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ISLAND FA SHION. ISLAND CULTURE.

Interview

RETIRE IN

MAUI

10 GREATEST

BEACH SCENCES

Shake it!

HULA FOR

HAPPINESS

GET UP STAND UP 1


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CONTENTS POP KULCHA: Top 10 Best Beach Movies A c o u n t d o w n of the 10 most classic beach movies

SUMMER WORKOUT: Get Up Stand Up Paddleboard A l o o k a t t h e n e w w o r k o u t c r a z e , a n d how to get the best board for you.

SRESS RELIEVER: Shake, Shake, Shake, Senora! D a n c i n g h a s m u l t i p l e p r o v e n h e alth benefits, including stress relief!

INTERVIEW: Retire in Maui A l o o k a t l i fe o n a n o r g a n i c fa r m in on the island of Maui in Hawaii.

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BEAUTY:Summer Waves FASHION HISTORY:History of the Bikini FASHION INSPIRATION:Underwater Myths TREND WATCH:The Color Coral FASHION BEAT:Jam Session

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POP KULCHA:

TOP 10

BEST BEACH MOVIES 10

JAWS

Remember this beach movie about a shark invading Amity Island, and scaring everyone off the beach? Roy Scheider is the police chief, and he has to find a way to get the sharks away from the vacation spot. He teams up with Richard Dreyfuss, the shark expert, to undertake this task.

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INTO THE BLUE

In Caribbean Sea, the diver Jared and his girlfriend Sam have a simple life, aiming at finding a treasure, but without money to buy the necessary ship and equipment. When Jared’s friend, the egocentric and selfish young lawyer Bryce, and his new girlfriend Amanda arrive in the island to spend a couple of days with them, they dive together and accidentally find a wrecked airplane loaded with cocaine, and evidences of a sunken boat with a treasure. Afraid of losing the treasure for the arrogant hunter Bates, Bryce tries to convince Jared and Sam to negotiate a small part of the drug to raise the necessary money for the expedition, but the correct couple does not accept the proposal. Bryce and Amanda decide to deal themselves with a drug lord, jeopardizing the life and integrity of Jared and Sam.

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Benjamin Finnegan is a deep-sea treasure hunter certain he’s onto the find of the century in waters near an island close to Key West owned by a murderous rap star to whom Ben is in debt. Ben’s flat broke and recently divorced from Tess, his long-time research and diving partner whom he still loves. She’s nearby, working as a steward aboard the yacht of Nigel Honeycutt, a multimillionaire. The rapper has hired a rival treasurer hunter. Can Ben convince Nigel to bankroll his search, convince Tess to work with him, keep the rapper and his thugs at bay, and find a Spanish treasure hidden for centuries and rich beyond imagination?

FOOLS’ GOLD

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HOW STELLA GOT HER GROOVE BACK

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THE BLUE LAGOON

Whoopi Goldberg, Taye Diggs and Angela Bassett star in this romantic comedy that is filmed in Jamaica.... Stella is a highly successful, forty-something San Francisco stockbroker who is persuaded by her colorful New York girlfriend Delilah to take a well deserved, firstclass vacation to Jamaica. As she soaks in the beauty of the island, she encounters a strapping, young islander, Winston Shakespeare. His pursuits for her turn into a hot and steamy romance that forces Stella to take personal inventory of her life and try to find a balance between her desire for love and companionship, and the responsibilities of mother and corporate executive.

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BLUE CRUSH

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LILO & STITCH

We all remember this cult-classic surfing movie. A young girl has a dream of becoming a pro surfer, surfing on Hawaii’s North Shore at a place called the Pipeline.

This beach movie is about two children stranded on a desert island. This is one of Brooke Shield’s best performances in a movie. The two grow up together, fall in love and have a baby. They then try and escape from the island. Will they survive?

In a place far, far away, illegal genetic experiment #626 is detected: Ruthless scientist Dr. Jumba Jookiba has created a strong, intelligent, nearly indestructible and aggressive being with only one known weakness: The high density of his body makes it impossible for the experiment to swim in water. Stitch escapes and heads for Earth where he tries to impersonate a dog and gets adopted by little Lilo, whom, bent on self preservation, he plans to use as a human shield to protect him for the aliens sent to recapture him. But without a greater purpose in life, no friends, family or memories, Stitch does a little soul searching and begins to understand the meanings of “love” and “family” and his feeling for Lilo begin to change.

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50 FIRST DATES

Henry Roth lives in a Hawaiian paradise with the company of endless women with no strings attached. This is until he meets Lucy Whitmore. Both Henry and Lucy enjoy the company of each other and feels the start of a serious relationship occurring. Approaching Lucy the next day, Henry is confused when Lucy fails to recognise him. This is the moment Henry discovers that Lucy actually suffers from short term memory loss and can’t remember each individual day. Henry won’t let this stop him and is prepared to make her fall in love with him all over again, each and every day.

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WEEKEND AT BERNIE’S

Two friends are invited for a weekend to a luxury island with their boss. The boss gets shot and nobody seems to notice, except for the two friends. In order not to become suspects of murder they treat the body as a puppet and make people believe he’s still alive. The killer wants to do his job so when he is informed that the stiff is still alive he’s got to shoot him again, and again, and again. Filmed on the island of St. Thomas, in the U.S. Virgin Islands, this movie is a classic 80’s cheese-fest. Though the movie was not a blockbuster, it is still a cultural icon as well as a financial success, grossing $70 million worldwide at the box office.

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COOL RUNNINGS

Irving Blitzer disgraced himself when putting extra weights into his team’s bob in the Olympics, resulting in his gold medal being taken away from him. Years later, Derice Bannock, son to a former friend of Irv, fails to qualify for the 100-yard sprint for the Olympics due to a stupid accident. But when he hears of Irving Blitzer living also on Jamaica, Derice decides to go to the Games anyway. If not as a sprinter, then as a bobsledder. After some starting problems, the first Jamaican bobsledding team is formed and heads for Calgary. In the freezing weather Derice, Sanka, Junior and Yul are only laughed at, since nobody can take a Jamaican bobsledding team led by a disgraced trainer for serious. But team spirit and a healthy self confidence may lead to a few surprises in the upcoming Winter Games.

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SUMMER WORKOUT:

GET UP STAND UP

PADDLEBOARD

A

s temperatures rise and gyms turn from warm to sweltering, it’s time to take workouts to the water. One in particular that’s making a splash with women—including Kate Hudson— from Hawaii to Sag Harbor is Stand Up Paddleboarding (SUP). The heavier, wider, and more buoyant forms of surfboards are built for one paddler to stand upright and maneuver with a paddle through oceans and

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lakes alike. In keeping with surf culture, the boards are also designed with looking good in mind. Here’s a slide show of some of our favorites, with tips from Gina Bradley, instructor and founder of Paddle Diva, a Hamptons-based company that offers surf and paddleboarding instruction for women. by Molly Creeden


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“I tell women to always look at the shore while paddling,” says Bradley. “If you look only ten feet in front of you, you’ll either lose your balance, or become disheartened by the choppiness of the water. Plus, you’ll miss the scenery.

An hour on the water is equivalent to a 60-minute Core Fusion class

eralded as an excellent core workout, SUP also tones the arms and legs. An hour spent on the water is the equivalent to a 60-minute Core Fusion class. “The best time to go is early morning, when there’s no wind and the water is flat,” says Paddle Diva’s Bradley. To get started, stand on the board with your feet parallel. Then find the “sweet-spot”-not too far forward, and not too far back-by wiggling your legs and lightly marching in place on the board until you get the perfect balance. When paddling, the top arm pushes, and the bottom arm pulls, both staying straight through the stroke. Bend them a bit as you pull the paddle out of the water.

A few minor adjustments will yield maximum results, explains Bradley. “If you use the correct stance, you should feel it afterward in your obliques. It’s also great because it can be done in conjunction with other workouts, increasing core strength to improve other activities like running.” With all the sleek, bright boards available, it’s tempting to run out and buy one after the trip on the water, but Bradley cautions it’s best to get your sea legs first. If you do decide to invest in a board, make sure it’s light enough to carry. Bradley suggests looking for one with a handle in the center, “so that you can be completely independent and aren’t limited in terms of where you can go.” Select a board between ten and eleven-ahalf feet long, depending on your height and weight. The sport has been such a home run with women because it’s exercise that’s fun,” says Bradley. “If passion is there, a great body follows. If you hate going to the gym, your body’s not going to respond, but if you’re excited to get out on the water, paddleboard, talk to friends-your body responds positively.”

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BIG DADDY TANDEM PADDLEBOARD JP AUSTRALIA PADDLEBOARD NORTH PACIFIC PADDLEBOARD

DIVA PADDLEBOARD

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STARBOARD PADDLEBOARD

SURFTECH PADDLEBOARD

NORTH PACIFIC PADDLEBOARD

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STRESS RELIEVER:

Shake, Shake, Shake,

Senora!

If you secretly sashay across your living room when you’re home alone, or long to cha-cha with your significant other, you’re in luck. Not only is dancing an exceptional way to let loose and have fun, but it also provides some terrific benefits for your health!

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D

ancing is a unique form of exercise because it provides the heart-healthy benefits of an aerobic exercise while also allowing you to engage in a social activity. This is especially stimulating to the mind, and one 21-year study published in the New England Journal of Medicine even found dancing can reduce the risk of Alzheimer's disease and other forms of dementia in the elderly. In the study, participants over the age of 75 who engaged in reading, dancing and playing musical instruments and board games once a week had a 7 percent lower risk of dementia compared to those who did not. Those who engaged in these activities at least 11 days a month had a 63 percent lower risk! Interestingly, dancing was the only physical activity out of 11 in the study that was associated with a lower risk of dementia. Said Joe Verghese, a neurologist at Albert Einstein College of Medicine and a lead researcher of the study, "This is perhaps because dance music engages the dancer's mind." Verghese says dancing may be a triple benefit for the brain. Not only does the physical aspect of dancing increase blood flow to the brain, but also the social aspect of the activity leads to less stress, depression and loneliness. Further, dancing requires memorizing steps and working with a partner, both of which

Remember that any type of dancing is better than no dancing at all!

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Dancing as Fitness?

Calories burnt per hour

380 265 365 420 BELLY

HULA

SWING

YES

SALSA

( b a s e d o n a 1 5 0 l b p e rso n )

Y E S N O M AY B E

>>

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provide mental challenges that are crucial for brain health. How Good of a Workout is Dancing, Really? The amount of benefit you get from dancing depends on, like most exercises, the type of dancing you're doing, how strenuous it is, the duration and your skill level. Says exercise physiologist Catherine Cram, MS, of Comprehensive Fitness Consulting in Middleton, Wisconsin, "Once someone gets to the point where they're getting their heart rate up, they're actually getting a terrific workout. Dance is a weight-bearing activity, which builds bones. It's also "wonderful" for your upper body and strength." Plus, dancing requires using muscles that you may not even know you had. "If you're dancing the foxtrot, you're taking long, sweeping steps backwards. That's very different than walking forward on a treadmill or taking a jog around the neighborhood. Ballroom dancing works the backs of the thighs and buttock muscles differently from many other types of exercise," says Ken Richards, professional dancer and spokesman for USA Dance, the national governing body of DanceSport (competitive ballroom dancing). Physical benefits aside, dancing has a way of brightening up a person's day, says ballroom owner and operator Karen Tebeau."A lot of times, when people come into the studio, it's because there's been a change in their life: a divorce or they've been through a period of depression. They (continue) coming in, and you see a big change. After a while, they're walking in with a sunny expression. You know it's the dancing that's doing that," she says.


BELLY

HULA

SWING

SALSA

Improved posture Icreases flexibility Helps prevent lower back problems Strengthens and tones legs and body Tones and firms arms and shoulders Helps with weight loss Increases stamina Increases balance Relieves stress Helps release toxins via sweating Helps you develop strong social ties

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INTERVIEW:

RETIRE IN MAUI

When you move to Maui, you don’t just change your own life; you change your whole family’s. by Adrienne Egolf / Photo by Lori Barbely

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When you move to Maui, you don’t just change your own life; you change your whole family’s. Just ask Autumn Hurlburt. When she was 2 years old, her family relocated from Canada to Kipahulu. The family took root and grew on the island, helping to start ONO Organic Farms. And Autumn, now 24, has since moved back to the mainland and back to the island again — with her own 2-yearold daughter in tow. We talked to Autumn to find out how it feels to work with her family, what her daughter loves most about island life and why she’s staying on Maui for good this time.

Q: What was it like growing up on an island farm?
 A: It was much like growing up on any other farm — a lot of hard work. But it’s always gratifying when you can see such noticeable results. To plant a seed, water, feed and care for it just like a child and then watch it grow into an amazing life source that continues growing and giving new life for so many generations to come is very rewarding. I was blessed, for sure. When I wasn’t helping out on the farm, I always found ways to enjoy the island. Some of my favorite childhood memories are of playing in the streams next to our house, running through the neighborhood picking and eating wild fruits. We used to have coconut-husking contests, fishing tournaments and sandball races with ice-cream bars for a prize. I could go on forever!

Q: Sounds like a dream. Why did you ever leave the island?
 A: I wanted to get to know my dad’s side of the fam-

ily, so I went to Louisburg College in North Carolina. I lived there with my grandmother for two years getting to know my cousins, aunts and uncles. Then I came back to Maui for a stint and worked at the Fairmont Kea Lani and the Kula Lodge & Restaurant. But eventually, I moved to a small town in Washington state called Point Roberts, near where I was born. That’s where I met my husband, Michael. We hit it off right away, and in just a few years, we were heading to Kipahulu to get married on my family’s farm. Then in September 2006, our daughter, Serena Louise Hurlburt, was born.

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Q: Is that when you started thinking about moving Q: It must be nice for your daughter to grow up back to Maui again?
 so close to her family.
 A: Yes. After Serena was born, we came to Maui to visit A: She loves it. And I never have to worry about a baby my family every six months or so. And in 2009, we decided to move back. We wanted to live in a place where our daughter could run freely in the warmth, play safely in her backyard, learn how to be self-sufficient, to laugh and learn in such beauty — the way I did. And I wanted to be close to my family again.

sitter! She’ll go out on the delivery runs with her dad or sit with grandma or visit her new baby cousin down the road.

Q: Now that you’re back, can you see any drawbacks to living in Hawaii?
 Q: What’s it like watching your daughter grow up A: Hours can get long when you work on a farm, but in the end, it is definitely worth the time. Every morning I as an islander?
 wake up knowing I love what I do and where I am and A: I’m so grateful every single day. She can walk out to that it’s going to be another day in paradise. the back porch whenever she wants and pick up whatever fresh fruit she wants to eat — she loves fruit. She even has her own vegetable garden. She’s also been learning how to swim, and she’s joining a hula class this year. Living here, she never gets bored.

Q: Has the farm changed much since you were a kid? 
A: It has grown tremendously since my childhood.

When the farm was first started, the first nine acres were really just a few papaya trees and banana trees. Now we’ve got 380 acres of land, and about 70 of those are fully farmed with all different varieties of crops. To grow one variety of anything is simply not productive. Last year the weather was really dry and our bananas suffered. But the dryness helped our avocados. Plus, some crops just grow well together — like avocados and lemons, which both like to grow on a rocky terrain and come into season at the same time. They taste good together too!

Q: Is that the kind of dynamic that makes your family work so well together?
 A: We’re very, very close, so it’s always been really great

working with them. My mom and I work together hosting farm tours and preparing jams and jellies. My husband does all of our farm deliveries two days a week and works the rest of the time on whatever needs to be done around the farm. My brother is the farm manager, and his wife works in the office. We all have our own little spaces and niches on the farm, so we work really well together.

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Q: So do you think you’re on Maui for good this time?
 A: Absolutely. I was up in Haleakala National Park

the other day. We had hiked all across the crater and wound up standing on a ridge, where all you can see through the clouds is Hamoa Beach near our farm. I just kept thinking, wow. When you’re standing on top of the world and all you can see is the little sunny spot where you get to live, you really know how blessed you are.


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BEAUTY:

SUMMER WAVES There are many reasons to relish a day at the beach, but chief among them is—yes—the amazing hair. You’d think that wind, salt, and water would not a perfect coif make, but instead, it leaves you with a head of perfectly chunky waves. Which is what makes re-creating the look so frustrating; something that looks effortlessly good shouldn’t take a lot of effort, and yet it does. So we had Kelly, SALT’s Web Designer who also happens to have pin-straight hair, test out three new beach-wave products. As luck would have it, we just might have found your beach hair in a bottle. Of course, if you’re looking to do it on the cheap, nothing beats a spray bottle filled with water from your last ocean-side visit. But for the land-locked out there, here’s how to make waves without actually having to go near them.

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Fekkai Beach Waves - $23 “It has a light, tropical smell, sort of like a Pina Colada, that sticks around all day, even after I took a dip in the ocean when I actually did go to the beach last weekend. The spray gives your hair a light, crunchy feeling (like a more natural hairspray), and even with my hair—which is very hard to ever curl or keep a curl for more than half an hour—I could twirl it around my fingers after it dried and get a nice natural wave.”

David Babaii For WildAid Bohemian Beach Spray - $10 “It smells like coconut, but the benefits stop there. I tried this two days in a row, both on dry and wet hair, and it really did nothing. I even OD’ed on it the second day and kept touching and scrunching my hair so much my boyfriend told me to stop, but it didn’t seem like it did much of anything besides make my hair feel a tiny bit drier, like I had some sort of really light hairspray in.”

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P2 by Philip Pelusi BeachComber - $29 “It smells like Lemon Sugar scrub, and is a little bit scary to put into my hair because it’s thicker and a bit gritty, but when rubbed into my dry hair right at the roots, I instantly had more volume that stuck around the entire day. I could really easily pump it back up again just by scrunching my hair with my hands. It felt like I didn’t even have any product in my hair, just like my hair overall was thicker and slightly wavy.”

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FASHION HISTORY:

HISTORY OF THE BIKINI Here’s the Skinny on the Two-Piece Louis Reard had this problem. He had designed Something that would stir the masses. But he needed a name for it, something exotic, bold, and eye opening. Four days before he was to show the world his new bikini in Paris, the U.S. Military provided him with a name. They exploded a nuclear device near several small islands in the Pacific known as the “Bikini Atoll”. On July 5th, 1945, he unveiled the bikini. lthough he would later claim he named the bikini after the islands and not the atomic blast, he was clearly taking advantage of a “hot topic”. Another Frenchmen, Jacques Heim, had created his own two piece bathing suit, which he called “The Atome”, and he described it as “The world’s smallest bathing suit. Reard called his “Smaller than the world’s smallest bathing suit.” Reard’s “bikini” was so small, in fact, that no Parisian models at the time would wear it on the runway. He hired Micheline Bernardini, who had no qualms about strolling around in a bikini, seeing as her day job was a nude dancer at the Casino de Paris. Bernardini was not what you’d a classic beauty, but after photos of her in a reclining pose hit the press, she was swamped with fan mail, close to 50,000 letters. Two piece suits weren’t new. As part of wartime rationing, the U.S. Government, in 1943, ordered a 10 percent reduction in the fabric used in woman’s swimwear. Off went the skirt panel, and out came the bare midriff. At beaches across the country, men paid special attention to women doing their patriotic duty. But Reard pushed the envelope. He shrunk his suit down to 30 inches of fabric - basically a bra top and two inverted triangles of cloth connected by string - and put the navel on center stage. The world took notice. In Catholic ountries Spain, Portugal, and Italy - The bikini was banned. Decency leagues pressured Hollywood to keep it out of the movies. One writer said it’s a “two piece bathing which reveals everything about a girl except for her mothers

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maiden name.” Movie star Esther Williams who probably was seen in a two piece bathing suit by more people than anyone in the world, once said: “A bikini is a thoughtless act”. It’s not clear whether she was talking about the bikini or the thought of wearing one. Reard’s firm did it’s part to fan the fantasies by proclaiming that a two piece wasn’t a bikini “unless it could pulled through a wedding ring.” In the ‘50’s Brigitte Bardot did wonders for business- But not in modest America. Here it remained an invitation to scandal. As recently as 1957, Modern Girl magazine sniffed, “It is hardly necessary to waste words over the so called bikini since it is inconceivable that any girl with tact and decency would ever wear such a thing. By 1960 America was ready for new frontiers, including, it seemed, great expanses of bare flesh. That year pop singer Brian Hyland immortalized the suit with his song “Itsy Bitsy Teenie Weenie Yellow Polka Dot Bikini.” Three years later “Beach Party”, the first in a series of Annette Funicello / Frankie Avalon flicks with a recurring theme of women danicing in bikinis, hit the big screen. Times and tastes change, however, and just as importantly, people age. Through the ‘80s and early ‘90s, the bkini sales began to slide. Sales dropped to less than a third of the women’s bathing suit market. in 1988 Reard’s company folded. The bikini, however, appears to be making a comeback. Sales are up! Some cite the “Baywatch” factor - or perhaps the Internet itself. by Steve Rushin


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FASHION INSPIRATION:

UNDERWATER MYTHS M

ermaids--and mermen--appear as consistently in history as faeries and dragons. Like their “mythological” counterparts, mermaids were considered real until the early 20th century. In fact, although we think of Disney’s Ariel when we hear the word “mermaids,” their actual history is ancient, well-founded, and--until recent years--treated as fact, not fantasy. In this article series, we will define the merfolk as people with a human upper body and a fishlike lower body. Mermaids and mermen appear in some of our earliest recorded history. Over 7000 years ago, the Babylonians honored a merman called Ea, later named Oannes by the Greeks. This god of the sea had the upper body of a man and the lower body of a fish. He spoke to the people in their own language, and provided important knowledge in the arts and sciences. Today, we are more familiar with his later Greek and Roman counterparts, Poseidon and Neptune, although only their descendants appear as mermen. In Roman history, Neptune is a god of water. Neptune is the son of the god, Saturn. Neptune’s legends seem to have formed after the Greek Poseidon, and draw heavily from the Poseidon lore. Poseidon, the god of the sea, was the son of Kronos and the brother of Zeus and perhaps Hades. When the

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world was divided, Zeus took the sky, Hades took the Underworld, and Poseidon took the seas. Although he is shown with a human body, Poseidon was able to live on land or under the sea. Poseidon was also the father of Triton, one of the most famous mermen in history. Triton has the upper body of a man and lower body of a fish. In art, he is usually shown rising from the sea, blowing on a conch shell. Triton’s mother was Amphitrite, queen of the sea and one of the fifty Nereids. Although Amphitrite is usually portrayed with a fully human form--so she is not a mermaid--in legend she, like Poseidon, was able to travel under the sea as easily as on land. One of the earliest mermaids was Syria’s Atargatis, loosely related to Astarte and Aphrodite, and perhaps to Pisces. Sometimes--but not always--this goddess is portrayed with the lower body of a fish, relating to the cycles of the moon and the tides. She is also shown with a sheaf of wheat arched over her head, relating to a plentiful harvest. Other early literature describes similar creatures, including sea nymphs and perhaps Sirens. So, although Disney has given us a clear picture of a red-haired modern mermaid, the tradition of merfolk is an ancient one.


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TREND WATCH:

CORAL S

pring summer 2011 color trends are all about bright and cheerful hues. This season we veer away from neutrals and military colors and embrace vivid hues. One of the hottest colors this season is coral and watermelon pink. Coral is just right for summer and there are many fashion designers who have showcased resort wear and spring summer wear in this beautiful color. The best way to wear coral is not from head to foot but just by adding a dash of this color, say, in your blouse or scarf. You can pair coral with either a deep tan color or a light brown. This makes your outfit look more harmonious and polished. If you are a bit wary of wearing a coral blouse or dress, how about just applying a coral colored nail paint or lip gloss. This can instantly make you look polished and ready for summer. Watermelon pink is also a great color that you can try this season and it is elegant enough to be worn as day wear. This year watermelon red is definitely the new pink. If you study spring summer 2011 women’s fashion trends, you will notice that one color that fashion designers are using the most is shades of blue. Darker shades of blue like cobalt, electric blue and teal are very trendy right now. They show off your tan beautifully and you can pair them well with colors like dull gold, rust and even light orange. Softer tones of blue like icy blue, sea blue and sky blue are also very much in fashion. The best thing about blue color is how you can wear them not only in your clothes, but also in your ac-

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cessories. A quilted navy blue envelope clutch or a sea blue pumps can instantly jazz up even the plainest of all outfits. For makeup, you can use blue eye pencil and blue eye shadow to create smoky eyes. And of course, wearing electric blue nail paint is the ultimate style statement that you can make this year. Another hot spring summer 2011 trends in color is peach. This color was seen extensively in Elie Saab Spring 2011 runway show. When I say peach, I mean a very muted almost nude shade and not the color you see in a baby’s nursery. To make peach look spectacular invest in cocktail dresses or long evening gowns in peach color with a metallic sheen. You can also wear short ruffled organza blouses in this hue or even peach colored origami mini skirts and dresses. Mint green is another color that has been seen in many spring/summer collections of major fashion designers and design houses. Icy mint green is just right for the summers, be it in clothes or makeup. If you are wearing something bright just pair it with a mint green eyeshadow and nail paint. This was all about spring summer 2011 color trends. To complement your fashionable wardrobe you will need to follow spring/summer 2011 hairstyle trends which is all about big volume and romantic curls. Keep these color trends in mind when you shop for your wardrobe and makeup this season.


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FASHION BEAT:

JAMReal HotSESSION in the Shade J

amaican clothes are as exciting and flamboyant as the mood of the place. Jamaica is celebrated by tourists from all over the world as the land of the sun and sea! The coconut palms and the Jamaican rum come to mind almost immediately when the name is mentioned. The temperatures switch from pleasant to unbearable in a matter of minutes. Through the day the temperature is warm. It gets cool by nigh-fall and towards early parts of the morning. This variation is due to the proximity to the sea. Jamaican clothes are observed to be very colorful and vibrant and loose and comfortable. The kind worn by UB40 and Bob Marley! Jamaica is synonymous with the calypso and rum and the mood is generally light and foot-loose-and-fancy-free. The people run traditional family businesses and own little eating places that are almost always crowded with tourists. The coconut groves give the people additional income from the natural produce and the need to handle everything from agriculture to beach side inns requires the locals to be comfortable. The basic trend of long skirts and scarves seen in many other cultures around the world is also seen Jamaica. The women wear traditional Jamaican clothes which are most of the time hand made. They wear a skirt, a blouse and a head scarf that is made out of Calico. Calico is a sort of cotton cloth locally made and marketed. The scarf is draped in a particular way. The piece of material is folded in half and tied around the head and then tucked, to prevent it from slipping off. The women dress in very colorful clothes. The blouses are usually short sleeved because of the weather.

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Jamaican men wear trousers and shirts, just like men in other parts of the world. However, the fabric used for the attire is different. The fabrics sported by men are as colorful as those flaunted by the women and children. They love designs with flowers, loud colors flaunting sailing boats and swaying coconut palms and the sun and sea. The men wear short or long trousers and even knee length ones. There is little or no difference in the formal and informal clothing and again the reason is the weather. Jamaican children look as colorful as the men and women. They are dressed most of the time in flimsy attire to beat the heat. The little boys wear banyan like or short sleeved shirts or t-shirts and short pants. They are seen sporting bandanas whenever the heat becomes unbearable. The little girls wear short dresses or shorts and t-shirts and are as flamboyant as the boys. Both, the girls and the boys, sport short hair. Just like the fashion trends are changing the world over, so are the fabrics and patterns in Jamaica. The younger generation prefers sober colors and combinations. The older people opt for loud and dark clothing. The fashion trends are changing rapidly in Jamaica and today, there are a number of dedicated designers who are catering to the shift in personal preferences and the influence of the tourists. Jamaica is a land close to nature’s heart and the people are just as accommodating as Mother Nature! Tourism and the resultant shift in the way of life of the locals are largely affecting Jamaican fashion. The clothes, the calypso and the rum – all scream quality of life and hospitality at its best!


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SALT Magazine  

ISLAND FASHION. ISLAND CULTURE.

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