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CAPPELLA Faith Muir


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CONTENTS INTRODUCTION Brief and Site Analysis Precedents DESIGN Initial Ideas Materials Design Development Structure and Details DRAWINGS Site Plan Plan Section Elevations Isometric Junction MODEL BIBLIOGRAPHY

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INTRODUCTION BRIEF The brief is to design a space that stimulates metaphysical reflection to those that enter within it. The word “cappella” simply means chapel; however, the intentions of the project is not constricted to religion. For my project, I wanted to create a space that illustrates our universal belief that the Earth is sacred to us. My aim was to form a therapeutic open space in which art can be displayed as it is representative of our emotional capabilities.

S I T E A N A LY S I S The site is on a quiet grassy area adjacent to 4ES, between the trees and the eastern edge of the lake. Parts of the ground leading towards the lake have a 4° incline. The building will be accessed with a footbridge linked directly to the path on the east. Due to the fact that the main purpose of my building is to exhibit artwork, south-facing windows are appropriate as it will allow sufficient natural lighting. Likewise, north-facing windows will also be included to provide more ambient lighting.

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M AT E R I A L S

COPPER

GLASS

STEEL

Copper is a malleable yet durable architectural metal that has a high resistance to corrosion.

Glass is a strong, transparent material that can be further strengthened when tempered.

Steel has a high strength to weight ratio, making it a popular structural material.

In the presence of environmental conditions like moisture, copper will transition from a bright red metallic shade to a verdigris patina. Interestingly, this creates a poetic narrative between the building and the nature that surrounds it.

Its effectiveness in transmitting light makes buildings susceptible to rapid changes in temperature; however, using double glazing will minimise this effect.

Both universal columns and beams are made of hot rolled steel, and can be bolted together using angled cleats. In addition to the properties of steel, the web resists sheer forces whereas the flanges resist bending moment.

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PRECEDENTS EXTERNAL VOLUME

P E R F O R AT I O N

I N T E R N A L FA C A D E

Sarphatistraat Offices | Steven Holl Architects Amsterdam, The Netherlands | 2000

OneEleven | Handel Architects Chicago, USA / 2014

San Telmo Museum Extension | Nieto Sobejano Arquitecto San Sebastiรกn, Spain | 2006

The perforated exterior of this office building adds a sense of weightlessness, however, during darker hours the artificial lighting from within accentuates the solidity of its form.

As opposed to a simple perforated mesh scheme, I wanted the facade of my cappella to further blend into its surrounding environment.

This open plan exhibition space is overlaid with panels that are perforated in random clusters throughout the building, with perforations mainly concentrated in front of glazed faรงade areas.

Additionally, the use of copper further accentuates the transient nature of the building, which is the atmosphere I want to create for my cappella. 6

The painted plate aluminium panels seen on the lower levels of this luxury residential tower emulate the organic arrangement of tree branches.

The combination of perforations and deep window reveals heighten the sense of space within the building and creates an airy yet private ambience by allowing glimpses of the plaza outside.


INITIAL IDEAS

The starting point of this project was to consider the function of the main area and its relationship with the other facilities in the building. In order to avoid disrupting the overall spatial flow, I separated the rooms into three cuboidal forms.

By experimenting with volumetric forms, I was able to create a sense of hierarchy within the building. For instance, varying roof heights allow the exhibition area to feel more important to the viewer than the sitting room and library.

To add further interest to the external form, I considered interlocking the buildings. This meant that although the exterior resembled several buildings, it still shared one floor plan internally.

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DESIGN DEVELOPMENT EXTERNAL VOLUMES

After several attempts to reorder the cuboidal forms, I came up with the stepped elevation as seen above. I then felt that the walls were too planar so I thought of adding angled notches into the scheme. The placement of the smaller buildings concentrated the flow of people into one corner which felt like an inappropriate transition from the open nature of the entrance.

In the end I chose to remove the notches as I wanted the overall form to be as simple as possible so that the cladding can be more intricate. The grid like formation of my initial ideas was altered by rotating the smaller buildings or giving them an angled edge as seen above.

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The entrance is still directly linked to the gallery and leads on to the secondary rooms. However, the smaller rotated building meant that the library linked directly to the sitting room, which disturbs the serenity of the library. As well as this, the transition from a large, airy atmosphere to more constricted spaces towards the end of the building might be inappropriate.


CONCEPT AND FUNCTIONALITY

The floor plan is now altered so that the entrance is on the opposite end, allowing for a grander reveal of the gallery through a coridoor that sits on a symmetrical axis of the main hall. By swapping the bathroom with the office, it allowed access to both the library and sitting room with their own respective doors.

The site is placed within natural surroundings so it is important to consider the orientation of the building which consequently affects the views that each room gets. As a result, the gallery has two large windows that have a view of both the lake and the large tree towards the north, linking both land and water. The shading provided by the southern trees is beneficial as it will prevent overheating in the facilities in which people are more likely to be stationary in, such as the library and therapeutic talking space. 9


STRUCTURE The building is supported by a steel frame as shown by the columns in the figure to the left. The placement of the columns allow the beams to span the shortest lengths. These structural elements will be hidden in the walls so there is no need to give them a special finish.

As seen above, the steel angles and support bars are exposed due to the perforations so they would need to have a preferably lighter finish to avoid standing out more than the copper.

These two figures show how each of the 0.5 x 1 m panels would attach onto the building. A support bar is bolted onto a steel angle which is then attached to the external walls. The panels then hook onto the bar. To create a seamless finish at the corners, special corner pieces will be made. These follow the same assembly principles as the regular panels.

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P E R F O R AT I O N PA N E L S I N I T I A L P E R F O R AT I O N D E S I G N S

FINAL DESIGN

Apart from the aesthetics of perforation, the panels also provide shade from the sun and privacy when placed in front of a window. It is important to consider the effect of shading on the perforated panels throughout the year. During spring and summer, the trees to the south of the building are likely to cast shadows onto the site in the morning. This means that the scattered light effect the perforated panels produce will be less pronounced during that period.

M AT E R I A L F I N I S H E S

The rendered image to the left illustrates the building with a brushed finish, whereas the image to the right is semi-polished. I feel as if the more reflective finish will be more aesthetically pleasing, particularly during sunrise and sunset as it will reflect the red hues of the sky.

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O X I D I Z AT I O N P R O C E S S

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ORIGINAL

SEMI-OXIDIZED

F U L LY O X I D I Z E D

When the building is first constructed, it will appear to have a bright, highly reflective finish.

Due to the damp weather conditions of the site, the building will start to develop rough, dark patches.

A few years after construction, the building will have fully developed its distinct green patina.

This accentuates the perforated pattern.

Some of the reflective surfaces will still shine through.

The green tones create a poetic link between the building and its surrounding natural environment.


D E TA I L S

HANGING RAIL

ARTIFICIAL LIGHTING

To display 2D artwork without altering the walls with fixtures, this hanging cable display system will be used.

Internally, track lighting will be used to create a spotlight effect on the artwork.

3D work will simply be placed on plinths.

Externally, LED lighting will be used to create a gradient effect during the night as seen in the Bang & Olufsen building, Denmark.

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SITE PLAN SCALE 1:100

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PLAN SCALE 1:50

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SHORT SECTION SCALE 1:50

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E A S T E L E VAT I O N SCALE 1:50

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S O U T H E L E VAT I O N SCALE 1:50

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ISOMETRIC JUNCTION SCALE 1:10

24 mm copper cladding 90 mm support bar 75 x 125 mm steel angles Waterproof membrane 50 mm rigid insulation 18 mm plywood 254 mm soft insulation 254 x 254 mm structural column 18 mm plywood 12 mm plasterboard 20 mm steel deck 254 mm soft insulation 254 x 254 mm structural beam 50 mm rigid insulation Waterproof membrane 18 mm plywood

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EXTERNAL PERSPECTIVE

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INTERNAL PERSPECTIVE

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FINAL MODEL

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PRECEDENTS archdaily.com, (2012). Flashback: Sarphatistraat Offices / Steven Holl Architects. [online] Available at: https://www.archdaily.com/201033/flashback-sarphatistraat-offices-steven-hollarchitects [Accessed 26 Feb 2019]. azahner.com, (2014). Works: OneEleven. [online] Available at: https://www.azahner.com/works/oneeleven [Accessed 26 Feb 2019]. detail-online.com, (2011). San Telmo-Museum in San Sebastián. [online] Available at: https://www.detail-online.com/article/san-telmo-museum-in-san-sebastian-16392/ [Accessed 26 Feb 2019].

STRUCTURE inspiration.detail.de, (2011). San Telmo-Museum in San Sebastián. [pdf] Available at https://inspiration.detail.de/Download/document-download/id/58b67deec95c6 [Accessed 26 Feb 2019]. imagewall.com, (2014-2019). Features: Discover more about ImageWall. [online] Available at: https://www.imagewall.com/features [Accessed 26 Feb 2019]. Ernst, N. and Peter, N. (2012). Architects’ Data. 4th ed. New York: Wiley-Blackwell, PAGES p.s

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Profile for Faith Muir

Design Studio 1.2 Cappella  

An outdoor copper clad art gallery focusing on the metaphysical | Year 1 Project 3

Design Studio 1.2 Cappella  

An outdoor copper clad art gallery focusing on the metaphysical | Year 1 Project 3

Profile for fhmuir
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