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THE GIVING ISSUE 2020

An Inspiring Look At Some of Georgetown’s Most Generous

Unique Giving | Compassionate Room Makeovers A Giving Time | The Life and Legacy of W.D. Kelley Live Here, Give Here | Helping Hands of Georgetown

geo r ge t own v i ew W E B U I L D CO M M U N I T Y

NOVEMBER 2020

LAND OF THE FREE LAND OF THE FREE Courtesy of the Brave

Courtesy of the Brave GIVING THANKS FOR OUR VETERANS


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FEATURES 8 HONORING THOSE WHO SERVE

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12 A PLACE OF THEIR OWN Smilin’ V Scout Ranch 16 UNIQUE GIVING Compassionate Room Makeovers 49 WHAT MAKES TEXAS “TEXAS”? Talkin’ Texan, Y’all

FAVORITES 20 EVERYBODY HAS A STORY Alex Chon’s Perseverance is a Recipe for Success

22 A GIVING TIME The Life and Legacy of W.D. Kelley 34 HEALTHY HABITS Healthy Holidays 51 AROUND TOWN Helping Hands of Georgetown

INSIDE THRIVING AFTER 55 A monthly, special section highlighting the people and lifestyles that build quality of life for us all. 40 THEO THURSTON Fitness Is For Any Age 42 READY TO ROLL Sun City Cyclists Club

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Ichiro Asian Bistro owner Alex Chon shares his recipe for success and sumptuous Asian cuisine.

44 WES ODELL Traditional Photography Exhibits in Georgetown and Liberty Hill 46 DR. SAMUEL STRAUSS Detective Extraordinaire

53 WORTH THE DRIVE Now You Can Always Find ‘The Tamale Lady’ 57 POPPY TALKS My Superpowers

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ON THE COVER

60 FOOD Turn Thanksgiving Leftovers into “Best”-overs

Sons of the American Revolution, Patrick Henry Chapter, lead the parade at opening ceremonies of the 2019 The Rotary Club of Georgetown’s Field of Honor®

63 PARTING SHOT K-9 Mog-WOW!

Details about 2020’s event are on Page 9.

Dale and Carl Illig share the story of one of Georgetown’s most fascinating and generous philanthropists, W.D. Kelley and the The Kelley Foundation Photo courtesy of Carl Illig

Visit our Facebook page for follow-ups to these stories, outtakes & hints to those upcoming... GeorgetownViewMagazine N O V E M B E R 2 0 2 0  G E O R G E TO W N V I E W

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georgetown view Published by Optimus Media Group, LLC PUBLISHER

Cathy Payne

cathy@georgetownview.com Like many of the best in her craft, Cathy has a specialized degree—in her case, hard science—and a gift for writing. She found her voice and fulfilment reporting and writing news and magazine features for a regional Central Texas audience. Along with serving as the publisher of the Georgetown View, Cathy oversees multiple news magazines, marketing campaigns, and books.

EDITOR Ann Marie Kennon annmarie@georgetownview.com

While not a native of Texas, Ann Marie is at home here. With a quarter-century of writing, reporting and marketing behind her, she not only writes about Georgetown, she dove into community service almost as soon as she moved here. Currently, she is on the board of the Williamson County Child Advocacy Center, and a member of several support organizations.

ANN MARIE KENNON EDITOR’S NOTE

By the time you read this, it is my hope we will all be enjoying election withdrawal, and, perhaps, replacing political mindedness with gratitude for Veterans while looking forward to celebrating a happy holiday season. With that in mind, we present our annual Giving Issue, featuring wonderful people and organizations you might like to keep in mind as the season of giving and hope approaches. I am pleased to shine a light on Boy Scouts of America, The Kelley Foundation, Helping Hands of Georgetown, and the Williamson County Children’s Advocacy Center. All serve our community by caring about children and families, and each has continued to serve those in need, even while facing the same financial and logistical challenges we’ve all encountered this year.

CONTRIBUTING WRITERS Charlotte Kovalchuk • Greta Bauer GRAPHICS & DESIGN Zion Pistole • Ann Marie Kennon CONTRIBUTING PHOTOGRAPHERS Rudy Ximenez • David Valdez • Todd White ACCOUNT SERVICES Debbie Tolliver DISTRIBUTION David Schumacher IT / WEBMASTER Jesse Payne SOCIAL MEDIA DIRECTOR Jenny Campbell CONSULTANT W. Ben Daniel

ADVERTISING Mark Elliott 512-240-2267 • 512-598-3500 mark@georgetownview.com

Georgetown View is an Optimus Media Group, LLC publication. Copyright © 2020 All rights reserved. Georgetown View is published monthly and individually mailed USPS, free of charge, to homes and businesses in Georgetown, TX zip codes. Mail may be sent to View Magazine, P.O. Box 203, Jarrell, TX 76537.

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For our focus on Veterans’ Day, I am happy I was able to visit with my beautiful friend, Jeanne Cox, who is as committed to celebrating and honoring our Veterans at the The Rotary Club of Georgetown’s Field of Honor®, as she is a proud mom of a Navy Corpsman. We also have a new and very special feature. Check out our special “Thriving After 55” section, which will introduce you, every month, to local folks and ideas that remind us that age is just a number. Since we’re thinking about the holidays, there is also enough turkey talk in this issue to make you a tiny bit sleepy. As I write this, I’m already thinking about the best way to reach Santa Claus for our December issue, and I am happy to report I will be camera-in-hand at the annual Lighting of the Courthouse Square in a few weeks!


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experience georgetown

by Charlotte Kovalchuk • charlotte@georgetownview.com

Veterans Find Healing through Music and Art Courtesy of Amanda Still; this rendering, which will change with the final product, gives a hint of what the K9 Heroes Mural will look like at Wag Heaven’s new location off Austin Avenue. Painting will begin Nov 11.

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illiam Childress always found solace in music composition, with notes and lyrics constantly flowing from his mind to the piano. As a veteran, he uses music and equestrian therapy to cope with his Post-traumatic Stress Disorder. “No matter what I’m doing, music is in my mind. I love sitting at the piano and bringing it to life,” he says. But at 79, he had never seen his compositions on paper, until Austin Classical Guitar (ACG) helped him realize that dream. Musicians from ACG, which is spearheading the Storytelling Through Music portion of Georgetown’s Healing Arts for Veterans program, collaborated with William to set his creations to paper. “This is a dream I’ve had all my life that’s finally coming true,” William says, adding he’s forever grateful to ACG for encouraging him and boosting his confidence as a piano player.

HEALING ARTS

Like William, many have paid the price that often comes with serving their country, whether PTSD, depression, or another health issue. But as the city’s Arts and Culture Coordinator Amanda Still says, the health care community doesn’t have enough capacity or funding to meet these needs. “We needed to create an arts program to raise awareness of the issues confronted by this underserved population and present options for artistic programming that help address those issues,” she says. That goal sparked the Healing Arts for Veterans program, which provides healing and outreach through music workshops and a public art project. “The arts offer alternative and unique opportunities to promote healing from trauma-based experiences and can contribute to an improved quality of life for many suffering the effects of this trauma,” Amanda says. Both projects will culminate during Veterans Day week November 7-15 in recognition of The Rotary Club of Georgetown’s Field of Honor®. The Arts and Culture Program has joined forces to provide Healing Arts for Veterans with the Rotary Club 8

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of Georgetown, Resilient Me Community-based Veteran Resiliency Programs, ACG and country artist Wynn Williams. The program originally had three components: Removing the Mask, mask-making for veterans; Storytelling Through Music, in which veterans’ stories are transformed into songs; and a K9 Heroes Mural at Wag Heaven’s new location next to Lark and Owl Booksellers.

MUSIC PROJECT

ACG’s Travis Marcum shares the heart of the music project: “The goal is to provide a space for members of our military to express their personal experience, their hopes, dreams, fears, and appreciation in the form of a song that’s unique to each participant.” Three veterans ages 30-80 are involved in the Storytelling Through Music program. “Their service spans three wars and they have some truly beautiful things to say about themselves, their fellow service members and the world we live in today,” Travis says. Wynn and ACG musicians will perform the veteran-inspired songs during a private performance that will be live-streamed at 3 p.m. November 7 on the Georgetown Arts and Culture Facebook page.

HEROES MURAL

Georgetown Arts and Culture is also collaborating with Wag Heaven to create a service dog-themed mural to honor K-9 service heroes, war dog Nemo A534, the first K-9 in WWII to receive a Purple Heart. Artists Jay Rivera, who served 18 years in the military, and J. Muzacz will lead the project. Amanda hopes Healing Arts for Veterans will inspire other similar programs. “Our hope is that healing arts programs as therapy will continue to develop—long after our program has concluded—as an avenue for trauma-based therapy,” she says. For more about Healing Arts for Veterans, visit arts.georgetown.org/healing-arts-for-veterans-program.


2020 FIELD OF HONOR Rotary Club of Georgetown’s Field of Honor is Nov 7-15. More than 1,700 U.S. flags will fly at the San Gabriel Park Activity Field, each a tribute to a military service member, veteran, first responder, or COVID hero. For safety, there will be no opening or closing ceremony, but Director Jeanne Cox has great vision for a very special week. Visitors will enjoy static displays, activities, and photogenic views of the field from the observation platform. Flag sales are ongoing at GeorgetownTXFieldOfHonor. org, and prior year flags may be re-posted starting Nov 7. This year, proceeds will benefit ROCK, Samaritan Center, and Veteran Outdoors. Veterans can make appointments online for The Legacy Tent, and tell their story in a 15-minute interview. Each is saved to CD and duplicated for family geneology and oral history. Jeanne says, “Imagine a child hearing the story of her father or grandfather’s combat experience in his own voice.” Vacation Liberty School will host the Dear Hero Station, at which visitors may write an uplifting note to a Veteran, First Responder, or COVID hero. “We are delighted to honor all the people who have served honorably in this unusual time.” The morale-boosting messages will be delivered locally or delivered to Fort Hood to be sent to a deployed soldier.

American Heritage Girls render honors at a flag burning ceremony in 2019. Photo by Jeanne Cox

Jeanne says a great silver lining, with the loss of field trip opportunities, is a plan for virtual field trips. Troops deployed around the world will come right into the classroom—virtually—from Poland, Italy, Australia, and the Middle East, to speak and interact with students. “The people who volunteered to participate are excited to speak to the kids directly, and some have even signed on for extra classrooms and panels all week, and we may make this part of our ongoing plans.” Everyone is encouraged to see the field; masks are required only in the tents. Volunteers will be available from 9am to 7pm for flag sales, and the field is open 24 hours for visitors and respectful viewing.

Veteran Congressional Awards “The CVC program is a great way to honor the brave men and women across our community for their faithful service to protect our great Nation and their continued service to their community,” said Rep. Carter. Among the awardees were Georgetown’s Colonel Charles L. Baker, U.S. Air Force, and Major Terrance Wayne Hall, U.S. Army of Round Rock who is a naturalized Canadian-American. After his military service, he presided as a Magistrate Judge and enjoyed encouraging new American citizens at naturalization ceremonies.

Dan Garza, Brigadier General Ronald R. Ragin, Christianna White, Denise White, Congressman Carter, Jeanne Cox

On october 10th, Rep. John R. Carter (TX-31) hosted the 6th Annual Congressional Veterans Commendation ceremony, where he formally honored distinguished veterans of District 31 for their wartime sacrifices and peacetime community involvement. The CVC program is nomination-based, designed to recognize veterans within the 31st District of Texas and preserve their stories for future generations of America.

Pictured is Lieutenant Denise R. White, U.S. Coast Guard and her daughter Christianna. Lt. White was celebrated for her military service, dedication to the environment, community service as a coach, Rotarian, Scout leader, and coordinator for the American Heritage Girls in Georgetown, who are docents for the Field of Honor each year. Rep. Carter said, “This is one of the great things I get to do. To honor these fantastic veterans for all they’ve done for our country is a duty I take great pleasure in. They have done all the little things that matter in life, without asking for recognition for it.” N O V E M B E R 2 0 2 0  G E O R G E TO W N V I E W

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a place of their own

by Ann Marie Kennon

Smilin’ Smilin’VVScout ScoutRanch Ranch

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ess than a half hour drive from Georgetown, just outside Liberty Hill, is a gorgeous piece of countryside, purchased by the Capitol Area Council Boy Scouts of America, and dedicated to the growing number of Scouts in Williamson County. The Smilin’ V Scout Ranch has 100 acres of creative space for family camping and Scout activities, and will eventually be available to businesses, non-profits, and other groups for education and events. Capitol Area Vice-President and Sun City resident Ron Garland says the Ranch is not only beautiful, it is optimally located. Current Scout camps are in Bastrop, and the Ranch will provide ample local opportunities, particularly for Cub Scouts, Cub packs, and their families.

HOW IT STARTED

Two years ago, Ron recruited a task force, including engineers and builders, to install infrastructure for a very modern outdoor experience. Camping areas have water and electricity underground, and will include eight pavilions for activities designated by pack directors. Construction for each pavilion is about $50,000—there are still some available for funding and naming rights for companies or individuals who wish to support future growth. Ron says plans are underway to upgrade the main kitchen, and they have already modernized bathrooms to provide showers and privacy for campers and their families. “Water and power was the most expensive, but most important piece of our development. Although it is invisible to visitors, it means the difference between ‘roughing it’ and providing amenities and technology that will hopefully attract non-Scouting groups to visit and help us sustain operations for a long time to come.”

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FUTURE GROWTH

Over time, and with help from the community, the Ranch will add an archery and BB range, chapel, Council ring, fishing ponds, splashpad, and a “wild west” Main Street with open air and classroom space (concept photo below) for Scouts, corporate retreats, and STEM education. P.J. Brown is an Assistant Scoutmaster, parent, and full-time resident on the Ranch. He says it is a great place to live and is looking forward to seeing the pavilions put to use for myriad programs. “With open air and covered spaces with electricity, we can accommodate nearly any program our leaders determine. We will also have climate-controlled space for a nurse’s station and trading post for Scout items, drinks, and snacks.”

TOO GOOD NOT TO SHARE

The Ranch will primarily be used by Cub Scouts and their families on weekends, and throughout the summer, for activities toward Scout advancement programs. However, during the week, the Council plans to encourage others to take advantage of the unique space—and the outdoors—for corporate retreats, fundraising private events, and more. Ron says, “An organization like BiG or the Georgetown Project need only talk to us about their needs and we will make space and resources available for their clients and families to help them meet their missions. We are about Scouts first, but we are excited about generating revenue from other groups that will help the Ranch become self-sustaining.” Ron adds, once the ranch is re-opened, local ISDs will be welcome to call for field trips, projects, and school programs. The BSA Council has already been


Engineers, builders, and community leaders gathered at the Ranch for a tour and update on Phase developments. The monument at the main pavilion shares some history of the land and the families who lived there... The Vincik family purchased part of the old Childress place in the mid-1980s. They lost a child on December 9, 1990 in a tragic horse accident. From that day forward, lives changed, and a lifelong process started to turn this unique property into a place of enjoyment and prosperity for young people. The name “Smilin V” was easy because their late son Shawn Alan Vincik would smile every morning while sleeping before awakening. The Capital Area Council, BSA continues to honor him with the name of the Scout ranch.

approved by the Health District to reopen, and is slowly adding activities beyond what Council can manage personally.

LOCAL SUPPORT

Among those recruited to help ready the ranch was Curtis Steger of Steger-Bizzell Engineering in Georgetown. A former Cub Scout himself, with bragging rights for his son, Curtis “Cray” Steger, who became a Troop 405 Eagle Scout as a freshman in high school, Curtis says he has enjoyed helping over the years with everything from conceptualizations to water systems. More recently, his firm has collaborated with the onsite builders as infrastructure and construction have converged. “This was a personal project for me for a long time; I was happy to jump in with designs for the pump station. As a Scout dad, I have always been pleased to be a part of this very motivated group, and I’m looking forward to seeing it ready for new Cub Scouts and families.”

HOW YOU CAN HELP

Groups and companies are encouraged to schedule a tour of the property and take in their vision for the future. Ron adds, “We bought this for camp activities, but we look forward to the final roll-out of an amenity-filled location. There is great development to come and now is the time to get in on the ground level. Many business owners have been inspired just by their walk around the Ranch. “We would love to have more partners, or skilled workers who can help with construction. Once we have

completed our phases, there will be many opportunities for church or community groups to volunteer for upkeep, and maybe spend a day out in this pastoral spot while helping a great cause.” P.J. laughs, “This is the outdoors, so there is plenty to brush to be cleared, or chores to be done. We can always put people to work.” You can keep up with their phase development or even reserve a campsite at BSACAC.org/activities. The Ranch will soon be available to anyone who enjoys the outdoors and wants to feel good about paying their venue fees to a great youth organization.

Photo Courtesy Capitol Area Council, Boy Scouts of America

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unique giving

Ann Marie Kennon • annmarie@georgetownview.com

My Safe Space: A Room Makeover Project IT’S THE SMALL, SIMPLE THINGS THAT COUNT. AND IT TAKES ALL OF US TO MAKE A DIFFERENCE. ~FIRST LADY OF TEXAS, CECILIA ABBOTT

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ou may already know the Williamson County Children’s Advocacy Center (CAC) provides many invaluable services to assist and support child victims of abuse and neglect every day. Their caring and professional staff provide a welcoming, child-friendly, and protected place for victims and their families to share experiences, receive medical assessments, engage with law enforcement, and, ideally, be restored through therapy and counseling. The Center’s mission is to break the cycle of abuse, one child at a time, by working to reduce the emotional trauma for children and their non-offending family members. While clients receive services that always reflect best practices in the field, it is quite possible that a Texas grant program may be the most innovative and compassionate of them all.

COMPASSIONATE TRANSFORMATION I M A G I N E L I V I N G O R G O I N G TO S L E E P EVERY NIGHT IN A CRIME SCENE Nearly every child victim of sexual abuse (90%) knows his or her attacker, which means a great deal of abuse happens in a familiar environment. Having to live in a place that has become a crime scene is a desperate fact of life, and one that might be easily overlooked in light of pressing clinical and judicial needs. While children do need and find healing in counseling, in many cases, they go back to the home or bedroom where the abuse occurred. Challenges arise because the child’s personal space was violated by the perpetrator of their abuse, or furniture and belongings may have been removed as evidence in the criminal investiga-

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tion. Being in this space again can trigger or renew the emotional response from the original trauma. But, through unique donations and grants, volunteers are able to provide some children with a truly new start by fully remodeling their bedrooms or other rooms in the home. New colors, furniture, toys, and personalized decór help return a sense that their personal space is an authentically safe haven.

THE IDEA

Based on a 2015 Women of Courage grant, My Safe Space: A Room Makeover Project provides funding for CACs statewide to transform spaces in which children impacted by trauma can have greater consistency in the sense that they are moving forward from a bad experience. Funding from these grants is available to all 71 CACs in Texas. The program is implemented in a variety of ways across the state. The Williamson County CAC is proud to participate as well, and has expanded on the premise to provide support in any capacity that might help futher the healing process. Kerrie Stannell, CEO, of the Williamson County Advocacy Center says the program is developing, and they are particularly sensitive to the need for the entire family to feel safe inside their own home. “The abuse happened to the child, but the trauma happened to the whole family. When we receive funds from the Women of Courage grant we use them accordingly to makeover a bedroom. However, with local partnerships and donations we can expand the help we are able to give. We can redo a parent’s bedroom, a bathroom, help with a few repairs or assist with siblings’ rooms, whatever it takes to reinstate the victim’s comfort and healing, and help the siblings and protective family members with safety and stability.”


unique giving WHETHER IT’S A LAMP, NEW BEDDING, AN AREA RUG, CURTAIN TREATMENTS, THROW PILLOWS, OR PAINTING THE WALLS, THESE ROOM MAKEOVERS ARE A SIMPLE YET POWERFUL ACT OF CREATING A POSITIVE AND SAFE NEW ENVIRONMENT FOR CHILD VICTIMS.

HOPE, HEALING, AND JUSTICE

HOW YOU CAN HELP

Kerrie says, while the program is still relatively new, the Center is grateful to receive funding from Women of Courage, which has inspired others in the community to donate. “We are fortunate to have the Round Rock Leadership Class and Renee Fox at Fox Realty partnering with us to help grow the program. It is our hope that more people in our community will see the benefits of striking up a corporate or business partnership for this program, so we can make changes in more homes. We are always happy to accept small donations from individuals or community groups as well, to enable us to help more children in need.”

The WCCAC is ready to accept financial donations on their website at WilcoCAC.org, and you can arrange to donate household items in person. Director of Community Engagement Tiffany Sturman says donors can ask to direct funds to the program in the Paypal memo field, but if the field proves elusive, you can email her directly to ensure your donation gets into the right account. (tsturman@wilcocactx. org) Blankets and toys, if not used for a room makeover, help make the interview and counseling rooms at the Center more comfortable as well. Kerrie adds, “This wonderful program is part of the healing. New rooms and spaces allow children and families to feel safe inside their home again. Many suffer through nightmares or the simple fact that they do not want to go to their room again. Having a new space, one that is different than it was before, is a big step to putting the trauma behind them.”

When I helped to paint my room during the makeover, it was as if I were covering all of the bad things that have happened in that room.” ~ My Safe Space recipient N O V E M B E R 2 0 2 0  G E O R G E TO W N V I E W

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everybody has a story

by Charlotte Kovalchuk • charlotte@georgetownview.com

Perseverance: A Recipe For Success ICHIRO ASIAN BISTRO 1500 RIVERY BLVD. SUITE 2120 GEORGETOWN · 512.688.4288 an cooking skills and his father’s master sushi chef ability, and the fact that the restaurant was one of few sushi bars in the area at the time, were a recipe for success, one the Chons would eventually pass on to their son.

CONTINUING THE TRADITION

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successful, welcoming business owner, Alex Chon is far from the shy 17-year-old who reluctantly immigrated here with his family from South Korea in 1987. His international adventure began when his father realized he wasn’t ready to stop working, despite nearing 55, Korea’s retirement age. Alex’s aunt, who had married an Austin-ite, convinced them to join her in America, where his parents would have more opportunities, including the chance to pursue their restaurant dream. Like any teenager uprooted from home, Alex wasn’t thrilled about having to leave his friends and move to a different country, especially because he didn’t speak English and everyone else seemed to be blonde and blue-eyed. He also didn’t get why schools here started in September instead of January. “Why start in the middle of the year?” he wondered. Despite the culture shock, Alex was determined to fit in, vowing to prove himself by making the best grades in class. While his inability to speak English hindered him from making friends, his passion for the international language of numbers and a strong work ethic quickly overcame the communication barrier. “One good thing about getting very good scores—other kids want to be your friend,” he says. Those good grades paid off again when Alex was accepted at UT at Austin to study chemical engineering. A few months after graduating, though, he realized he was more passionate about the family business. The Chons’ restaurant dream hadn’t come easily; many lessons were learned the hard way. “They learned everything by making mistakes,” Alex says. But his mom’s Kore20

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Alex and his two sisters helped their parents run their restaurant, but when they retired and sold the business, Alex began forging his own culinary path. He opened Takara Sushi & Asian Bistro in Cedar Park, offering Japanese rather than Korean cuisine as well as wine; an unusual pairing, he admits, but it worked. It worked so well, in fact, that a group of business partners who were acquiring sushi bars all over Texas asked to buy it. Alex agreed, already eyeing his restaurant’s new location—Georgetown was calling his name. “When you expand, you have to expand to Georgetown,” his customers would always say. The small but growing town was indeed a favorable choice; one of the fastest growing cities in the nation, plus, developer and frequent Takara customer Jeff Novak offered him space in the Summit at Rivery Park. “It was a good marriage in a way, except for the pandemic,” Alex says. Ichiro Asian Bistro & Wine Bar was open just two days before it was shut down by COVID. An agonizing two weeks followed before he was able to reopen, but one thing Alex learned from his parents, to get back up when there was nowhere else to go. And he did, using down time to revamp the menu and build a stronger staff team. Now he sees the closure as a blessing in disguise. “If we opened right away and the shutdown didn’t happen, I think we would have made a lot of mistakes,” he says. Looking back on his life’s journey, Alex sees his family’s immigration as a blessing, too. Though he wasn’t happy about the move in the beginning, he came to realize his aunt was right about America’s opportunities. When you work really hard here, success follows, he says. “Back in Korea, you had to have a lot of connections, but over here, you have more fair chances. As long as you put your time and effort and work hard enough, the reward is really good.”


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a giving time

Ann Marie Kennon • annmarie@georgetownview.com Photos courtesy of Carl Illig

About the W.D. Kelley Foundation

William Dennis Kelley is as deserving of a movie about his life as the likes of Patch Adams or Buddy Holly. From the first day he walked into attorney Dale Illig’s office in 1978, wearing a Hawaiian shirt and a three-day beard, he showed himself to be a caring, though eclectic character who reflected righteousness and generosity. His legacy, and trust, has been directly benefiting Georgetown and surrounding communities for nearly 20 years. Perhaps, in time, the book Mr. Illig has begun about their time together, will bring the story of this extraordinary man, and partnership, to people outside Georgetown. 22

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he mission of the W.D. Kelley Foundation is “to acknowledge and encourage innovative leadership in the areas of education, health, and human services in the Georgetown non-profit community.” As trustee of the foundation, Dale Illig continues to be worthy of the name, as he was during Mr. Kelley’s lifetime. “I had only been a practicing attorney for one year when Mr. Kelley walked into my office,” Dale says. “He presented me with a will contestation case that I believed we couldn’t win. He trusted me then and, over the 18 months it took to win the case, our relationship was cemented. He was not just as a client or friend but a father figure—until he died 18 years later. His only complaint during that time was that I worried too much and didn’t charge him enough.”

HISTORY

Mr. Kelley was the last living heir of a distinguished Swedish pioneer family. His great-grandmother, Anna Hurd Palm, came to Texas in 1853 and settled in what is now known as Palm Valley in Round Rock. The land she purchased in 1863 to bury her son, who had succumbed to pneumonia, later became the Palm Valley Lutheran Church, but she maintained a successful estate property, which passed down to later generations.


a giving time WDKELLEYFOUNDATION.ORG: THE OBJECTIVE IS TO HELP GRANTEES ACHIEVE GOALS AND BE CATALYSTS FOR CHANGE. THEY HOPE ORGANIZATIONS SERVED CAN LEVERAGE FUNDING SO THEY DO NOT BECOME DEPENDENT ON IT, AND MAY BE SELF-SUSTAINING IN THE FUTURE. In 1978, Kelley’s aunt, Mary Palm, passed away after having been convinced by her pastor to sign a new will just 54 hours before she died. Her original will left her estate, in equal shares, to her sister Marguerite and her nephew William Kelley. The note she signed, in the presence of influential witnesses, left uncertainty as to her final wishes, so the parties put it to a jury to decide. Dale says, “Kelley was very clear that we would not settle and, despite being up against some of Austin’s best trial attorneys, we prevailed with the jury. They determined Mary was not competent at the time she signed the second will, so he received his rightful inheritance.” While Mr. Kelley insisted that he didn’t need money, and did not have any children of his own, he did have a love for the homestead that had been in his family for 130 years. He protested mightily when the City of Round Rock decided to build Old Settlers Park on the site, but was forced to accept their decision to condemn and take possession of the site. Payment to Kelley was $4 million and, when Dale asked him what he wanted to do with it, he said, “Why don’t you just take care of it for me?”

THE TRUST

Still reeling a little from the confidence his friend showed, Dale helped Kelley pay some taxes and make gifts to friends, then set about investing in what would become very lucrative properties along I-35 in Georgetown. These buys were made during the S&L crisis in the early 1990s, so the purchases were a risk that paid very well as the Texas economy recovered. Despite having and earning money from his trust, Kelley lived very simply on his pension from Carpenter’s Local Union 769, where he had spent his working years. Dale smiles to recall being friends with a millionaire who lived out of his car, or slept on his law office floor, often for weeks or months. Dale was a very successful money manager, and at the time of Kelley’s death, the trust had grown from $2.3 million to $6.8 million.

THE FOUNDATION

After Mr. Kelley’s death, Dale recognized the immense responsibility, and challenges, of giving away money. He converted the trust to a foundation and recruited trusted community members to form a board. Today, the

foundation continues to thrive, with the help of his son Carl as Executive Director, board members Thomas Baird and Rev. Jim Turley, and Administrative Assistant Jeannie Coffman. Since 2001, the Foundation has contributed nearly $7 million to local groups, and strives to donate between $400-500,000 annually. “In the beginning,” Carl says, “we focused on small organizations that could benefit from the support because we recognized not everyone has resources for long applications and processes. We are also atypical in that we do not have an annual plan, or an open door policy. When we hear about good opportunities, we invite individuals and organizations to submit information to us for review.” Dale adds, “We like to focus on education, jobs, and good leaders. Kelley was doted on by his aunts, who emphasized his own education, and he believed a job is the greatest gift you can give a person. I also believe when you find a great leader, whatever you give them, they’ll do the right thing with it.” Evidence of this is the recently established W.D. Kelley Award for Leadership, which Carl and Dale agree has provided a lot of fulfillment from and pride in recipients Eric Lashley, Erin Kiltz, Tamara Huggins, and Nancy Krenek. This year, among others, the Foundation is providing $75,000 for scholarships at Temple College in Taylor and Hutto. Funds will help high school students who want to earn dual credit but can not afford the tuition cost of Austin Community College. An additional $75,000 will be donated to the college to renovate existing space into a brand new physics lab. Dale says, “What Kelley gave me was a lot more important than just taking care of his money and his legal problems. No one had ever given me such absolute trust and confidence, from the day he met me until the day he died. This was Kelley’s greatest gift.” N O V E M B E R 2 0 2 0  G E O R G E TO W N V I E W

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Healthy Is The New Beautiful

advertorial

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A

mong many gems in Georgetown is our award-winning Renew Med

Spa. Far from typical, Renew combines relaxing, pampering services with

the expertise of a medical clinic, leaving patrons with long-lasting benefits.

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Founder and owner Kacey Pond is celebrated for her wellness and aesthetics, having opened the spa in 2012 to improve clients’ quality of life. “Our goal is not to replace necessary medical treatments,” she says, “But to add to our clients’ healthcare toolbox.” With 25 years in healthcare, Kacey is welltrained in medical procedures, and understands safety as much as comfort. In a recent testament to both, she welcomed Dr. Larissa O’Neill as full-time medical director, who brings a physician’s privileges and new capability to the spa’s passion for optimum health. “We can help people at a different level,” she says. “We spend quality time with clients to determine whole-body solutions that go beyond prescriptions or a single treatment.”


THE HOLISTIC DIFFERENCE A critical benefit of a med-spa is receiving services, under a doctor’s care, to revitalize or correct damage done to the skin or body. Medical procedures include Botox® fillers, vein removal, skin pen, body contouring, and light (laser) treatments. “Renew also has many day spa services,” Kacey adds. “So whether you need therapy following an accident or injury, are looking to relax and rejuvenate, or want special touches like waxing or laser hair removal, we have a great balance of recovery and pampering.” Renew also prioritizes the client environment. “Spa services can be fairly intimate, and our staff are expert at making connections,” Kacey says. “We want people to feel comfortable asking sensitive questions, and explore every possibility for better quality of life. This is valuable, for instance, to a client who wants to look at diet or peptide therapy for hypertension, rather than a pill with potential side effects.”

M E E T D R . L A R I SS A O ’ N E I L L Dr. O’Neill has been in practice for more than 20 years and has a special love for women’s health and aesthetics. “I found myself interested and eager to work in aesthetic medicine; it is so rewarding to work with patients who are proactive about the way they seek to and take care of themselves.” Dr. O’Neill loves working with clients to help them be proactive about their overall health. Her vision is to provide personalized care to treat the whole person, inside and out. “We are introducing many new services at Renew, including bio-identical hormones, nutraceuticals, and peptides for the inside, and new laser treatments and injectables for the outside. “Our goal is to spend enough quality time with our clients, which will enable us to put together a comprehensive plan to help them age better and feel better for the long term.”

4859 Williams Dr • Open 10am-6pm, Mon-Sat • RenewMedSpaTX.com • 512-413-7960

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healthy habits

by Greta Bauer • greta@georgetownview.com

Happ... um, Safe Holidays!

W

e have all had those moments of temptation; asking “should we?” since Easter, and continuing through every holiday and special celebration. This month we might be thinking about how to adapt these typically overly-scheduled weeks of thanks, fellowship, and celebrating everything from a good business year to the birth of the Christian Savior. We are in for much enticement to collectively shop, eat, plan, worship, and spend time with the people we have been missing since last Spring. In a normal year, about 50 million Americans travel more than 50 miles to see family and friends. Experts believe that number will be down by about half this year, with most of the reduction being in air travel. If Bureau of Transportation Statistics hold true, based on 4th of July and Labor Day trips, the number of 100-500 mile trips will go up, while those covering more than 500 miles will diminish.

continue to follow the rules and socialize outdoors when possible.  Quarantine ahead of time. Consider staying home a little (or a lot) more before you go, to minimize exposure or bringing something with you.  Go Virtual. For $15, you can buy yourself a month of unllimited Zoom calls and see your family any time.

DRIVE!

If you really want to get out of the house, consider turning the big days into an opportunity for a travel vacation. We still have days off, and travel deals are aplenty right now. There are great destinations where you can relax and not feel like you’re missing out entirely.

IF YOU GO...

Dr. Stephen Morse, an epidemiologist at Columbia University says, “Although the collective risks of holiday travel are large, with caution, the risks for any given individual traveler can be reduced. If you’re unsure, or your loved ones are particularly vulnerable, err on the side of not going.”  Consider visiting off-peak—that is, not right around a holiday, when lots of other people might be traveling as well.  Plan a smaller gathering. The fewer people from different households, the better. It’s not clear that shortening a visit marginally—say, from three days to two or from two weeks to one—will reduce risk in a predictable, linear way.  Get tested. Each family member should be tested before the trip. If the test comes back positive or if you’re feeling sick, bail on the trip.  Stay with your family. For longer visits, if your loved ones have the space, it’s probably safer to stay with them than in a hotel.  Follow the basic guidelines that apply the rest of the year. Even if you’re willing to take on some extra risk to see your loved ones for the holidays, you should 34

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D r. M o r s e s ays i f yo u c a n g e t th e re i n a d ay ’s ti me, d r i v i n g i s safer th a n f l y i n g. To be s a fe, yo u s h o u l d n o t dr i ve fo r mo re th a n n i n e h o u r s a day, exc l u d i n g bre a k s. Th i s i s a map o f th e pl a ce s yo u c a n re a c h i n a d ay ’s d r i v i n g o n h i g hways a n d s tate ro a d s. . .


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advertorial

Advanced Hearing Aid Solutions Saves Hearing ...and Relationships

K

aren Block wants to improve your life, and she is open for business. It is not merely her passion, but also her professional specialty. As a hearing healthcare professional, she is in a unique position not only to educate about the importance of literal communication in relationships, but also to provide appropriate solutions, and tools, to maintain and even elevate your quality of life.

HER “WHY”

Karen’s father developed some difficulties with communication when she was just 12 years old. By the time she was 17, he had begun avoiding family and social situations because it was just too much work to join in conversations. The compassion she continues to feel for a situation over which she had no control is what gets her out of bed every day; “I couldn’t help my dad, but I am devoted to helping people hear and enjoy their lives and families again.” Karen is a licensed Hearing Instrument Specialist whose focus is on evaluation, education, and understanding each patient’s unique hearing needs. As the manager of Advanced Hearing Aid Solutions, she sees and embraces the life-changing effects of restored communications every day.

“ H E A R I N G I S F U N D A M E N TA L TO R E L AT I O N S H I P S — I N T H E H O M E , W O R K P L A C E , AT C H U R C H , A N D M O R E . M Y G O A L I S TO C R E AT E A H E A LT H Y R E L AT I O N S H I P W I T H M Y C L I E N T S S O T H E Y C A N G E T B A C K I N TO H E A LT H Y R E L AT I O N S H I P S W I T H E V E R YO N E E L S E .”

‘SOLUTIONS’ IS IN THE NAME

There is no business model to illustrate the heart Karen puts into hearing. To start, her office is small and inviting, which helps encourage trust and comfortable conversation, and she schedules extra time between patients to ensure everything is sterilized. “For many people, accepting the fact of hearing loss can be challenging because they have made accommodations over time—they often 36

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come at someone else’s urging. Here, you are family, we will educate and explain, and everything we do is transparent, to assure you that your visit is about quality of life. Once you’re a client, office visits are part of the service. You never pay for adjustments or consults—I want you to hear better without always worrying about costs.” What truly sets Karen apart is that her goal is to help you, even if the answer is not a hearing aid. “I’m not here to make a sale. I spend time getting to know people, speak to their family members, and provide testing to determine the best way forward, including physician referrals. And, if a person will benefit from a hearing aid, I work with many brands, so you know you’re getting the ideal device for you.”

HEALTH BENEFITS

Karen explains, “Hearing loss is not about age; it’s about experience. Roughly 80 percent of all individuals over the age of 65 have some level of loss, but much of it is determined by sound levels sustained over your lifetime.” What many people do not realize, however, is that aside from diminishing your emotional well-being, hearing loss also creates a higher likelihood of cognitive decline. “Our auditory nerve feeds directly into our brain, and when you have to focus so much energy to comprehend—because you don’t hear well—you are causing our brain to overwork in order to process all the sounds.”


TO D AY ’ S H E A R I N G A I D S C A N S T R E A M T V, P H O N E C A L L S , A N D C H U R C H S E R V I C E S D I R E C T LY I N TO H E A R I N G I N S T R U M E N T S . YO U C A N A D J U S T YO U R A B I L I T Y TO H E A R B A S E D O N T H E E N V I R O N M E N T. I F YO U LO S E A H E A R I N G A I D, T H E R E I S E V E N A N A P P TO H E L P YO U F I N D I T.

CHANGING TIMES

For clients who have concerns about visiting the office, or even put it off due to scheduling conflicts, AHAS is using new technology for “extreme” convenience: virtual consultations via Zoom, low-touch in-office and curbside testing, and no-touch in-home testing. “We deliver a sterilized HearX Testing System via courier, and walk you through the testing process, by phone or Zoom. Then we download the results to our computers here. You even receive an otoscope so you can see inside your own ear!” As they do with in-person appointments, hearing aids can be programmed and delivered on the same day. Adding to the magic of the technology, Karen can connect via wi-fi and adjust hearing aids remotely. She is determined to make sure we have no reason not to hear better. “We are not using COVID as an excuse to do less. While many businesses are scaling back, we are moving forward; adding these multiple layers of service to help our clients maintain whole-body wellness, and we are here to help you with the process.”

NO EXCUSES!

Your consultation and first hearing test are free, and you can schedule all appointments online, whether in-person or in-home, at your convenience. Karen provides comprehensive evaluations, consultations and, when necessary, precise fittings. She carries all major brands and can fit all budgets to give you the best hearing aid for your lifestyle needs. Bottom line, it’s easier than ever to have your hearing checked, and work with experts on the right solution. Visit their website for more education, appointments, free office visits, starter kits, software updates, education, and long-distance adjustments.

LEARN MORE ABOUT THE SELF-TEST KIT... ADVANCEDHAS.COM/BLOG-AND-VIDEOS/ Join Karen, wherever you are, and with a loved one for free Zoom webinars on a monthly basis.

HEALTHY SOLUTIONS ONLINE

You can take advantage of Karen’s expertise 24 hours a day on her website. There are many new features, and informative blogs and training videos—everything from tinnitus to the specifics and benefits of at-home testing. You can also arrange for a 30-day hearing aid tryout. She also believes one of the silver linings of 2020 is the proliferation of Zoom calls. “I always prefer being face-toface with patients. But also, standard telephone calls are particularly challenging for those with hearing loss. Now that clients are familiar with and comfortable using Zoom for telemedicine; I have found them more likely to make appointments to allow us to help them.”

HEAR MORE THAN YOU EVER THOUGHT POSSIBLE

(512) 468-7776 • advancedhas.com • ahas@suddenlinkmail.com 5353 Williams Drive Suite 112 in Georgetown, Texas (near the entrance to Sun City)

You’ll understand what your audiogram really means, common causes and signs of hearing loss, and solutions you can appreciate. Call or email to register!

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Thriving AFTER 55

“We don’t stop playing because we grow old. We grow old because we stop playing.” ~George Bernard Shaw

THEO THURSTON

Fitness Is For Any Age Page 40

READY TO ROLL

Sun City Cyclists Club Page 42

WES ODELL

Traditional Photography Page 44

DR. SAMUEL STRAUSS

Detective Extraordinaire Page 46


FITNESS IS FOR ANY AGE As we age, our mission is to use sound, scientific evidence to build effective counter strategies, not only to survive, but thrive after 55—the second half of our lives. Yes, even actuaries tell us that 120 years is no longer a long shot. Theo Thurston, 67, began training with weights when he was 48, and is helping others learn about resistance training, intensity levels, and maintaining quality of life at his GetAgeFit studio. “My wife gave me a book that said our number one job when we retire is to work out, with resistance training.” He admits that he didn’t really know what he was doing at that point, but he followed people he trusted because they had done the research and produced cred-

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by Ann Marie Kennon

ible results. “Walking is great, and playing golf or tennis is wonderful, but the science tells us the number one thing that will land us in a nursing home is lack of muscle and the mental acuity to take care of ourselves.” His mission is the help people think of life in terms of decades. “Think about how you felt ten years ago, and you feel fine today, but what you do today determines how you will feel when you are 77, and 87. We are all going to decline, but my mission is to help people get their health ready for the rest of their lives.” Theo recommends we think of our bodies as a car. “You’re not getting another one to trade in, so we must put the best oil and gas in it, and keep it detailed. Intense physical exercise is the one thing that has been proven to help delay, and even prevent cognitive decline. It may be tough to take that first step, but it is my mission to get people to the point that they enjoy it, and getting healthy becomes the high point of their day.”


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CITY CYCLISTS READY TO ROLL SUN GO THE DISTANCE by Charlotte Kovalchuk • photo by Walt Grabowski

Whether pedaling around Sun City or across the country, the Sun City Cyclists are “retired and ready to ride.” That’s how club president Leanne Waldo describes the group of 180 cyclists. And what better place to ride than “one of the most gorgeous places in the United States”? “The great thing is folks like me whom I can connect with any day of the week to share a ride, burn energy, and improve my health; folks to have fun in the fresh air and beauty of the Texas hill country,” Leanne says. Designed to accommodate all levels of speed and distance, groups ride 20-60 miles a day. Some stay in Sun City while others venture out into the county. “We know every farm to market road in the vicinity, from Salado to Hutto,” Leanne says. Members participate in the Red Poppy Bike Ride, and in Spring, they usually enjoy a scenic hill country ride to Kerrville, Utopia, or Fredericksburg. Some members, like Bill McMillan, go a bit further. During one cross-country trip, he and several members rode from Mexico to Canada. He and his wife Ricki ride a tandem and enjoy being part of the club. “Having people you identify with and enjoy the same activity has been a treat and a positive effect for us,” he says. “The side benefit is good exercise. It’s always good to be out of doors.” The club also hosts an annual Bicycle Tune-up Open House with CycleWerx bicycle shop to help Sun City residents get their bikes safe and ready to ride. A Safety Improvement Committee made up of experienced members provides regular safety reminders and road condition updates to members.

CHECK OUT THESE BIKES

The club’s efforts extend beyond Sun City. Since 2018, the group has collected more than 200 “pre-loved” bikes from residents and donated them to the Austin Yellow

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Bike Project, a nonprofit organization that refurbishes used bikes and gets them back on the streets. The club also donated and continuously maintains 10 bikes for the Georgetown Public Library’s bike share program. You may have noticed bikes lined up at the library’s entrance (their bright yellow hues make them hard to miss). The program began in 2014 as a partnership between the library and Visitors Center that allowed tourists and residents to enjoy downtown, and hike and bike trails. However, staff soon realized some residents were using the bikes to get to work. “It started out as more of a tourist recreation program, which is still part of the goal, but anybody that needs transportation can use it for now,” Library Director Eric Lashley says. Anyone can check out a bike from the library at 402 W Eighth St., even without a library card and regardless of age (kids need to have parents sign for them). Typical check-out time is 24 hours, but if someone needs a bike for transportation, they can borrow it for a week. For more information about the library’s bike share program, call 512-930-3551.

HOW TO JOIN

Avid cyclists should join the Sun City Cyclists, Leanne says, because members are familiar with roads with less traffic and it’s safer to ride in a group, which allows you to be more visible. Plus it’s a lot more fun socially. (Members gather for socials throughout the year when there’s not a pandemic.) Williamson County residents who are interested in joining the club can email SCTX.cyclists@gmail.com, join Facebook/SunCityCyclists-TX or visit SunCityTXCyclists. weebly.com.


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WES ODELL

Ann Marie Kennon photos courtesy of Wes Odell

HISTORY ON DISPLAY Sun City’s Wes Odell is a well-known and award-winning photographer, and this month you can see his 19th Century West and Cavalry photos at the Stubblefield Visitors Center in Liberty Hill. He also has a wall exhibit and works for sale at the Estrada Garcia gallery in Georgetown. Wes specializes in two genres: photojournalism, particularly of local people “doing their thing” such as rodeo, boxing, and folkloric dancing. He also enjoys making monochrome prints of “old-time things and people,” capturing the images before they vanish forever. Along the same lines, he says prefers action photography to freeze moments that will never happen again. “Mountains and landscapes will look the same a month from now, but a well-landed punch in a boxing match is a thing to behold.” The Liberty Hill exhibit is open Monday-Friday 9am-4pm His Liberty Hill exhibit features the U.S. Army’s Horse Cavalry Detachment at Fort Hood, and Western Re-enactors, including the Trader from the Mountain Man Rendezvous at Fort Bridger, Wyoming; the Town Marshall, and the Gunslinger.

Wes says each of these show the action just as it happened in the late 19th Century. “Half the exhibit is dedicated to showing the people who were contemporaries of the Cavalry—the ones who lived in Texas and the West during the 19th Century, when the Cavalry was protecting Westward migration and settlements.” The other half of the collection is titled ‘Gone Are the People.’ Most are in Black and White and some reflect the early photographic techniques the industry now calls ‘antique.’” Wes says he has a personal affinity for the 19th century and loves the Old West. “Photography has been in my family since 1892 and I had my own wet darkroom when I was 12. At 86 years old, I have known many people in my life who were alive in the 1800s, and I have always been fascinated with the life and lifestyle reflected in those times.” In addition to sharing his work in shows and galleries, he judges photography contests across the state, and also teaches other photographers the fine art of film photography. Next up in his hobby plan is to resurrect some of his old cameras and reworking photos from negatives. “There’s just something about seeing the photo appear when it comes out of the water.”

S E E W E S’ W O R K S AT T H E S T U B B L E F I E L D C E N T E R 1000 LO O P 3 3 2 I N L I B E R T Y H I L L W E D N E S D AY - S U N D AY AT T H E E S T R A D A G A R C I A 206 W 10 T H S T R E E T I N G E O R G E TO W N .

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You can meet the artist at a reception November 21st from 6:30-8:30pm. Photos, greeting cards and magnets are available for purchase.


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DR. SAMUEL STRAUSS

Ann Marie Kennon photos courtesy of Samuel Strauss

DETECTIVE EXTRAORDINAIRE

The Williamson County Sheriff’s Department has a wealth of knowledge and expertise among its Reserve Officer corps. Among them, is Dr. Samuel Strauss, whose career experience is unmatched nearly anywhere. In short, his accomplishments literally range from the depths of our oceans all the way to Mars. After graduating from medical school, he volunteered to serve in the U.S. Navy and was assigned as the medical officer on a nuclear submarine. He also completed two months of Navy diving and salvage training because, he says, “Submariners, even doctors, are all put through what everyone else is trained to do.” After ten years in the Navy, he went into the Air Force and rose to Senior Flight Surgeon. Again, he went through pilot training to gain familiarity with the planes and the pilot experience. “I wanted to have a good understanding of what they went through every day.”

WHAT’S RETIREMENT?

After the Air Force, despite his underwater and flight training, he was too old to become an astronaut, but that didn’t mean he wouldn’t be invaluable at NASA. “Diving and living on submarines is a lot like being on the Space Station, so I had the perfect combination of training to take care of them. They all fly, train, and do research in the air. Add spacewalk training under water and not too many people have the background to cross over.” Dr. Strauss also worked on a multi-year study to re-engineer spacesuits that were causing repetitive shoulder injuries. “I figured out safety concerns by marrying the

engineering with the medical perspective. I recommended changes the MIT folks could make to the suits, then corrected and re-oriented the tasks in the pool to avoid injury.” Later he partnered with another doctor to create a medical kit algorithm that would support individual astronauts in the Mars Landing program. “It’s very specific with respect to what each needs, based on age, gender, risk factors, medical history, etc. The finished program I am very fortunate to have had the opportunities—and many adventures— allows NASA in my life and in my career. to plug in the variables for each astronaut, create a kit, then human doctors verify the final plan.”

When he retired from NASA in 2013, he was looking for his next challenge, and went back to school. He exhausted all the law enforcement and criminal justice courses he could find, and when he was done, he had qualified for a peace officer license. “I loved criminal law and DNA forensics, so I went to work as an investigator.” When Sheriff Chody created a Cold Case unit, Dr. Strauss was quick to apply for the opportunity to serve as a Reserve Detective. He moves, every day, between four cases, which he says can be daunting because of the volume of details that have built up over the years. Once again, his expertise proves valuable, particularly when he can present medical evidence to the D.A., request testing, and assess DNA data to connect dots in new ways. “This is a personal job and it’s and about people. We work for the day we can bring closure to a family, and I love being part of this group of dedicated detectives.” Given the story he told, that seems like pretty high praise, and good fortune for Williamson County.

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WHAT MAKES EXAS “TEXAS”?

Talkin’ Texan

part 11

Ann Marie Kennon annmarie@georgetownview.com

T

exas is big enough to be its own country. In fact, our land area is larger than 155 whole countries. So, is it any wonder we have our own culture, several sub-cultures, and in the case of this month’s feature... our own language? While diversity is more of a thing these days, and some of these Texas-isms are more stereotype, or antiquated, than standard, they are still a part of Texas style. You may not run across any pardners gittin’ along their little dogies any more, but if you really want to feel Texan, there’s just some things y’all ought’a know how to say properly, or at least translate. First and foremost, a visitor or new Texan must understand the complexity of addressing others. A single person may be addressed as Hoss, or Darlin’. However, be they from Bexar (BAY-er), Boerne (BURN-ee), or Manor (MAYner), y’all (proper contraction of you all) is used when addressing more than one person. It’s also more polite than calling a mixed group “you guys.” Naturally, if the group gets large enough, you must emphasize the quantity with an All Y’all. Of course, y’all’d’ve known that if you were born here. It is also reasonable, when you are formally introduced to someone you are somewhat acquainted with, to say, “We howdied, but we ain’t shook.” Perhaps you ain’t met this person before because they live yonder, so far out in the country, the sun sets between their house and town.


what makes Texas “Texas” If your new friend is a particularly boastful type, you may consider him all hat and no cattle. If he’s not the intellectual type, perhaps he couldn’t pour [urine] out of a boot with a hole in the toe and directions on the heel. Since daylight’s burnin’ (don’t waste any time), you reckon you’d like to get to know him right quick (immediately), before you are near about past going (too tired), so you explain you are fixin’tuh (about to) get some lunch and you have a hankerin’ (craving) for barbecue. It is also important to explain that fixins’ are also what you eat with your barbecue (white bread, sliced white onions, dill pickle slices, sauce, and sometimes cheddar cheese squares on the side). So you say, “Jeetjet?...no?... then les’squeat.” He may respond that he might could (has an affinity to) enjoy for some barbecue himself, and will ask what kinda coke (all soft drinks) you want with your supper, particularly if it’s summer and you’d have to set yourself on fire to cool off. If you’re lucky, he’s got more than he can say grace over (wealthy) so he can pick up the tab. If you like and enjoy the barbecue, then it was good as all git-out (the extreme case) and you can plan to meet again sometime to paint the town and the front porch (celebrate then come home to relax and talk about it). So, you ask “Y’aunt’to?”

GEN’L PURPOSE

It is helpful to drop the -Gs at the end of your verbs if you don’t want to sound city-fied. To make up for it, be sure to add the -Ns in your descriptive clauses so a Texan won’t be thinkin’ you’re dumber’n a box a’hammers.

ADVICE FOR LIVING HERE

 Don’t dig up more snakes than you can kill.

 If you cut your own fire wood, it warms you twice.  Don’t cut your foot. (Watch out for cow pies.)  Can’t dance, never could sing, and it’s too wet to plow. (Might as well do it.)  Don’t go out in a toad choker / frog strangler. In other parts of the country, it rains cats and dogs. ‘Roun’ here, rivers flood with little warning, so a big rain is cause for caution.  Always show loyalty with at least a Lord willin’, and the creek don’t rise, (I’ll do my best) and its more serious cousin, Come hell, or high water (no matter what).

BETTER’N YOU

 FAST: He can blow out the lamp and jump into bed before it gets dark.  HAPPY: If I felt any better, I’d drop my harp plumb through the cloud.  LUCKY: He’s riding a gravy train with biscuit wheels.  TIRED: One wheel down and the axle dragging.  HOT: Hens are laying hard-boiled eggs.  BIG: When do we get to the ranch? Get there?... we’ve been on it for two hours.

Like many Southerners, Texans are big on blessing your heart. But, it is wise to consider the context, as the friendly phrase can mean anything from “Thank you,” to “Aww, your life really stinks” or “You’re a moron.” It is also worth noting, if a sentence starts with “Bless her heart, but...” the rest may be wildly insulting; “...she makes a hornet look cuddly.” Other examples of Lone Star speak are evident in the pronunciation of words. You can tell a Texan by the way they emphasize the first syllable in words like CE-ment, PO-lice, and DIS-play. Also helpful, for nearly every situation, is the universal You Good(?). Translated, this means: Are you okay? You are okay. How have you been? You’re welcome. No need to apologize. Need some money? Did you get enough? I’m very impressed with what you just did.

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Ann Marie Kennon • annmarie@georgetownview.com

live here, give here

Helping Hands of Georgetown

I

n 2016, Bob Weimer took a look at one of the lesser known and underserved populations in Georgetown—the homeless—and began making sandwiches that he delivered himself. His simple idea has grown into many volunteers, fundraising events—even a mobile food pantry—and the vision to provide basic services; clothing, job support, and connections to services. Helping Hands serves nearly 1,400 brown bag meals a month, and a freshly prepared meal on Sunday nights in the parking lot of the Georgetown public library. They also hand out clothing and toiletries for up to 600 people over the course of a week to help them get back on their feet. They recently began taking the mobile food pantry to Quail Valley in southeast Georgetown as well. Bob explains, “This is the most talked about and underserved community on Georgetown. We are pleased that our services are growing in this area and our 2021 plan is to have a full-time, managed food pantry here that the community can use every day.”

2020 HOLIDAYS

With continuing COVID changes, Helping Hands is not able to have the full complement of fundraisers and mealtime events they have had in past holiday seasons. Bob says the food pantry is eager to receive donations of Thanksgiving items; e.g., canned goods, stuffing, and shelf-stable foods to create ‘kits’ for the full week. They will also be happy to take reusable shopping bags, which are great for packing and delivery. “We will store the items in our canteen and deliver them starting Nov 16th. We are, of course, delighted to have cash donations any time; even $5 can buy enough rice or beans for a family of four. We also welcome any support for operations, as we carry several critical policies to cover our drivers and health certifications.” Bob is currently working on a holiday food truck event in December that will be open to the public. He recommends checking HelpingHandsGTX.org or Facebook/ HelpinghandsofGtown for updates and locations. Helping our underserved neighbors is as easy as stopping by the library parking lot to donate clothing, toiletries or money; donate funds on their website, or visit the office near the Georgetown airport (info below).

107 H A L M A R CO V E S U I T E 2 3 2 • 512 - 688 - 3595 • I N F O @ H E L P I N G H A N D S G T X . O R G M O N - T H U R S 9 A M - 4 P M • F R I D AY B Y A P P T F I N D T H E M AT T H E 8 T H S T. PA R K I N G LOT A C R O S S F R O M T H E L I B R A R Y S U N D AY 4 P M , M O N - T H U R S 3:15 P M N O V E M B E R 2 0 2 0  G E O R G E TO W N V I E W

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worth the drive

Ann Marie Kennon annmarie@georgetownview.com

No More Waiting For “The Tamale Lady”! 205 SONTERRA BLVD, JARRELL (INSIDE FAMILY FOOD MART) • 972-971-7216 JARRELLKITCHEN • OPEN TUESDAY-SUNDAY 8AM-8PM • TAMALES FROM $12/DOZEN

For all those times you couldn’t wait for the spontaneous visit from “the tamale lady” at your office, home, or community meeting to deliver her hand-made bits of heaven, you should know you can enjoy authentic tamale taste any time you get a craving.

Located inside the Family Food Mart in Sonterra in Jarrell, Aurora’s Family Kitchen is literally run by tamalera (tamale maker) Aurora Cedillo, her husband, son, and daughters, and has been serving up Grandmother Aurora’s corn tamales to the public since 2019. In addition to tamales, they serve a full menu of Mexican favorites and are happy to take orders for catering and pickup. No matter where you live, you can enjoy the nearly infinite combinations of beef, chicken, sweet corn, fruit, cinnamon...whatever you like, in these special treats. Son Albert says you can even request off-menu combinations, or bring your ingredients (venison, anyone?) and they will work up a custom creation. Some items may add a bit to the cost—brisket is popular—but starting at just $12/dozen, your favorites are worth a try. But, best to do it soon. Aurora’s is already seeing an uptick in holiday party orders, ready to pick up for catered events, or freeze for yourself for up to six months.

HOLIDAY FARE?

Perhaps you haven’t lived among Texans or Hispanics long enough to know, for holiday meals, tamales are right up there with turkey and gravy. A few millennia ago, many peoples in what we now call Central America enjoyed plantain-leaf- or corn-huskwrapped packets of goodness, and passed their customs down through the generations. Tamales are a lot of work and preparation, so it was common for groups to make a big supply for traditional celebrations and contemporary holidays. Fast forward a few thousand years, when Mexican families began adopting the culture brought over by Europeans. Eventually, Christmas became part of the holiday calendar, and the annual tamaladas (tamale making parties) became part of that holiday as well. Today, the tradition continues as Hispanic families gather in kitchens and share goodies among family and friends far and wide.

PLAN YOUR HOLIDAY NOW

Albert explains, “Tamales are not technically seasonal, but we know a lot of our customers have a tamale lady they only see once a year, mostly around the holidays. My mother has been cooking all her life and has put a lot of finesse into my grandmother’s recipe. She started out delivering to family and friends, and was very successful just by word of mouth. We opened this kitchen to be able to work together as a family, and keep the quality of our product at a premium for customers old and new.” Albert recommends tamales for their variety and resiliency. “These are hand-made, and you can eat them in so many ways, with many toppings. We are ready to cook and custom-make; right now we have one order for 42 dozen, so don’t be afraid to ask for a lot.” N O V E M B E R 2 0 2 0  G E O R G E TO W N V I E W

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(

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-3354

AL Facility ID# 106705

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poppy talks

I always knew I had superpowers I

am going to drop some science on my dear readers and gently request that the world get over my love of french fries. I recently validated that I am a SuperTaster. I have suspected for a while, but some reasonably legitimate websites confirmed and, finally, I have scientific proof that I hate vegetables. I am not lazy or entitled or ill-informed. I eat a lot of plant matter and know corn is really a grain and potatoes are a starch and beans are legumes. I also know I have to eat yucky green stuff to really make it count. But... I am in my 50s and if one more person tells me I should eat more vegetables, my head will explode. Not because I disagree, but because... I am in my 50s and apparently some think I. Do. Not. Already. Know. This. Incidentally, I also am aware I should exercise more so humankind can give that a rest too. This or that special diet or workout is not the magic bullet I’ve been missing all my life, so, sorry-not sorry. When I go out for lunch, it will not be salad. When I travel internationally, I WILL find a McDonald’s with food I know and love. Just sayin’. Anyway, science tells me due to many factors; greater number of receptors, what my mother ate when I was in utero, and even my DNA, predispose me and my super tastebuds to find bitter flavors (and some sweet and spice flavors) literally unpalatable. Apparently not liking things is a reflex, not a preference. A long time ago, we animals developed distastes to protect from dangerous or toxic things. PrecisionNutrition.com says, “Much of the modern work in the genetic basis of taste starts with a substance called PROP (6-n-propylthiouracil). Some people, it seems, find this substance overwhelmingly bitter. Others literally can’t taste it. At all.” Plus, when I say Propylthiouracil, I sound so smart!

So I’m one of the 25 percent of people for whom these alkaloids make some foods taste awful—grapefruit juice, kale, tonic water, dry wine, broccoli, dark beer, Sicilian olives and the like. My superpowers say, “nay nay” to those. E.g., if you make 3 gallons of spaghetti and put a bell pepper in it, all I will taste is pepper. My mom insisted if I just tried the broccoli enough times, I would “get used to it.” I never did, and at least now I know why. So, thank you, Science, for giving me justification to ignore the eye-rolling when I say, “No thank you” to the green lumps in the casserole. Still, without all the help from non-PROP6 people who are fortunate enough to enjoy cruciferous torture instruments in their salad, I realize my parental units didn’t help either. Mom boiled everything until it was grey, so I give fresh, flavored samples to my own offspring. Oddly, he really loves broccoli, so I had to learn how to cook it. Still, I promise to “complement and cushion” the stuff he thinks is gross, so he might get used to more food. I also promised myself we wouldn’t have the nightly battles I had as a child—you-have-five-minutes timers, and you’ll-eat-it-for-breakfast ultimatums. I suppose the point of all this is just a nice way of: 1. reminding myself, and maybe some others, to stop fussing over the obvious. We can start with vegetables and maybe someday we can all stop fussing at each other about elections or masks; and 2. maybe we can give our kids a break when they say pork chops or peas are disgusting. I like them, but I won’t presume to know which alkaloids make my son crazy either. Meanwhile, this Quarter Pounder is delicious and so far “I’m lovin’ it!” in ten countries and counting.

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food

What to do with Thanksgiving leftovers There are two kinds of people at Thanksgiving. The first group enjoys a big dinner and looks forward to having three days to recover. The other group grabs a turkey sandwich and runs

FRIENDSGIVING NACHOS INGREDIENTS

• 1 bag ridged/wavy potato chips • 1 c. Gouda • 1 c. cooked, shredded turkey • 1-1/2 c. leftover stuffing • 1 can cranberry sauce

out the door to early-

• 1/2 c. turkey gravy

early-Black-Friday-on-

DIRECTIONS

Thursday sales. What they have in common is an appreciation of the best leftovers of the year. How much do we all love having wholesome and good

Preheat oven to 375°.

Photo by Ethan Calabrese/Pinterest

As it heats, spread potato chips on a parchment-lined baking sheet. Top with half of the cheese, turkey, and stuffing. Top with more chips and remaining cheese, turkey and stuffing. Bake until the cheese has melted, 8 to 10 minutes. Top with dollops of cranberry sauce and garnish with a drizzle of turkey gravy.

food just waiting to be heated up quickly... for days! Here’s hoping you have plenty of good leftovers and can take advantage of these recipes to turn leftovers into “Bestovers”.

LEFTOVER APPLE PIE MILKSHAKE INGREDIENTS

• 1 slice leftover apple pie, plus more for garnish

Photo by Delish.com

• 3 scoops vanilla ice cream • 1/2 c. milk • whipped cream, for garnish • caramel sauce, for garnish

DIRECTIONS

In blender, blend apple pie, ice cream, and milk until smooth. (Add more milk for thinner consistency.) Pour into milkshake glass and garnish with whipped cream, caramel sauce, and apple pie crumbles.

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food THANKSGIVING RING INGREDIENTS

• 1 (8-oz.) tube crescent rolls • 1 c. leftover mashed potatoes • 1 c. leftover stuffing • 1-1/2 c. shredded leftover turkey • 1 c. leftover cranberry sauce • 1 tbsp. melted butter • 1 tbsp. garlic powder • Freshly chopped parsley, for garnish • Leftover gravy, warmed, for dipping

DIRECTIONS

Preheat oven to 375°. Unroll crescent rolls, separating each triangle. Arrange on baking sheet in a sunburst pattern, with pointy ends of triangles facing outward and bases of triangles overlapping. Spread mashed potatoes over triangle bases, forming a ring. Top with stuffing, turkey, and cranberry sauce. Fold triangle tips over filling (there will be gaps where ingredients peek out between triangles). Brush crescent dough with melted butter and sprinkle with garlic powder. Bake until golden, 15 to 20 minutes. Garnish with parsley and serve with gravy for dipping.

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The Rev. Dr. Bill Pederson, Pastor

On-site activities suspended until further notice. Sermons & Children’s Sunday School online at

www.sgpcgeorgetown.org For additional information, call 512-868-0902 5404 Williams Drive | Georgetown

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parting shot

Mog-WOW!

Mogwai is the newest member of the Williamson County Sheriff’s K-9 unit. Just shy of one year old, this Trailing and Tracking specialist was nurtured from birth, when he displayed desired characteristics. He showed interest in the scent of a human hand before he could even see, and gave chase among his puppy pack when humans encouraged them to run. He has been in training for his job since he was six weeks old. This K-9 Deputy is a Hanover Hound, a breed descended from and cross-bred with mountain hounds, and he has already proven he can track suspects from 1-1/2 miles. Not only can he follow a scent from heat and chemical signatures left when humans move through, he can also sniff out disturbances as small as broken blades of grass or dry leaves that have been crushed by a person running away. His handler, Deputy Chris Holmes, says Mogwai makes a great witness. “We let him out to get a sniff inventory, then cast a scent of the person not present. When he locates the subject, while we can’t prove what that person might have done, the court considers the dog’s evidence as undeniable proof that the suspect was at least at the scene.”

Mogwai is put to work for any kind of tracks, but he is most effective during active foot pursuit, or he may be deployed during vehicular pursuit in case the suspect leaves the car on foot. He is also, undeniably, the best help for a missing child or Silver Alert. Deputy Holmes says, “Traces last longer in vegetation and porous surfaces, but they do disappear in a few hours due to heat, humidity, wind, or air flow. The sooner we can be on scene, the better our odds.“ The Sheriff’s Office keeps the dogs’ abilities in mind when it comes to protocols. Mogwai and Deputy Holmes do not participate if a suspect is armed or violent because tracking dogs are trained to find, not take down. And for the safety of suspects, they do not use bite dogs for misdemeanor offenses. Team leader Sgt. Marco Gomez says he enjoys watching Mogwai train. “Working in tandem, I follow footsteps in the dirt and the trail I know to be true. Mugwai may veer 50 feet off the trail, but I see him sniffing the wind or treeline for stronger traces, and we always converge. So even when he seems like he’s not on target, we trust his instincts and interpret his behavior because he is doing his job the K-9 way.” N O V E M B E R 2 0 2 0  G E O R G E TO W N V I E W

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512-643-9200

NOW HIRING! Contact us for more details!

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georgetown view P.O. Box 2281, Georgetown, TX 78627

ECRWSS POSTAL PATRON GEORGETOWN, TX

Profile for Fidelis Publishing Group, LLC

Georgetown View Magazine • November 2020  

Georgetown View Magazine • November 2020