their awareness campaign. The bottom line for all the group members is to make people aware that there are animals that are unprotected while you're reading this article, and that needs to change. "All those animals are at risk just like ours were," Robin says. "The sooner we move on this, the greater our chances to avoid another tragedy. We just want to make sure no animal or family ever has to go through this again."

Jonathan Gilliam and Koda visited with Wag Heaven co-owners Jeffrey Manley and Jusak Yang Bernhard. Wag Heaven has been a vocal supporter of the Georgetown 75 and are working hard to support the consumer awareness campaign. N O V E M B E R 2 0 2 1  G E O R G E TO W N V I E W

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everyday hero

by Ann Marie Kennon • annmarie@georgetownview.com

Giving Back is Simply Company Policy

R

HOW IT WORKS

enee Fox has always had a desire to give her time, talent, and treasure to help others. As a business owner, her passion to help individuals and non-profits in Central Texas led her to create a corporate policy and business strategy around it. As a result, Fox Realty collectively, and consistently, donates 20 percent of all commissions to charity.

Most brokerages split sales commissions, at different percentages, with their agents. Those fees cover the cost of office space, advertising, and the broker's salary. As part of Renee's upside-down business plan, agents work from home and she takes a salary only from her own sales. She then donates 20 percent of her own commissions as well.

THE DESIRE Born in South Africa and raised in England, this Georgetown wife and mom has been in the United States for 22 years and has always had a mutual love for business and volunteering. "My priority was to have a business while staying at home," she says. "I didn't want to work 80 hours a week, and when a friend introduced me to real estate, I knew I could manage my business from home and watch my children grow up."

clients. Today, Fox Realty focuses on residential, land, and ranch sales and she is excited to see her luxury branch of Fox Realty booming as well, which enables her to give back even more. "It is a lot of responsibility to be the boss. Before, I had grown accustomed to being able to give my time to help the community, but this brokerage is a wonderful vehicle for me to give back financially."

After seven years as a Realtor, Renee founded her own brokerage with a mission to train agents to be knowledgeable and do right by their

Unlike a typical fundraiser, in which an organization gives what it can to a charity, Fox Realty reaches out every few months and asks non-profits what they need, then sets about making a plan to raise that amount. "We have a sense of community responsibility," she says, "It is not about tithing. While Christian values are a driving force for me, this is separate from what I give to my church. I honestly believe if you do business out of a city, you should give back to that city. We have agents from Bastrop to Georgetown and Leander and we choose non-profits in all those cities."

Renee presents a check for $24,382 to Table of Grace, which provides emergency shelter services to the children and youth in the foster care system. 22

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everyday hero

WHO BENEFITS When she began her new plan, Renee and her agents chose non-profits that aligned with their personal passions. She says, "We are always interested in housing and children, which represent a large spectrum of needs. We supported groups who combat homelessness in the typical sense, but also helped people leaving foster care or transitioning from long-term incarceration." Over time, the group received many requests for help so they created the Community Transformation Foundation and a board to help decide where their donations would have the greatest impact. Most recently, they donated $16,000 to the Williamson County Children's Advocacy Center for their room makeover program, which provides new rooms for children who have been victims of abuse. Renee says that was a good marriage of their two primary passions. She adds that while they focus efforts in the Austin metropolitan area, the foundation also gives one international charity on an annual basis. Renee says all the agents at Fox Realty are fully behind the mission. "When we interview new agents, we want to know that they have a heart to understand this business model. They understand they are giving up office space to enable the company to put the money to something more useful than a brick and mortar. We know they may be giving up an opportunity to work for a big brand, but they all have a heart for and are rooted in giving back to their communities while building a successful business. It is wonderful that we all share a common goal."

In addition to sharing their commissions, Renee gives her administrative staff monthly opportunities to volunteer while still on the clock. She is pleased that her philanthropy provides her an opportunity to meet and work with new people. "Some may feel cynical about a business that gives back, but we are just helping people because it means so much to us. We do get new, incidental clients, but the benefits to us are in our hearts."

2021 SCHOLARSHIP During September and October, agents combined their commissions to fund a scholarship through the Foundation. The Board is taking applications from any who are first-generation college students. "We want to support anyone who is first in their family," Renee says, "from all demographics and ages who are the first to go on to post-secondary education. Whether their plan is a Bachelor's, tech or cosmetology certificate, or an Associate's degree, we will be accepting applications for the remainder of the calendar year and award a scholarship for the Spring semester."

Renee and Andrew Fox present a check for $18,662 to Boys 2 Men of God, now called Children of the King. The group provides mentoring, fellowship, tutoring, and after school meals and activities for children of father-absent homes. N O V E M B E R 2 0 2 1  G E O R G E TO W N V I E W

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justice

by Ann Marie Kennon • annmarie@georgetownview.com

Meet Precinct 3 Constable Matt Lindemann Taking the oath at Commissioners' Court Oct. 5 with (L-R) Claire, M'Lissa, Clark, granddaughter Lucy, and Hannah Lindemann. courtesy Matt Lindemann

M

att Lindemann has worn several badges in his 36 years in Williamson County law enforcement, but none so humbly as Precinct 3 Constable. Having been unanimously appointed to fill the vacancy left by the sudden death of Kevin Stofle, the new Constable says, "I am proud to wear this badge and excited to work with the Precinct 3 staff, Judge McLean, Commissioners, and the people of Williamson County. Kevin was my friend and it was a difficult way to come into the job, but when the Stofle family asked me to continue his legacy, I was honored to have their confidence. Hal appreciated that I stepped up in a time when law enforcement is under such scrutiny. I know there will be those who are critical, but I will do my best and I won't pretend to be something I'm not."

A LAWMAN'S LAWMAN Our new Constable began his career, right out of the Academy, as a corrections officer for Williamson

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County. He says working in a jail was a great experience because handling inmates was an education on trying to keep people happy without giving them what they want. "It all comes down to treating them like human beings." While at the jail, he met a Texas Ranger who was bringing Henry Lee Lucas to the jail, and the experience planted the seeds of wanting to be a Ranger himself. "My experience as a young Deputy Sheriff was invaluable. I was exposed to significant criminal activity, investigations, and natural disasters. I also learned the importance of working well with other agencies and officials in the county. It prepared me for a career in the Department of Public Safety." In 1990, Trooper Lindemann graduated 7th in a class of 100 and worked as a Trooper in Cedar Park and Georgetown. He also served on the Special Weapons and Tactics team; and handled high-risk search and arrest warrants, hostage situations, and public protests. While in Georgetown, he also served as a volunteer firefighter.

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He was promoted to Sergeant in the Ranger Division in 1997 and was assigned to Northeast Texas, but quickly returned to Austin by request. He worked many criminal investigations, including a few high-profile bank robberies, kidnappings, and prison escapes. Ranger Lindemann was also assigned to Governor George Bush and Rick Perry's Protective Details during their campaigns for President. He recalls, "Those assignments provided an exciting but unconventional experience in law enforcement. Everyone on the rope lines wanted to shake the Governors' hand or get a photograph, so I learned to be tolerant and diplomatic in the course of my security duties." In later years, he trained in forensic investigation and studied at the National Forensics Academy "body farm"; was an instructor in Digital Police Photography, a primary Ranger firearms instructor, and precision rifleman for six years, providing support to the S.W.A.T. team. Most of his career assignments involved great collaboration and partnership with law enforcement officers and agencies across the country. While he insists that his success is always attributable to working with local law enforcement, the FBI, and others, at least one Williamson County rancher has high praise for his work. Cattleman and business


justice Constable Matt Lindemann at home in his new office at JP3 in Georgetown.

owner Jim Schwertner says, "Cattle rustling is still a serious offense in Texas and it doesn't always involve taking cows through a fence. Matt Lindemann was responsible for the extradition of a man who wrote me a very large, fraudulent check for a lot of my cattle. He was also part of a task force that arrested the man who robbed one of my banks, and he personally returned the cash to me. I have always known him to be as honorable and reliable." Mr. Lindemann says then, as now, "On a major investigation, you have to get everyone going in the same direction. There can be no egos and we all have one goal. As Constable, I have 11 great officers working here with me; I have never liked the for me."

E V E N M A R I N E S H AV E HEROES, AND THEY ARE TEXAS RANGERS. ~ W I L L WA R D, A S S T. D I S T R I C T AT T Y

Prior to his appointment, Constable Lindemann's most recent position was as sergeant investigator with the Williamson County District Attorney’s Office. He says, "It was very educational. As law enforcement, I was only in the courtroom long enough to give my own testimony. In the D.A.'s office, I was able to see trials from start to finish and it was very satisfying to work with victims; helping them navigate the legal experience and provide support to the prosecutors. I worked to make everything as simple as possible and put people at ease."

CONSTABLE'S OFFICE County Judge Bill Gravell said, “Matt Lindemann has served the State of Texas very honorably with more than 36 years in law enforcement. He is a highly principled and respected law enforcement officer with extensive experience and training who will provide excellent leadership to the Precinct 3 Constable’s Office.”

Constable Lindemann says, while he wasn't ready to go into politics, he is eager to carry on in his new role. "Part of my goal is to assure the people who work here that Kevin and I were very like-minded and I am not going to change a bunch of things. He chose these officers and staff and I've known five of them for more than 20 years. I want everyone to know that things will be okay, and I want them to know I am a handsoff person as long as everyone is performing. I have faith in these people and that they will guide me through the process; if I am doing something wrong, I want them to tell me." As a public-facing official, and as a former Ranger, he is used to engaging with citizens and is looking forward to meeting people in person. "People used to see the Ranger badge and stare. I would walk over and strike up a conversation to put them at ease. As Constable, I will do the same; I want to get to know individuals in a positive circumstance as often as possible."

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people

by Charlotte Kovalchuk • charlotte@georgetownview.com photo by T.B. Hindes.

Georgetown Woman Takes the Helm American Legion Abe Harrison Post 174

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arbara MacMillan’s life philosophy was forged on the Cold War battlefield. “One thing I learned in the military is that you can do anything you want if you want to Front: Ray Sanchez, Barbara MacMillan, Rick Robinson. Back: Bob Hogg, William Crelin, Karah Powell, and Ray Geurink badly enough,” she says. “That’s how I’ve “A lot of our first units didn’t know tions like the VFW and Marine Corps done things. If there’s something I what to do with female officers,” she League. Nearly two million American want, I go after it.” says of her first year training with oth- Legion members champion more That view helped Barbara pioneer her way through managing her college men’s baseball team, and later join the Army through a direct commission program in 1976, the first year it began admitting women to service academies. Most recently it spurred her to become the first woman to lead Georgetown’s American Legion Abe Harrison Post 174.

DESTINED A broadcast journalism major at the University of Kansas, Barbara was encouraged by her brother, a West Point graduate, to join the Army to get the work experience she wanted. “I joined and liked it, so I stayed,” she says. That enjoyment was the simple 'Why' behind her 22-plus year military career, which ranged from master parachutist to Lt. Colonel to human resources director (G1) of the 1ST Cavalry Division at Ft. Hood.

er trailblazing women. “We opened a lot of doors. We had to overcome things and make our way.” Making her way included having to make adjustments as a five-foot tall parachutist whose weapons case always dragged on the ground. “You figure out a way to do it. There’s always a way if there’s a will,” she says.

AT THE VANGUARD Barbara joined the American Legion in the early 2000s, after retiring and making Georgetown her home. She says it is "the loudest voice in Congress when it comes to veterans and active-duty benefits.” The American Legion was formed to help World War I veterans and their families, and has since expanded to offer youth programs and collaborate with other veteran organiza-

than 13,000 posts worldwide, including Post 174 in Georgetown. Our local post was named in honor of the 26-year-old Georgetown man who died fighting in the final days of World War I. Today, the 170-member Abe Harrison Post 174 serves as a helping hand for local veterans, collecting clothing and gift cards for veterans in need and offering high school scholarships for youth. The newly-elected Commander believes the group can do even more. Barbara explains, “I’m motivated to revitalize the post and have it become a known asset to the city and the community.” She plans to engage more youth and their families to carry on the American Legion tradition.

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Veterans' Day

Purple Heart Integration Project

A

s we all celebrate veterans and their sacrifices this month, the Purple Heart Integration Project is going above and beyond by lending a helping hand. Founded in 2018 by Ted Acheson, Michael Terry, and Conley Giles, this society specifically helps members of the Armed Forces who have been injured while on active duty. When Georgetown became the first Purple Heart City in Texas, the three friends saw an opportunity to give back. The Project provides a method and the means for those who have received a Purple Heart to rehabilitate and reclaim their independence.

THE MISSION As a first step, the three founders purchased a 17-acre parcel in southeast Georgetown (at right) to house a complete rehabilitation and training center for veterans. Michael says, “The idea was that veterans could spend 6-18 months in that facility, during which we would provide life and work skills training and continued rehabilitation.” In addition to the center, they plan to build an on-site clinic, plus housing and training facilities specifically built for injured or handicapped veterans. To complement the training and therapy, they hope to include a public raised garden the veterans will maintain to help sustain the center. In 2020, pandemic changes put their plans on hold, but Ted, Michael, and Conley are persevering as volunteers, working with experts and potential donors. “Our first goal was a focus on securing the property,” Conley says. “But, moving forward, Purple Heart is really about what we can do to encourage people to rally behind us.”

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PLAN B Michael and Conley have not let the loss of their original vision discourage them; the idea of a piece of property being converted into a rehabilitation center is far from lost. In the meantime, they are giving all they can to help Purple Heart veterans.


Right now, the organization has ongoing, local silent auctions for military, sports, and entertainment memorabilia on their website, which has been redesigned to enable easy fundraising. Anyone, regardless of location, may go online to bid on these items, while supporting local veterans. The intent is that this auction system will create more opportunities for support and resources to help those who fought for our nation become completely self-sufficient. The website can also accept cash donations if supporters choose to donate directly. “There’s no amount too large,” Michael says. Despite their setbacks, the founders have one major cause for celebration—obtaining 501(c)3 status, which provides benefits to donors and opens major doors that were previously closed.

FUTURE GROWTH Michael, a veteran who led 20,000 troops in Iraq in 2007, is being honored by Congressman John Carter with a special Veteran Commendation. Not only will this honor acknowledge his bravery and service, it will also shed state and national light on the Integration Project. They will also have a chance to discuss their goals with the Veteran’s Administration of Central Texas.

Veterans' Day

courtesy Jo Trammell

by Cassidie Cox renderings provided by Purple Heart Integration Project

GET INVOLVED This month, the Purple Heart Integration Project is excited to announce their second pickleball tournament scheduled for February 2022. Men and women, age 50 and up, are invited to participate; registration is open now on their website. This event is a fundraiser and proceeds will be donated to the Project to support veteran programs. Thanks to Congressman Carter and the perseverance of these three friends, a dream previously only in their own hearts is now having a positive impact on some of our nation’s heroes and their livelihood. While this journey has taken many twists and turns, the dream of providing a place for Purple Heart veterans to heal and learn is alive. Their online fundraising and upcoming pickleball tournament will help raise money for these veterans even as the Project continues to reach for its dream of a facility. Georgetown rallied together once to make us a Purple Heart City; it is now rallying again to celebrate a project that will provide positive impact for generations.

Rendering provided by PHIP N O V E M B E R 2 0 2 1  G E O R G E TO W N V I E W

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tails from the shelter

contributed by April Peiffer

Keep your Pets Safe During the Holidays

H

olidays are a time for cheerful gatherings of families, and of course, that includes the furry ones too! To help ensure those furry friends stay safe and healthy in the midst of all the feasts and celebrations, here are some safety tips to keep in mind.

FOOD Chocolate and food with xylitol can be lethal, even in small amounts, so keep human food out of reach. You shouldn’t feed fatty or spicy foods or bones to your pet. Bones can become lodged in the esophagus or lacerate the intestines. Alcohol can also cause your pet to become very ill, from gastrointestinal upset to coma and respiratory failure.

PLANTS Holly and mistletoe can cause vomiting and diarrhea; mistletoe can also cause cardiovascular issues in an animal. Poinsettias are toxic to cats.

DECORATIONS Small decorations and tinsel can be swallowed, as they are hard to resist to playful dogs and cats. This could lead to an obstruction and, if not caught in time, could result in an expensive surgery and even death. Glass ornaments can break and cut your pet’s mouth or esophagus. Like any time of the year, keep electrical cords and batteries out of reach, as they can cause electrical shock or burns to the mouth and can be harmful if ingested.

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CHRISTMAS TREE Anchor your Christmas tree properly so it doesn’t fall over onto your pet or while your pet is in the tree. If you will be choosing a live tree, be sure to change the water in the base frequently to keep the bacteria that breeds in stagnant water from growing. This bacteria can cause vomiting and diarrhea in pets. Also be careful about using fertilizers or additives in the water that may be toxic to your pet.

VISITORS If your pet is on the shy or fearful side, be cautious when introducing them to new people. They may become overwhelmed. You can give them a room of their own or have them in their crate. Make sure overnight guests do not have medicine within reach of your pet. If you have visitors in and out of your house, make sure your pets do not have access to the frequently used door. Try to keep your pet’s routine as close to normal as possible to reduce anxiety.

GIFT OF FAMILY All this being said, the holidays are a wonderful time to bring home a new adopted dog or cat. What greater present for a shelter animal than a family? Williamson County Regional Animal Shelter is here to help make that happen. Go to wilcopets.org to see all of our adoptable dogs and cats!


tails from the shelter

WCRAS FEATURED PETS PIPER Piper is a super sweet kitty who would love nothing more than to have a family of her own to play with her and give her a nice warm bed. She's been at the shelter for quite some time, and in that time, she's really come out of her shell and learned to trust and enjoy attention and affection. Piper is FeLV+; many cats with FeLV live long and healthy lives and don't require extra care beyond routine vet visits. However, her new owner should be mindful that she's contagious to non-vaccinated cats. Please don't let that stop you! Piper will reward your love with a lifetime of biscuits and purrs. If she sounds like the right addition to your family, scan the code to set up a time to meet her today!

CHAPO This big lover boy is everyone's best friend. He's the hunky couch potato you've always wanted by your side. Chapo is a funny and quirky guy who doesn't like the rain and is allergic to chickens. He loves sitting in your lap, riding in the car, and playing fetch with his favorite people. He's even housetrained! Chapo is a people person—­ don't tell him he's a dog—and he likes them so much that he'd prefer not to share them. If you'd like to meet Chapo, scan the code to schedule a priority-service appointment. You'll love this silly boy.

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non-profits

by Charlotte Kovalchuk • charlotte@georgetownview.com photos courtesy Derick Zwerneman

Bringing Hope into Crises Austin Disaster Relief Network Equips Churches From worldwide pandemics to climate change, and catastrophes on our doorstep like Hurricane Harvey and Winter Storm Uri— Derick Zwerneman believes God is calling churches to be His hands and feet in a world impacted by more disasters than ever before.

Derick’s journey to ADRN was inspired by a disaster that hit close to home. After their move to Round Rock, he and his wife had begun praying for opportunities to share God’s love in tangible ways. “The next thing we knew," he says, "A flood happened in our neighborhood.” Right away, Derick rallied a few men from his church, Celebration Church, to help move possessions out of flooded homes. Those "few men" multiplied into hundreds of volunteers and also laid the groundwork for the ADRN role he now alternates with his job as a firefighter at the Austin Fire Department.

DISASTER SPIKE F R O M 1909 - 2009 T E X A S E X P E R I E N C E D N I N E H I S TO R I C D I S A S T E R S

T

he Austin Disaster Relief Network (ADRN) is a growing non-profit that engages and guides churches as part of a network that offers hope in times of disaster. Derick, who is ADRN's Network Development Manager, says, “It’s about strengthening existing relationships and growing our network. We connect with new churches and equip their leaders, which we hope will empower them all to do the things they have been called to do. We realize disaster relief is not the number one thing on the mind of every church leader every day, but our goal is to make it as simple as possible when something does happen.”

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ADRN was founded in 2009 and, since that time, the Central Texas region has experienced nearly 30 major crises, making it the fourth most disaster-prone city in the United States after Houston and New York. But, thanks to ADRN, almost 200 Austin-area churches and thousands of volunteers have been trained to meet the emotional, spiritual, and physical needs of those affected by disasters. Among their many successes, the nonprofit organization led the Williamson County Mask Brigade, which provided face masks for health care workers and first responders in the earliest stages of the pandemic. More recently, during winter storm Uri, volunteers distributed water and food to homebound residents. Collectively, over the past year, ADRN has assisted 932 families and invested nearly $1.8 million to help survivors get back on their feet. They also met


non-profits

the needs of 465 local families impacted by everyday disasters like home fires and floods. Additionally, they provided support, after the fact, to nearly 1,000 individuals who received free clothing, shoes, linens, and more from their Hope Family Thrift Store.

GOING NATIONAL ADRN 's Founder and Executive Director Daniel Geraci hopes to expand their reach. The current mission is to extend the same support and resources across the United States and, eventually, worldwide. He recalled, in 2013, when an F5 tornado devastated Moore, Oklahoma and adjacent areas, the organization helped churches there launch their own disaster relief program. “Wow, this model works everywhere,” he thought. ADRN plans to launch the United Disaster Relief Network in March 2022, which will spread ADRN’s model across the U.S. The new network will hold informational meetings in states heavily impacted by disasters; e.g., Louisiana, California, and Florida, followed by training sessions in Austin. “It all began in Austin, Texas, and God is using the network to touch people all over the world,” Derick says.

JOIN THE MOVEMENT To partner with ADRN as a church, scan the code and click on ‘network.’ Derek explains, “We want to help create a preparedness model with every church so we don't become not complacent; acting like nothing is going to happen. We are going to prepare so if something does happen, we will be able to mobilize quickly and train those who are able to support their community well."

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education

by Sofia Elizondo photos by Ruben Morales, courtesy of Ilonka S.P.

Fashion Comes to Georgetown

A

ustin School of Fashion Design has been teaching aspiring creatives of all ages and backgrounds since 2007. Students not only learn the basics of aesthetics and design, but they also learn how to sew and bring their designs to life. Owner and director Ilonka Soto-Pelyvas (Ilonka SP) is a native of Chile and says she was born an artist. When the opportunity to move to Austin presented itself in 2010, she found city offered more than she ever imagined; an artistic and fun environment. She took over the Austin School of Fashion Design in 2016 and created a signature program called the 'Academy for Young Designers,' which has become the premier sewing and fashion summer camp in Texas. Ilonka says, "We're creating the youngest fashion designers of Texas, and teaching college prep programs for all students looking for high fashion training.

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LEARNING FOR ALL The school is open to all ages, but, Ilonka says, training is very popular as an after-school program. Children as young as 7 years old, with no experience, sit beside students up to 18 years old and adult designers as well. She believes having designers of all ages and experience sharing the same space provides a healthy environment for creative thinking. More experienced students are also invited to enroll in their advanced Academy. "This is our super-star program," she says. "It is a comprehensive program where kids design their own looks and bring them to reality thanks to our Swiss-engineered 'Bernina' sewing machines." All Academy students take part in a fashion challenge, including runway shows, to celebrate their accomplishments and give away prizes such as free Academy programs, free Summer Camp Weeks, and free packages of private classes.


education ADVANCED STUDENTS PRESENT THEIR OWN DESIGNS ON THE RUNWAY AT ANNUAL ASFD SIGNATURE RUNWAY EVENTS

ENROLLMENT Classes are held year-round, on Saturday mornings, in garment construction, pattern making, draping, illustration, college prep, and more. Adults are welcome to all classes and, as well, beginning January 2022, students can register for their popular and signature Sewing and Fashion Summer Camp. (SewingSummerCamp.com) As a private school, they do have fees, but the school offers sibling discounts and all students have opportunities to work toward free classes and loyalty discounts. Parents and students agree that Ilonka clearly cares about every student who walks through her door. She mentors each student to reach whatever goal he or she sets.

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Thriving AFTER 55

DECORATION

COMPETITION

Kiwanis Sun City Tour of Homes

Georgetown Pickleball Association

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Twenty Years and Still Glittering Sun City Holiday Home Tour

E

ach year, the Sun City Texas Holiday Home Tour dazzles the community with homes decorated in magnificent holiday splendor. Whether in celebration of Christmas, Hanukkah, or Kwanzaa, every nook and cranny flaunts the wow factor— and all for the low price of $10.

PLACES WITH PURPOSE This event is a labor of love and Kiwanis is proud that the thousands of dollars they donate to children’s programs each year stay in Williamson County. When not working on the tour of homes, members also become “grandparents” to community children and sit in their own roped off sections at school, sporting, and graduation events and autograph the books read and donated to children, as part of their literacy program. Preparations for each event begin right after the previous tour. Members of the committee start by visit-

story by Linda A. Thornton photo courtesy Sun City Kiwanis Club

ing and reviewing homes that have been recommended or volunteered. Some artistic homeowners choose to decorate their homes on their own, but some work with decorators. Most often, decorators have previously collaborated with homeowners and are happy to show off their talent. During the event, visitors receive a program, designed by volunteers, with detailed home descriptions, including certain “don't miss” areas and items. At the homes, docents welcome guests and provide security. After the event, owners and volunteers spend a week gingerly tearing down and then... it’s time to start planning again.

the tour of homes. The trailers will be decorated in a variety of themes for the holidays and parked at Legacy Park on Del Webb Blvd. The Sisters hail from Sun City and elsewhere between Georgetown and Austin, and they enjoy taking their upscale style on the road together for fun and philanthropy.

2021 EVENT

A map of the five homes will be on the ticket and signs will be posted.

New this year, a group of dedicated glampers called Sisters on the Fly will be gathering their travel trailers, some of them vintage, to be part of

Each ticket ($10 advance) allows unlimited visits and tour hours are: Friday, December 3, 4–6pm Saturday, December 4, 10am–5pm Sunday, December 5, 12– 4pm Scan the code to purchase tickets or visit in person: Sun City Community Association Center • 2 Texas Drive Visitors Center • 103 West 7th St First Texas Bank • 5321 Williams Drive or 480 Del Webb Blvd. in Sun City. Tickets may be purchased on the tour for $15.

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Pickleball for All

P

ickleball is one of America's youngest sports but, thanks to its near-universal popularity, it is also the fastest growing. In 1965, two Washington businessmen and their families tried pairing ping-pong paddles with a wiffleball on an old basketball court. As they continued to play, they soon worked out a game format with rules and points. Fast-forward to 2021 and you can enjoy playing in a league for recreation or to support the community, or both.

by Ruby Moseley photos courtesy Jo Trammell

WHERE TO PLAY Residents of Sun City have several options for play and, in the greater Georgetown area, there are several locations to find courts, clinics, or organized play. Georgetown Tennis Center: 8 outdoor courts. Leagues, clinics, private lessons McMasters Athletic Complex: 6 new outdoor courts. Free public play Georgetown Recreation Center: 3 indoor courts

WHAT IS PICKLEBALL? Play is on a 20' x 44' hard surface—indoors or outdoors—lined similar to, but about one-quarter the size of, a regulation tennis court. Players use a larger and slightly modified ping-pong paddle to hit a plastic, perforated ball over a net. Game play is considered by many to be a hybrid of tennis, ping-pong, and badminton. Most believe what puts pickleball into a class of its own is the social aspect. At most locations, there's no need to bring a partner or a group to enjoy a day on the court. Anyone can join the game as long as there is an open spot. Players put their paddles in a courtside "stack" to wait their turn to enter a game. When one player leaves, it is understood that the next paddle in the stack will join and everyone makes a new friend.

BENEFITS OF THE GAME Pickleball can be a fast-paced game but, without the need to cover a large area, as in tennis, the game is easier on the body. Other pluses include portable setup, as the nets can be rolled up and taken home, and there are also modifications for players who use wheelchairs.

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THE CLUB Jo Trammell, the volunteer Central Texas Pickleball Ambassador, says the Georgetown Parks Department has been very supportive of the needs of pickleball players. She and other pickleball enthusiasts formed the Georgetown Pickleball Club. Their mission is to ensure all pickleball players are treated equally, regardless of skill level, but also to provide training, education, events, and competitions to a growing crowd of enthusiasts. Scan the code for more on how to start playing pickleball, upcoming events, locations to play, and even game rules.


If you’re ‘game’ for pickleball, this is just the right time to get involved... registration and sponsorships are open now for the first-ever Georgetown pickleball championship. PURPLE HEART INTEGRATION PROJECT FUNDRAISER On February 19-21, 2022 Georgetown Pickleball Club will sponsor the Texas Masters Pickleball Tournament

in Georgetown and Sun City. This event is a Tournament and fundraiser benefitting the Purple Heart Integration Project. (Story on p.32) The Purple Heart Integration Project provides high-tech career train-

ing to wounded and PTSD-affected veterans. Their goal is to provide homes designed for the physical capabilities and needs of wounded veterans.

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food

Thanksgiving Change-ups A traditional Thanksgiving meal with the special people in our lives is as much a sensory pleasure as a social one. But, perhaps, a change

Maple Harissa Sweet Potatoes If you thought you didn't like sweet potatoes, this recipe spices them up with harissa—a hot chili pepper paste—and tops with savory roasted almonds and spice seeds (dukkah). This change-up to the traditional sweet potato casserole adds a little heat that pairs well with a cool glass of milk. • 3 medium sweet potatoes (2½-3lbs), thinly sliced; 1/16" to 1/8"

in the menu will make the

• 3 T extra virgin olive oil

meal and the holiday even

• 2 T mild harissa

more memorable. These less-expected menu options just might create new annual favorites and give everyone something to talk about when planning the meal for all the December get-togethers.

• 2 T pure maple syrup • 1½ t salt • 2 large cloves garlic, thinly sliced • 3 T dukkah (recipe below or storebought)

ALMOND DUKKAH TOPPING

• 1/3 c dry roasted almonds coarsely chopped • 2 T sesame seeds • 1 T coriander seeds • 2 t cumin seeds • 1 t black peppercorns • ½ t flaky salt

Arrange sliced sweet potatoes vertically in concentric circles in a 10-inch casserole or gratin dish. Tuck garlic slices between potatoes.

itch xyK Sni

In large bowl, toss sliced sweet potatoes in olive oil, harissa, maple syrup, and salt.

en

Preheat oven to 400°F.

Cover gratin dish in foil and roast for 40 minutes. Remove foil and bake another 15-20 minutes until potatoes are tender and beginning to turn brown on top. Meanwhile, prepare dukkah. In a dry skillet, toast sesame seeds, coriander seeds, and cumin seeds over low heat, stirring constantly, until they smell fragrant and sesame seeds begin to turn golden; 2-3 minutes. In a coffee grinder, or with a mortar and pestle, finely grind black peppercorns. Add toasted seeds and lightly grind with a few pulses. Toss ground seeds with chopped almonds and salt. Top potatoes with 3 T dukkah (reserve remaining dukkah for later use) and serve warm. 54

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food

Sparkling Cranberries FountainAvenueKitchen.com Yield: 2 cups

An unusual sweet-tart snack, these can be eaten as-is, or added to a favorite salad in place of dried berries.

infused with cranberry flavor and is delicious in lemonade, cocktails, etc. Spread berries on a cooling rack (over a baking sheet or foil to catch the drips), and let dry one hour. Cranberries should be tacky but not wet.

• 1 cup water

Place 3/4 cup sugar in a paper or plastic bag. Add cranberries, gently shake to coat them with the sugar. Spread sugared cranberries in a single layer on a baking sheet, let stand at room temperature for one hour or until dry.

• 3/4 cup additional granulated or sanding sugar for rolling (see notes)

Store in airtight container in a cool, dry place, up to a week. Use as a garnish or a snack.

• 2 cups or one (12-oz) bag fresh cranberries • 1 cup granulated sugar

DIRECTIONS Rinse and drain cranberries; discard damaged or squishy ones. Place in a bowl and set aside. Combine 1 cup granulated sugar and water in a small saucepan over medium-low heat. Bring mixture to a simmer, stirring until sugar dissolves. Remove from heat and allow simple syrup to cool 5-10 minutes. Pour mixture over the cranberries in the bowl. Cover and refrigerate 8 hours or overnight. Drain cranberries in a colander over a bowl, reserving the steeping liquid, if desired. Syrup will be

Citrus Turkey Brine This will leave your Turkey very moist and it can also be used on other poultry. AllRecipes.com Yield: 15 servings

• 1 cup salt • 1 lemon, cut into wedges • 1 orange, cut into wedges • 1 medium onion, cut into wedges • 3 cloves garlic • 4 bay leaves • 1 tablespoon dried thyme • 1 tablespoon ground black pepper • 1 ½ gallons cold water Rub salt onto your turkey, and place remaining salt, lemons, oranges, onion, garlic, bay leaves, thyme and pepper into a large pot. Place the turkey in the pot, and fill with water. Refrigerate overnight. Discard brine after removing turkey. N O V E M B E R 2 0 2 1  G E O R G E TO W N V I E W

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512.


Spreading the Good News in SE Asia Georgetown Family Answers the Call

by Charlotte Kovalchuk photos courtesy Devon and Jared 58

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faith & chicken soup Note: Due to the sensitivity of their calling into cross-culture work, some terminology, names, and locations have been left out or changed to keep the family safe and protect their future work in SE Asia.

When an opportunity presented itself to reach 13 unreached people groups in Southeast Asia, where few had traveled and many had no access to the good news, they were reminded of another trailblazing move they made almost a decade ago that encouraged them to pursue this daunting adventure—being the first ones to help plant River Rock Bible Church in Georgetown. “It’s a good fit for us to be pioneers,” Devon says. Over the last 14 months, while waiting for coronavirus travel restrictions to end, she and her family lived at 22 different addresses. Their nomadic life taught Devon to be content with not having a home, which is only temporary anyway. “We’re not really from here. Our citizenship is in heaven and I have to be okay with that,” she says.

THE MISSION FIELD

I

’d go anywhere in the world except Asia.” Devon remembers having the thought before she, her husband Jared, and their three sons surrendered their comfortable American lives, preconceptions of the region, and fears about becoming the first cross-cultural workers in Southeast Asia. “I believed what was on TV about these people, that they were violent and hostile. The Father changed my heart,” she says, adding that there are bad seeds in every culture. “The people He has called us to serve are loving and hospitable, very religious, open, and friendly.” Eleven years ago, Devon and Jared answered God’s call to become cross-cultural workers. They were later joined by their sons, Quinn, Asher, and Silas, to spread the good news so “every man, woman, and child in the whole world would have the life-changing experience of hope and reconciliation.”

Finally in Thailand, the family has been busy learning the language and culture over the last two months. These final preparations will prepare them for their ultimate ministry destination in Southeast Asia, which they hope will be opened to travelers next year. The unnamed location has restrictions regarding cross-cultural workers, but is home to millions of unreached people who have never heard His name. The family plans to integrate themselves into tribal villages, not as “westerners coming to save the day” but with the goal of meeting needs and incorporating His love and truths into their culture. Devon is looking forward to planting seeds of the Father’s love in the villages, a reward she believes will make all their sacrifices worth it. “You have to count the cost,” she says. “Is giving up your house and job and all the comforts of America worth it to follow where He calls you? For our family, the answer is yes.”

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poppy talks

The Real Issues C

itizens of the world have many disagreements. Paper or plastic. Elephant or Donkey. Sweet or Unsweet. But, the really big problem, as we approach the cooler months... is the thermostat too hot or too cold? I’m just going to say it. Hot is better. I’m not saying I enjoy the necessity of pot holders to touch my steering wheel in the Texas summer. But, as the weather begins to cool, if you’re quiet enough, you can hear the arguments in every office, master bedroom, and car. Some of us are just hot- or cold-natured and we didn’t choose to be this way so let's please stop looking at each other like everyone else is just *wrong*. People who are Hot think the people who are Cold should just layer up and be quiet about it. Put a space heater under the desk. Get a blanket. But, there’s only so much clothing I can put on before I look like a giant tick and really can’t get my work done. Ever try to type or use a mouse with mittens on? Yes, I turn on the seat warmer when it’s 70 degrees out. Actually, I do it when it’s 90 degrees out and the air conditioner is on… it loosens the muscles in my back that are sore from shivering all day in the office. I have six king-sized fleece blankets in my house. I can’t sit under a ceiling fan when the air conditioning is blowing. We who are Cold think it is tedious that we have to pack a sweater whenever we go to a movie, restaurant, or office in July because someone else might develop a bead of perspiration over lunch if the air conditioning is above 65°. I want to eat my sandwich, not bury it in permafrost for a future paleontologist. Sitting on my hands in the staff meeting because my fingernails are blue while the person sitting next to me is fanning herself in the path of an oscillating fan—both of us wondering, How on Earth can she be [the opposite of me]? I’m dying here. Some facts; breathing and memory are better when the body is warm. Warm air is relaxing to the lungs, especially when it’s moist; blood pressure decreases so the brain works better. 62

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No one ever closed a road because there was too much sunshine, or cracked a skull on a sidewalk that was too dry. Very few people retire from Texas to North Dakota and heating a house costs less than cooling it. And I don’t care how hot-natured you are; no one wants to sit on a cold toilet seat. Don't forget, last winter, Texas was colder than Alaska. Neither extreme is comfortable, of course, and that’s exactly the point—pick your misery. Let’s face it: Even the most hardy among us can live comfortably without accommodations only in an extremely narrow range. Most people only say “beautiful day” somewhere between 65-80 degrees. Down sweaters or linen shirts help, but the comfort window is still small and the longer we spend exposed, the more likely our defenses activate; shivering, sweating…and complaining. For those of you who insist that 65 degrees is the perfect temperature for sleep, I stipulate that may be true— on average. But that is only for your head, and if you’re a hot/cold person who prefers another number, you’re just as likely to have a bad night’s sleep because your brain is always working to achieve your perfect state. The right number is whatever lowers *your* body temperature a few degrees at night. And of course you have to be able to stick your “thermostat foot" outside the covers to warm/cool the rest of your body appropriately. I suppose my point is that for whatever reason, thyroid, body mass, metabolism, it’s rare to be in sync with any one or more persons, but somehow, we cold people get more flak for being cold. I suppose it's easy to think we’re doing it on purpose, right? ​In the plus column for cold, I bet no one ever complains about the smell of the athletes at the Iditarod or in a snow-angel competition. So there, one point for cold. Meanwhile, if anyone needs me this winter, I’ll be drinking cocoa in a hot tub on a beach at the equator.


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parting shots

Homecoming Returns!

 Karen Ivicic, 1974 graduate of GHS, has been working at sporting events for 20 years and is an Education Assistant at GHS.

 Senior overalls, a new homecoming tradition at GHS

Kristen Dodson, EVHS mascot 

 EVHS Sparklers ready for half-time  Mini-Eagles Kai (8) and Chloe (6)

 EVHS cheerleaders Alanna (10th) and Shaylee (11th)

 GHS Flags flown by Benold Middle School students • Keegan (7th), Samuel (8th), Charlie (8th), Matthew (7th), Kyle (8th), Weston (7th), Adam (8th)

GHS Juniors and Seniors pep up the student section   EVHS Flags by Carter (12th), Tyson (11th), Ethan (11th), and Timothy (12th) 64

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