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Capit al Projects Technology Roadmap Introduction

October 2004

3925 West Braker Lane (R4500) Austin, TX 78759 www.fiatech.org ď›™2004 FIATECH


Capit al Projects Technology Roadmap Introduction

ABSTRACT FIATECH is a non-profit consortium that focuses on the fast-track development and deployment of technologies to improve substantially how capital projects and facilities are designed, engineered, constructed, and maintained. FIATECH develops new technologies and adapts existing technologies from our industry, as well as others, while working with the standards community to accelerate the development of industry-wide standards and guidelines for capital projects. This publication, Capital Projects Technology Roadmap, was developed through a cooperative effort, with input and support from many contributing individuals and organizations, as referenced below. This report is freely available to the public; however, no copies may be made or distributed and no modifications made without prior written permission from FIATECH. To obtain permission for this or other FIATECH publications, contact FIATECH at www.fiatech.org or 512-232-9600.

Copyright Š 2004 by FIATECH. All Rights Reserved.

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Capital Projects Technology Roadmap Introduction

Acknowledgments We wish to acknowledge gratefully those individuals and organizations that assisted FIATECH in developing, promoting, and refining the Capital Projects Technology Roadmap (CPTR). First, we would like to acknowledge the efforts of Jim Bartlett (Naval Facilities Engineering Command, retired) who, while he served as Chair of the Construction Industry Institute's (CII) FIAPP Steering Committee, first proposed the idea of developing a CPTR for the industry. Our thanks also extends to Dr. Jack Snell, former director of the National Institute of Standards and Technology's (NIST) Building and Fire Research Laboratory, who helped us obtain initial seed funding for the effort from the National Science and Technology Council's Subcommittee on Construction and Buildings. With that funding, we were able to initiate the project and sustain it with additional support obtained from Linda Beth Schiller, Acting Deputy Director of the NIST Advanced Technology Program. The early success of the CPTR was sufficient to excite the interest of the CII Executive Committee, in particular, Ken Eickmann, CII's past director, and Hal Yoh, Chairman, and CEO, Day and Zimmerman International, Inc, who was Chair of the CII Executive Committee at the time. They convinced the CII Board of Advisors to provide further support to carry the CPTR forward. This was critical and their support is acknowledged gratefully also. Numerous sponsoring agencies were also integral in generating initial support and interest and they include the National Science Foundation (Dr. Miriam Heller, Program Director), the National Research Council of Canada (Dr. Sherif Barakat, Director General), and the NIST Advanced Technology Program (Dr. Cita Furlani, Director, Information Technology and Electronics Office). Dr. Snell, whose support in the early stages of the CPTR was instrumental, also provided additional support later on to reflect the new realities of Homeland Security. Without the vision, commitment, and support of these individuals, organizations and agencies, this CPTR would not have come to be. Our special thanks also go to Sally Barton of Barton Consulting Ltd. who served as the technical editor and was instrumental in integrating the parts and producing this publication. Of course, the technical content of the CPTR comes from people: dedicated, motivated, and committed people from all across the industry, at all levels within their organizations and from all types of organizations. It is these technical professionals, their companies listed below, who volunteered their time to refine the details of the current state, the desired future state, and the path by which we get from one to the other. Additionally, a select group of volunteer technical reviewers provided significant input and thus helped to refine the early versions of the documents. We owe a tremendous debt of gratitude to all of these individuals who shared a common goal to see that the vision was achieved for the capital projects and facilities industry. These are the leaders, the ones who "get it." They are the ones who realize that the revolution that this industry so desperately needs will not come by watching from the sidelines, but by rolling up our sleeves and working to make it happen. Anteon Corporation Aramco Services Company Arizona State University AVEVA, Inc. Barton Consulting, Ltd. Bayer Corporation Bechtel Systems Bentley Systems Black & Veatch

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Bovis Lend Lease Broadband Energy Networks Burns and Roe Enterprises, Inc. BWXT Y-12 Carnegie -Mellon University (CMU) CH2M HILL Chevron-Texaco Cisco Systems, Inc. Civil Engineering Research Foundation (CERF)

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Capital Projects Technology Roadmap Introduction

Construction Industry Institute (CII) Constructware Continental Automated Buildings Association (CABA) DaraTech, Inc. Day & Zimmermann Dominion Power Dow Chemical Company DuPont Company East Carolina University ENC Corporation ePlantData EPM Technology Fairfax County Govt. Fluor Corporation Georgia Institute of Technology International Alliance for Interoperability (IAI) IMTI Impress Software Industry Canada Intel Corporation Intergraph International Research Council Jacobs Engineering JP Step Holding Co. KBR Lean Construction Institute (LCI) McDonough Bolyard Peck McGraw-Hill Construction Mead Westavo Corporation Massachusetts Institute for Technology (MIT) Meridian Project Systems MOCA Systems Morpheus Technology Group National Center for Manufacturing Sciences (NCMS) Nationa l Conference on States Building Codes and Standards (NCSBCS) National Research Council of Canada (NRC) National Science Foundation (NSF) National Institute for Standards & Technology (NIST)

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Natural Resources Canada Noumenon Consulting Ltd ON Semiconductor Open Standards Consortium for Real Estate (OSCRE) Operations Management International (OMI) Palmer Security Consulting Parsons PMI The Procter & Gamble Company Purdue University Primavera Systems Reality Capture Technologies, Inc. Rohm and Haas S&B Engineers & Constructors Ltd. SAP Labs SaveEnergy Engineering, Inc. Shell Chemical Company Skire Smithsonian Institution Software Innovation Stanford University, CIFE TENG Solutions Time Industrial, Inc. Turner Aviation Security Turner Construction Corporation U.S. Army Corps of Engineers U.S. Army Engineering Research Development Center U.S. Coast Guard U.S. Department of Labor, OSHA U.S. General Services Administration University of California, Berkeley University of Florida University of Illinois University of North Carolina University of Texas - Austin University of Toronto Virginia Tech VTT Zachry Construction Corporation

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Table of Contents CAPITAL PROJECTS TECHNOLOGY ROADMAP.......................................................................................................7 PURPOSE ....................................................................................................................................................................................... 7 ECONOMIC BENEFITS.................................................................................................................................................................. 8 THE VISION .................................................................................................................................................................................. 9 TACTICAL PLANS: DELIVERING THE VISION ......................................................................................................................... 10 THE PATH FORWARD................................................................................................................................................................ 10

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October 2004, Introduction, Table of Contents


Capital Projects Technology Roadmap Introduction

ď›™2004 FIATECH

October 2004, Introduction, Table of Contents


Capital Projects Technology Roadmap Introduction

Capital Projects Technology Roadmap The Capital Projects Technology Roadmap (CPTR or the Roadmap) is a cooperative effort of associations, consortia, government agencies, and industry, working together to accelerate the deployment of emerging and new technologies that will revolutionize the capabilities of the capital projects industry. The initiative is led by FIATECH and is open to all stakeholders who are committed to the future success of the capital projects industry. The Capital Projects Technology Roadmap presents a vision for the capital projects industry and a strategy and plan for achieving that vision. Representatives from all areas of the industry have come together to create this work. This is their vision, and their foundation for investment in the future.

PURPOSE Establish a consensus vision for the capital projects industry and a unifying initiative to achieve the vision. The capital projects industry (i.e. the industry that executes the planning, engineering, procurement, construction and operation of predominantly large-scale buildings, plants, facilities and infrastructure) is a critical element of the industrial base, providing the physical infrastructure that supports our economy and our way of life. Maintaining this infrastructure is an immense challenge. The capital projects industry greatly lags other sectors in exploiting technological advances. It is characterized by vast disparities in business practices and levels of technology application. It is fragmented, with great divergence in tools and technologies from company to company and across its supply chains. New pressures, such as Homeland Security in the U.S., have moved infrastructure security to the forefront of our national consciousness. Some of the issues the industry must respond to include: •

population growth and demographic shifts,

aging buildings and structures,

pressures on natural resources,

globalization of business,

economic pressures in both the public and private sectors, and

workforce issues.

To address these challenges the capital projects industry needs: •

new methods,

improved technologies,

a flexible and responsive workforce, and

improved business practices.

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The capital projects industry generally is not well prepared for this far-reaching response, which extends beyond the boundaries of control for any one organization. All of these issues can and should be addressed in a collaborative environment for shared success. FIATECH was formed to provide that integrating entity in partnership with invested stakeholders across the industry. The Capital Projects Technology Roadmap is open to all companies, consortia, associations, and research institutions interested in addressing these critical issues to the industry. Presently, there is no concerted effort to define common goals, leverage available resources, and cooperate to deliver dramatic improvements in capability and cost-effectiveness. This initiative fills that void.

ECONOMIC BENEFITS The potential economic impact of aggressively pursuing the industry goals in automation and integration technology is substantial. The Joint Economic Council estimates the total value of US commercial/industrial construction in 2000 at $171.5 billion. 1 , which excludes significant relevant items 2 such as: •

engineered equipment (often half the value of a capital facility),

additions and alterations of existing capital facilities (approximately 45% of new plant cost3 ), and

numerous other types of capital facilities, such as offshore oil and gas production and transportation.

When these additional items are considered, capital facility creation and renovation costs in the U.S. approach $230 billion per year. These figures do not include the value of facilities owned by U.S. companies in foreign countries. The potential benefits of integration and automation technology include: •

up to 8% reduction in costs for facility creation and renovation 4 ,

up to 14% reduction in project schedules 5 ,

repair cost savings ranging from 5-15 % 6 , and

significant collateral benefits to homeland security by providing an industry focal point for improving capital facility resilience to external threats.

1

US Census Bureau, “Annual Value of Private Non-residential Construction Put in Place by Detailed Types of Construction, 1993-1999”. 2 US Census Bureau, “Annual Value of Private Non-residential Construction Put in Place by Detailed Types of Construction, 1993-1999”, Definitions 3 A similar “fixed proportion” estimate using the “1992 Census of the Construction Industry” was used in “Benefits and Costs of Research: A Case Study of Construction Systems Integration and Automation Technologies in Industrial Facilities” , by R.E. Chapman, NIST. 4 Construction Industry Institute, 1998. “Cost and Schedule Impacts of Information Management”, Research Summary 125-1. Austin, Texas 5 Construction Industry Institute, 1998. “Cost and Schedule Impacts of Information Management”, Research Summary 125-1. Austin, Texas 6 NIST Office of Applied Economics – Building and Fire Research Laboratory, “Benefits and Costs of Research: A Case Study of Construction Systems Integration and Automation Technologies in Industrial Facilities” , R.E. Chapman, June 2000.

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In addition, the U.S. National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST) recently published a study that identified and estimated the efficiency losses in the U.S. capital facilities industry resulting from inadequate interoperabilit y among computer-aided design, engineering, and software systems. Although the focus of the study is on capital facilities-commercial/institutional buildings and industrial facilities - it benefits key stakeholders throughout the construction industry. This study - the conception, design, and publicity of which FIATECH was a strong and early contributor to - is based on an earlier report also done by NIST of the cost of interoperability in the U.S. automobile supply chain. NIST GCR 04-867 estimates the cost of inadequate interoperability in the U.S. capital facilities industry conservatively to be $15.8 billion per year. These cost impacts are of interest to owners and operators of capital facilities; design, construction, operation and maintenance, and other providers of professional services in the capital facilities industry; and public - and private-sector research organizations engaged in developing interoperability solutions.

THE VISION Fully integrated and highly automated project processes coupled with radically advanced technologies across all phases and functions of the project/facility life cycle. The vision of the future for the capital projects industry is of a highly automated project and facility management environment integrated across all phases of the facility lifecycle. Information is available on demand, wherever and whenever it is needed to all interested stakeholders. This integrated environment will enable all project partners and project functions to instantly and securely "plug together" their operations and systems. Interconnected, automated systems, processes, and equipment will drastically reduce the time and cost of planning, design, and construction. Scenario-based planning systems and modeling tools will enable rapid, accurate evaluation of all options, resulting in the selection of the best balance of capability and cost-effectiveness. New materials and methods will reduce the time and cost of construction and greatly extend facility performance, functionality, aesthetics, affordability, sustainability, and responsiveness to changing business demands. This vision is captured in the guiding model for the Capital Projects Technology Roadmap in the figure below. This model depicts a completely integrated structure composed of nine critical elements and can be thought of as a virtual enterprise for the future. 1. Scenario-based Project Planning 2. Automated Design 3. Integrated, Automated Procurement and Supply Network 4. Intelligent and Automated Construction Job Site 5. Intelligent Self-maintaining and Repairing Operational Facility 6. Real-time Project and Facility Management, Coordination and Control 7. New Materials, Methods, Products and Equipment 8. Technology and Knowledge-enabled Workforce 9. Lifecycle Data Management and Information Integration

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TACTICAL PLANS: DELIVERING THE VISION The Vision Model defines the future of the capital projects industry. To realize the vis ion, focus areas and projects must be implemented that move the industry from where we are to where we need to be. This requires prioritization to define what must be done in a way that delivers high value to industry in the near-term, and builds the constituency needed to support investments in the longer-term. Teams of motivated technical experts from all stakeholder constituencies have developed tactical plans for each of the nine element areas listed above. These plans do not, even at this stage, represent everything that must be done. The plans are dynamic; new projects will be added and modifications made as progress is made. In all cases, the tactical plans focus on a migration strategy - delivering value now, while moving directly to realize the vision of a totally integrated capital projects environment.

THE PATH FORWARD The CPTR is integral to the future strength of the nation's capital infrastructure. It is the result of a process that will continue with: •

rallying support from industry, associations, consortia, government agencies, and academia,

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•

engagement of partners and funding to define and execute the project plans that deliver solutions which provide near-term benefits while achieving the long-term overall vision, and

•

updating the goals and plans as progress is accomplished and as requirements evolve.

The CPTR is a major component of this continuing process. The tactical plans will support activities, and new projects will be launched to fully address all elements of the vision model. Strategic performance measures will be put in place to assess progress. Organizations will be enlisted to deliver pieces of the solution, and technology vendors will engineer their product lines to align with the needs. The result: a more efficient and capable industry. Funding to achieve the vision will come from many sources. Research and development organizations will secure grants to conduct research; companies will join together to write proposals and establish joint ventures; government agencies, acting independently and in concert, will find ways to support critical enablers for the nation's capital infrastructure.

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