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health! St. Clare

FROM

ST. CLARE HOSPITAL AND THE OTHER SERVICES OF FRANCISCAN HEALTH SYSTEM

Our patients’ new best friend — St. Clare’s

Concierge

Ouch!

Obesity hurts See page 12

You gotta have heart!

Franciscan experts answer your questions See page 13 fo r o u r

Calendar of Events

Franciscan Health System • WINTER 2012


Find your new health care professional today! 3 PRIMARY CARE The biggest secret for better health: Your doctor

6 HEART HEALTH You gotta have heart! Talk with our experts

10 PALLIATIVE CARE Live life to the fullest— even toward the end

11 DIGESTIVE HEALTH What is IBS and could you have it?

12 WEIGHT LOSS

Amparo Franco, MD ›› St. Francis Medical Clinic 253-874-2227 34503 Ninth Ave. S., Suite 100 Federal Way

Reid Holtzclaw, MD ›› Port Orchard Medical Clinic 360-874-5900 451 S.W. Sedgwick Road, Suite 110 Port Orchard

Kevin Schoenfelder, MD Brenda Lee, ARNP ›› Kevin Schoenfelder, MD 253-272-0186 1515 Martin Luther King Jr. Way Tacoma

Karen Casseday, ARNP ›› Port Orchard Medical Clinic 360-874-5900 451 S.W. Sedgwick Road, Suite 110 Port Orchard ›› Franciscan Women’s Health 253-530-2955 11511 Canterwood Blvd. N.W., Suite 145 Gig Harbor

Bahman Saffari, MD, PhD Julie Peerboom, ARNP ›› Bahman Saffari, MD, PhD 253-426-4780 1624 S. I St., Suite 402 Tacoma

Obesity hurts the whole body

Check out! us

Health! online ›› WWW.FHSHEALTH.ORG

Know your health risks! ›› When it comes to health conditions and diseases, early detection is key. Get insight into your health risks at www.knowmyhealthrisk.org. The assessments are simple, quick— and may just keep you healthy!

Sign up for free health talks ›› Interested in attending? Get more information or register by visiting the Franciscan website at www.FHShealth.org/classes or calling 888-825-3227 toll-free.

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Find us on Facebook, Twitter and YouTube! ›› Get news and information about health events and more at: www.facebook.com/ FranciscanHealth

www.twitter.com/ FHShealth www.youtube.com (Search for Franciscan Health System.)


Primary care

The biggest secret for better health:

Your doctor

You wouldn’t dream of changing hairstylists, and you get your morning joe from the same café every day. But do you have the same loyalty to your most important service provider—your doctor? “We serve as the reservoir of information for patients,” says Geoffrey McNicoll, MD, a family medicine doctor at Franciscan Family Geoffrey Medicine. “They are McNicoll, MD getting health care from a familiar face, they may end up getting specialty care but going to a regular doctor they get customized preventive care in a warm and loving environment.” Primary care physicians coordinate your care

Having a regular primary care physician (PCP) or family doctor can improve your health and your medical care experience.You’re likely to see this doctor first when you need a checkup or have minor symptoms or complaints. However, he or she does more than ease your sniffles. A PCP’s responsibility is to: • help you make health care decisions • treat minor problems before they become more serious • provide preventive care • refer you when you need to see a specialist • manage chronic conditions • keep track of your medical records and health history “Not only do you get to build a strong relationship and trust with a PCP, you get to be seen by someone you know in a timely fashion. I tell my patients don’t spend your time in the Emergency Department when you can see me within 15 minutes of coming into my office,” says Dr. McNicoll.

Reap the benefits of regular visits

Your PCP may not give you a frequent shopper card for stopping by, but studies show that patients who see the same primary doctor regularly get the following perks: • higher satisfaction with their health care • more coordinated care • a stronger doctor-patient relationship • lower costs “With a PCP, patients get personalized care in a quick fashion,” Dr. McNicoll says. “With us, you have a lot more control over which doctor sees you and we can organize care for the entire family—from the baby to grandma.” Your family or primary care doctor is trained to care for you through all the phases of life. Even if you see specialists for certain conditions, you should still have a PCP for your general health care needs. He or she will help you get the tests you need for your age and risk profile. Your PCP will also check your cholesterol and weight regularly, and perform or order the right cancer screenings for you.

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For an appointment with Dr. McNicoll or another primary care doctor at Franciscan Family Medicine, call 888-825-3227 or go to www.SouthSoundDoctors.org.

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Scan this QR code with your smartphone for direct access to our South Sound Doctors’ website!

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St. Clare Hospital

St. Clare’s Concierge… Making patients’ lives easier Life doesn’t stop just because you’re in the hospital recovering from surgery. Certain day-to-day tasks can weigh on your mind, when really, your focus should be on recovery. To take some of the stress out of your hospital stay, St. Clare is offering surgical inpatients the services of a concierge. Did you enter the hospital unexpectedly and wonder if you left all the lights on? Do you wish you had certain items from home? The concierge can go to your home, check the lights and pick up the items you request. Are you wishing you had something more comfortable to wear during your stay? The concierge can run to the store and buy the designated items.

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now The concierge service is free.The only costs are for the purchased goods, items requested and for mileage, when necessary. Patients can access the concierge’s services by calling the concierge, or by asking a nursing staff member to make a request. “We want to exceed our patients’ expectations of services at St. Clare,” says St. Clare President Kathy Bressler.

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To learn more about the concierge program and other programs available at St. Clare, go to www.FHShealth.org/StClare.

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Don’t suffer alone! Sign up for a grief support group Everyone experiences grief differently, but whether it’s a parent, spouse, child or friend, losing someone you love is painful. Fortunately, you don’t have to experience your loss alone. Sign up for one of the Grief Support Groups. (See our calendar item on page 15.)

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Are you grieving? If you recognize the following signs of grief, call 800-338-8305: • forgetfulness and confusion • crying at unexpected times • loss of pleasure in activities • mood changes as a result of the slightest things • appetite or weight changes • guilt, sadness or loneliness • suicidal thoughts

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St. Clare Hospital

Making great care even better St. Clare’s Patient Family Advisory Council: listening to patients, improving service Strong relationships require open communication channels. So to strengthen St. Clare Hospital’s relationships with the people it serves, the hospital started patient feedback teams known as Patient Family Advisory Councils in 2011. “We can only offer excellence when we’re listening to the people we serve to discover what they value,” says Mary VonGoedert, Franciscan Experience Coach, St. Clare Region.“The councils give us a powerful new way to learn and collaborate.” Listening to those we serve

Each council—there are five centered around each Franciscan medical center as part of Catholic Health Initiatives—brings patients, their families, staff and senior Franciscan executives together. Participants sign on for one-year terms, and are able to ask questions and give feedback in nine face-to-face meetings. Mary says that almost everyone signed on for a second year.“We’re pleased with the enthusiasm and continuity that represents,” she says.“When you engage the people

who are doing the work with the people who are experiencing the care, it’s incredibly motivating.”

“Staff use AIDET in exchanges with patients as well as each other,” explains Mary. “This has helped improve relationships among coworkers, too.”

Communication is key

During its first year, St. Clare’s council discovered a theme running through patient discussions: a desire for more— and better—communication. “When things hadn’t gone as well as they should have, it always seemed to be about communication, no matter the issue,” Mary says. “We felt offering patients greater clarity would be beneficial.” As a result, St. Clare trained all staff on a tool known as AIDET, which stands for: • Acknowledge—Greet people with their name and a smile • Introduce—Tell people who you are and how you can help them • Duration—Communicate delays so patients aren’t waiting and wondering • Explanation—Tell patients how procedures work • Thank you—Serve gratefully and say, “Thank you”

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Looking towards a bright future

Throughout 2012, St. Clare’s council will be exploring ways to ensure AIDET is used consistently, perhaps through patient-guided audits. The group will also work more closely with St. Clare’s Patient Experience Team, a staff group focused on enhancing the patient experience. “The Patient Experience Team has many initiatives underway, but it really needs the voice of the patient to gain relevant feedback.We’re looking forward to seeing what we can accomplish,” Mary says.

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now now For more information about now Franciscan’s Patient Advisory Councils or to learn about opportunities to participate, please call Mary directly at 253-985-6539.

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Heart health

Cut the salt to help your heart

Reducing your daily sodium intake reduces your risk for heart disease.

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Most people know that exercising and eating a low-fat diet can lower the risk for heart disease. But many don’t realize that reducing their sodium (salt) intake may be just as important. In fact, a new study published in the British Medical Journal reports that people with slightly elevated blood pressure who reduced their daily intake of sodium by just 25 to 35 percent significantly cut their risk for this deadly disease. Older adults, African Americans, and people with high blood pressure— who together make up almost 70 percent of the American population— should eat only 1,500 milligrams or less

of sodium eat day. Other adults should aim for 2,300 mg or less. But the average person eats twice that amount. Why? The American diet is high in processed and restaurant foods—both of which are notorious for elevated sodium levels. The good news is you can reduce your sodium intake—and boost your heart health—with a few simple steps: • Choose fresh vegetables and foods that are fresh whenever possible. Or, look for canned or frozen foods without added sauces or salt. • Cut back on convenience foods that are typically high in sodium, such as


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Ask our heart experts

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HeartAware? The HeartAware Risk Assessment is a free and confidential online health survey about your heart. This quick survey will help assess your heart health to see if perhaps you should consider any lifestyle changes. Visit www. KnowMyHealthRisk.org and click the “HeartAware” link at the right.

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How does inflammation lead to heart disease?

Inflammation is our body’s protection system. When we are injured or exposed to a foreign microorganism, our body responds to the threat with inflammation. Once Y.G. “Joseph” it destroys the alien cells, the inflammation goes away. Chronic inflammation occurs when the body’s inflammatory Chami, MD, Franciscan response doesn’t “turn off” and instead continues to attack. Cardiology Scientists now think chronic inflammation plays a role in Associates the development of several health conditions, including heart disease. Inflammation tends to accompany heart disease. It arises when tiny cholesterol particles enter the blood vessel lining, causing an inflammatory response. To reduce inflammation, reduce risk factors for heart disease, such as arteryclogging cholesterol. Our Western diet is too high in starch and bad fats. Avoiding these foods helps reduce damaging dietary elements.

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I’ve read about small incision surgeries to remove tumors. How is the surgeon able to find the tumors when the surgical area is so small?

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frozen pizza, TV dinners, instant rice mixes, and canned soups. If you must buy packaged or processed foods, check the label first. Whenever possible, choose foods that have less than 100 mg of sodium per 100 grams. Try not to use salt in cooking water and remove the salt shaker from the table. Limit salty snacks such as chips, pretzels, and salted nuts. Eat at home more often to better control your intake of sodium. Add flavor with herbs and salt-free seasonings. When dining out, request that your meal be prepared with little salt.

Some types of lung cancers can be removed if caught Nyen Chong, MD, early, helping improve chances of survival. St. Joseph Today, small tumors on the outer edges of the lungs can Cardiothoracic be removed using a minimally invasive procedure called video-assisted thoracic surgery (VATS). In VATS, the surgeon Surgeons inserts a tiny camera between the ribs to view the surgical field. The doctor then operates through two incisions less than half an inch long, using long-handled instruments similar to chopsticks. We can perform VATS even more easily using robotic arms. We sit at a console to control the robotic arms. The robot offers an improved visual field, greater mobility and better precision than traditional VATS. VATS reduces hospital recuperation time to just a day or two, and lets patients return to their normal activities in a couple of weeks.

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Get a copy of the 2012 Franciscan Heart Diet book packed with delicious, healthy recipes and helpful tips for keeping your heart healthy at www.FHShealth.org/heartdiet.

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Cancer care

Robots to the rescue: The da Vinci prostatectomy Robots help surgeons treat cancer. This may sound like a science fiction movie, but for men facing prostate cancer, it can be a real-life scene. Not every man with prostate cancer needs surgery. However, a radical prostatectomy—an operation to remove the prostate— might be an option if you: • have cancer that hasn’t spread • expect to live at least 10 more years • are in good health otherwise • are able to tolerate anesthesia Since the da Vinci Surgical System for robot-assisted surgery was approved in 2001, its use has increased steadily. “Now, the majority of men who undergo prostate removal are operated on with the da Vinci Surgical System,” says Christopher Arroyo, MD, of Franciscan Urology Associates in Gig Harbor. He has performed more than 100 surgeries since 2008. Franciscan Health System and St. Joseph Medical Center recently acquired two state-of-the-art da Vinci units and surgeons now have access to three robots. Benefits for doctors and patients

Why would a surgeon need a robot’s help? “It allows us to do the operation through laparoscopic ‘ports’ and with a 3-D camera

instead of making an incision in the abdomen,” Dr. Arroyo explains. “The 3-D camera allows for better visualization and a more precise dissection.” Men whose surgeons use the da Vinci system tend to: • lose less blood • feel less pain during recovery • leave the hospital and return to regular activities sooner

Christopher Arroyo, MD

In Dr. Arroyo’s experience, urinary continence can return faster after robotic surgery compared to standard “open” surgery and some men have early return of potency, because of the surgery’s nerve-sparing technique. And, like other minimally invasive procedures, robotic surgery leaves only small scars. Ask your doctor about options

Like all operations, the da Vinci prostatectomy has risks. However, studies have shown that in comparison with standard surgical approaches, the da Vinci prostatectomy has a lower risk for major complications. “Recent studies also show patients who undergo robotic surgery have a higher rate of clear surgical margins, which should translate to better cancer control rates,” Dr. Arroyo says. If you’ve been diagnosed, talk with your doctor about your range of treatment options, and whether da Vinci robotic surgery is right for you. “Most patients who are candidates for radical prostatectomy for treatment of prostate cancer will be candidates for the da Vinci approach,” Dr. Arroyo says.

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now Ready now now for the now Robot? Dr. Arroyo will be speaking at free health talks in March. Give us a call at 888-825-3227 to sign up today!

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Pelvic floor disorders

Don’t suffer in silence Talk with your doctor about Franciscan’s expert treatment for pelvic floor disorders It may not be your favorite conversation topic, but one in four American women suffers from a pelvic floor disorder, or PFD. The pelvic floor is made up of ligaments and muscles that act as a hammock to keep the bladder, uterus and other organs in place. As women age, particularly if they have given birth vaginally or are genetically predisposed to having weaker pelvic muscles, PFDs can result in embarrassing symptoms. These symptoms don’t have to be a lifelong hindrance.Your Franciscan Health System primary care physician can help you seek individualized care and effective treatment for PFDs. Here is a quick Q&A to help you learn more about this common condition.

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William André Silva, MD

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What is a PFD?

“Pelvic floor disorders occur when weakened or injured pelvic ligaments and muscles allow internal organs to shift out of position,” says William André Silva, MD, Franciscan’s only fellowship-trained urogynecologist, who practices at Franciscan Women’s Health in Federal Way and Franciscan Urology Associates in Lakewood. Common PFDs include: • urinary incontinence. Women may experience urinary leakage with a cough or sneeze (stress incontinence) or frequency and urgency (urge incontinence). • pelvic organ prolapse. The uterus or other organs shift. Heaviness, vaginal bulges, abdominal aches and pressure result. • fecal incontinence. Women may experience leakage of liquid or solid stool.

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Who develops PFDs?

Women who have given birth vaginally are most likely to develop a PFD. PFDs often worsen after menopause because hormonal changes weaken pelvic tissue. Increased pelvic pressure, caused by being overweight, can also trigger symptoms.

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How are PFDs treated?

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Treatment for PFDs may include: dietary modifications weight loss pelvic floor strengthening exercises such as Kegels prescription medication devices called pessaries that hold organs up and can also treat stress incontinence physical therapy surgery

you from getting help. Call 888-825-3227 to be connected to a free health talk or a primary care physician today.

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“Franciscan physical therapists can train patients to do Kegel exercises, and help them retrain their bladder for greater control,” says Dr. Silva. If surgery is required, Dr. Silva emphasizes evidence-based, minimallyinvasive procedures. “Most are performed vaginally on an outpatient basis,” he notes, including slings for stress incontinence. Several newer procedures are being used to treat urinary urgency incontinence. In one treatment, called Urgent PC®, a small acupuncture-type needle is inserted into the ankle that stimulates a nerve that eventually improves bladder control. This is performed in half-hour sessions, weekly for 12 weeks. “Urinary urgency patients who haven’t found relief from other methods including medication are finding relief with it,” Dr. Silva says.

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A permanent nerve stimulator called InterStim® placed under the skin on the lower back as an outpatient procedure is also offering many patients improved bladder and bowel control for both urinary urge incontinence and fecal incontinence.

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Palliative care

Living each day to the fullest As life nears the end, palliative care offers support to patients and loved ones When a loved one nears the end of his or her life, it can be a sad and difficult time. It may even seem like there’s no roadmap for getting Georganne through those challengTrandum, RN ing last days. For a long time, that’s how Gig Harbor resident Marianne Reed felt. Her husband, Lloyd, 85, suffers from dementia. “He would tell me that he was ready to die, but he was afraid of death,” Marianne says. “I didn’t know what to do. He was depressed and I felt stuck.” Marianne’s daughter, who is a nurse at St. Joseph Medical Center in Tacoma, suggested palliative care. Palliative care is a service that helps support a patient and his or her family toward the end of life with whatever medical services or social resources they need most, says Georganne Trandum, RN, clinical division manager of Palliative Care Services at Franciscan Health System. “Palliative care is for patients at risk of passing away in one to two years from a life-threatening illness. Hospice care is for patients who are within the last six months of life.”

Lloyd and Marianne Reed are finding joy again, thanks to Palliative Care Services.

as a chaplain. “They helped us focus on living the life we have now to the fullest,” Marianne says.

Support when you need it most

Palliative care often begins with a visit from a nurse practitioner or physician’s assistant.You may not have met this person before, but you will get to know them well. He or she will perform a comprehensive physical assessment and will speak with the patient and his or her family to find out what else may be needed from a physical, mental, emotional or spiritual standpoint. For Marianne and Lloyd, that meant meeting with a social worker as well 10

Rediscovering the joy in life

At Franciscan, palliative care providers take the time and care to get to know your family and find out what you need and what will make a difference for you. This can include having warm meals delivered to your home or getting help with chores, Georganne says. This is in addition to the expert-level medical care you receive from your regular Franciscan physician.

Franciscan Health System | Winter 2012

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“The help we’ve received through palliative care has allowed me to stop feeling like Lloyd’s caregiver all the time and to feel like I can be his wife again,” Marianne says. “In fact, I used the word ‘joy’ last night for the first time in years.”

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member benefit from Palliative Care Services? Give us a call at 253-534-7028.

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Digestive health

What’s got you tied up in knots?

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Irritable bowel syndrome: What it is and how to know if now you havenow it Digestive disorders, irritable bowel syndrome and inflammatory bowel syndrome are not at the top of anyone’s list of interests, but when you’re suffering from intestinal cramping and pain, constipation and diarrhea without relief, you want to learn everything you can to reclaim control of your life. And learn it fast! Irritable bowel syndrome (IBS) and inflammatory bowel diseases (IBD) share the symptoms of altered bowel habits associated with abdominal pain or discomfort. The difference between the two is that IBS, also known as spastic colon, is the result of a functional abnormality diagnosed by a characteristic cluster of symptoms in the absence of detectable structural defect, while IBD’s

(including Crohn’s and ulcerative colitis) are structural bowel disorders. IBS is the more common ailment. About one in six people in the United States have symptoms of IBS. Symptoms are subtle, including bloating, constipation, diarrhea and feelings of fullness that come and go. The bowel doesn’t seem to work as it should. These symptoms often show up when the patient is experiencing a higher volume of stress than normal. When symptoms also include weight loss, persistent pain, anemia, persistent diarrhea, diarrhea at night and bloody stool, then IBD is considered, especially if there is a family history.

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If you have symptoms of irritable bowel syndrome or if you notice a change in your bowel habits that does not go away, don’t wait. Make an appointment with a Franciscan Digestive Care Associates doctor today. Call 888-825-3227.

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Signs and tests

Most of the time, your doctor can diagnose IBS based on your symptoms. Eating a lactose-free diet for 2 weeks may help the doctor spot a lactase deficiency, and although there isn’t a test to diagnose IBS, tests may conducted to rule out other problems. For example, blood tests can determine if you have celiac disease (an immune reaction to gluten) or a low red blood cell count (anemia).

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Simple changes make a big difference

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Lifestyle changes can help in some cases of IBS. Regular exercise and improved sleep habits may reduce anxiety and help relieve bowel symptoms. Dietary changes can also be helpful. No specific diet or medication can be recommended for IBS patients, because the condition differs from one person to another. Talk with your doctor before taking over-the-counter medications.

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Franciscan Digestive Care Associates GIG HARBOR John Carrougher, MD Michael Kimmey, MD Amy Tsuchida, MD LAKEWOOD Brian Mulhall, MD Kyung Noh, MD

PUYALLUP William Hirota, MD Michael Lyons, MD TACOMA Steven Larson, MD Sangik Oh, MD W. Michael Priebe, MD Katherine Britt, ARNP Tobie Halpin, PAC James McMahon, PAC

www.FHShealth.org

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Weight loss

Obesity hurts! How the extra weight affects your overall health The statistic is staggering: One-third of American adults are obese. The combination of poor diet and lack of exercise is second only to smoking as the leading cause of preventable death in this country. But research shows bariatric surgery can reverse a number of health conditions and reduce your risk of death by 89 percent. Take a look at how carrying around 100 extra pounds taxes the body:

4 Neurological disorders

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A study published in the journal Neurology found obesity doubles the risk for Parkinson’s disease.

4 Depression Obese patients have a 20 percent to 44 percent increased risk of depression.

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Excess neck fat constricts airways, making breathing difficult or loud or stopping it altogether during sleep. Weight loss surgery corrects apnea 85 percent of the time.

1 Heart disease Obesity ups the risk of heart attack, stroke, high blood pressure and high cholesterol. Bariatric surgery reduces hypertension in 79 percent of patients and cholesterol in 70 percent of patients.

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2 Liver disease Fat buildup in the liver causes inflammation, damage, cirrhosis and, ultimately, liver failure.

Gaining 45 pounds or more after age 18 doubles a woman’s odds of developing breast cancer. Obesity also increases the risk of cancers of the colon, esophagus, kidneys, uterus and prostate.

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3 Incontinence Obesity is associated with urinary stress incontinence and urge incontinence in women.

3 Fertility Obese women are five times more likely to develop polycystic ovary syndrome, which affects fertility. They’re also three times more likely to have menstrual disturbances.

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6 Osteoarthritis

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Foot problems ACT7Obesity ACT strains your feet, leading to

Shed the weight! To learn how bariatric surgery can benefit you, sign up for a weight loss seminar today! Go to www.StFrancisWeightForLife.org or call 800-823-6523.

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5 Type 2 diabetes Obesity is the largest environmental cause of diabetes, but losing 5 percent of your weight can improve blood sugar control. In fact, bariatric surgery is shown to resolve or improve diabetes in 86 percent of patients.

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Health Resources & Events F ran c is c an H ealth S y ste m

ST. JOSEPH MEDICAL CENTER 1717 S. J St Tacoma • 253-426-4101

ST. FRANCIS HOSPITAL 34515 Ninth Ave S Federal Way • 253-944-8100

ST. CLARE HOSPITAL 11315 Bridgeport Way S.W. Lakewood • 253-985-1711

ST. ANTHONY HOSPITAL 11567 Canterwood Blvd N.W. Gig Harbor • 253-530-2000

ST. ELIZABETH HOSPITAL 1455 Battersby Ave Enumclaw • 360-802-8800

Most programs and classes are free, but many require registration. For more information, call the number listed.

UPCOMING EVENTS ›› Pierce County Cancer Survivors’ Conference 2012 Join us on Tuesday, March 13, for the Pierce County Cancer Survivors’ Conference. Connect with other survivors to discuss and learn about the physical, mental and spiritual aspects of the cancer journey. This event is presented by multiple community organizations and cancer care advocates. This event is free and open to all people affected by cancer as patients, family members and caregivers. To register, visit www.pccancersurvivorship.org or call 253-267-5814. Tues, March 13 • 8 a.m.-4 p.m. TACOMA University of Puget Sound, 1500 N. Warner

›› Shop for a Doc Looking for an obstetrician? Shop for a Doc gives you the opportunity to spend one-onone time with each of our OB providers. Tours of the Family Birth Center will follow. To register, call 888-825-3227. Thurs, Apr 19 • 6-8 p.m. FEDERAL WAY St. Francis Medical Office Building, 34509 Ninth Ave. S.

›› MardiGrams Screening Event Woman who are 40 to 64 and are uninsured or underserved are invited to the Carol Milgard Breast Center for its 3rd Annual MardiGrams—where mammograms and Mardi Gras rendezvous! Includes screening mammograms, breast self-exam classes, complimentary spa services and light refreshments! Must pre-qualify by calling 253-680-3394 and reference MardiGrams. Space is limited. Walk-ins will not be accommodated. Tues, Feb 21 • 1-4 p.m. TACOMA Carol Milgard Breast Center, 4525 S. 19th St.

HEALTH TALKS ›› Women: Your Heart, Your Hormones Presented by Rosemary Peterson, MD Call 888-825-3227 to register. Thurs, Feb 16 • 6-7 p.m. TACOMA St. Joseph Medical Center, Lagerquist Conference Room

›› Healthy is Delicious Series: Keep the Taste, Lose the Waist! Let’s face it. Your clothes just don’t fit the way they used to. Join your good health partners from Franciscan for an evening of learning how eating healthy truly can be delicious, using REAL, fresh ingredients and learning cooking methods that enhance flavor without adding calories. Plus we’ll cover proper portion sizes. Call 888-825-3227 to register (required). March 1 • (Time noted upon registration) TACOMA St. Joseph Medical Center, Lagerquist Conference Rooms A & B

›› Hysterectomy: New Options, New Choices Considering hysterectomy? Join us for a free health talk and learn more. Come and meet Barbara Levy, MD, one of the region’s top gynecologists, surgeons and women’s health expert. Dr. Levy will discuss advancements in minimally invasive hysterectomy surgical techniques. Smaller incisions mean less pain, less scarring and shorter recovery periods. Bring a family member and your friends and enjoy hors d’oeuvres while you learn about how advanced gynecological surgery options can help you get back to living the life you love! Space fills quickly. Register today! Call 888-825-3227 or visit us online at www.FHShealth.org. Tues, Mar 27 • 6-7 p.m. FEDERAL WAY St. Francis Medical Office Building, 34509 Ninth Ave. S.

Winter 2012

›› Men’s Health Solutions for ED and Incontinence Christopher Arroyo, MD, Franciscan Urology Associates Call 888-825-3227 to register. Tues, Mar 27 • 6:30 p.m. GIG HARBOR St. Anthony Hospital, Smalling Education Center Wed, Mar 28 • 6:30 p.m. TACOMA St. Joseph Medical Center, Lagerquist Conference Room

›› Transfusion-Free Medicine and Surgery Program-Educational Event Series Franciscan’s Transfusion-Free Medicine and Surgery Program is a special service for patients who wish to avoid the use of donor blood during medical and surgical procedures. Join our expert team of professionals at a free educational seminar about transfusion-free medicine and surgery. We’ll cover the advantages to using transfusion-free medical techniques, common reasons people choose transfusion-free treatment, ways to make sure your wishes are known in an emergency situation, and much more. Refreshments will be served. Registration: Seating is limited and registration is required. Call 253-426-6918 or toll-free 888-311-2655. Sat, Mar 10 • 2-4 p.m. TACOMA St. Joseph Medical Center, Lagerquist Conference Room

ORTHOPEDIC HEALTH TALKS ›› Advancements in Joint Treatment Health Talks Joint replacement has seen many innovations in the recent past including new implants, new surgical techniques and equipment. Come to a free seminar. Learn about your options for total joint replacement surgery and how people are responding to joint replacements today. continued on page 14 www.FHShealth.org

13


Health Resources & Events, continued from page 13 “Six Weeks to a Healthier You” A Community Wellness Program from St. Anthony Hospital and Joe Piscatella Don’t let your New Year’s resolution go to “waist!” Fast-track your start to a healthier lifestyle with this six-week series. Whether your goal is to lose weight, reduce stress, exercise more or eat better, this program will help you achieve success. Led by nationally acclaimed speaker and one of the foremost authorities on lifestyle habits and heart health, Joe Piscatella, with the experts at St. Anthony Hospital. Biometric screens, to establish baselines of key health indicators, including cholesterol and glucose levels, blood pressure and body mass index (BMI), will be taken at the beginning and end of the series. Registration fees are: $75 per person, $125 per couple, and include the six sessions and the biometric screening series. To register, call 888-825-3227. BIOMETRIC SCREENINGS: Located at St. Anthony Hospital in the Smalling Education Center. (Appointments are encouraged.) April 14, 8 a.m. to noon Pre-Series Screening These biometric screens will establish baselines of key health conditions before you start the class series. May 19, 8 a.m. to noon Post-Series Screening These biometric screens will be taken after the class series is over to see how your health may have improved. Class series: Class sessions will be held at Chapel Hill Presbyterian Church, 7700 Skansie Avenue, Gig Harbor. Week 1/Session 1 • April 19 Make Your Health Last as Long as Your Life Learn the difference between longevity (the number of years you live) and health span (the number of years you live in good health). Joe will examine lifestyles around the world and explain how people in some parts of the world live longer and have extended years of good health. Week 2/Session 2 • April 26 Eating Healthy in a Doubleburger Dotcom World Joe will offer practical principles for healthy eating, including leading-edge methods for controlling your

14

Franciscan Health System | Winter 2012

fat tooth. Holly Martindale, Franciscan outpatient nutrition education center registered dietitian, will share the latest information on nutrition. Week 3/Session 3 • May 3 Move It or Lose It Committing to exercising regularly is a critical component of living a healthy lifestyle. Learn about the link between physical activity and weight control, cardiac health and stress management. With a certified fitness trainer, Joe will examine how to establish a balanced exercise program— aerobic, weight resistance and flexibility—and share ways to make exercise an integral and fun part of everyday life. Week 4/Session 4 • May 10 Take a Load Off Your Heart Americans today live with chronic stress. Understand the major impact chronic stress has on diet, exercise, productivity and quality of life. Discover how you can better manage stress by learning how to respond to stress, not react to stress. Week 5/Session 5 • May 17 Healthy Cooking at Home It is one thing to understand the basics of healthy eating, but quite another to make those basics work in the meals you cook for your family. Enjoy a Mediterranean diet demonstration by a Franciscan Health System chef, with recipes (and taste testing) to show how eating well can be delicious. Post-series biometrics screens: May 19, 8 a.m. to noon, St. Anthony Hospital (appointments encouraged; walk-ins welcome) Week 6/Session 6 • May 24 Raising Fit Kids in a Fast World Raised with the temptations of fast food, texting, television and computer games, kids are more sedentary, overweight and out-of-shape than a generation ago. In the last decade, childhood obesity has soared by more than 50 percent. The result is elevated cholesterol, high blood pressure and more type 2 diabetes. This may be the first generation not to live as long as their parents. Learn practical and easy-to-implement strategies for teaching children healthy exercise and eating habits to last a lifetime.

Joint Replacement Health Talks continued from page 13 Refreshments will be served. Registration required. Call 888-825-3227.

Advancements in Joint Replacement: Options and Outcomes for Total Joints Lance Bear, MD, orthopedic surgeon, Harbor Orthopedics Wed, Feb 22 • 6-7 p.m. PORT ORCHARD Clubhouse at McCormick Woods, 5155 McCormick Woods Drive SW

Advancements in Joint Replacement Steven Teeny, MD, orthopedic surgeon Tues, March 6 • 6-7:30 p.m. LAKEWOOD St. Clare Hospital, Classrooms A, B &C

Advancements in Joint Replacement David Bishop, MD, orthopedic surgeon Visit www.FHShealth.org/ StElizabethHealthTalks or call 888-825-3227. Wed, Mar 7 • 6-7 p.m., hospital tours 7-7:30 p.m. ENUMCLAW St. Elizabeth Hospital, Rainier Room

›› Podiatry Health Talks Healthy Feet for a Happy Life Christopher Bock, DPM If you’re tired of aching feet, learn how to take unhappy feet and make them happier! Christopher Bock, DPM, will talk about some of the most common foot problems and how you can treat them—and even prevent some of them. Evening includes refreshments and a gift. Hospital tours available following the talk. Wed, Mar 21 • 6-7 p.m. ENUMCLAW St. Elizabeth Hospital, Rainier Room


Wellness for the Sole: Total Foot and Ankle Health

›› Free Weight Loss Surgery Information and Seminars

Come hear Chad Farley, DPM, of Franciscan Foot & Ankle Specialists, talk about common foot ailments, such as hammertoes, bunions and more. He will discuss ways to keep your feet healthy, as well as surgical and nonsurgical solutions to foot and ankle conditions. Register by calling 888-825-3227 or visit www.FHShealth.org/classes. Wed, Apr 18 • 6:30-7:30 p.m. PUYALLUP Best Western Park Plaza, 620 S Hill Park Dr.

We invite you to learn how weight loss surgery can help you lose weight, reclaim your body, and lead a healthier, happier life. You can register by calling 888-825-3227 or online at www.FHShealth.org.

LIVING BETTER ›› Quieting Tremors: New Treatments for Symptoms of Movement Disorders Are you bothered by tremors? Hands that shake uncontrollably may be no more than a minor nuisance, but over time, tremors can worsen and make it hard to hold a glass of water or write legibly. Neurologist Lissa Brod, MD, Franciscan Medical Group, and neurosurgeon Peter Shin, MD, and radiation oncologist Herbert Wang, MD, will share the latest information about understanding and treating tremors, including treatment with Gamma Knife. If tremors are affecting your quality of life or that of someone you love, come learn how this condition can be improved. Call 888-825-3227 for more information or to register. Tues, Mar 6 • 6-7 p.m. TACOMA St. Joseph Medical Center, Lagerquist Conference Room

›› Heart-Healthy Nutrition Series Four-week series on heart-healthy eating topics, including meal planning, food labels, eating out and portion control. Call 888-825-3227 to register and for more information. For Nutrition Services, call the St. Joseph Outpatient Nutrition Center at 253-426-4926.

SUPPORT GROUPS Please visit www.FHShealth.org/support for a list and details of current support groups available.

›› WomenHeart of Pierce County Ladies! If you are a heart attack survivor, you have heart disease or you are at risk for it, attend our first support network meeting! This group will be led locally by Franciscan Health System Regional Manager Tina Blackett, a heart attack survivor and support network coordinator at WomenHeart of Pierce County. WomenHeart is the only national organization dedicated to advancing women’s heart health through advocacy, community education and patient support. Group members will also receive free e-mails and updates. To RSVP or for more information about WomenHeart of Pierce County, contact Tina at TinaBlackett@ FHShealth.org. Act soon—seating is limited. Last Tuesday of the month. Next meeting is Tues, Feb 28 • 5-7 p.m. TACOMA St. Joseph Medical Center Please use valet parking and meet in main lobby.

Franciscan Orthopedics and Sports Medicine announces sponsorship of Rainier to Ruston Well known for its Ultra (50 mile) Marathon and Relay race, Rainier to Ruston (R2R) was founded to bring public attention to the Foothills Trails, from the shoulders of Mt. Rainier to the shores of Puget Sound. Celebrating its 10 year anniversary, R2R has changed the courses to offer Pierce County’s most scenic routes. R2R includes an Ultra (50 mile) Marathon and Relay, 50k Ultra, Full (27.7mile) Marathon and Half (13.1 mile) Marathon. Join us on National Trails Day, June 2, 2012! Learn more at www.rainiertoruston.com.

›› Grief Support Group First and third Wednesday of the month. Call 800-338-8305 for more information.

›› Caregiver Support Group First and third Thursday of the month. 1-2:30 p.m. ENUMCLAW St. Elizabeth Hospital, Cedar Room Call 360-802-8800 to confirm dates, rooms and times.

›› Internal Cardiac Defibrillator (ICD) Support Group

›› Honoring the Legacy and Memory of Parents

Free quarterly meetings offer support for those living with an ICD. Light refreshments will be served. Sponsored jointly by Franciscan Health System and MultiCare Health System. Call 253-426-6709 for more information. Tues, Mar 27 • 6:30-8 p.m. TACOMA Tacoma General Hospital, Jackson Hall Auditorium, 314 Martin Luther King Jr. Way

We invite sons and daughters to gather in memory of the lives and legacies of their mothers and fathers and to share ways to make meaning of the loss at a time when others are making plans to celebrate. Join us for a Saturday brunch, short program and opportunity to connect. $18 per person. Please call Peggy McEntee at 253-661-4077 or Susan Mix at 253-5347016 for more information and to register. Sat, April 21 • 10 a.m.-Noon TACOMA Tacoma Dome Best Western, 2611 East E Street

Franciscan Health is now on Facebook, YouTube and Twitter! ›› Search for “Franciscan Health System.” www.FHShealth.org

15


health! Franciscan

10437ME

A publication of Franciscan Health System

FRANCISCAN HEALTH SYSTEM 1717 South J Street Tacoma, WA 98405

NONPROFIT ORG U.S. POSTAGE

PAID

FRANCISCAN HEALTH SYSTEM

St. Francis Hospital 34515 Ninth Ave S, Federal Way, WA 98003 St. Joseph Medical Center 1717 South J St, Tacoma, WA 98405 St. Clare Hospital 11315 Bridgeport Way SW, Lakewood, WA 98499 St. Elizabeth Hospital 1455 Battersby Ave, Enumclaw, WA 98022 St. Anthony Hospital 11567 Canterwood Blvd NW, Gig Harbor, WA 98332 Franciscan Medical Group 1313 Broadway Plaza, Suite 200, Tacoma, WA 98402 CEO, Franciscan Health System Joe Wilczek President, St. Clare Hospital Kathy Bressler Managing Editor Joan B. Artman Franciscan Health System is part of Catholic Health Initiatives, which has health care facilities throughout the United States. ©2012, Franciscan Health System. All rights reserved. For questions or comments, or if you’d like to be removed from the health! mailing list, please contact us at 253-382-3850, (fax) 253-382-3877, www.FHShealth.org or write to: Editor, Franciscan health!, Franciscan Health System, Marketing & Communications, PO Box 2197, Tacoma, WA 98401-2197.

About Franciscan Health System

››

OUR MISSION To create healthier communities OUR VISION To be the South Sound's first choice for healing of mind, body and spirit OUR VALUES Reverence, Integrity, Compassion, Excellence

St. Francis Hospital • St. Joseph Medical Center • ST. CLARE HOSPITAL • st. elizabeth HOSPITAL • ST. ANTHONY HOSPITAL • FRANCISCAN MEDICAL GROUP

There’s help for

joint pain Come and learn more about some of the latest advancements in joint replacement with one of the most experienced joint replacement surgeons in the Northwest, Steven Teeny, MD. He will talk about new implants, new surgical techniques and equipment that make the experience less painful with a faster recovery and better outcomes. If you are experiencing hip or knee pain due to arthritis or other conditions, joint replacement may be right for you.

Advancements in Joint Replacement Tuesday, March 6 • 6 - 7:30 p.m. St. Clare Hospital, Classrooms A, B and C 11315 Bridgeport Way SW, Lakewood Seating is limited. To register, call 888-825-3227 or visit www.FHShealth.org/StClareSeminars.

Joint pain used to have me down. Now, thanks to Franciscan Orthopedics, I’m back on track.

health! - St. Clare Hospital, Winter '12  

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