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Opportunity For Change The Need To Compete


(chemicals balance of trade slide here)


Gulf Coast Pipefitters 1979-2003 Hourly Wage Rate Adjusted for Inflation

$18.00

$16.00

$14.00

Wage

$12.00

$10.00

$8.00

$6.00

$4 00


Gulf Coast Pipefitters 1979-2003 Hourly Wage Rate Adjusted for Inflation

$18.00

$16.00

$14.00

$10.00

$8.00

$6.00

$4.00

19 78 19 79 19 80 19 81 19 82 19 83 19 84 19 85 19 86 19 87 19 88 19 89 19 90 19 91 19 92 19 93 19 94 19 95 19 96 19 97 19 98 19 99 20 00 20 01 20 02 20 03

Wage

$12.00

Year

Actual Wage

Adjusted Wage


Union Membership in the U.S. Percentage of Total U.S. Workers


Ozzie & Harriet Days


Gap Widens


Distribution of Wealth 1993 and 1997

All five groupings: Top 1%, Top 20%, Next 20%, Middle 20%, Bottom 40%

Top 1%


Who’s Investing?


Ratio 90:10


Process Industry Practices


Juran focused on quality control with the "trilogy" - quality planning - quality control - quality improvement


FIAPP


Research and Development Costs

Industrial R&D Spending 250 $Millions

200 150 100 50 0 1999

2000

2001

2002

2003

2004


What Can Be Done?


Innovation


CHANGE


Lighter, Stronger, Easier to Install


Connections


Standardization e in g d i r B o ith t l w a i e R d a m . . . e c Veni S LEGO


Materials ¾ Barrier – Liability ¾ Barrier – Engineer Must Take Risk


Best Practices ¾ Safety ¾ FEL ¾ Subcontractors ¾ Suppliers ¾ Small Projects ¾ Surviving Downsizing/Mergers ¾ Working Together ¾ Risk Allocation


Productivity Metrics „

Construction Productivity

‹ Concrete ‹ Structural Steel ‹ Instrumentation ‹ Equipment ‹ Insulation ‹ Electrical ‹ Piping

„

Engineering Productivity

‹ Concrete ‹ Structural Steel ‹ Instrumentation ‹ Equipment ‹ Electrical ‹ Piping


Universal Problems


Universal Problems ¾ Image ¾ Training ¾ Engineering Decline ¾ Foreign Engineering Graduate Students ¾ Health Insurance ¾ Legal ¾ Women In Workforce ¾ Environmental ¾ Training Coops


Training


Engineering Engineering Undergrad Degree Engineering Graduate Degree TAL


Search for Talent in China is Getting Tougher By David Lague International Herald Tribune MONDAY, APRIL 24, 2006

BEIJING When Grace Li started a recruiting drive through China's elite universities and technical colleges late last year, she soon turned up about 500 potential employees for her client, a U.S.-based scientific services company. The company was seeking as many as 150 graduates with basic or advanced degrees to staff a research and development laboratory it planned to open in China this year. After careful screening, about 100 candidates were offered jobs to start in June. About 70 eventually accepted. The drawback was that most of them had also accepted offers from two or three other prospective employers and had yet to decide which job to take. For headhunters like Li, competition like this is now commonplace as China's headlong economic growth outpaces the supply of qualified professionals and managers. "It's become a very big problem," said Li, client partner at Corporate Resources International, a Beijing-based recruiting agency. "Just because people accept your offer doesn't mean they will join your company." This talent crunch is now hurting many multinational companies, which last year invested a combined $60 billion to fund expansion and new ventures in China. Local companies are also suffering as they try to grow and meet the challenge of foreign competition. And, while experts warn that shortages of cheap labor threaten the dominance of China's powerhouse manufacturing industries, the lack of qualified graduates could derail longer-term plans for a transition to producing higher-value goods and services. "We are not ringing the alarm bells yet," said Andrew Grant, the Shanghai- based managing director in China for the management consultancy McKinsey.


Health Insurance


Disputes


Disputes


Women in Construction


Coa l?

Energy

Cru d Oil? e

? Ga s

S ha l Oil? e

N

le c u

? ar

Ta r ? S a nd s

Re ne

wa bl e


U.S. and World Energy SUMMARY WE BELIEVE THE ENERGY INDUSTRY IS BEGINNING A PROCESS OF MAJOR TRANSITION FROM CHEAP OIL AND GAS TO ALTERNATE ENERGY SOURCES THE DIRECT IMPACT OF THIS CHANGE ON ENGINEERING AND CONSTRUCTION RESOURCES HAS NEVER BEEN GREATER IN THE HISTORY OF MANKIND


HIGH RELIABILITY ORGANIZATION (HRO) FOCUS ON HUMAN & ORGANIZATION FACTORS RELIABILITY IS NOT COMPROMISED HRO IS AN INVESTMENT STRONG FOCUS ON INTEGRITY MANAGEMENT LOW OPERATING COST ARE A RESULT


Soccer Kids


Progressive Change Helps Us!


You Involved . . . Working Together!


Construction Industry Vision 2030


National Agenda to Improve the Built Environment Hans Van Winkle, CII Jesus De La Garza, NSF


Leadership


l ! a t ! i ! p w a o C e le N r u t b n a l Ve vai A


Gulf Coast Pipefitters 1979-2012 Hourly Wage Rate Adjusted for Inflation Projected Wage Rates for years (2007-2012)

$29.00

$24.00

Wage

$19.00

$14.00

$9.00

Year

Actual Wage

Adjusted Wage

2012

2011

2010

2009

2008

2007

2006

2005

2004

2003

2002

2001

2000

1999

1998

1997

1996

1995

1994

1993

1992

1991

1990

1989

1988

1987

1986

1985

1984

1983

1982

1981

1980

1979

1978

$4.00


WE NEED TEAMWORK ¾ To address our mutual challenges ¾ To address our mutual opportunities ¾ To take advantage of our American gift of

innovation ¾ To increase our capital efficiency ¾ To keep jobs at home ¾ Keep supplying the world with leadership and

technology



http://fiatech.org/images/stories/events/techconference/2006/JGSlaughter