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Blood drive biggest in nation 04 TOMS day without shoes 13 Baseball advances to playoffs 22

Franklin High School • 900 N. Resler, El Paso TX 79912 • 915.833.2696 • Volume 17, Issue 5 • May 2010 • fhschronicle.com

40 years of

earth day & where we are now

All-American

cover photo by Briana Sanchez

continued online coverage at

fhschronicle.com


NEWS

02

cover photo

Senior Bianca Marino enjoys Earth Day, along with senior Samantha Hernadez from Eastwood High School. The event was not only a celebration for our school, but for the entire community. photo by Briana Sanchez

believe in yourself

At the National Honor Society induction, teacher of the year Galen Hampton offered words of wisdom to the 178 students being inducted. “I related a quote I had heard a few weeks before: ‘If people cut you down long enough, then you start to believe it.’ It seems to me that the opposite is true as well. If people bring you up long enough, then you start to believe it,” Hampton said. In honor of the ceremony, four candles were lit from the flame of the center to represent the core values of NHS: scholarship, service, leadership, and character. photo by Briana Sanchez

freedom of the press statement Student publications guard freedom of the press as a right of all people in a free society. It carries with it freedom and responsibility to discuss, question and challenge actions and statements of the student body, administration and other public figures. Student journalists hold the right to speak unpopular opinions and the privilege to agree with the majority. The Chronicle is a public forum of speech that is produced by students of Franklin High School once a month. Bylined columns represent the writer’s opinion while editorials are designed to persuade, warn, criticize, inform or inspire. Letters to the editor must be signed and may be edited. The editorial board reserves the right to refuse any letter or advertisements that are not in the best interests of the school. Views expressed in editorials are not necessarily those of the administration, newspaper staff or journalism advisers. Further information may be obtained by calling 915.833.2696, 832.6600 or going online to our website www.fhschronicle.com.

the chronicle staff Chris Canales • editor in chief Hayden Pendergrass • editor in chief Sabrina Nuñez • news director Amanda Brinegar • features, ctr. spread Karen Zamora • features editor Anthony Zaragoza • sports editor Ian Ekery • asst. sports editor Kathryn Bohle • entertainment editor Rhianna Tapia • copy editor Amanda Rodriguez • copy editor Stephanie Avalos • business mgr. Gunnar Lamb • ad sales mgr. Briana Sanchez • head photographer Eugenio Felix • graphic illustrator Gustavo Esquinca • illustrator, photographer Justin Ayers • cartoonist Jason Beverly • photographer Karina Soares • photographer David Brown Megan Cahalan Mauricio Casillas Natalie Felsen Ana Garcia Cami Gonzalez Omar Hernandez Evan Hughes Renata Isa Hae Rin Ma David Morales Adriana Rosen Javi Sandoval Elizabeth Silva Sarah Skirmont Lauren Venzor Nick Zebrowski Jai Tanner • adviser Carla Gasway • principal

about this issue volume 17, issue 5, May 2010

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pring is in the air, and with it comes growth and change. This sentiment is evident in the events that are covered in this issue. Our reporters examine issues that are specific to our state and school, particularly the fact that Franklin will become a Title 1 school (pg. 3)—a designation that will bring an additional $600,000 to our campus. You'll find an insightful look at the State Board of Education's debate over the content of social studies textbooks (p. 5). We examine many other social topics in this issue, ranging from the increased usage of ecstasy (p. 16) to one student's attempt to start a chapter of the Gay Straight Alliance (p. 6) to another student's drive to collect shoes for a program called Give Back to the Track (p. 12). The Staff Outlook (p.11) addresses the need for improvement to the school's crosswalks. Also, changes in admistrative policies for the upcoming National Day of Silence (p. 9) are examined as well. Similarly, numerous instances of growth have recently occured, specifically with the successes of the Earth Day fair (p.14) and TOMS One Day without Shoes (p.1213). We hope you enjoy this issue. If you would like to make comments or suggestions, go to the <<Contact Us>> section at fhschronicle.com, write us a letter to the editor or come see us in Room W100.— The editorial staff

Title I funding

assets analysis

As a Title I school, Franklin can expect to receive $600,000 in federal aid. The majority of the funds will be spent on instructional supplies for core classes and new technology. Science teacher Alesia Jackson says the grant is timely. “We, in the science department, have needed lab materials and workbooks that we can now purchase to increase student achievement,” Jackson said. “Many of our new science courses, such as Earth/Space Science and Micro-Pathology need different materials that we have never needed in the past—so this money is coming just in time.” graphic by Natalie Felsen

how is title I achieved?

Title I is based only on students’ freelunch applications that qualify. “It is very important for all students to fill out the free-lunch form whether they think they will qualify or not,” science teacher Alesia Jackson said.


NEWS

School to gain $600K, Title I status I T

03

School likely to achieve TEA recognized status again sabrinaNUNEZ • news director

natalieFELSEN • reporter

his fall, the school will achieve Title I status for the first time since its inception. Title I is a source of aid for schools with 40 percent of underprivileged students. “Title I is federal funding for schools with a large percentage (40%) of economically disadvantaged students,” Pincipal Carla Gasway said.  “This funding has been around since 1965 to ensure all children have a fair and equal opportunity to obtain a high-quality education.” Though Franklin’s current population does not fall under Title I standards, by using future projections, the school was able to qualify. “We are projected to be Title I based on the students in our feeder pattern that are coded economically disadvantaged,” Gasway said.  “Franklin had 31% of our population coded economically disadvantaged in the fall.” In essence, Assistant Principal of Curriculum Mary Cress said that the upcoming Title I status is based on the third graders in the current feeder pattern, which consists of Tippin, Polk, Lundy, Kohlberg, Rosa Guerrero, Mitzi Bond and Roberts Elementary schools, along with Brown, Hornedo and Lincoln Middle Schools. Cress says that the extra resources will help the school remain highly competitive. “These funds are meant to help us improve instruction for disadvantaged students,” Cress said. “We have had our share of disadvantaged students for a long time. Though we were already

competitive without funds, gradually, without funding, we would have lost our edge.” According to Cress, the school had previously received State Compensatory Education funds, which were provided by the state of Texas. They were used to hire TAKS coordinators at both campuses and sponsor double-blocked teachers and after-school tutoring. However, those funds could only be used by at-risk students. Cress said that Title I funds have already been distributed in the school budget for the 2010-2011 school year, with the majority of the $600,000 going to tech equipment and instructional supplies. See Title 1 Funding graph on p. 2 “We make decisions [regarding the budget] based on staff input, and our staff is represented by individuals that serve on the Campus Improvement Team,” Cress said. “I presented [the budget] at the last meeting, and I’ll be showing them the final draft on May 11. Most of the money will go to the core subjects: math, science, social studies, language arts and the fine arts.” Gasway says that the federal funding will be well used. “The additional funding will allow us to purchase some instructional materials that we haven’t been able to afford in the past,” Gasway said.  “We will also be able to purchase technology for our classrooms.  We will be able to do some remedial programs for our struggling students and programs to increase parental involvement.  Some of it will also be spent on professional development.”

f all goes as expected with TAKS scores, Franklin should once again be named as a TEA Recognized school. To maintain this distinction, the district implemented three weeks of TAKS review for an entire period of core classes. However, the school chose to use half of the period for TAKS and the other half for the traditional curriculum. “We have always focused on the tested curriculum,” Principal Carla Gasway said. “The district has provided the teachers with great resources to prepare our students for the tests.  Each subject is doing different things to make sure our students are ready.” In order to project what the school needs to improve, predictions are made using the TMP [Texas Prediction Model] from last year’s scores as well as this year’s benchmarks. “We found specific items in objectives that were more troublesome than others.  We addressed those parts of the objectives that we needed to work on throughout the school year,” math coach Andrew Long said. “As we got closer to TAKS, we started allocating more and more time to teaching those parts of TAKS that would benefit the students most.” Long said the motivation to prepare students came from ensuring college readiness. “A scale score of 2200 or above on the Exit TAKS Test will place most students who go to a Texas college automatically into a college math course that is not remedial,” Long said.  “A remedial math course is required by the college, costs a lot of money and the student receives no credit for passing the course.” Long hopes to continue the school’s success. “[TEA Recognition] is important to us and to the community that we service,” Long said. “We have shot for Recognized status every year and now we have achieved it.  Our goal this year is Exemplary status, which is the highest.”

Flashing a thumbs up sign, sophomore Andres Armendariz is one of 3,100 students who will benefit from the $600,000 the school will receive due to its becoming a Title 1 school. Title 1 funds are designed to assist schools that have 40% or more students from low-income families. Franklin is the last of the 11 EPISD high schools to be named a Title 1 school. photo by Briana Sanchez


NEWS

04

EPSYOs featured in April issue of People magazine hae rinMA • reporter

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Keeping calm while she takes her turn at saving lives and contributing to the record breaking collection of 409 units, junior Julie Vasquez was among the 350 students who signed up to donate blood on April 16. photo by Briana Sanchez.

TOPS IN THE NATION Recent Blood Drive collects 409 units, maintains nationwide record anaGARCIA • reporter

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ecause of the success of the spring blood drive, approximately 1,200 lives will be saved using the 409 units collected on April 16. The school also maintained its status as the largest high school blood drive in the country. Part of the reason for the school’s success is the maturity level of the students and the belief in the necessity of blood, Student Activities Director Lisa Thompson said. “The kids at Franklin are great and understand the importance of donating blood and giving to their community and how it saves people’s lives,” Thompson said. “Also, we’ve had a few kids who have passed away that are still close to our seniors’ and juniors’ hearts, and I think that [is] the motivating factor.” Most students say that the most difficult part of donating is their fear of needles and their apprehension about fainting. However, United Blood Services coordinator Pason Booth said the employees have a few tricks up their sleeves to keep this from happening. “The biggest challenge at high schools is reactions from first time donors because we normally get a lot more reactions than we usually would,” Booth said. “Ultimately, the best thing we can do is keep them talking and laughing. That’s the best remedy for any reaction, so [we] just keep them talking, keep them moving.”

Even those that are not first time donors may have unpleasant reactions. Senior Amin Karabash knows this well. “I got up really fast and I was feeling fine for a minute or two, and then all of a sudden my vision started getting more and more blurry until I was blind for at least 30 seconds,” Karabash said. “Then suddenly everything went black, and I fainted. I had a dream that somebody was choking me, but in reality the United Blood services employees were putting ice on my jugular vein to get the blood back pumping through my brain again.” Fortunately, the nightmare was short lived. “[I was] unconscious for I don’t know how long, and I wake up similar to Uma Thurman in Pulp Fiction, how she kind of just pops up with the adrenaline rush,” Karabash said. “I’ll just heed the advice of staying in my chair to allow my body to get accustomed to the loss of blood next time.” It is this optimism and excitement to donate that keeps everyone coming back. “After a few successful blood drives with Franklin, the students realized how big it was and from there it just exploded,” Booth said. “We always have the best response here. We love coming out here, love this drive. Our staff comes out and [does] what we have to do, and I think the kids just believe in this; they believe in what we’re doing here.”

haring the spotlight with Sandra Bullock in the May 10 issue of People magazine, the El Paso Youth Symphony Orchestra (EPSYOs), along with several other groups is featured in an advertisement. Six months ago, EPSYOs was awarded a $10,000 grant from the “Power a Bright Future” program hosted by Clorox through Facebook. “Participating in the Clorox grant was great because we were able to reach out to a lot of people and media before we were featured in People magazine,” manager Leslie Chen said. “We were able to meet so many people on the way.” However, the EPSYOs was not the only organization to win the grant. “The Center for Courageous Kids,” “The Upside of Downs of Greater Cleveland,” “The Riverview Foundation” and “For James’ Sake” also received $10,000. “The EPSYOs placed third out of five with 14,305 votes,” Chen said. “The grant applicants were narrowed down to 50 out of 5,000 organizations, and then the top five in the end.” EPSYOs held a release party at Barnes & Nobles on the East side El Paso location to highlight the singlepage spread. The organizers of EPSYOs emphasized the importance of the money for the young musicians in El Paso. During its four-year existence, EPSYOs has never turned down a student because of financial problems, and with this grant, they hope to sustain this status.

The musicians of the El Paso Youth Symphony Orchestra are featured in a one-page spread for People magazine after being awarded $10,000 from Clorox. Their picture is in the top center of the spread. photo by Hae Rin Ma


NEWS

Waivers offer SBOE to vote on juniors free keeping ‘history’ in social studies ACT, SAT natalieFELSEN • reporter

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hanks to funding provided by the Texas State Legislature, juniors across Texas can now obtain a voucher for a free SAT or ACT test. According to Princeton Review SAT Prep Teacher and Master Trainer Michelle Bury, this marks the first time waivers are available for standardized tests regardless of financial status. “Some families do not apply for the waivers available on the basis of need, but instead choose to forgo the test because they cannot afford the $45+ fee,” Bury said. “This opportunity will allow students and parents to breathe a little easier knowing that they have one less fee to pay in order to apply and be admitted into college.” Bury said that the vouchers, which are limited to roughly one-third of juniors statewide on a first-come, first-serve basis, have been received well. “Many schools in El Paso offer nearly every student a fee waiver due to the financial situation that families are in,” Bury said. “However, at Franklin, very few students qualify for the free waiver. So far, this offer has been successful.  Students in the Franklin SAT prep course are registering earlier and in larger numbers than in previous semesters.” Bury said that the waivers relieve both students and parents of hardships associated with testing expenses.   “One of my expectations as an SAT Prep teacher is for students to take the SAT at the end of the course,” Bury said. “However, many students are not able to because of financial hardships or because they worry that if they do not reach their score goals, their parents will not want to pay for a second test. The voucher takes some of the stress off of students in those situations.” Bury said that the waivers quicken the process of registration. “Since there are a limited number of vouchers, students are less likely to procrastinate. It seems that most students truly understand the value of this voucher.”

05

text books sarahSKIRMONT • reporter

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reparing to take a firm stance against State Board of Education (SBOE) members, professors and cultural experts will meet in Austin on May 21 to reach a final decision concerning revisions to the Texas social studies curriculum. At one point, historical figures Thomas Jefferson, Supreme Court Justice Thurgood Marshall and social activist Cesar Chavez were on the chopping block to be taken out of Texas high school social studies textbooks, but the SBOE has recently reinstated them. Decisions such as these have resulted in controversy among liberal and conservative members of the SBOE, and many see the decisions as being political, not educational. “We need a governor and a school board that’s focused on preparing young Texans for college and their careers, not injecting a political agenda into the classroom,” spokesperson for Democrat Bill White Katy Bacon said. Bacon believes the problem not only lies with the SBOE, but also with Governor Rick Perry. “Texas voters have voted against those who are extreme and hyper-political,” Bacon said. “If Perry won’t show some leadership, he should at least respect Texans who’ve said they don’t want the current, controversial SBOE making decisions about their children’s future.” In contrast, Republican chairperson Gail Lowe supports the new social studies curriculum. “The standards are more inclusive on a number of key individuals. They will be standards that will help serve students in Texas,” Lowe said. “There have been a number of revisions made that will help beef up the instruction students will receive on the Founding Fathers and chief historical documents.” Many of the proposed revisions, however, have been rejected by gubernatorial candidate Bill White, teachers and professors. UTEP Assistant Professor of history Dr. Keith Erekson questions the SBOE’s decisions as they pertain to preparing students for higher education. “In terms of problem solving, analysis, and decision making, the Texas social studies standards require nothing more of seniors than they do of kindergartners,“ Dr. Erekson said. “The proposed new curriculum would leave students ill prepared for college, as well as their ability to function intelligently in a multi-cultural and rapidly changing modern world.” However, teachers and professors say that their input is not being considered. Martin said initially, the opinions of educators were considered, but that has changed. “Teachers played a vital role in the development

Passionate about maintaining objectivity in textbooks, U.S. history teacher Laura Strelzin rejects the SBOE’s current interpretation of history. “It covers up key figures and events that are a big part of our society, especially in Texas, where Hispanics are a minority, or in El Paso, where they are a majority.” photo by Briana Sanchez

of the early recommendations, which the cultural right-wing faction of the board ignored at times,” Martin said. Lowe disagrees. “We have included several educators on our panels that reviewed and made the original recommendations to us,” Lowe said. “We have included public hearings and testimony in which historians and members of the public, parents, and business leaders have addressed history standards.” Amid the debate, the element of political bias stands out as one of the hot button topics. “Gail Lowe wanted Supreme Court Justice and civil rights pioneer Thurgood Marshall removed from a section on citizenship because he is ‘not particularly known for citizenship,’ “ Bacon said. However, Lowe has had a change of heart. “The standards include more minority figures than have ever been included in history standards ever before,” Lowe said. “We have increased the mentioning of Thurgood Marshall.” Social studies teacher Laura Strelzin ultimately questions common sense and credibility. “Are they [SBOE] really listening to teachers, and what really matters, or is it just a small government committee that is going to make the decision?” Strelzin said.

“In terms of problem solving, analysis, and decision making, the [proposed] Texas social studies standards require nothing more of seniors than they do of   kindergartners.” •UTEP PROFESSOR KEITH EREKSON


NEWS

06

In hopes of starting a Gay Straight Alliance chapter at Franklin, students seek a sponsor for the group. GSA, a national organization, provides a safe haven for all students, gay, transgendered and straight. “A sponsor would help plan what we should discuss in meetings, provide a place to meet, be there for moral support and be able to help out in the future,” Chris* said. photo by Briana Sanchez

Gay-straight alliance seeks sponsor for club karenZAMORA • features editor

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hen Chris* moved to Franklin from North Quincy High School in Boston, he almost immediately saw the need to start a new organization—a Gay-Straight Alliance. “A GSA group is extremely important because I know how it feels to be treated differently just because of your choice of sexuality. Not only that, but the pressure of coming out is harder to deal with at school because not a lot of people have the same views as you,” Chris said. “Educating people is very important, and that’s the main reason this group is so necessary.” However, after doing the initial paperwork, Chris has run into an obstacle. He cannot find a sponsor. “A sponsor would help plan what we should discuss in meetings, provide a place to meet, be there for moral support and be able to help out in the future,” Chris said. Though most students agree that harassment of gay students at school is minimal, there are those who disagree with the lifestyle. “If they keep their private life private, then it’s fine, but when they start going crazy in public, then it should be frowned upon,” a senior, who chose not to be identified, said. “It’s like, ‘Oh hey, how are you?’ and they start hitting on you. Yeah, that’s wrong.” Nathan*, another student, says that most gay males do not hit on straight guys. “While it can happen, generally, you are not going to hit on someone who has a different point of view and different interests than you do. It’s a waste of time,” he said.

Nathan is no stranger to discrimination. Years ago, as a seventh grader, he stayed late to do school work at a private elementary school in Juarez. As he left the safety of the school, he was unaware of the beating he was about to receive. “There were three guys waiting for me outside. Two of them were in my grade and the other was older,” Nathan said. “At first they started pushing me, so I told them go away, then they started slapping me, which then turned into punches. They weren’t like little punches—they were hardcore beat down punches.”

more tolerance here. We are more educated. Forming an organization is the next step towards continuing that education,” Nathan said. “It’s a fabulous support group, because kids like us need someone to be like, ‘I’m here for you.’” Senior Steven Tavera agrees. “It is a great idea, so more people will feel safe about being open. I would want to be around all those people, to talk to them and to hear their experiences,” Tavera said. “I’d like to talk about equal rights, for people to be more open minded about it and to talk about how not every gay person likes every straight person out there.” Though Nathan says that he experiences verbal discrimination a couple of times a month, he says that the situation has improved. “At Franklin, it’s not that often. During my first few years, it was pretty obvious that I was being harassed—name calling, physical abuse like pushing in the hallways, both at the Ninth Grade Center and in the beginning of the sophomore year,” Nathan said. “Once I was slammed into the lockers during passing periods. It used to happen during lunch and before school. Right now, it’s the name calling, but I let it go.” Nathan said that coming out has actually increased his own self-acceptance, and acceptance by others as well. “The decrease in discrimination can be attributed to two things: students are more tolerant, especially females, and more students know me as a person,” Nathan said. Currently, GSA is active with Rio Grande Adalante, and together they hold activities like parades and dinners. Teacher Laura Strelzin says education is a must when dealing with social issues. “This club would bring more awareness to people and this school, because a lot of people can be close-minded,” Strelzin said.

“A GSA group is important because I know how it feels to be treated differently just because of your choice of sexuality. Educating people is important and that’s the reason this group is so necessary.” • sophomore student seeking to start GSA chapter Then the abuse escalated, Nathan said. “When it seemed things couldn’t get worse, one guy took off his belt and started beating me in the face with his buckle,” Nathan said. “Soon they stopped punching and started touching me.” Despite the ugliness of the incident, Nathan said that he is stronger, but he doesn’t want others to have to go through the same experience. “Discrimination is worse in Juarez. There is

“If you have a club, you can talk through those issues and educate people about what it means to be a gay or lesbian person, and what it means even at this age. There are people exploring that right now, but might not be too sure what it’s about. Educating others: isn’t that what school’s about?” *Due to EPISD district policy, the names of minors have been changed in order to maintain privacy.


NEWS

07

Friends collect over $3,000 for funeral expenses anaGARCIA • reporter

Holding up a poster with Sergio Villa’s photo, senior Adriana Rosen and former student Zeus Chavira, are part of a campaign to raise money to cover the funeral expenses of their friend. “Everytime you would see him, and he was everywhere, he would be making people laugh saying funny stories,” Rosen said. “Even if it wasn’t a story, he was always making people laugh or he would be dancing.” photo by Dino Francescutti

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very dollar collected helped friends get one step closer to their goal of $3,800— money collected to assist with the funeral expenses for their friend, Sergio Villa, a graduate of 2009. “We all came out Sergio Villa with the idea to help,” Juan Estrada said. “The family obtained the resources for us to help and that’s why were here, to supporting the family.” Villa died on April 27. Two days earlier, he was involved in a car crash just after six a.m. by Executive Boulevard. In the incident, he lost control of his Honda Civic, a car, friends said, he loved. Villa was transported to the hospital, and put on life support. Over 100 friends came to visit to support Villa and his family. “I was really worried so I went to the hospital after work and they told me he had already passed away, but I didn’t want to believe it until I knew for sure until somebody from the hospital told me he had,” senior Adriana Rosen said. “There were a lot of people there, so many guys and girls there for him. Friends are having a difficult time coming to grips with the loss. “He was a happy person, and every time we needed him, he was there for us,” former

student Ullisis Lopez said. “I still feel like they’re going to call us, and he’s going to wake up. I still haven’t put it in my head that he’s not here with us anymore. The reality of losing Villa hit hard. “When we got to the hospital, they let us see him again but to say goodbye, that was the hardest thing,” Rosen said. “It looked like he would wake up.” Before Villa expired, his father had a request. “Sergio’s dad told me, ‘Sergio is already dead, the only thing left to do is unplug the machine,”’ Ullisis Lopez, a former student, said. “He looked at me and said, ‘I have to ask you for a favor. I don’t have any money at all. I just want to say bye to him in a good way, in the right way.’” In response, the next morning, Lopez, along with other Franklin students and graduates began to raise money outside Walmart with posters and buckets bearing the image of their lost friend. However, this would test their spirit even more. “He was really special to us and that’s why we’re supporting him,” said Daneida Ferreira. “We really want to raise the money to give him the proper burial he deserves.” Villa’s rosary was held at Martin Funeral Home West on April 30. The funeral mass was held on May 1, at Queen of Peace Catholic Church. Villa is survived by his father, Sergio Villa and his mother, Armida Villa.

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OPINIONS

08

hall talk Battle of the Blogosphere As the future of journalism remains uncertain, the recent advent of blogging has provided a new challenge to the medium. In this Point-Counterpoint, we determine if blogging is a detrimental or beneficial practice.

What is Eyjafjallajökull? Anahi Quinones, 11

“A Russian taco.”

Pedro Loya, 10

“‘Where are you?’ in Portuguese.”

Daria Burton, 12

“Fried chicken.”

Alyssa Madrid, 12

“French cuisine.”

Jared Gilbert, 12

“An Arabic saying.”

Kristina Coster , 11

Eyjafjallajökull

“The Icelandic volcano.”

Eyjafjallajökull is a volcano located in southern Iceland that has erupted relatively frequently since the last Ice Age. The eruption on April 14, 2010 caused extensive air travel disruption in Europe.

stephanieAVALOS • business mgr.

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hen the outlandish question is asked, “Are blogs journalism?” the answer is a simple no. In today’s web-centric world, society makes the mistake of confusing bloggers with hardworking journalists. To be considered an expert in the past, you would have to have some sort of expertise in a field. Bloggers tend to have the misunderstanding that if they back up their biased posts with facts from Wikipedia (facts that 12-year olds probably made up), they can consider themselves journalists instead of a more appropriate term − typists who write without questioning or examining. As the media has revolutionized, journalists work day and night to keep up with what society wants to read. Journalists often find themselves having to compete against average “Joe the Plumbers.” For bloggers to consider themselves journalists is an offense to those who performed ludicrous jobs for many Miranda Priestlys, hoping to catch their big break. By definition, a blog is simply a popular way to communicate personal opinions without any social interaction. Journalism takes actual effort. As a journalist, it is essential to have social skills in order to receive accurate information through interviews and other reliable research in order to develop an objective and well-written article. Bloggers need not make any effort to relay the news; the only tools they need are the copy and paste buttons and a few subjective words of their own. Although reporting was first known as yellow journalism, a sensationalized form of news that was meant for entertainment purposes, it eventually developed into a reliable form of news. Today, society is taking a step back by believing that bloggers can be identified as respected journalists. Due to the recent evolution of the media, it has now become effortless to get immediate, reliable news updates on an iPhone or a home computer. This should relieve the hassle of having to filter out the unreliable material and deter the public from reading undependable blogs.

chrisCANALES • editor in chief

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fter many years of repetitive newspaper reporting, veteran Consumer Reports writer Trudy Lieberman was reborn in a blog. “I could be edgy, irreverent, engaging and analytical,” Lieberman said. The experience of writing for a new age, online audience was freeing, she said. All around the world, experts and Average Joes alike are turning to the internet, the most extensive form of mass communication, to spread their views and chronicle the days’ happenings in online journals dubbed blogs. This phenomenon is not new, however. With the advent of an integrated social networking, it is becoming far more widespread. The claim that blogging is ruining journalism and that blogging is fundamentally wrong because bloggers do not use facts or do not work hard for material is simply untrue in many cases. Lieberman, an experienced blogger, debunks this myth. “You’ve got to go out there and do the reporting, no matter what medium your work will appear in,” Lieberman said in Columbia Journalism Review’s Write Stuff. In reality, there are many blogs and bloggers out in the internet that report with concrete facts, and many that do not. It is up to the reader to determine whether a blog is reliable. If journalists cannot keep up with the immediacy of blogs, then they shouldn’t be journalists. There is competition between trained reporters and untrained bloggers, but this competition should elevate the level of journalism. For example, Matt Drudge was just an average citizen who broke the Lewinsky Scandal. There are even numerous blogs published by media outlets of every type, ideology and medium. Anderson Cooper from CNN has a blog, as do Diane Sawyer from ABC, Greta Van Susteren from FOX News and Brian Williams from NBC. The New York Times employs permanent bloggers who research their content and go into the field to investigate, interview, and report. Saying that bloggers like this are ruining journalism is like saying that young, unpublished poets are ruining poetry. The key to handling blogs is to use common sense. Stick to credible sources, and blogs can be a valuable source of information. Lieberman sums this up best. “It’s not about pretty writing,” she said. “It’s all about the reporting.”


OPINIONS

Juarez needs Batman

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the voice of reason With the continuation of harsh policy, administrators should respect the rights of National Day of Silence participants.

Put down the joint; be a decent human in an indecent time It is our love for the romantic, the steadfast idealism, and the unquenchable thirst for justice that has led America to a love affair with superheroes. In them, we see everything we wish we were; through their actions, we accomplish everything we wish we could do on our own. Chief among these heroes is Batman, the noble vigilante. Ever watching, ever faithful to righteousness, this man takes justice into his own hands and achieves what the rules of society cannot hope to do on their own. Gotham is not a fictional city, though it does go by another name. It drowns in its own corruption. True justice is an idea so abstract that few can comprehend it, much less wish for it. This city is Juarez. that it is harmless, you fuel the violence, murders, and bloodshed in Mexico. Sure, ith 958 killings, March 2010 blame the government for not decriminalwas Mexico’s ‘bloodiest month’ izing soft drugs, blame Mexico for letting since President Felipe Calderon corruption seep in for decades, blame Felaunched a military operation against the lipe Calderon for going to war and blame drug cartels in December 2006. The state those responsible for growing the merchanof Chihuahua accounted for the majority dise. Don’t forget, however, “unbiased, unof those deaths with 670; Juarez has been prejudiced, and fair” economics: without crowned “murder capitol of the world.” demand, supply will decrease. 
 When Harvey Dent, the fallen hero in Moreover, 95 percent of the guns emthe 2007 movie The Dark Knight proclaims, ployed in the Mexican murders were pur“You thought we could be decent men in chased in the United States. Every day of an indecent time, but you were wrong. The the week, 2,000 of these weapons are world is cruel, and the only morality in a smuggled into Mexico from the United cruel world is chance. Unbiased. Unpreju- States. It is time that the U.S. does more to diced. Fair, we close our ears and shout, regulate traffic going to Mexico instead of “Never!” because just coming in. It we still want to “Sometimes the truth isn’t good should be embarbelieve that there rassing to know enough; sometimes, can be decency in that the Mexican people deserve more.” troubling times. military and po•BATMAN in The Dark Night Even now, we lice officers are wish that a dark being shot with knight, with the power of good at his side, American guns. could deliver Juarez from the violence it is As Americans, we need to realize this facing. Unfortunately, the world does not isn’t a “Mexican” problem; it is a multihave a hero who we know will ultimately national, multi-faceted issue that ignores save the day. borders and laws. Most people don’t realize that the bigIt was Batman that said, “Sometimes the gest import in the U.S. from Mexico is mar- truth isn’t good enough; sometimes, people ijuana, and that it’s about 70 percent of the deserve more.” drugs coming from Mexico. Mexico also So go ahead, light up that “harmless” provides around 80 percent of the Ameri- drug or swallow that colored pill, but realcan methamphetamine supply, which is ize that thousands of innocent lives have used to make ecstasy. been needlessly ended because of the deMarijuana provides a 500-600 percent mand that is created when you make that return rate for the drug cartels. In more choice. Let that be on your conscience. Resimple terms: for every drug you consume, member that you have the potential to be for every joint you smoke and tell yourself Juarez’s hero. nicholasZEBROWSKI • reporter

W

cartoon by Gustavo Esquinca

chrisCANALES • editor in chief

A

lmost a year after a similar incident, students who participated in the National Day of Silence were called to the office over the loudspeaker and made to remove tape that they had placed over their mouths to raise awareness of bullying and harassment on lesbian, gay, bisexual, and transexual students and those perceived to be LGBT. Forcing the students to remove the tape was a violation of their First Amendment right, as it was not established that the each student was individually causing a classroom disruption. According to the National Day of Silence website, “You do have a right to participate in Day of Silence and other expressions of your opinion at a public school during non-instructional time: the breaks between classes, before and after the school day, lunchtime, and any other free times during your day. You do not have a right to remain silent during class time if a teacher asks you to speak.” The precedent for classroom disruption cases, established in the Tinker vs. Des Moines Supreme Court decision in 1969, makes no reference to the anticipation of classroom disruption. Making a blanket statement over the loudspeaker that applies to every student with tape on his or her mouth is not legal. It is up to each individual teacher to deem the tape a classroom disruption and send the student to the office. If this happens, the administration can make the student remove the tape; if the teacher does not deem the tape a disruption, nothing need be done. There are students who disrupt class by talking, cursing, bothering their classmates and even overtly defying their teachers. These students are generally not sent to the office for their behavior. How, then, can students be punished for sitting in silence? Perhaps the administration should consider the old adage “silence is golden” and realize that the tape is not disruptive after all. Likewise, there are students who sit in class silently each and every day who do not participate in classroom discussions or ask questions. These students are not considered classroom disruptions. The students with tape on their mouths are in the same situation. It is impossible for the administration to know that each student was individually disrupting his or her class. Taking action without such knowledge violates the rights of these students and eliminates a voice that is, after all, symbolically silent.


OPINIONS

from the desk of

10

The Grass is Always Greener Nicholas Zebrowski

As tension over immigration reform mounts, assistance for asylum seekers needs to be an important deciding factor. Zebrowski analyzes the complex situation.

nicholasZEBROWSKI• reporter

P

olicy makers have increasingly taken ethnocentric attitudes toward immigration (such as the Arizona immigration bill which arrests and deports suspected immigrants who don’t provide documentation or the States policy pushing School Districts to reassign instructors with heavy accents). The idea is to “forcefully encourage” those who are thinking about migrating illegally to go through the legal routes. In El Paso and the border regions affected by the drug war violence, the issue becomes far more muddled. Many, who flee their homes in Mexico because of death threats, extortion, or kidnapping, attempt to take the honest legal route by seeking political asylum from the violence and danger they are facing in their homes. For a lot of those people, the United States is the last hope for safety in an

increasingly unstable country. It is those who are in danger that suffer from the collateral damage. The United States needs to reform its current laws for those seeking asylum in order to more fairly assess individual petitioners’ requests. The decision to grant asylum is left to one’s discretion, but it must be made certain that the law is more lenient. Homeland Security officials and judges claim that they want to avoid triggering a system-clogging flood of asylum petitions or offending the Mexican government by ruling that it can’t protect its own citizens. Reforming the law doesn’t mean abolishing the strict screening that applicants must go through; it only means changing it to make it more comprehensive and inclusive. Homeland Security and judges who are personally against the idea of asylum to Mexican nationals must realize that although Mexico is not a failed state, those that speak out against the drug cartels face swift and violent repercussions. Moreover, the amount of corruption in the police force and abusive tendencies of the military have left ordinary citizens vulnerable to persecution. It should never be an acceptable American policy to allow such profound miscarriages of justice. Immigration is not something to be feared. If illegal immigration is to be opposed so staunchly, then a legal alternative must be allowed. Granting asylum seekers a more comprehensive process may only address a portion of the immigration issue, but it is a step in the right direction.

yourVIEWS

on the news

After the discovery of numerous scandals involving child molestation over the past four decades, the question of whether or not Catholic priests should be allowed to marry has arisen. How do you feel about the marriage of priests? Esteban Gerardo, 10

Priests should get married because I bet they get lonely, too.

Elizabeth Oyetunde, 10

They should be able to get married. It’s the natural order of things. God made men and women so they could help each other. His first priority doesn’t have to be his wife, he can still have God.

Tyler Gonnell, 10

Priests should not get married because they are supposed to donate their lives to God. There are other people reproducing and all of the kids that go to their church are part of their family.

John Osaki, substitute

It’s a natural thing for them to get married. We are always talking about companionship, so I don’t see anything wrong with it.

With the new immigration law in Arizona, the call for immigration reform is on the table. However, without Mexico’s trust or respect, our economic future looks bleak.

haydenPENDERGRASS • editor in chief

A

s part of the recent New Border Vision Forum at UTEP, Customs and Border Protection Commissioner Alan Bersin and U.S. Congress Representative Silvestre Reyes outlined the future goals of the Obama Administration in revamping border policy. Specifically, Bersin elucidated that for the United States to have a sustainable commercial corridor with Mexico, respectful dialogue and trust must be built. However, with the recent passage of the immigration bill in Arizona and the suggestion of passing similar bills in other states, this tentative trust will surely be undermined by the inherent suspicion police officers must have towards those of Latino origin. The new Arizona law requires police to make an attempt, when practicable, to determine a person’s immigration status if there is “reasonable suspicion” that the person is an illegal alien. This, at its most basic level, is racial profiling, a practice intended to strike fear into the Latino population. This fear will subsequently lead to distrust by Mexican citizens and will undermine the utilization of potentially the largest international trade zone in the world. Despite its means, the new law illuminates a growing issue: the need for comprehensive immigration policy reform. In fact, according to a recent CBS/New York Times poll, 60% of Americans feel that illegal immigration is a very serious problem. However, addressing this issue in the way Arizona has ultimately focuses on the symptoms, not the disease, and leads to side effects like distrust and bigotry. Furthermore, to address the concerns by many conservatives, the potential economic impact that a trustful relationship with Mexico could provide to the United States is quite profound. According to the Congressional Research Service, over 80% of Mexico’s exports go to the United States and over 48% of Mexico’s imports come from the United States. Most importantly, Mexico’s investment in the United States totaled $95.6 billion in 2008. The economic benefit that Mexico provides through commerce and trade could potentially assist America’s recovery from the economic recession. Thus, the establishment of a trusting and respectful dialogue between the U.S. and Mexico, separate from the prejudice of Arizona’s immigration law, is necessary. The true cure lies within the legislative abilities of Congress to not only reform our immigration policy through non-racial means, but also to facilitate the discourse necessary with Mexico to promote a secure and prosperous border. These goals rely on one condition: trusting and respectful dialogue with our southern trade partner and the benefit it will attain.


OPINIONS

11

Don’t let textbook trouble make Texas a laughingstock amandaRODRIGUEZ• copy editor

I

n a recent meeting, the Texas State set by the SBOE. Considering that Board of Education (SBOE) drafted distributors don’t tailor their books to over 100 amendments to be added individual states, not only will students to the social studies curriculum for in Texas have to learn an edited version elementary, middle and high schools. of history, but also our entire nation’s The SBOE will hold a final vote for the integrity could suffer because of the amendments at a meeting set for May SBOE’s decision.  20. Furthermore, the SBOE has no With many historians, politicians right to rewrite history. Although the and school administrators bashing the members of the SBOE are educated, current amendments, it’s obvious that they aren’t historians. the SBOE should either extend the 30 Many of them aren’t educators by day public viewing period or revamp the trade, and only one of the Republicans amendments favored the altogether to amendments has “We could find ourselves save Texas from learning more about the inventor a history degree. becoming a Anyone who of the yo-yo than the founding laughingstock in has taken a basic fathers of our country.” the educational American history community. class knows Texas is one of the leading states that Thomas Jefferson is the author in education and one of the largest of the Declaration of Independence buyers of textbooks in the nation. and an integral part of the American If the proposed amendments are Revolution. However, SBOE members passed, many of the major textbook are trying to strip Jefferson of his title distributors will have to adapt their as an inspirational writer and replace material to the curriculum set by the him with figures such as John Calvin, SBOE. This will not only affect Texas, a Protestant Reformer.  but also the entire nation. Despite members of the SBOE being Because of the two to one ratio of well educated, they lack objectivity. If Republicans to Democrats on the the SBOE keeps the date of its meeting Board, the amendments will add a as is and passes the amendments, it highly conservative tone to textbooks. will cause the Texas education system Many states don’t have a conservative to suffer. We could find ourselves mindset like Texas, and most other learning more about the inventor of states won’t be satisfied if their the yo-yo than the founding fathers of textbooks have to follow the guidelines our country.

SHOUTS&pouts

To the six UIL Academics State qualifiers—the most in the city

To the SAT fee waiver for junior students. To the baseball and softball teams advancing to playoffs. To Pride for the ILPC Gold Star award, Pacemaker Finalist and UIL Distinguished Merit.

To the expanding oil slick in the Gulf Coast. To President Barack Obama for not coming to graduation. To the 10,000 drug-related murders in Mexico since 2007. To the Times Square bomber who attempted to create a car bomb with a SUV and nonexplosive fertilizer.

the staff outlook

W

ith the implementation of zero period next year, the safety of students crossing Resler to get to early morning classes should be at the forefront of the attention of city and district officials. After all, the crosswalk that adjoins the shopping center where Walmart is located and Franklin High School is notorious for injuries. In 1998, Franklin sophomore Ashley Murphy was critically injured when a speeding car ignored the school zone and crosswalk and struck her at 45 mph. She was on her way to an early morning class. After Murphy’s injuries, several improvements were made to the Resler crosswalk and school zone shortly afterward, including the addition of overhead school zone flashers. The issue of crosswalk safety was brought into the public’s attention once again after journalism adviser Jai Tanner and junior Fernie Espinosa were hit while crossing Resler Drive at about 10:30 pm on Friday, Jan. 21 of this year. The pair was on their way to Walmart to retrieve Tanner’s car, which she had parked there earlier that day due to lack of available parking in the sanctioned lots. It was yearbook deadline, and both were planning to return to school. Whether a crosswalk is used for traversing a school’s parking lots or bridging the gap to local businesses, it is supposed to be an indication of safe road crossing. While the purpose of a crosswalk is clear, misinformation about the law and ignorance by both drivers and pedestrians have left a clouded understanding of the role of the crosswalks at school. The Resler crosswalk is very problematic, as drivers who are coming from the south near Sonic are unable to clearly see those crossing the road due to the dip and incline. Likewise, pedestrians aren’t able to see drivers, especially at night. Crosswalks around local schools need to be kept up and the rules surrounding them better enforced. A group of students and administrators is currently looking into getting grants from Walmart and other local businesses that would be used to repaint the school’s crosswalks and add more lighting to the area. The police department has also agreed to help by enforcing the area more strictly. These improvements will greatly improve the safety of the crosswalks and streets surrounding Franklin, but they alone may not be enough. For the sake of both pedestrians and drivers, more restrictive rules could also be imposed. Perhaps the speed limit on Resler could be lowered or Resler in its entirety (along which lie Coronado High, Franklin High, Kohlberg Elementary, and Brown Middle schools) could be labeled a “safety corridor” with additional fines for traffic violations. Perhaps the school zone hours could be lengthened to accommodate zero period in the early morning and Cougar Class after school. There are numerous possibilities. To make such changes possible, the city needs to hear from the community, so get contact with your city representatives. Tell them about the situation on the streets around Franklin. Tell them you would like to see done to fix the problems. Help us to ensure that the schools zones will be safe for students in the future.


bubbly fun

Gathered on the grass at Imperial Park, seniors Otto Nicli, Ivonne Aguirre, Erika Molina, junior Lauren Venzor and David Alcala, and senior Cody Voytko are some of the many who participated in the One Day Without Shoes on April 8. “The park show was amazing, having all those people together just made me see what we can accomplish just by spreading the word about something, and walking around barefoot just opened my eyes to what the lives of those who suffer are like,” Voytko said. photo by Vanessa Thai

be a goody donate running shoes karenZAMORA • features editor

W

hen sophomore Ani Mangold started track this season, she noticed something different; a fellow teammate was running in converse instead of spikes. Knowing that her teammate couldn’t afford the rather expensive spikes needed for track, she decided to lend her an old pair of hers. But she soon realized that many students who cannot afford track shoes quit the program. This gave Mangold had an idea. Along with girls’ track coach Daniel Rosales, Mangold conceived the idea of a shoe drive that will take place on May 8, on the track. “I have always been a real big fan of charity. As I was growing up, I knew I was blessed and other people weren’t. This year when we were running track someone didn’t have spikes,” Mangold said. “They are really expensive, but my teammate didn’t have [the right] shoes and it affected her performance. I realized that I have all these extras, so I told her to take mine. I figured we could do something like this on a bigger scale.” When Mangold began organizing the event, she realized that it needed a name, so she dubbed it the Debbie Chestnut “Give Back to the Track” Running Shoe Drive, in honor of El Paso track coach Debbie Chestnut who died of brain cancer several years ago. “Debbie Chestnut was the main lady who helped with the United States Track and Field Association within El Paso. It opened up different city leagues, it was a big influence in building more teams in El Paso and getting more competition,” Rosales said. ”Several years back, she was diagnosed with brain cancer, she coached all the way to her last year when she passed away. There are many athletes out there that don’t realize that summer track is in El Paso because of her.” On Friday, tables will be set up on the track with boxes corresponding to sizes and gender. Donors can drop off their useable running shoes. “A couple weeks from now, once the shoes are organized, people who need them can come pick them up. No questions asked. Those that aren’t picked up will be donated to Good Will,” Mangold said. Starting off small this year, Mangold hopes to continue with the drive next year. “Since it was chaotic getting everybody together, we wanted to keep the event small and organized,” Mangold said. “That was Debbie’s way—strict, by the book, organized all the time. We didn’t want to get in over our heads to see if we could really handle it. Depending on how well it goes this year and how well we do and it turns out, I will do it annually.”

Baring your sole, baring your feet

Give Back to the Track

karenZAMORA • features editor

W

share your sole

Holding several pairs of running shoes, sophomore Ani Mangold, brainchild of the Debbie Chestnut Give Back to the Track Running Shoe Drive, shares her love for charity and running track by creating a shoe drive that gives shoes to those who can’t afford them. photo by Briana Sanchez

alking two miles to school without the protection of shoes, senior Codey Voykto dodges stones and glass, but he is happy to make the sacrifice. He has chosen to go to school barefoot and it’s all for a good cause—TOMS One Day without Shoes. TOMS, an organization dedicated to giving back, organized its third annual day without shoes on April 8. With every pair purchased, the company donates a pair of new shoes to children in need around the world. “I was never really passionate about anything in my life before this,” Voykto said. “It’s easy to help out. You don’t have to donate money or go somewhere. All you have to do is walk around with your shows off. People will ask you why you have your shoes off According to the TOMS website, a leading cause of disease in children are soil- transmitted diseases, that can harm the skin through bare feet. But with shoes, these diseases are a hundred percent preventable. “This is such a huge problem, but so easily fixed. If everyone in America bought a pair of TOMS there wouldn’t be any more people without shoes, and hopefully tons of extra shoes. It’s just crazy how simply this problem could be fixed, and yet millions of people are dying because nobody really knows about it,” Voykto said. This year, Voykto and 40 other students participated in this nationwide event to give awareness to TOMS mission. “I’m going barefoot to help raise the awareness on what these children endure every single day,” senior Erika Molina said. “Here, everyone sees shoes as a fashion statement,

not a necessity. If they went without shoes for a day. It would really help them realize that shoes are a necessity.” For Molina, taking off her shoes for one day was an easy sacrifice. “It was definitely an eye opener,” Molina said. “I walked around all the time without shoes, but it’s always in the comfort of my own home, doing it in the outside world was rougher than it sounds. There are many hazards just

One Day Without Shoes lying on the floor and you are restricted as to where you can walk. I never realized how important and comforting shoes are.” But walking around barefoot for one day is easier said then done. “It was not necessarily painful, but the pain I experience is not nothing compared to the daily struggle those living in third world countries experience,” junior Kimball Bartlett said. “It may hurt, but it won’t leave any lasting scars or kill me, so really you just deal with it. And if I do get a scar, it will leave me with a reminder that I’m better off and there’s always someone I can help.” After school, many more gathered at the nearby Francisco Delgado Park on Imperial Ridge. There, the day’s barefoot festivities continued with several performances from local acoustic bands.

“All the bands helped raised awareness,” senior Ben Balusek said. “Today meant fun, friends, and making music.” But when the day came to an end, some endured blisters, cuts, scrapes, and bruises, but for Voytko, the satisfaction of the outcome of this event proved much more than just withstanding pain for one day. “It was amazing to know that I could do this. I was so overcome with joy when this all started coming together,” Voykto said. “I’m glad that there were people there to support it. I know that I will continue to do this every year. I’m actually trying to get an internship at TOMS so hopefully that will help me to be able to promote more people to lending a hand. I hope to do this for the rest of my life, or until this problem is solved. I have a new appreciation for shoes and the life I have because of this.”


bubbly fun

Gathered on the grass at Imperial Park, seniors Otto Nicli, Ivonne Aguirre, Erika Molina, junior Lauren Venzor and David Alcala, and senior Cody Voytko are some of the many who participated in the One Day Without Shoes on April 8. “The park show was amazing, having all those people together just made me see what we can accomplish just by spreading the word about something, and walking around barefoot just opened my eyes to what the lives of those who suffer are like,” Voytko said. photo by Vanessa Thai

be a goody donate running shoes karenZAMORA • features editor

W

hen sophomore Ani Mangold started track this season, she noticed something different; a fellow teammate was running in converse instead of spikes. Knowing that her teammate couldn’t afford the rather expensive spikes needed for track, she decided to lend her an old pair of hers. But she soon realized that many students who cannot afford track shoes quit the program. This gave Mangold had an idea. Along with girls’ track coach Daniel Rosales, Mangold conceived the idea of a shoe drive that will take place on May 8, on the track. “I have always been a real big fan of charity. As I was growing up, I knew I was blessed and other people weren’t. This year when we were running track someone didn’t have spikes,” Mangold said. “They are really expensive, but my teammate didn’t have [the right] shoes and it affected her performance. I realized that I have all these extras, so I told her to take mine. I figured we could do something like this on a bigger scale.” When Mangold began organizing the event, she realized that it needed a name, so she dubbed it the Debbie Chestnut “Give Back to the Track” Running Shoe Drive, in honor of El Paso track coach Debbie Chestnut who died of brain cancer several years ago. “Debbie Chestnut was the main lady who helped with the United States Track and Field Association within El Paso. It opened up different city leagues, it was a big influence in building more teams in El Paso and getting more competition,” Rosales said. ”Several years back, she was diagnosed with brain cancer, she coached all the way to her last year when she passed away. There are many athletes out there that don’t realize that summer track is in El Paso because of her.” On Friday, tables will be set up on the track with boxes corresponding to sizes and gender. Donors can drop off their useable running shoes. “A couple weeks from now, once the shoes are organized, people who need them can come pick them up. No questions asked. Those that aren’t picked up will be donated to Good Will,” Mangold said. Starting off small this year, Mangold hopes to continue with the drive next year. “Since it was chaotic getting everybody together, we wanted to keep the event small and organized,” Mangold said. “That was Debbie’s way—strict, by the book, organized all the time. We didn’t want to get in over our heads to see if we could really handle it. Depending on how well it goes this year and how well we do and it turns out, I will do it annually.”

Baring your sole, baring your feet

Give Back to the Track

karenZAMORA • features editor

W

share your sole

Holding several pairs of running shoes, sophomore Ani Mangold, brainchild of the Debbie Chestnut Give Back to the Track Running Shoe Drive, shares her love for charity and running track by creating a shoe drive that gives shoes to those who can’t afford them. photo by Briana Sanchez

alking two miles to school without the protection of shoes, senior Codey Voykto dodges stones and glass, but he is happy to make the sacrifice. He has chosen to go to school barefoot and it’s all for a good cause—TOMS One Day without Shoes. TOMS, an organization dedicated to giving back, organized its third annual day without shoes on April 8. With every pair purchased, the company donates a pair of new shoes to children in need around the world. “I was never really passionate about anything in my life before this,” Voykto said. “It’s easy to help out. You don’t have to donate money or go somewhere. All you have to do is walk around with your shows off. People will ask you why you have your shoes off According to the TOMS website, a leading cause of disease in children are soil- transmitted diseases, that can harm the skin through bare feet. But with shoes, these diseases are a hundred percent preventable. “This is such a huge problem, but so easily fixed. If everyone in America bought a pair of TOMS there wouldn’t be any more people without shoes, and hopefully tons of extra shoes. It’s just crazy how simply this problem could be fixed, and yet millions of people are dying because nobody really knows about it,” Voykto said. This year, Voykto and 40 other students participated in this nationwide event to give awareness to TOMS mission. “I’m going barefoot to help raise the awareness on what these children endure every single day,” senior Erika Molina said. “Here, everyone sees shoes as a fashion statement,

not a necessity. If they went without shoes for a day. It would really help them realize that shoes are a necessity.” For Molina, taking off her shoes for one day was an easy sacrifice. “It was definitely an eye opener,” Molina said. “I walked around all the time without shoes, but it’s always in the comfort of my own home, doing it in the outside world was rougher than it sounds. There are many hazards just

One Day Without Shoes lying on the floor and you are restricted as to where you can walk. I never realized how important and comforting shoes are.” But walking around barefoot for one day is easier said then done. “It was not necessarily painful, but the pain I experience is not nothing compared to the daily struggle those living in third world countries experience,” junior Kimball Bartlett said. “It may hurt, but it won’t leave any lasting scars or kill me, so really you just deal with it. And if I do get a scar, it will leave me with a reminder that I’m better off and there’s always someone I can help.” After school, many more gathered at the nearby Francisco Delgado Park on Imperial Ridge. There, the day’s barefoot festivities continued with several performances from local acoustic bands.

“All the bands helped raised awareness,” senior Ben Balusek said. “Today meant fun, friends, and making music.” But when the day came to an end, some endured blisters, cuts, scrapes, and bruises, but for Voytko, the satisfaction of the outcome of this event proved much more than just withstanding pain for one day. “It was amazing to know that I could do this. I was so overcome with joy when this all started coming together,” Voykto said. “I’m glad that there were people there to support it. I know that I will continue to do this every year. I’m actually trying to get an internship at TOMS so hopefully that will help me to be able to promote more people to lending a hand. I hope to do this for the rest of my life, or until this problem is solved. I have a new appreciation for shoes and the life I have because of this.”


FEATURES

celebrating

“Earth Day worked because of the spotaneous response at the grassroots level. We had neither the time nor resources to organize 20 million demonstrators and the thousands of schools and local communities that participated. That was the remarkable thing about Earth Day. It organized itself,” Senator Gaylord Nelson, founder of Earth Day

14

day 40 years later

amandaRODRIGUEZ• copy editor

O

Playing his bass for Ashes of Angels, freshman Jorge Aburto and his band was one of the several bands that performed electrically at the fair. Gathered in matrimony, seniors Steven Tavera and Veronica Marinelarena take part in a mock ceremony sponored by the Spanish National Honor Society. Drumming along to the beat, senior Josiah Dowdy performs with Seventh Calvary. Perfecting her face painting techniques, junior Natalia Bustamante concentrates as she paints a heart shaped earth on someone’s face. all photos by Briana Sanchez

ver 700 students gathered on April 21 to listen to local bands, participate in games, and learn about the environment to celebrate the 40th anniversary of Earth Day. While the games and stages were entertainment-based, many students got the chance to learn about different environmental issues. “The students care about the Earth,” science teacher and Environmental Issues Club sponsor Debra Gilbert said. “Our students are activists, they have strong concerns about what the Earth’s going to be like in their future, and I think they want to learn more.” The past two Earth Day fairs were created and headed by former student Nessly Torres, but this year the fair was taken over by a new eco-friendly leader.  “I never took part in the first Earth Day; this is kind of Nessly Torres’ brain child, but last year I got involved. I became president of Spanish National Honor Society and I was the only junior president within Science Club, Spanish National Honor Society and Environmental Issues,” senior Karen Zamora said. “Nessly Torres took me under her wing and said, ‘This is what you’re going to do next year.’ I took it over and the event has continued to grow.” Although Earth Day was April 22, members of Spanish National Honor Society, French Honor Society, Environmental Issues Club and Science club decided to hold the fair the day before due to scheduling conflicts with the end of the grading period. “It’s always been on Earth Day, but Thursday and Friday were six weeks tests,” Zamora said. “We had a meeting with other organizations, the presidents and the sponsors. We figured that we didn’t want to get into the mess of asking permission to see if we could have it on a six weeks test [day].” The fair was also set for April 21 because sponsors didn’t want to have to contend with other festivities set up for the Earth Day’s 40th anniversary. “This was the 40th anniversary of Earth Day, and we knew there would be a lot of other things going on and we didn’t want to compete with those things,” Gilbert said. Holding the fair the day before Earth Day made it possible to enlist more sponsors

that were already booked, but because sponsorships weren’t approved on time, the fair was put together using donations by clubs, not businesses.  “We did have a problem getting sponsors,” Zamora said. “We spent a lot of out of pocket money and that’s where donations come in, [but] we didn’t get them approved on time. There were a lot of things that fell short.” Even though donations fell short, three businesses provided materials which helped make the fair successful. “Freeport McMoran Copper & Gold donated all the t-shirts, Westside Pizza donated pizzas, and Texas Parks and Wildlife provided the trunks which we built the display boards of for the environmental part of the fair,” Gilbert said. One of the new additions to the fair was a second stage for bands to perform. Bands that signed up to play at the fair were able to choose whether they wanted to play an acoustic set or a set with amps, microphones and speakers. “We had more people who were interested in performing than in previous years,” Gilbert said. “Unfortunately, we don’t have the ability to have two stages that are hooked up to electricity so we had one that was an acoustic stage and then we had one for the bands that needed electricity.” Zamora believes that a large portion of the crowd that attended the fair was drawn in by the bands but stayed to participate in the other activities. “If we didn’t have the bands, I don’t think we would have had a great turnout because people have to pay money to participateand to go play games, but the bands are free,” Zamora said. The money gained at the fair is used to reimburse the clubs who paid to get it off the ground, and the rest will be used to fund future Earth Day fairs. “Whatever we have leftover, we are keeping it to continue financing the Earth Day fair. We don’t give money anywhere, we don’t make a profit, we don’t keep it for our own, [and] we don’t pay for banquets,” Zamora said. “It’s an ongoing cycle of making money, replenishing what we lost and keep building the Earth Day fair. In essence, it’s recycling.”


FEATURES TANNER’S INJURIES On the night of the accident, junior Fernando Espinosa suffered brain injuries, has blood clots and is on Coumadin, a blood thinner, indefinitely. Upon impact with the car, his head hit and broke the windshield. photo by Karina Soares

EGAR aBRIN amand or res edit • featu

In the accident, Tanner suffered a broken tibia and fibula, and now has seven inches of titanium in her leg, along with 15 pins.

k s i r n ? w e o r er gam g u g o o r f y or

t lk a s rosswa c s l o o o r h Sc C It takes 42 steps to reach Walmart from Franklin’s curbside. They only took 38. At 10:30 at night, journalism adviser Jai Tanner and junior Fernie Espinosa found themselves thrown across Resler like two rag dolls. “When we got to the cross walk, we looked both ways. Then we stopped again and looked both ways and a car was by Sonic, and since that was a good ways away, we decided to cross,” Espinosa said. “Two thirds of the way, I heard the noise of the car hitting the wet pavement and that made me look to my right and the car was already right there. And the lights…it was just so quick.” One moment, Tanner was engaged in conversation, crossing the white-lined street, and next, she is face down on pavement, leg twisted, asphalt chafing against her cheek. “It happened so fast. Right before the car hit us, there is that split second where you are aware of what’s about to happen and that’s when Fernie pushed me out of the way. Then I saw him in my peripheral vision, and he was running, and then I just thought, ‘Oh God, I’ve got to run,’” Tanner said. “Then at some point the car hit me. Then suddenly I was lying in the middle of Resler. We were maybe three feet from the curb, if even that far.” Only moments before, Tanner

and Espinosa were sitting in rolling chairs, working on Macintosh computers for yearbook deadline. The night was coming to an end and Tanner remembered that she had parked at Walmart because there were no available spaces at school that morning. She asked Espinosa to step out into the rainy night and escort her across the street. And that’s where their night really began. “I remember everything; it was a very visual experience. I remember the reflection of the light on the pavement, I remember seeing my shoe and sock lying several feet away,” Tanner said. “I looked down and saw my foot was turned like an S. It was backwards.” Although Tanner says she remembers everything, the police did not interview her or Espinosa. That was one of the many mistakes they made that night. “There was the allegation that we were both unconscious, far from it. In a case like this, you remember everything,” Tanner said. “The first police report was terribly erroneous. They had my first and last name completely wrong, not even remotely right. The police never interviewed me or Fernie, and when my husband questioned this later on, we were told that it was because we were unconscious, which was never the case.” This is not the only outcome of the night that eats away at Tanner. “Unfortunately, it really es-

15 capes me why there was no ticket given because according to Texas State Law, whenever you hit a person in a crosswalk, regardless of any circumstances, you are at fault. It is frustrating, because it makes you wonder you about your value as a human being,” Tanner said. “Are you not even worth a traffic ticket? If I go and I park illegally, I’m going to get a ticket. If I drive a too fast, I’m going to get a ticket. If I park on my lawn, I would get a citation, and yet you can run over two human beings and you don’t get a ticket? It defies all logic.” Even the driver involved in the accident, senior Daniel Salas, was surprised by the lack of repercussions. “[The police] asked me all of my information and told me that they were going to make a report and told me to call them and that was it,” Salas said. “I thought I was going to go to jail to tell you the truth, but the cop said it was all fine, and that it would just go down as an accident.” But it isn’t all fine. Tanner has a broken tibia and fibula and Espinosa suffered a concussion and has two blood clots behind his kneecap. Both have ongoing medical issues. However, this is far from an isolated incident. In 1999 another student , Ashley Murphy, was hit at the same crosswalk about 6:55 in the morning on her way to zero period. She suffered serious head injuries. There have been seven pedestrian deaths in the city of El Paso just this year alone. “Do drivers think about the fact that they are operating a deadly weapon?” Tanner said. “Until you think of your car like that, you can’t be fully cautious.” Special Education teacher Susan Preslar has witnessed this indifference first hand. When she takes her students to Walmart as part of their curriculum to practice life skills, it is almost as if they have been dropped into a game of frogger. Crossing with 10 students, Preslar often feels like the crosswalk can be like a war zone. “We go during class time, so there is not a crossing guard and there is not a school zone during that time. I have to walk out in front of my class, which is difficult because they all want to

be right next to me, but I have to make them wait and have to make sure that the cars stop in each lane. Even if one car stops, or two lanes stop, sometimes even the third lane will just zoom by,” Preslar said. “Once a guy in a truck yelled ‘Hurry up!’ at my visually impaired student that walks with a cane.” Security guard Gilbert Flores sees the same lack of caution every day at lunchtime. ‘There are a lot of close calls because the kids or the drivers aren’t paying attention,” Flores said. “Even though we have that cell phone ban, you still see people on their cell phone not paying attention and almost hitting a kid.” Preslar believes that before school, after school and lunchtime are not the only times the school should worry about. “It was better when they had blinking lights, because most of the people did slow down for the school zone. Now there is nothing to stop them. The speed limit is 40, but I think they are going about 60,” Preslar said. Not everyone crosses the street before and after school and at lunchtime, so I don’t know why a short area around every school is not a school zone all day long.” No matter the time of day or the incident, all involved agree that something has to be done. “The fact is, that kids go to these schools. Don’t we owe them the courtesy of safety? Wouldn’t the tax payers say this is something worthwhile?” Tanner said. “How much do we value the lives of our students? We say we don’t have money for improvements, but we have rethink that.” Some options that have been suggested that the city and EPISD shook their heads at include an overpass bridge, more lights around crosswalks, and keeping school zones functional during the entire school day and during school functions. “I know that the [city] wants EPISD to foot part of the bill, so money is always an issue. It is unfortunate, but I hope it is not going to take a tragedy before something does happen,” Preslar said. “I think that when people walk out into a crosswalk, they feel protected. They believe those while lines protect them, but they don’t.”


FEATURES

16

Ecstacy originally came about as an appetite surpresor (a form of diatery supplement) created by a German pharmaceutical company in 1912. It didn’t really hit the streets until the early 1980s, when a group of chemists began manufacturing the drug in tablet form and selling it to party goers. photo illustration by Briana Sanchez

Ecstacy rises among teens rhiannaTAPIA• reporter

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he sight of glow sticks whizzing by her face and the sound of the music beating in her ears moves her body to another place, another planet entirely. She touches the lining of her shirt and suddenly feels like she’s part of the cotton. But she’s interrupted by a tight grasp on her arm and a firm voice shouting, “Follow me outside.” Confused, Jillian* yanks her arm back, but the grip is constricted, locking her in place. “I’m the manager of the club. Now, I said. Outside,” the voice demands. Panic begins to consume Jillian, but she realizes she’s in deep when an officer walks up to her and asks, “What are you on?” “Ecstasy,” is the only answer she can manage before she breaks into tears. Jillian is not alone. The use of ecstasy is on the rise both locally and nationally. According to the National Institute on Drug Abuse, ecstasy, otherwise known as MDMA is a synthetic drug with amphetamine-like and hallucinogenic properties, and is classified as a stimulant. Its initial effects are mental stimulation, enhanced sensory perception and an increase in energy, but health effects can include nausea, sweating, teeth grinding, muscle cramping and blurred vision. In street lingo, the use of ecstasy is often called rolling. “I remember the first time I rolled, I felt my emotions [overwhelming me],” Jim* said.

“It’s kind of like fast food. You know it isn’t healthy for you, but you eat it anyway. [I’m] just like the people giving out the fast food; they know it’s bad but don’t feel guilty.” • student drug dealer “When you’re rolling, you feel a lot depending on what you’re doing or what mood you’re in, but you also sweat because your body develops a high fever from the drugs. You can become dehydrated from taking ‘X’ too, but you shouldn’t drink too much water because you can drown yourself.” In addition to being a frequent user of ecstasy, Jim also sells it. “I sell for the same reason everyone else sells, the money,” Kim said. “I feel like I’m addicted, and I actually plan on stopping. Since I owe money to my dealer, I’m just going to sell the rest of what I have and pay him off.” Student dealer Clarence* says that in a good week, he can sell up to 300 pills. “The most I’ve made in a week is around a thousand dollars,” Clarence said. “I started selling in September of last year, and it seemed like an easy way to make money. Now I buy a lot of pills and give them to people to sell for me, but selling directly makes more money for me.” According to drugabuse.gov, in 2008, an

estimated 5.2% (roughly 12.9 million) people 12 years of age or older consumed MDMA in some form. In 2009, the use of ecstasy use decreased by 1.3%, but is expected to increase in 2010. This past semester, a student was caught under the influence in speech and debate teacher Kimberly Falco’s classroom. “I did not know what she was on, but she was acting different than usual,” Falco said. “She was much more talkative and giggly, and she was out of her chair a lot and was making odd statements. At one point, she came to me and asked for a band-aid because she had cut her hand and was bleeding. I took her to the nurse because of the odd behavior and the cut hand.” Taking any form of MDMA can cause extreme long-term effects such as confusion, depression, sleep deprivation, addiction to drugs, severe anxiety, paranoia, depletion of serotonin and memory, and death. “I’ve forgotten so much. I actually have a terrible short-term memory because I’ve been rolling for over a year and a half,” Jim said. “Sometimes I’ll sit in class and I can’t remember what I did at lunch.” Since dealers sell at schools and clubs, they must find a way to hide the merchandise. “When you buy it, it comes in a little package and for girls you just stick it in your bra. It’s the easiest way to do it,” Jillian said. “If you’re still scared that you’re going to get caught, you stick it in the center of the cup of the bra. Sometimes they pull your bra out to make sure the pills don’t drop. So what I’ve done before was put it in my pants where the belt buckle is.” Even with a hiding place, if a person is caught with ecstasy the consequences can range from a $2,000 fine and/or two years in prison to a $50,000 fine and/or life imprisonment. However, many dealers realize that possession will get them arrested and fined, but the use of the drug will not, so they have a simple solution if they are caught—swallowing the merchandise. “I’ve sold hundreds of pills and I’ve never been caught selling,” Clarence said. “I only ever carry enough so that I can eat them.” Despite the toll that drugs can take on a single being, Clarence believes that the money he makes is well worth the health of another. “It’s their choice and responsibility to take the pills,” Clarence said. “I just give it to them. I don’t feel guilty for giving it to them. It’s kind of like fast food. You know it isn’t healthy for you, but you eat it anyway. [I’m] just like the people giving out the fast food; they know it’s bad, but they don’t feel guilty.” * Names have been changed to protect privacy


ENTERTAINMENT

17 Theatre troupe to perform comedy, The Last Night of Ballyhoo sydneyRAY • reporter

A Presenting a blood-drenched palm, the subjects of Yuh’s pieces are commonly shown in dramatic colors. Yuh’s sculptures are a gnarly, gorgonlike aggregate of caricatural heads and figures, with animals, flowers and sometimes fangs or horns. Yuh can use up to 14 layers of glaze, which causes the dripping effect and meshing of colors when the pieces are fired in the kiln. photo by Gustavo Esquincas

Ceramic artist bases work on Korean, Buddhist and Christian art hae rinMA • reporter

this flower, Yuh conveys the peace t first glance, artist Sunkoo that humans yearn for amongst the Yuh’s sculptures may seem chaos that surrounds the world. freakish and mindboggling. Yuh plays with the idea of reinIt’s as if the viewer is gaping at an carnation by incorporating ceramic enormous puzzle, difficult to deci- dogs, fish and angels. It is not uncompher; however, the answer is actual- mon to see dripping blood and devly quite simple. Every detail in Yuh’s il-like creatures in his art. He molds superbly crafted work bleeds the the faces of people in his sculptures essence of humanity’s hopes, greed with sour and pompous expressions. and desires. In one instance, he portrays a soldier The Koreanstanding next born artist, to stacks of Sunkoo Yuh, gold with lo“He connects hell and exhibits his tus and a devil reincarnation in nearly Seasons collecbehind him. tion at UTEP’s Yuh uses these every piece, using Rubin Art Galtwo contrasts, symbols to portray lery, including the lotus and human nature.” several of his devil, to repceramic sculpresent the evil tures and drawand peace in ings. Yuh’s specialty is in ceramic art war. In every war, people seek peace, and sculpture, based mostly on Ko- however Yuh presents the irony of rean, Buddhist and Christian art. He the situation; so many people go connects hell and reincarnation in through violence and agony in order nearly every piece, using symbols to to achieve peace. portray human nature. In looking at Yuh’s work, the viewIn Yuh’s work, viewers often have er becomes a psychologist, finding to start from the center of the piece themselves pondering on why he and either work upwards or down- connects certain objects with entirewards, depending on where their cu- ly different things. Yuh’s Seasons exriosity takes them. Yuh uses the base hibition is definitely an eye-opener of his sculptures to represent hell, to a different way of viewing the huthe center to demonstrate human life man species. It succeeds in allowing and ascends to the top, to parallel his audience to engage in a medium the idea of heaven. of art we are not used to; and in this Further, Yuh commonly uses the case, it’s a good thing. lotus in his art, a flower considered The Seasons exhibition will be pure and peaceful in many cultures, open to the public from April 15 to yet it grows amid dirty waters. From Aug. 7 at UTEP’s Rubin Gallery.

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s the last theatrical production of the year, The Last Night of Ballyhoo by Alfred Uhry will open on May 19 and will play through May 22. The production, a comedy that takes place in the home of a German-Jewish family living in Atlanta, contains a serious underlying message. Uhry, who also wrote Driving Miss Daisy, is known for illustrating the Jewish American experience in the South. In The Last Night of Ballyhoo, the family is so assimilated to Gentile society that they have a Christmas tree in their living room.  “They are not your typical family, but they still manage to be close and care about each other,” director John Poteat said. The story is set during the Christmas holidays in 1939, and Ballyhoo, a Southern Jewish social event, is quickly approaching. A socially awkward Lala Levy (junior Sydney Ray) finds herself without a date for the dance on the last night. Her widowed mother Boo Levy (senior Mary Rochford) constantly pushes her daughter toward the wealthy and obnoxious Peachy Weil (junior Gilbert Bauman) but Lala isn’t going for it. Aunt Boo’s widowed sister-in-law, Reba Freitag (senior Shelbie Ponder), is easy-going and kindhearted. Reba’s daughter, Sunny Freitag (sophomore Casey McCool) is Lala’s smart, beautiful cousin who thinks Ballyhoo isn’t worth her time.  All these women live with businessman relative Adolf Freitag (junior Seth Beltran). Adolf runs the family business and hires a Russian Jewish man named Joe Farkas (junior Sebastian Orozco) whom he brings home for dinner one night. As the story unfolds, it highlights the difficulties that come with being a member of a minority and the social pressures that can occur with discrimination, while still inspiring many jokes and laughs.  “People like a variety,” Poteat said. “It was time for something lighter, but with a message.”

Portraying their characters sophomore Quinn Lara, juniors Sebastian Orozco, Gilbert Bauman-Flores, Seth Beltran, senior Shelbie Ponder, sophomore Casey McCool, senior Mary Rochford, and junior Sydney Ray bond at rehearsal. photo by Briana Sanchez


ENTERTAINMENT

18 “I got to thinkin’ o’ yew. I knowed sudden I loved ye yet, an’ allus would love ye!” • Eben Cabot

star-crossed lovers

Prior to their arrest, Sebastian Orozco (Eben) embraces Mary Rochford (Abbie) as cast members junior Ian Baker (Sheriff) and sophomore Michael Medrano (Old Farmer) look on. photo by Briana Sanchez

Despite superb acting, sets, Desire needs time to develop meganCAHALAN • reporter natalieFELSEN • reporter

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he rocky scenery of “Desire under the Elms” reflects the toughness of its owners, who are ultimately unchanging. Yet, like rocks, the Cabots wear away under unerring currents of emotion; or, instead, when under pressure, they shatter. This version of Eugene O’Neill’s work centers the action on the tense familial relations between the Cabots. The patriarch Ephraim (junior Seth Beltran) ignites a jealous fuse within his son Eben (junior Sebastian Orozco) when he remarries magnetic Abbie (senior Mary Rochford). Abbie at first covets the rocky family farm, which legally belongs to Eben; yet her desire for flesh supersedes her desire for land when she allows her romantic tendencies toward Eben to emerge. The set faithfully replicates a rural New England farm – indeed, the furniture looks like it dates back to 1850. A single, lonely elm branch hangs over the stage, further adding to the pastoral effect. The golden lighting is dimmed just enough to express the emotion of the scene while still putting the cast in the spotlight. Somber music is played in between each of the short scenes, setting the mood for the audience. Director John Poteat condensed the two-anda-half-hour play into a mere forty minutes - an action never attempted by any other director during the century-long history of UIL competition. As such, the scenes we see are inevitably emo-

tionally charged. The actors manage to surpass the high standards; Rochford, certainly deserving of her Best Actress award from the UIL Zone division and All Star Cast award from District, delivers a riveting performance, utilizing many skills in her vast arsenal to maintain an aura of purity even during traumatic times. Orozco, who earned Best Actor at Zone and Honorable Mention All Star Cast at District, delves into the emotional complexities of his character with enthusiasm and never fails to communicate his passion to the audience. Yet Beltran, two-time winner of Honorable Mention All Star Cast, is truly arresting - his voice alone, so authentically resonant, is marvelous enough; but Beltran becomes the epitome of the rock of the family, who, though aged, will not surrender leadership quietly. While the play had many pleasant moments, some elements were distracting. The cast talks rapidly in several parts, making it difficult to comprehend the storyline. The beginning is a hodgepodge of jumbled words; the only discernable sound is a shout of “bacon.” Since the play is only a single act, every moment is a major one; there is no time to relax and take in what’s happening. The action happens so quickly that it is difficult for the audience to emotionally build up to the ending and see certain relationships grow. The “desire” mentioned in the title is indeed manifold. Tragically, when those sensual desires supplant empirical reason, the shaky familial foundation explosively cracks.

rocky relations

After his son and wife are taken to jail, Seth Beltran (Ephraim) sits to collect himself; he has become a broken man. • In town, senior Andrew Beckman (Old Man) and Michael Medrano (Old Farmer) gossip about Eben and Abbie’s affair. • Lost in thought, sophomore Quinn Lara (Peter) envisions leaving the farm to mine gold in California. all photos by Briana Sanchez


ENTERTAINMENT

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Nightmare on Elm Street: Remake should have been left six feet under meganCAHALAN • reporter

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t’s difficult to live up to a classic. But with the remake of the 1984 film, A Nightmare on Elm Street, hope returned for the comeback of the horror movie. But hope died quicker than the victims on the screen. The newer reboot has everything a scary movie could ask for: eerie background music, a creepy setting and a gratuitous amount of blood. However, while the remake meets the criteria for horror films, it falls short of the nail-biting, teeth-gritting nature of the original. Directed by Samuel Bayer, the film follows the infamous horror icon Freddy Krueger (Jackie Earle Haley) as he warps the dreams of various teenagers to the point where they can’t distinguish reality from nightmare. However, despite the fact that the movie is a remake, there are few similarities. In the opening scene, the story line varies from the original. The characters have completely different names, aside from the lead character, Nancy (Rooney Mara), Krueger’s favorite victim.  The tone of the remake is more serious than the original, and the story line added depth and motivation to the mystery of Freddy Krueger’s identity, while still finding the time to acknowledge a typical teenage love story between Nancy and the other lead, Quentin (Kyle Gallner).  The drastic changes between the films make it difficult to compare the two, almost as though they were completely different stories. The film reveals the obvious fact that technology has indeed  advanced since 1984. Complete with a more frightening Freddy and exceptional visual effects, it almost gives the impression of authenticity. Add that to the much-improved acting skills of the cast, and the film is almost on par with the original. Despite that, the film has its fair share of predictable moments, providing the viewer with enough notice as to when a terrifying occurrence is about  to  pop  around the corner. It focuses a little too much on the emotion of the characters, forgetting momentarily that it’s a horror movie, rather than a drama. Those who love a decent horror film won’t necessarily be disappointed. While the movie doesn’t leave an impression, it’s  still mildly entertaining. Lesson to be learned? Don’t disturb the dead, and don’t remake a classic unless you’re prepared to face the consequences.

Haunting a victim’s dreams, Krueger arouses terror in an old, abandoned preschool. The role of Krueger was played by Oscar winner Jackie Earle Haley. photo courtesy of www.itsathrallworld.com

KICK-ASS: NASTY & NERDY Good-time gore makes geeks cool again camiGONZALEZ• reporter

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iving up to its name, Kick-Ass is a delightful merging of action and comedy. This movie is a hard-hitting, bone crunching, blood splattering good time, as only celluloid can deliver. Originally a graphic novel written by Mark Millar and illustrated by John Romita Jr., Kick-Ass was brought to the silver screen by writer/director Matthew Vaughn. The rights to a film version of the comic book were sold before the first issue was published. The comic and the script were written at the same time in a collaborative process between Vaughn and Millar. Kick-Ass tells the story of teenage nerd, Dave Lizewski (Aaron Johnson), who only wonders why there are no superheroes in the world. Lizewski and his friends are reminiscent of a Saturday night movie marathon of Revenge of the Nerds. After fantasizing about how it would feel to be a superhero, Lizewski decides that he’s had enough of wondering. Dressed in a green wet suit under his regular clothes—like Superman and Spider-Man before him—he transforms into Kick-Ass. But little does he know that his good intentions have pulled him into a much more dangerous reality. Johnson delivers a charming performance. But, the true gem in this story is Hit-Girl, played by 13-year-old Chloë Moretz. Hit-Girl could easily be the most entertaining superhero ever. She’s brutal, tougher than nails, delivers incredible dialogue, and is only 11-years-old. Moretz undertook most of her own stunts as well. Hit-

Girl is the most enjoyable character of the film and steals every scene. While the film was side-splittingly hilarious and the adrenaline pumped action scenes will satisfy any action junkie, there are still some flaws that could’ve been avoided. The story line, the dialogue, and the acting were all top notch. The cast is where things took a downward spiral. Surprisingly, the problems lie within Nicolas Cage (Big Daddy).

Dressed in a green wet suit under his regular clothes—like Superman and Spider-Man before him—the teenage nerd Dave transforms into Kick-Ass. Though, as of late, his recent track record hasn’t been impressive, Cage was the best he’s been in a long time until the end. Also, Christopher Mintz-Plasse (Red Mist), who has only been in a handful of films, manages to play McLovin in every one of them. Right now he seems to have this repertoire going where he plays the same character over and over again. Besides those minor setbacks, KickAss is an incredible movie. The story line takes a few unexpected turns, but these are enjoyable and only add to the entertainment value of the film. Kick-Ass could very well be one of the funniest films to come out of 2010 so far. best films to come out of 2010

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SPORTS

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Freshman Lindsay Osborn hits a backhand during practice. Osborn was the only freshman in the semifinals at the regional tournament. photo by Lisa Webb

Freshman makes regionals sydneyRAY • reporter

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reshman Lindsay Osborn was the school’s only tennis player to earn a regional qualifying spot this April. She was 4 and 1 at the district tournament, taking out Montwood and a former regional qualifier from El Dorado for the regionals spot. Osborn traveled to Lubbock to represent the school at the regional tournament in girl’s singles. “It was a really good experience to see where all the competition was,” Osborn said. “I got to see where I needed to be in the next few years if I want to reach my goals.” Osborn was technically third place in the district tournament, but events worked in her favor when Montwood won second place. Since Osborn had not met Montwood in the course of the tournament, an additional match was played to determine which player would advance to regionals. Though exhausted from two long matches, Osborn defeated Montwood to earn the trip. “The best part was seeing my team running on the court [after I won],” Osborn said. “It really sank in when I saw how excited everyone was.” Osborn won her first round against Arlington Martin High at the regional tournament in Lubbock, but lost the next match to the number 3 tournament seed from Duncanville. “It was weird not having my team [in Lubbock] for support,” Osborn said. “They always talk to me and take the pressure off.” Coach Samantha Isaac is proud of Osborn for being a competitor all the way to the end. “She fell down during a point, but she still fought and gave everything she had,” Isaac said. “She proved to me, and hopefully to herself, that she is a competitor.” Isaac hopes that Osborn will take the knowledge and experience she gained back to the team to help and inspire them in the future. “It is a huge deal for a freshman to be at regionals,” Isaac said. “The experience she gains this year and brings back to her team is going to help us next year.”

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SPORTS

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Varsity boys’ track team wins district, prepares for regionals anthonyZARAGOZA •sports editor

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he varsity boys’ track team has taken the title of district champions for the third consecutive year after winning the District 1-5A Track and Field Championships at Coronado on April15-17. The team tied with Eastwood with a score of 133 points, while Montwood finished in third place with 90 points. “We had two back-to-back district championships, so going into the meet we felt not only motivation, but a sense of responsibility to defend that title,” senior Victor Mendez said. “We wanted to keep that streak going for the people who did it before us.” For head coach Kelly Hady, the seniors’ experience and their drive to succeed in their final high school season was invaluable to the team’s title run. “My seniors really took over and became the leaders of the team, and helped motivate the team during the training,” Hady said. “[Senior] David Sambrano, one of our distance runners, really took over and helped all of the younger kids, which is why we called him Coach Sambrano.” Things started off slowly for the team, as they could not get better than fifth in their first three events. However, this changed when Mendez finished third in the 400-meter dash. This result gave the team momentum, and senior Manny Lopez was able to earn second in the 800 meter run with a time of 2:00.5, followed by Sambrano earning second in both the 1600 meter run (4:34.46) and the 3200 meter run (10:05.47). “Going into this meet, we were the underdogs, and people didn’t really think we had a shot to win it,” Mendez said. “However, everything happened exactly as we needed it to going into the final race, and when we finished and saw we did what we had to do to tie for the top spot, it felt great.” As the team slowly, but surely, began racking up the points, the afternoon eventually belonged to senior Andres Estrada, who has earned over 100 track medals in his career including over 30 this season, finished first in the 4 x 100 meter relay and the long jump, second in the triple jump, fourth in the 4 x 200 meter relay, and seventh in the 200-meter dash, earning his team a combined total of 32 points. “Of course it takes hard work and dedication to get where we are, but it also takes more than that,” Estrada said. “You have to cooperate and be willing to sacrifice if you want to get far.” Despite all of his accomplishments throughout high school, including being a part of each of the district championship team since his sophomore year, Estrada is hesitant about his chances of running track in college. “I am hoping to run track at UTEP, even though I don’t know if I am good enough to get a scholarship,” Estrada said. “I have been contacting them, and according to their standards, they say I haven’t done very well. I hope to walk on the team and really make an impression on them.” The top three finishers from each event qualified for the regional meet held at Texas Tech in Lubbock. Hady explains what the team is doing to prepare the seniors for regionals and state in their last high school season. “We are basically just fine-tuning the seniors, because the rest of our team is all underclassmen,” Hady said. “We are just getting them focused and working hard, because they are the ones who we feel have a real shot to win state.”

Senior Andres Estrada, junior Kyle Royse, and senior Victor Mendez are all part of the district champion varsity track team which tied Eastwood with 133 points for first place at the District 1-5A Track and Field Championships. photos by Briana Sanchez

Qualifying in two events, senior Nina Herrera is poised to advance state. photo by Jason Beverly

Girls’ varsity track advances 10 athletes to regional competition mauricioCASILLAS • reporter

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ith a strong second place finish at the Montwood High School Track and Field Invitational, hopes were high for the girls in the district meet at Coronado. However, the team finished fourth with a total of 97 points. “Overall, I’ve been really proud of these girls. A team is like a family; you have your ups and downs and it’s a matter of how you bounce back from them, “coach Daniel Rosales said. The meet started off slowly; however, it soon picked up when sophomore Estefania Lujan put the team on the board with a third place finish in the 400 meter dash with a time of 1:01.40. Senior Nina Herrera then added to the team’s total with a first place finish in the 800 meter run with a time of 2:17.63, earning her team 10 points and qualifying her for regionals. Herrera then also qualified in the 1600 meter run after winning with a time of 5:22.50. “It’s amazing to qualify for regionals,” Herrera said. “It’s moments like these that you can appreciate the time and effort from everyone that allowed you to get there.” The 4x100 meter relay team was also able to qualify for regionals. The team, consisting of juniors Carissa Ramirez and Veronica Cera, sophomore Evelyn Valenzuela, and freshman Maria Rubalcava, finished in second place with a time of 50.42 seconds, only .38 seconds behind Montwood. “The relay happens really fast and it’s over before you realize it,” Valenzuela said. “However, we were happy and relieved when we found out that we qualified.” Despite qualifying for regionals in her event, Valenzuela explains that the reason why the team didn’t win in the overall standings was due to a lack of discipline and unity. “We weren’t really as together this year as we were last year, because last year’s seniors really brought us together,” Valenzuela said. “A lot of people didn’t really care, and right before district was when we finally started to realize that we needed to try.” Ten athletes qualified for regionals in their respective events. “We have two weeks between district and regionals, and its more quality than quantity training,” Rosales said. “When it comes down to regionals, [the girls] already know what to be doing.”


SPORTS

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Softball takes district, falls short in playoffs anaGARCIA • reporter

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he varsity softball team had two goals for the season. First, they wanted to take the district title, and second, they wanted to go farther than any team before them. As the saying goes, you win some and you lose some. The team, which consists of mostly underclassmen, took the title, However, they didn’t go past the first round in playoffs, stopped by Odessa Permian on April 30 and May 1. “They played an awesome season and I’m very proud of them,” Principal Carla Gasway said. “They’re young, so it’s an exciting time for Franklin softball.” In their last district game against Coronado, senior Erin Chasco’s pitching proved too much for her T-bird opponents as she collected strikeout after strikeout. While the defense was impenetrable until the sixth inning, their batting took the spotlight in the fifth inning, scoring most of the runs. “Our hitting had to come alive for us to get fired up,” Perez said. “We had a good defense and with Erin pitching, [we knew] she was going to keep us in the game, so we just had to work on our offense.” Despite the youth of the team, the younger players proved their merit as sophomore catcher Britney Mosher caught virtually every ball Chasco pitched, and also contributed by throwing out two opponents trying to steal bases in the process. “This was really emotional because we really wanted to win it for our seniors,” Mosher said. “We also wanted it for ourselves since we’re so young.” The first playoff game started as a stalemate until the sixth inning, when Odessa Permian scored two runs which ended up being the only points scored. However, the girls were able to come back in the second game where they shut out the Panthers 8-0. “We held ourselves together,” sophomore Randy Santaella said. “We were really well prepared and became more of a team for the second game.” The winner of the third game would determine who would advance to the second round, but the talent in the opposing team made the girls come up short, losing 14-4, and putting their hopes of advancing past the first round on hold for one more year. “Playoffs is a different atmosphere,” Hess said. “It’s more intense and you have to play error free ball in order to come out as the winner.” Although the end of the season has come, Chasco knows it’s an accomplishment all the same. “It’s sad that it’s over, but cool that I’m finally here,” Chasco said. “It’s now my senior year and [we ended the season as district champions].” Hess is so happy to have made it this far. “I’m proud of the fact that we won one game out of three,” Hess said. “Many teams don’t even get the chance to play in playoffs, and we did.”

Posing as the new district champs, the young team had a successful season, beating the Coronado T-birds 6-1 on April 23 and going 1-2 in the playoffs. photo by Briana Sanchez

Pitching in the last two innings, senior Ian Ekery shuts down El Dorado on Senior Day. Watching the ball in, senior Mark Silverthorn finished the day with a couple hits. The starting pitcher, senior El Fego Torres, pitches five innings in the 15-6 win over El Dorado. photos by Vanessa Thai

POISED FOR PLAYOFFS sabrinaNUNEZ • news director

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s the baseball season comes to a close, the boys are looking to continue their playoff run, and moreover, hoping to reach the Final Four in Austin this summer. Finishing second in the district behind Americas, the Cougars had a district record of 13-3 and an overall record of 24-7. This season was different than others in that it involved contributions from eight sophomores and one freshman. “The guys are young [and] mature. Of the 11 older guys, a lot of them played varsity last year,” junior first baseman Cameron Haskins said. “We have a lot more experience compared to last year because last year’s team was pretty much all JV.” After suffering a midseason injury that benched him for a few games, Haskins started in 12 district games, while maintaining a .435 batting average with 12 doubles and 19 runs batted in (RBIs). “Our strengths are our pitching depth and we have a lot of guys who hit homeruns,” Haskins said. “Our weakness is probably bringing our mental focus to every game” Another young member who has had a major impact on the team, sophomore catcher Jose Favela, has started in 10 district games and has a district batting average of .480 with two homeruns and six RBIs. “I’m a serious player, I just have to develop a bit more, keep getting better,” Favela said. “[I want to] make an

impact on the team.” Senior pitcher and threeyear letterman Ian Ekery realizes what it takes to be a veteran and team leader. “I’ve learned a lot by watching the older guys these past couple years and now I’m ready to take on the responsibility of being a leader in the playoffs,” Ekery said. Finishing the season with a batting average of .500, two homeruns and 29 RBIs, Ekery also has a record of 6-2 on the mound with a 2.55 earned run average (ERA). Over the past two years, he has posted a 3-0 record in playoffs. Working with the young team, Ekery has observed and endured growing pains alongside them. “We’re all still learning something new every game whether it be as individuals or as a team.” Ekery said. “It’s been a lot of fun watching the team grow throughout the season. The youth definitely helps bring in new energy that is a lot of fun to be around.” Within the past couple of years, Ekery has realized one of the main keys to being successful at the playoff level – a short memory. “You have to forget the bad, accept the good and move on,” Ekery said. “If you try to replay the last inning, you’re only going to get beat in the next one. You have to live in the moment that’s given and enjoy it for everything it’s worth.” On Friday, they will be playing San Angelo Central in Van Horn on May 7 and May 8. If necessary, a tiebreaker game will occur immediately after the second game.


SPORTS

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Faculty slams students in annual game for fourth consecutive year davidBROWN • reporter

For a fee of $2, students rushed into the gym during 8th period to watch the game of the year, the student vs. faculty basketball game. For the past three years, the faculty has dominated the game; however, the seniors were confident going in. Their confidence would be misled, as the teachers took the 55-49 lead. The faculty scored the game’s first points, but the students answered back with a three-point shot by senior Alex Menchaca. Both teams went back and forth, but the students were never able to hold the lead. “The faculty and staff looked big and strong, but it wasn’t intimidating. They just looked like a decent team,” senior Dalton Potts said. “When we got the technical foul, it’s safe to say the reffing was questionable at best.” After protesting an out-of-bounds call, student coach Conor Bellegarde received a technical foul. “During the play, [the ball] hit a teacher’s foot and rolled out of bounds right in front of me,” Bellegarde said. “I had to make a point saying it should have been our ball and I tried to correct Coach Bailey.” Approaching halftime, the faculty extended the lead when a ball was chucked down court to a waiting Coach Montoya, who he went in for a lay-up with half a second remaining. The faculty led the students by three at halftime. “I was just having fun with the game and doing my thing,” Scott ‘The Machine’ Montoya said. “This wasn’t my first time playing basketball. I go play at the recreational center and here at open gym with high school

kids and guys my age all the time.” Heading into the second half, the momentum was tipping towards the faculty. They started off strong once again as they were first to score. With the students’ morale crippled by the technical foul given to Bellegarde, they had a tough time keeping up with the constant pressure. The students were never able to take the lead in the second half even after a hopeful surge to tie the game. “We were close during the whole first half. Our defense wasn’t great, but we were scoring a lot to make up for it,” senior Chris Canales said. “Our offense stalled in the second half, and we let them pull away.” Some students felt that referee Bailey was biased, but this didn’t bother the faculty members. “The reason we played so well was because some of the male faculty member have played together a lot before,” science teacher Alesia Jackson said. “Coach Bailey was a little biased, but that was perfectly acceptable.” Others never had a doubt. “I expected to win and we won,” football and track coach Osain Horner said. “But then again, we win because our opponents aren’t very good.” The loss was hard to swallow for some of the seniors. “We all gave it 110%,” Menchaca said. “It’s disappointing that the losing streak is still on.”

Confronting referee Carl Bailey after a controversial call, senior Conor Bellegarde costs the student team a technical foul. Bellegarde, a player for the varsity boys’ basketball team, served as the assistant coach in the game. photo by Briana Sanchez With his arm outstretched, teacher Dan Leeser attempts to block a three-point shot. “The game went real well. I’d love to say that it was a team effort, but it wasn’t, it was mostly me,” Leeser said. “I got the crowd going when I did that triple lutz, and I stole home, so that was really good.” photo by Briana Sanchez

Seniors Christina Ortiz (left) and Alex Menchaca (right) were hand-picked for the student team by coach senior J.J. Abbas. Menchaca opened the game with a quick three-pointer. Ortiz, guarded here by science teacher Alisia Jackson, finished with two points. photos by Briana Sanchez

UTEP athletes appear for three-point shootout kathrynBOHLE• entertainment editor

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he crowd erupts into cheers as UTEP Miners Randy Culpepper, 6-foot junior guard, and Gabriel McCulley, 6-foot-7 junior guard/forward enter the gym at halftime for the student-faculty Culpepper basketball game. Junior Decker Smith was the mastermind behind getting the athletes to appear. “After practice [one day], Coach Bailey asked if we could get any UTEP players to come put on a show and sign autographs for students,” Smith said. “So I asked my mom, who’s the director of the Miner Athlete

Academic Center. She and her staff handle the sports and she has basketball, so I thought Randy Culpepper would get the biggest turnout of students and Gabe McCulley just loves to see basketball.” As Smith predicted, Culpepper and McCulley immediately attracted attention. “It was crazy,” Smith said. “My mom said that as soon as they got out of the car, there was a screaming crowd. When they started letting people in, they made a beeline for him and started taking pictures and autographs. It’s great a lot of people came out and we were able to raise a lot of money.” The two were supposed to do a three-point shoot out and a dunk contest during half

time. Because of an injury, Culpepper was unable to participate. McCulley performed a simple dunk, even though he did not have basketball shoes on. However, the real show was the sophomores and juniors who showed off their dunks. “They were supposed to do dunks and three pointers, but Randy’s knee was hurting,” Smith said. “Our guys did the dunk part, though, so it was nice to show the school the kind of talent our own team has, too.” The athletes were glad to help raise money for the Athletics Dept. “We just wanted to be here,” McCulley said. “It’s nice for the school, it’s competitive, and it’s good that kids are coming out.”


ENTERTAINMENT

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In a final pose, senior Page Kemp, junior Edna Ibarra, seniors Carissa Castelo, Arlene Navarrette, Sarah Mende, Moriah Momsen and junior Jessica Munoz let the lights fade out in Lindsey Gerson’s “Nostalgia” piece. • Outstretched, sophomore Annemarie Donnelly does the splits for Sydney Gedaly’s “Circle the World” piece.• Arms raised in the air, senior Kaila Messerli, has a celebratory moment in Frida Gomez’s “Wind me Up” piece.• Interlinking arms, juniors Angie Avalos and Jessica Munoz do a partnership move in the dance called “Watermark,” choreographed by Lisa Smith.• Resting on their knees, sophomore Karen Lopez and seniors Mary Rochford and Laura Parton slink along the floor in Emily Ann Rodriguez’s “Passione/Instino.” • With smiling faces, seniors Emily Rodriguez, Samantha Washburn and Mary Rochford outstretch their arms in a ballet pose. all photos by Briana Sanchez

Delicacy, accuracy, creativity merge in annual dance concert

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n the show entitled “And There was Dance,” Fusion and Dance III/IV brought a mixture of dances alive at the Chamizal Theater on April 30 and May 1. The show, professional from start to finish, did not feel like a high school performance, showcasing solid choreography, and an engaging diversity of performance dance. As the dancers emerged, orange and red lights slowly illuminated the stage as the dancers began clapping in harmony to “Boy With A Coin,” in Sydney Gedaly’s “Circle the World” piece. The dance was a strong start to the concert, and can easily be considered one of the best dances of the night. In the fourth dance called “Passione/Instino,” red lights glowed as choreographer Emily Ann Rodriguez had dancers produce provocative snake-like movements on stage. The sounds made by the dancers, the clanking of gold bangles, imitated the sounds in the song, revealing the perfection achieved when time and thought are spent on the choreography of the dance. Another prime example of creativity was Laura Parton’s “Action in Accord” piece. Because of the song choice, “Music Box” by Regina Spektor, the piece required imagination. The song has no consistent rhythm, allowing Parton to create a unique modern ballet.

Sarah Mende’s “Foxy Mama” was received warmly by the audience, telling a story that was both funny and realistic. The dance brought sensuality to motherhood and exposed the lighter side of maternity with a dancing pregnant woman, mom’s jeans, and a shirt that read “#1 mom.” Senior Carissa Castello, in another shining performance, owned the stage with her bodily movement and ever-changing facial expressions. The audience responded to her facials, smiling right back at her. The spirit Mende exuded in her solo tap dance, “After Hours,” was met with bursts of laughter and sporadic applause. With her exaggerated facial expressions, Mende seemed to be surprised by her own tap skill—and the audience was pleasantly surprised by her mastery of the dance as well. Ballet exhibited a powerful presence in the dance concert, placing senior Fusion member Page Kemp at its forefront. She was memorable in Lindsey Gerson’s “Nostalgia” with long, linear movements. All her jumps landed with ease, her feet delicately resolute. However, some of the dancers were timid, and some missteps and mistakes evident to the audience. As the program progressed, the dancers seemed to hold their heads higher, confidence entering their veins.

The concert was not only filled with ballet, modern, jazz, hip-hop and tap, it included a flamenco piece called “Guajira.” Performed by three sisters, Arlene, Mayra and Claudia Navarrete, they almost seemed to float on stage in flamenco dresses, carrying red fans. The sisters made short quick movements with their feet, producing sharp, resonating sounds. Arlene sparkled on stage, dancing in over half the pieces, revealing one costume under another, and was awarded at the end of the night with the title ‘Dancer of the Year.’ Although the majority of the show flowed from one piece to another smoothly, the dance “Cyborg” seemed out of place—like a modern home stuck in a neighborhood of old classic houses. With its quick gyrations, the dance did not blend with the graceful movements of previous performances. Overall, the show provided the perfect balance of quirky, diverse dances and traditional, beautiful pieces. The delicate complexity of the program displayed the versatility of the dancers and their ability to adapt to all the different forms of dance. The length of the introduction and ending speech was not needed because the dancing spoke for itself. Simply said, it was an artful evening that inspired members of the audience to leave the Chamizal a little lighter on their feet.


The Chronicle: Vol. 17, Issue 5 - May 2010