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Volume 38 [Issue 6] February 18, 2009

Spotlight

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Animal Issue

Francis Howell High School [7001 Highway 94 South] St. Charles, MO 63304


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SpeakOut

Spotlight Feb. 18, 2009

editorials

Underclassmen need to get well, Senioritis disease is for seniors only Staff Editorial

whether they like it or not, two more years is required for graduation. Underclassmen can hurt their futures because colleges will look at cumulative GPA. The “I’ll do it later, I still have next year,” mentality also doesn’t work. Being a year older and a year closer to the cap and gown will further delude the mind of a student who has made procrastination and poor work ethic their top priority. Even if the material is easy, and known already, it still needs to be done. Just simply knowing the material doesn’t translate to a college scholarship, or even worse, a college acceptance. “Why should I work to get a 3.7, when I can slack and get a 3.5?” Well,, simply because the other guy might have that 3.7 and the college acceptance committee likes that better. Seniors who fall into the dangerous trap of senioritis are making a mistake. That much is obvious. But the have slightly more rights to senioritis. It’s named after them. Seniors are already looking into their futures, but the present is slowing them down. However, young students beginning to lose their hard work ethic are just fooling themselves. It’s too soon to be looking ahead. Stay in the present for now while working towards the future.

Spotlight Staff Editor in Chief Associate Editor News Editor Sports Editor Features Editor Ad Manager Staff Writers

Andrew Cogswell Dara Vint Katie Greathouse Joe Pannullo Erin Key Maggie Herring Jenn Alloway, Austin Brooks, Kelsey Brown, Hannah Burkett, Katy Carron, Krystle Del Castillo, Dan Dowell, Maggie Flynn, Crosby Franklin, Sam Galloway, Raven Garrett, Michael Gulledge, Nick Holder, Jessica Howard, Moli Hucthinson, Kevin Lanzone, Evan Loveless, Caitlin Page, Tony Pavez, Suzanne Pelley, Rae Strumsky, Sarah Taylor, Austin Thomas, Tara Tracy, Stephanie Wood, Kelsey Wyatt

Adviser

Michele Dunaway, MA, MJE

Hit or Miss [a quick Howell about the goods and the bads]

hit s

mis se s

Editorial Policy

Golden Girls rocked nationals They are currently ranked sixth in the nation in hip-hop and tenth in the nation in jazz. Nice.

We’re in school till June 1 June is traditionally supposed to be reserved for summer, not school.

Ryan Sparkman and Mark Powell being MCs of Assemblies These boys were willing to do some embarrassing stuff for the sake of our entertainment. Thank you.

New Missouri license plates We will miss the cute green comic sans ms font squiggly line plates. Now we get... a bird.

Crusin’ with natural AC Even if the weather’s not consistent, being able to drive with the windows down in February is a great thing. Short Assembly Even though the student participation was kind of lacking our butts didn’t hurt from sitting on the bleachers. Warped Tour With old school acts like Bad Religion, The Ataris, Streetlight Manifesto, and Thrice this could be the best line-up in five years.

Cat Love

Cartoon by Hannah Carlson

Everyone knows that second semester is tough on seniors. Senioritis strikes. Paying attention in class is hard enough, but after college acceptance, it becomes even more so. No one wants to pay attention to a class that is practically over. People want to move on. For seniors, graduation is close, and they are ready. Some are chomping at the bit, some even graduated early. However, younger classes have no excuse. Underclassmen suffering from this made up infection called senioritis are making their lives harder. Losing interest in subjects, falling behind in classes, and lowering grades are the symptoms. Juniors who claim to have the dreaded disease will suffer for another year. Sophomores and freshmen must be kidding themselves. Two and three years respectively is just too long to gripe about how little you care and how you can’t wait to get out of high school and go to college. Just try and stay patient. When underclassmen decide to not do homework because the TV looks more appealing, they need to remember that,

Dog Love

PETA’s “Sea Kittens” campaign Just because you want to protect the animals doesn’t mean you can start making them up. False Fire Alarms At least they didn’t make us stand outside on the two coldest days of the year. Howell Time Assembly It was much too early to have any excitement about school. Blagojevich’s hair Seeing Blago’s comb over on late night TV is getting old.

Francis Howell High School

• • •

Letters to the editor will be printed in the opinion section Letters must be signed by the author and verified for publication by the editorial board. Letters to the editor may be submitted to Mrs. Dunaway in room A115 or emailed to cogswell193@yahoo.com Letters to the editor should not exceed 400 words, must be signed and must include the writer's address and phone number for verification All letters to the editor will be verified by a member of the editorial board to determine the authenticity of the writer No material will be printed where content is obscene, invasive of others' privacy, encouraging physical disruption of school activities and/or implies libel The editorial board reserves the right to have letters edited for length, grammar, punctuation, clarity, etc. If editing is required, the letter will be sent to the author for consent. The school newspaper will only publish one letter per author per issue

All letters to the editor become the property of the school newspaper upon receipt and will not be returned

• • • • • •

Purpose of the school newspaper “Congress shall make no law...abridging the freedom of speech, or of the press...” - The First Amendment to the Constitution of the United States of America

“The vigilant protection of constitutional freedoms is nowhere more vital than in the community of American schools.” - Tinker v. Des Moines Independent Community School District The Francis Howell Spotlight is the official student newspaper at Francis Howell High School. The Spotlight began as a Francis Howell publication in 1971. The Spotlight believes it is essential to preserve the freedom of the press in order to preserve a free society and its purpose is to inform, interpret, and entertain through accurate and factual reports. Therefore: • This school newspaper will serve the best interest of the students of Francis Howell and keep itself free from any other obligation • The staff of the school newspaper will accept guidance from its adviser, but will make its own editorial decision • only the editorial board may veto any material intended for publication, judged to be in violation of the Spotlight editorial policy • this school newspaper will vigorously resist all attempts at censorship, particularly prepublication censorship • the school newspaper will serve as an educational laboratory experience for those on staff. • The school newspaper will run as a limited open forum • The goal of the school newspaper is to cover the total school population as effectively and the staff will strive to be impartial and responsible in its coverage of issues.

Advertising

All ads must be approved by the editorial board. An ad rate schedule and ad policies are available by calling 636-851-4820.

[7001 Highway 94 South]

St. Charles, MO 63304


Speak editorials

This is by| andrew cogswell Things don’t always go the way we want them to, but sometimes that’s okay. Right now I’d love to be sitting on a 3.5 or higher GPA, or playing music on the weekends with my friends and playing shows. Unfortunately, I’m not doing either of these and the reason I’m okay with that is all because of my sister. Even before I started high school, my sister, who graduated last year, was doing the most intense college search I had seen or heard of anyone doing. In all honesty she was kind of a college snob; she refused to consider the option of going to an in state college and demanded only the best from her education. It seems reasonable looking back on it since her job and ultimately, entire future was at stake. My sister would sit in front of the computer for hours slaving over a chart that would compare different aspects of potential campuses. This helped her narrow down her choices and helped her focus on what she really wanted out of her college experience. As her research progressed, her “perfect college” constantly changed to the point that I gave up on trying to remember where she wanted to go. She went on only one college visit during all this college chaos and that was to the University of Pennsylvania. When she came home the school was all she talked about. She loved everything about it and it became her goal to get in. She sent in her application and waited for the response that would eventually tell her that she did not get into the

life

Spotlight Feb. 18, 2009

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Administration has student interests, concerns at heart

school. Dismayed but still intent on going to the best school possible she finally settled on Arizona State University and was accepted. When my sister walked across the stage in her cap and gown last May she was all set to leave for Arizona. However, less than a month later she was starting to rethink her decision. One night she pulled me aside and asked what I thought about her joining the Air Force instead of going to college. I knew this had always been a backup plan so I wasn’t really surprised by this idea. I told her I was apathetic and told her to ask our parents about what they thought. At first my parents weren’t thrilled with her sugguestion, but they warmed up to the idea. So instead of my siser being the first person in my family to graduate from college my sister and her ex-boyfriend signed up. She left in late January and while I do like being the only child in the house, I do miss her and I am proud of her. She’s got a career in front of her and she’s doing what she wants. She taught me to be flexible in my plans for the future and take things as they come. I’m happy with where I am because I’ve realized that I have the power to effect what direction my life goes in and that nothing is set in stone. My sister gives me hope for my future and leaves me wondering what surprises are in store for me.

Staff Editorial

The nature of a high school is such that the administration always gets blamed for everything. But the truth is, Howell isn’t a bad place as some would have you believe. While some rules may seem pointless or unfair, they are in effect for the well being of the staff and students. And rules can change. Three years ago, students were not allowed to text, make phone calls, or listen to iPods at any point during the school day. But in 2007, with the privilege system, students can now use electronic

devices during their lunch hours. Final exam exemptions were added as well. Another unpopular move was taking away soda and vending, and making lunch options healthier. However, the administration isn’t at fault on that one. This rule was a state mandate, and it is in effect at every school in the state. Running an entire school is a very difficult task, and given the amount of stress involved, people are going to make mistakes, and there are always going to be people on both sides of the issue. But the administration is always going to do what they feel is in the best interests for everyone at their school.

Face In The Crowd

What would your dream pet be? “Lion, because it’s the King of the Jungle.” “My dream pet would be a unicorn because they are magical.”

David Shipley [12]

“I want a shitzu, but I can’t because my daughter is allergic.”

“I would have a Thompson’s gazelle because they have cute little faces.”

Kevin Grieb [11]

Nurse Rose Holmes

Science teacher Cathy Gelnett A dolphin that had legs. They are super smart, and I could train it to do my chores.”

“A platypus, because they are the only poisonous mammal.” Zach Lenk [9]

Ryan Weiss [10] Francis Howell High School [7001 Highway 94 South]

St. Charles, MO 63304


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Discuss Cold causes false fire alarm The World Spotlight Feb. 18, 2009

news

by| katie greathouse

at

C building students mingle in the big gym after the fire alarm forced classes to be evacuated during third hour, Feb. 3. A sensor on the roof malfunctioned because of the cold.

the weather, it’s too risky to have anyone stay,” Carter said. Although the false fire alarms are a nuisance, Carter feels there is an upside. “It would probably be worse if something happened to the sensor and it couldn’t detect a real fire,” Carter said. “It’s better to have the current sensor than one that doesn’t go off at all.”

Top basketball scorer injured by| sam galloway

Jenn Alloway

Senior Cody Sorenson broke his left hand during a scoring attempt in the varsity basketball game at Washington, Feb. 2. Sorenson finished his high school career with 1,287 points and 746 rebounds. The injury and his Feb. 5 surgery to repair the fracture sidelined Sorenson for the season and ended his quest to become Howell’s all time scoring leader. “It is an unfair circumstance for Cody and for his teammates, but for all that is lost, there is much to be gained by Cody and other members of the team. Everyone involved is really trying to maintain a positive attitude about a situation beyond our control,” Coach Mike Storm said. In the Jan. 23 game against Holt, seniors Cody Sorenson (21) and Camron Cathcart (42) run the ball down the court. With an average of around 20 points per game, Sorenson was on track to break the school record. Sorenson was injured Jan. 30 against Washington, ending his season with 1,287 career points.

Athletes sign letters of college intent by| dan dowell

Seniors declared their college intentions during National Signing Day, Feb. 4. From the football team, Brian Cobbs is going to the U.S. Army Military Academy; Chris and Billy Ekiss are going to Benedictine College; Jake Ksiazkiewicz and Malach Radigan are both going to Lindenwood University and Thomas Ortiz is going to Concordia River Forest. From the softball team, Kristen Felker signed a letter of intent to play for Indiana State University.

Front: Billy Ekiss, Jake Ksiazkiewicz, Chris Ekiss. Back: Dave Witter, Cam’ron Cathcart, Malach Radigan, Thomas Ortiz, Brian Cobbs, Brian Koch

Snow days extend school year to June 1 by| sam galloway

Due to the latest round of snow days, school will be in session, tentatively, until a half day on June 1. There will be full days of school May 22, 26, 27, and 28. Early release days are scheduled May 29 and June 1. In the event of future snow

Large

by| crosby franklin

Michael Gulledge

The cold weather brought more problems than snow days and car trouble. The cold air also caused false fire alarms. This winter there have been three false alarms during school days. “The alarms have gone off a couple of times after school hours as well,” assistant principal Randy Carter said. According to Carter there are several sensors on top of the C building. Some of the sensors are in direct sunlight, but one is concealed from the sun, making the sensor colder than others. “The sensors are constructed with a bulb. When it is cold outside, the bulb gets extremely cold. The heat in the unit causes the bulb to condense and frost over and the sensor detects it as smoke,” Carter said. There have been several attempts to fix the problem. “The administration has tried putting covers over the sensor, but it hasn’t worked,” Carter said. Due to the old age of the sensor, finding replacement parts is nearly impossible. “The buildings are separate so there are separate fire alarm systems for each building. The ages of the systems vary. When the new building is constructed we’re hoping to have all new fire alarm systems,” Carter said. The C building has been evacuated every time the alarm goes off, and students report to the big gym. “We will continue to evacuate. We don’t want the scenario where there is an actual fire and people don’t take it seriously. Although when the alarms go off, it’s most likely because of

days, the year could extend further into June. The 2009-2010 school year is tentatively scheduled to begin with an early release day Aug. 12, making the summer of 2009 seem one of Howell’s shortest in years.

Francis Howell High School

[7001 Highway 94 South]

Almost everybody who knows me knows I love dogs. In particular, I adore my dogs. I have a seven-year-old Boxer named Crash Davis (he got his name from the movie Bull Durham) and a twenty-month-old English Bulldog named Eleanor Roosevelt. I’m pretty sure that they are the cutest dogs in the world. Interestingly enough, my boyfriend is not a dog person. He is the definition of a cat person; his displeasure during his first meeting with Crash and Eleanor was very obvious. Somehow, this did not deter my dogs. Rather, it seemed to make my dogs try harder to win his affections. They tried to cuddle with him on the couch. They sat on his lap, licked his pants, even cried pitifully when they were kept downstairs so as not to bother him. I don’t know if dogs, like humans, are supposed to have dignity, but if so, Crash and Eleanor threw theirs away in the name of love. Crash, in the past months, has relaxed considerably. Though he still tries to spend as much time with my boyfriend as possible, my dog has begun to realize that he is much more welcome when he is calm. What was once a wriggling, slobbery mess has transformed into a tranquil, quiet companion. I wish I could say the same for Eleanor. Eleanor is in puppy love. She adores my boyfriend more than anyone else she has ever met in her four-legged life. When he enters the house, Eleanor begins jumping and licking furiously; standing on two legs yet only reaching his knees. In true ‘move your feet, lose your seat’ fashion, she claims the spot immediately next to him whenever I get up from the couch where we watch TV. A couple of months ago, my boyfriend was on the living room floor and gave a horrified yell. I looked over to see what terror had struck, and there was Eleanor, snuggling up to him while also being eye to eye with him. She quickly licked his nose before he could get up. I, of course, find this event much funnier than my boyfriend does. Like any love triangle, the situation between my boyfriend, Eleanor, and me is full of jealousy, mainly on Eleanor’s part. Her glares have become more sinister, and they are primarily reserved for me. After my boyfriend leaves the house, Eleanor sulks. She refuses to look at me or acknowledge my presence for the remainder of the evening. It’s as if I did something horrible that made her (not my) boyfriend leave. Despite the bumpy, saliva-filled ride, I’ve only grown to love my dogs more. It’s endearing to see them loving someone just as much as they love their own family. I love seeing the way they get excited the moment my boyfriend walks in the door. They are proof that animals have feelings and emotions just like people, and can love just as, if not more, fully than humans. Oh, and my boyfriend’s a dog person now.

St. Charles, MO 63304


F ea t u r es

Spotlight Feb. 18, 2009

news

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Happy Tails

Bear volunteers at Delmar Gardens by | crosby franklin

Saturday mornings are, for many, about cartoons, or maybe sleeping in. However, Bear Milster’s Saturday mornings were once all about adventuring, visiting friends, and lots of cuddling. Senior Amanda Milster and her eightyear-old golden retriever, Bear, used to visit Delmar Gardens nursing home every other Saturday. Milster and her dog made their trips with several other people and their pets. The group volunteered through Pet Pals, an organization facilitated by Sunrise United Methodist Church. “One girl had a bunny that she brought, and we also had big and small dogs. It was good to have all the animals, because some people were scared of bigger dogs like Bear, and they wanted to see the smaller pets,” Milster said. “Bear loved going,” Milster added. “He would get so excited. Once we went inside, he would go say hi to everyone. He loves people, and being pet is always fun for him.” The pair got into a regular Saturday routine. They and the other volunteers would go to each patient’s room to introduce their pets and allow the patients to pet, play with, or just sit with the animals and their owners. “He was the perfect height for visiting

everyone. He could just rest his head on people’s beds and sit there with them,” Milster said. For many of the nursing home residents, just the companionship was enough. “So many of the people were lonely and didn’t have visitors. We went on Saturday mornings, which were especially quiet. People liked the company from both the people and the dogs. Many of the residents remembered having dogs of their own when they were younger, and they said they missed taking care of their dogs at their own houses,” Milster said. “I enjoyed meeting the people because they told stories and had pictures of when they were younger, so we had a lot to talk about,” Milster added. However, the experience was also bittersweet. After becoming friends with many of the residents, Milster and her dog found it hard to lose someone. “One man loved Bear,” Milster said. “He even asked us for a picture of him and put it on his wall. He was a dog trainer when he was younger, but he had Alzheimer’s. When he passed away, it was difficult because he was Bear’s favorite person.” Milster took her dog to Delmar Gardens over a period of about one year. She and Bear had to stop their visits after the activity’s

Bear the Golden Retriever and his adopted younger brother, TJ, lounge on the floor at home. Bear visited Delmar Gardens nursing home with his owner, senior Amanda Milster, every other Saturday for a year.

coordinator moved away. “I miss it because it made me feel good about helping others. I wanted to do more to give back to the community,” Milster said. Although they no longer do it, Milster looks back on her visits fondly. “It allowed Bear and me to bond because it gave us a fun thing to do together,” Milster said.

Milster recommends the activity to anyone interested in animals or community service. “I got involved with my church, but it’s easy for other people to get involved, too. There’s a website, www.volunteermatch. org, where you can search for volunteer opportunities in your area,” Milster said.

Staff member learns price of kindness by | austin brooks

1312 Hwy DD by the Crossroads

FRANCIS HOWELL SCHOOL NIGHT EVERY TUES. FROM 4-8 PM

10% of purchases will be donated to the school!

$1 OFF

Any size stromboli Good till Feb. 17

The April 1 deadline is coming! To order or pay your yearbook bill, call Jostens at 1-866-282-1516

A few days ago I was having a rather terrible time. I was working the drivethru at Taco Bell and trying to focus. In the middle of dinner rush, one lady did something that turned the next half hour into a complete nightmare. However, what she did caused me to have the best night I have had at my job so far, and it also taught me how to be a little bit better of a person. This woman pulled up to the drivethru window and paid her bill and after I handed out her food, she asked me what the total of the car behind her was. Confused, I told her. She then said that she would go

ahead and cover it. My first thought was that she knew the people, so I asked her if she did. She didn’t. She told me that she was just being nice and that was going to be her good deed for the day. So after I cashed out the next car for her, I gave her some cinnamon twists and a high five. This was just a random act of kindness. When I told the man behind her that his food was already paid for, he looked at me in disbelief. Then he did something that shocked me just as much as the woman in front of him. He also picked up the tab on the car behind him. This started a chain reaction of

generosity that had me lost for words. After I explained the situation to everyone and they found out that their food had already been paid for, they kicked it back and covered the next order. It amazed me how willing everyone was to do such a favor for complete strangers. It also made me feel a little ashamed of myself at how unwilling I was to help my friends, and even my family. This one person not only started one of the most curious things I have seen at any of my jobs, she also helped me to take another viewpoint on life in which I found out what is truly important to me as an individual.

To watch Francis Howell’s official podcast, or to see the

cutest pet contest pictures, go to:

fhhstoday.com

Francis Howell High School [7001 Highway 94 South]

St. Charles, MO 63304


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Spotlight Feb. 18, 2009

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Needy animals find refuge at the Wildlife Center of Missouri

Did you know...

They have all Missouri mammals including a permit to keep bears, waterfowl (ducks, geese, and herons), amphibians and reptiles.

Wildlife Center of Missouri facts

The mission is to encourage people to enjoy the nature around them. They pledge to “help you open your eyes and ears” to the beauty of wildlife.

Francis Howell High School

does. Even when things don’t always go according to plan, Hogan patiently waits. “Sometimes, I’ll get a squirrel that really doesn’t want to eat. So then I have to hold them still while they squirm around and wait for them to be ready for their food,” Hogan said. “But, the worst that has ever happened to me was nothing like that. I was feeding a young squirrel. I had just put the syringe in his mouth, when I felt something warm on my jeans. When I looked down…there was diarrhea all over my leg. It was so disgusting.” On the more traditional side of animal shelters, junior Evonne McCracken is a volunteer at the Humane Society of Missouri. “My mom has worked at the shelter for three years, so for any random reason, I just kind of ended up there a lot,” McCracken said. “Since I was there so much, I figured I should do something to help.” McCracken helps out by exercising the dogs.

Tours are available of the facility and they offer a chance to watch injured animals be returned to the wild. Call 636-394-1880 first. Also visit www. mowildlife.org.

[7001 Highway 94 South]

St. Charles, MO 63304

The center was organized in 1979 and it’s the only wildlife rehabilitation facility in the region that rescues native Missouri animals.

“It makes me feel good to take them out, because if I don’t, then they won’t get any exercise for the day, which is sad. At the same time, the whole ‘dog therapy’ thing works, because I always feel great afterwards,” McCracken sad. Both volunteers spend time helping the animals they love. While the creatures that they deal with are vastly different, both volunteers share a patient and giving heart. To volunteer or information contact the Wildlife Center of Missouri a 636-934-1880 or visit their website at www.mowildlife.org. To contact the Humane Society, the St. Charles location can be reached at 636-949-9918 and Chesterfield at 636-530-0805.

They offer summer camps for children ages 6-14. They are also working to raise funds so children from lowerincome families can attend.

Grea

Hogan got involved with the program when she saw an ad looking for volunteers on St. Louis Today. After touring the facility, Hogan decided to lend a hand to the cause. “I had to take two classes before I ever got to handle an animal. The first one was just instructional, and informational and said I needed to have my shots updated. The second one was actual training [about what duties I would do],” Hogan said. Hogan cleans out dirty cages, does laundry for the building, and feeds box turtles, squirrels, rabbits and opossum. Turtle food includes strawberries and leaves, while young squirrels eat formula from syringes, and adults eat rat food and nuts. “Feeding the baby squirrels is my favorite part. You get to hold them,” Hogan said. “You have to hold them around the head and tip them forward a little and wait for them to drink from the syringe.” Her love of animals is what propels Hogan to do the work she

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nimal shelters are usually good places to find a cat or dog as a pet. Not all animals that need homes are pet-worthy though. This is where the Wildlife Center of Missouri launches into action. The Wildlife Center is in Ballwin, Missouri. The center treats sick and injured wildlife such as opossums, raccoons and foxes along with many others in hopes of releasing them back into their environment. The place is staffed with professionals in zoology, biology, and environmental science. In addition to the professional staff, devoted volunteers are needed to keep the center running. Junior Amber Hogan is one of these volunteers. “I volunteer on Sundays. Not every week, but whenever I can,” Hogan said.

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They accept household items, food and other goods on their wish list.

They’re hosting a Mardi Gras Trivia Feb. 28. They also have an open house in May and a “Drive Me Wild” golf tournament in October.

Francis Howell High School [7001 Highway 94 South]

They’re located in Southwest St. Louis County in Ballwin, Missouri. This year is their thirtieth anniversary.

St. Charles, MO 63304


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Needy animals find refuge at the Wildlife Center of Missouri

by| kevin lanzone

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nimal shelters are usually good places to find a cat or dog as a pet. Not all animals that need homes are pet-worthy though. This is where the Wildlife Center of Missouri launches into action. The Wildlife Center is in Ballwin, Missouri. The center treats sick and injured wildlife such as opossums, raccoons and foxes along with many others in hopes of releasing them back into their environment. The place is staffed with professionals in zoology, biology, and environmental science. In addition to the professional staff, devoted volunteers are needed to keep the center running. Junior Amber Hogan is one of these volunteers. “I volunteer on Sundays. Not every week, but whenever I can,” Hogan said.

Hogan got involved with the program when she saw an ad looking for volunteers on St. Louis Today. After touring the facility, Hogan decided to lend a hand to the cause. “I had to take two classes before I ever got to handle an animal. The first one was just instructional, and informational and said I needed to have my shots updated. The second one was actual training [about what duties I would do],” Hogan said. Hogan cleans out dirty cages, does laundry for the building, and feeds box turtles, squirrels, rabbits and opossum. Turtle food includes strawberries and leaves, while young squirrels eat formula from syringes, and adults eat rat food and nuts. “Feeding the baby squirrels is my favorite part. You get to hold them,” Hogan said. “You have to hold them around the head and tip them forward a little and wait for them to drink from the syringe.” Her love of animals is what propels Hogan to do the work she

Did you know...

They have all Missouri mammals including a permit to keep bears, waterfowl (ducks, geese, and herons), amphibians and reptiles.

Wildlife Center of Missouri facts

The mission is to encourage people to enjoy the nature around them. They pledge to “help you open your eyes and ears” to the beauty of wildlife.

Francis Howell High School

does. Even when things don’t always go acco patiently waits. “Sometimes, I’ll get a squirrel that really d then I have to hold them still while they squirm them to be ready for their food,” Hogan said has ever happened to me was nothing like that. squirrel. I had just put the syringe in his mouth, warm on my jeans. When I looked down…ther my leg. It was so disgusting.” On the more traditional side of animal s McCracken is a volunteer at the Humane Societ “My mom has worked at the shelter for t random reason, I just kind of ended up there a “Since I was there so much, I figured I should d McCracken helps out by exercising the dog

Tours are available of the facility and they offer a chance to watch injured animals be returned to the wild. Call 636-394-1880 first. Also visit www. mowildlife.org.

[7001 Highway 94 South]

St. Charles, MO 63304

The center was organize it’s the only wildlife r facility in the region native Missouri animals.


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Spotlight Feb. 18, 2009

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Katie Great house

features

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shelters, junior Evonne ty of Missouri. three years, so for any a lot,” McCracken said. do something to help.” gs.

ed in 1979 and rehabilitation that rescues .

They offer summer camps for children ages 6-14. They are also working to raise funds so children from lowerincome families can attend.

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doesn’t want to eat. So m around and wait for d. “But, the worst that . I was feeding a young , when I felt something re was diarrhea all over

“It makes me feel good to take them out, because if I don’t, then they won’t get any exercise for the day, which is sad. At the same time, the whole ‘dog therapy’ thing works, because I always feel great afterwards,” McCracken sad. Both volunteers spend time helping the animals they love. While the creatures that they deal with are vastly different, both volunteers share a patient and giving heart. To volunteer or information contact the Wildlife Center of Missouri a 636-934-1880 or visit their website at www.mowildlife.org. To contact the Humane Society, the St. Charles location can be reached at 636-949-9918 and Chesterfield at 636-530-0805.

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They accept household items, food and other goods on their wish list.

They’re hosting a Mardi Gras Trivia Feb. 28. They also have an open house in May and a “Drive Me Wild” golf tournament in October.

F r a n c i s Howell High School [7001 Highway 94 South]

They’re located in Southwest St. Louis County in Ballwin, Missouri. This year is their thirtieth anniversary.

St. Charl e s , M O 6 3 3 0 4


Chat VanHook shows blue ribbon sheep features

by| andrew cogswell It was then six-year old Brittany Vanhook’s first sheep showing competition and she was nervous. As she walked out into the arena, VanHook was instructed by her dad to hold onto her Oxford sheep, Wilma, by holding up its head and keeping a knee on its back to hold it still. Out in front of the judges, VanHook accidentally let go of Wilma and the sheep started to run. In an attempt to grab Wilma, VanHook grabbed the Wilma’s leg and was dragged around the showing area four times. Despite this first setback, Van Hook, now a junior, has gone on to win plenty of different awards from different shows around Missouri. “I’ve won showmanship twelve times. After each person shows their animal the judges pick who they think showed their sheep the best,” VanHook said. “I’ve also won reserve (runner-up) champion three times and Oxford overall champion five times.” Vanhook and her brother Brice travel all around Missouri for different competitions, mostly at state fairs and festivals. VanHook has done shows at the St. Charles County and Warren County Fairs, the Wool and Farmer Festival in Bethel, and the State Fair in Sedalia.

“My family raises Oxford sheep and Alpine and Boar goats for competition. We raise them on our 6.2 acre farm,” VanHook said. Judging is based on several aspects of the sheep’s physical appearance and it varies for each breed. “Judges look at how the owner presents the sheep, how even they stand, the quality of the wool, and the loin and muscle quality,” VanHook said. In order to take care of the livestock, VanHook feeds the animals a combination of corn and molasses and a bale of hay twice a day. The VanHooks also clean out the stalls during the spring and fall and if a sheep gets sick they get the privilege of staying in the family’s house. “When the sheep is sick we bring it in and feed it powdered milk every hour and keep it in a pen in the living room. It sleeps there until it gets better,” VanHook said. Animal competition isn’t just a personal thing, for the VanHooks it’s a family tradition. “I started competing because my dad and my sister both did it so I decided that I wanted to do it too,” VanHook said. “I’ve been competing every year for the last eleven years and I plan on passing it on to my kids when they are old enough too, just like my dad did with me.”

Dog bites–

Submitted photo

8

Spotlight Feb. 18, 2009

Junior Brittany VanHook and one of her award-winning sheep at the St. Charles County Fair.

Animal attacks leave painful memories by| evan loveless

Family pet or wild animal? Junior John Benoist found out that sometimes the natural instincts of an animal can have devastating effects. At the age of three, a dog viciously attacked Benoist. “I was riding my big wheel down the sidewalk when a large husky approached me. I petted the dog and then he started to circle around me. Before I knew it, he bit my cheek and I went into shock. The owner came up and pulled the dog off me and my dad took me to the hospital,” Benoist said. The hospital was almost as painful as the attack. “There was blood everywhere after the attack and the dog had ripped off a piece of my skin. I had to get 17 stitches which were extremely painful,” Benoist said. The painful memories of that day were not the only thing that stayed with him. “For a long time I was afraid of dogs’ barking and I have scars on the left side of my face from the attack. My advice for other people is don’t pet strange animals and make sure children are carefully supervised,” Benoist said.

Junior Ben Raulston had a similar painful experience. At the age of ten Raulston was attacked by a friend’s dog while camping. I was at Montauk campgrounds playing (guns) with a buddy of mine in his camper. The dog was sitting on the bed and I guess I posed a threat to the dog because he jumped off the bed and bit me in the face. My friend’s dad pulled the dog off me and put it in its kennel,” Raulston said. Since Raulston was camping at the time, he was far a way from any hospital. “I was screaming and bleeding pretty badly from underneath my eye to below my chin. It took us 30 minutes to get from the campgrounds to the hospital. Since I was bit right underneath my eye they told me they couldn’t do anything to help me. So we had travel two hours back to St. Louis so that I

“There was blood everywhere after the attack and the dog had ripped off a piece of my skin.” –junior John Benoist could have surgery,” Raulston said. Raulston also had some lasting effects from the attack. “For years I was afraid of dogs and after the surgery my vision was blurry for weeks. My advice for people, never try to confuse or provoke a dog,” he said. Benoist will receive some compensation from the attack when he turns eighteen and the dog was put down. The dog that attacked Raulston however, was put to sleep. “They were really close friends of my family so we didn’t sue them or anything,” Raulston said.

Turning vegetarian saves animals’ lives by| jessica howard

Celebrities from Paul McCartney to Davey Havok and Ellen Degeneress have all given up meat, and they aren’t alone. According to a Nov. 27, 2008, USA Today article, the number of teens converting to either a vegan or vegetarian life style has risen one percent in the last year. The most common rise has been in vegetarians, those who choose not to eat meat but allow themselves to consume bi-products such as dairy. Vegans are more strict with their habits and choose not to consume bi-products. “I do believe that animals can feel just the same as we humans do. Animals can love, be hurt and can show extreme loyalty. If animals didn’t have feelings then how could anyone have a caring pet? I have heard so many stories where someone’s in danger and their pet ends up saving their life,” sophomore Autumn Rempinski said.

That is why in seventh grade, Rempinski made a decision that completely reshaped her lifestyle. Rempinski decided to give up meat and join the ranks of Americans turning to vegetarianism. “I never really liked meat, and even as a little kid, I always loved animals and thought that eating them seemed wrong. When I moved to Missouri, if felt like I lost all control to my life and my parents were telling me where I had to live and where I had to go, so I guess it was my way of controlling my life by saying what I’m going to eat from now on. And it’s now become a thing I love about myself,” Rempinski said. At the beginning of the school year, Rempinski formed the vegetarian club, which raised $190.00 for a local animal shelter during the Pennies For Puppies drive. “It’s one of the greatest things I have done. We have

Francis Howell High School

[7001 Highway 94 South]

a good amount of members, quite a few of them being vegetarian and all of us being very interesting in the well being of animals,” Rempinski said. Another vegetarian is sophomore Britney White. While White isn’t as expressive about her choice and is not a member of the vegetarian club, White has been a vegetarian since four years old. “I become a vegetarian at a very young age, right when I was old enough to actually understand what meat was and where it came from. As a kid I loved animals, and I still do. There are a lot of people into the hunting stuff in Missouri. I just could never do that,” White said. “When you think about it, it’s like you’re eating a human. You’re eating muscles and fat. I don’t care if people say there is a difference between the two, I don’t see it,” White added.

St. Charles, MO 63304


5

Chat

Spotlight Feb. 18, 2009

features

1.

9

He is 6’10” and wears a size 15 shoe.

2. He is a personal trainer for children’s

basketball.

things

3. He has two daughters that are 9 and 12

you didn’t

that live in Israel.

know about...

4. He played on the National Israeli

Handball team.

5. He played professional basketball for 17 years all around the world in places such as Israel, France, Spain, Belgium, Holland, and Venezuela.

Security guard Bob Wallace

by | evan loveless

“Thanks to SCC, I am prepared for college, and have taken a leap forward in my four-year plan.” ~ Brianna Bernardy SCC Dual Enrollment Participant Francis Howell Central Alum, 2008 Freshman at Truman State University

Ask your counselor how to get started at St. Charles Community College. 636-922-8000 www.stchas.edu Francis Howell High School [7001 Highway 94 South]

St. Charles, MO 63304


10

Dear Sports Fans by|joe pannullo

UPCOMING EVENTS

As I matured, I have learned many things, and I have developed a skill I plan to use for the rest of my life. I have learned to look for good in everything. I’m always looking for a silver lining. This skill did not come just by chance. My brother brought it to my attention with a video this past summer. This video was of the 1993 Arthur Ashe Award acceptance speech. The late Jimmy Valvano or “Jimmy V” won the Ashe award. Jimmy V was a national championship winning college basketball coach and an award-winning commentator for ABC and ESPN. At the time of the speech he had been diagnosed with pancreatic cancer and did not have much longer to live. Valvano walked slowly up to the stage and began. He started out accepting his award but then warned the crowd he would “speak longer than anybody else has spoken tonight.” He began to talk about his fight with cancer. Early in his speech he talked about how he got through every day knowing he didn’t have much time left. He said, “When people say to me how do you get through life or each day, it’s the same thing. To me, there are three things we all should do every day. We should do this every day of our lives. Number one is laugh. You should laugh every day. Number two is think. You should spend some time in thought. Number three is, you should have your emotions moved to tears, could be happiness or joy. But think about. If you laugh, you think, and you cry, that’s a full day. That’s a heck of a day. You do that seven days a week, you’re going to have something special.” This part of his speech gets me the

Varsity Basketball 2/20 Vs. Howell North 2/23 Districts TBA

Varsity Wrestling 2/19-21 State Wrestling Competition @ Hearns Center St. Louis Blues 3/4 Vs. Red Wings 3/12 Vs. Sharks 3/15 Vs. Wild

sports

most. A man dying of cancer had such an enthusiasm about life. The speech goes on for twelve minutes. Way longer than planned. At one point a producer flashed “thirty seconds” on to the teleprompter to which he responded, “That screen is flashing up there thirty seconds like I care about that screen right now, huh? I got tumors all over my body. I’m worried about some guy in the back going thirty seconds?” There are a lot of stories of people dying of major illnesses, and doing great things in their time remaining. For example, “The Last Lecture,” shows Randy Pausch doing something great for other people before he goes. This one is my favorite. It shows a man trying to do something great for other people before he goes. When I try to look for something good out of such a sad situation, I find the Jimmy V Foundation. At the end of his speech Valvano said, “Cancer can take away all my physical abilities. It cannot touch my mind, it cannot touch my heart, and it cannot touch my soul. And those three things are going to carry on forever.” Later in the speech Jimmy V introduced the Jimmy V Foundation for Cancer Research. This was Valvano’s attempt to touch as many lives as he could. That foundation is still working today to raise money for cancer research. Every year they hold a basketball tournament named the Jimmy V Classic. Jimmy died shortly after his speech and he left a legacy in sports that wasn’t based on his record, or stats, he left his charity, a stat that will continue to pay off. I encourage every body to go to youtube or the Jimmy V Foundation website and look up this speech and sit down through the whole thing. I promise you, it will make you laugh, it will make you think, and it just might make you cry.

Girls Varsity Basketball 2/18 @ Howell Central 2/19 Vs. Howell North

Shout

Spotlight Feb. 18, 2009

Missouri Tigers Basketball 2/25 Vs. Kansas State 3/4 Vs. Oklahoma River City Rage 3/16 Vs. Gateway Soul 3/21 @ Saginaw Sting Missouri Tigers Baseball 3/6-9 Vs. Ball State 3/13-15 @ Texas 3/20-22 Vs. Texas A&M St. Louis Billikens 2/18 Vs. St. Joseph’s 2/21 Vs. Dayton 3/7 Vs. LaSalle

Francis Howell High School

College decisions hard by|dara vint Most little girls dream of being pop stars, ice skaters or actresses in Hollywood. Senior Julia Damon dreamt of being a Hoosier. An Indiana University Hoosier, that is. “I’ve just always wanted to go there and experience the big school,” Damon said. “My whole family is from Indiana, except me. My aunt, uncle and grandma graduated from there and my cousin goes to IU already.” As senior year approached and with a lifelong aspiration to venture to Indiana, the college application process was a no-brainer on a one way track. However, Damon had no sooner filled out her application to IU when another university called her with an offer that would throw her head first into a dilemma. “[A soccer] coach from Avila called me and he said that he watched me play and wanted me to come play forward,” Damon said. Damon has played soccer for nearly fourteen years. Her club team, Avalon, has played in numerous ‘college showcase tournaments’ where scouts from across the Midwest would come and sit in for the game with their “scary clipboards” watching for potential recruitments. “I always wanted to play [soccer] in college until high school, when I figured out how much work it would be with balancing school,” Damon said. Her love for the game wasn’t quite strong

enough to pull her away from her first choice of Division 1 Indiana. Then Damon was hit with what would seem the icing on top of the perfect offer for almost any high school athlete. A full ride scholarship. “With my academics I would get about $10,000 [from Avila] and, if I played soccer, they would cover the rest,” Damon said. Compared to $25,000 a year for an out of state school, Avila’s offer put Damon in a bind. “IU is a D1 school. Basically I’m not good enough to play on the school team,” Damon said. “I’d play for the IUs club team. But I want to go to a D1 school for academics, which is more important to me.” Fortunately or frustrating, depending on how one looks at it, Damon’s parents are trying to remain neutral. “They won’t really say what they want me to do. They are leaving it up to me. I just really wanna be a Hoosier. But how hard is it to turn down a full ride to college? Very,” Damon said. After months of deliberation, and a college visit to “give the small school a chance” Damon, who plans to study theology, has come to an almost certain decision. “I’m pretty sure I’m staying with Indiana. Nothing against Avila, but it’s the size of Francis Howell and I don’t want to get stuck in high school all over again,” Damon said.

Bowling club season ends by|dan dowell This season, the non-school sponsored Howell Bowling Club has grown not only in size, but in youth as well. The club increased from 18 to 27 members with 9 underclassmen and 7 bowling competitively for the first time. “I like how the high school league is more competitively than other leagues. It is a good experience for me, especially if I want to bowl in the future,” freshman Chase Banker said. Other members try not to take it as serious. “Our team goal for this season was to have fun. It takes a lot of pressure off the team when we are facing a tough opponent,” sophomore Jake Lasater said. For seniors Ryan Brown, Mike Rogers, and Ben Schulte, bowling has been a big part of high school. Yet, there has been something that has been out of reach for them since freshman year. “I really want to win the high school county tournament in March. We have come

in sixth, third, and second from freshman to junior year. We are due for a victory this year,” Schulte said. The three of them, including sophomores Emily Heintz and Lauren Englert, have a good shot this year. The three seniors are in the top seven in the conference in average, Schulte with a 201; Rogers a 202; and Brown a 221. Englert is second among girls with a 182 average and Heintz is tied for third with a 171 average. “My goal for the year was to finish the season with a 185 average. I am so happy I’m almost there,” Englert said. The team is in first place in their division at 324.5-117.5 and has the most points in the conference. The team of junior Albert Frasca and sophomores Cory Wagner, Philip DeNigris, and Alex Perkins are on the rise, having moved from seventh to third in their division. The four division winners along with three runners-up are able to represent the Vikings in the county tournament.

Cut out this ad! Francis Howell High School Discount! Valid at 94 & Jungermann only Good through March 31, 2009

[7001 Highway 94 South]

St. Charles, MO 63304


Buzz

Spotlight Feb. 18, 2009

entertainment

Best in Show Movies that left our tails waggin’

1. Dr. Doolittle

(1999) Starring: Hugh Laurie, Michael J. Fox, Jonathan Lipnicki Gross: $140,015,224

4. Bolt

(2008) Starring: Miley Cyrus, John Travolta Gross: $112,581,719

3. Marley and Me

(2008) Starring: Owen Wilson, Jennifer Aniston, Eric Dane Gross: $133,923,935

5. Cats and Dogs

(2001) Starring: Jeff Goldblum, Elizabeth Perkins, Alexander Pollock Gross: $93,375,151

UPCOMING EVENTS

Fox Theatre 314-534-1678 www.fabulousfox.com Feb 10 -22 Spring Awakening $25- $66 1, 2, 7:30, 8PM March 1 Ne-yo $35-$85, 7PM March 17-29

www.catsanddogsmovie.com

www.foxmovies.com

www.marleyandmmemovie.com

(1998) Starring: Eddie Murphy, Ossie Davis, Oliver Platt Gross: $144,156,464

2. Stuart Little

www.disney.go.com

Whether it’s the witty talking animals or the adorable furry faces, animals in movies have always touched our hearts, and our wallets. From Old Yeller in 1957 to Finding Nemo in the new millennium, animal movies have always found a special spot with audiences. This love for these films has leased in some major bucks for the studios that made them. Here are the top grossing animal films of all time (as according to imdb. com).

www.sonypictures.com

by| katie Greathouse

Cirque Dreams Jungle Fantasy 8PM $17-$58

The Pageant 314-726-6161 www.thepageant.com

March 11 Taste of Chaos 6:30 PM $24.25

Pops 618-274-6720 www.popsrocks.com

Feb 25 Flogging Molly $39.75 6, 8:30PM

March 15 Andrew Bird 7 PM $22

March 3 10 Years $15 6PM

Feb 19 Galactic $20 8PM

F r a n c i s H o w ell High School [7001 Highway 94 South]

St. Charles, M O 6 3 3 0 4

11

[Under the Radar] by| austin thomas

So sticking with the whole animal theme, I’m I going to discuss about some great bands that feature animals in their band names. A bit cheesy but there’s nothing wrong with that. Ratatat is an electronic/ instrumental band from New York City that is comprised of guitarist Mike Stroud and synthesizer player/ producer Evan Mast. The combination of interesting samples, heavy electronic beats and well-layered synths give this duo their unique sound. Don’t let the fact the lack of vocals deter your listening because you will be missing out on some awesome music. Check out the song, “Falcon Jab” from the duo’s 2008 release LP3 and to be blown away by the pulsing bass lines, throbbing drums and the bizarre guitar melodies. Currently, Ratatat is an on tour and working on new material. Another mammal-based band name is Fleet Foxes, whose brand of mellow folkpop made them one of the top indie acts 2008. The Seattle-based band started their year by releasing their debut EP Sun Giant and a self-titled album, both to critical acclaim. Their mixture of melodic guitar parts and beautiful vocals made critics rave over these complications. Their influences play a big role, which include everyone from Neil Young to Bob Dylan to Brian Wilson. The song “White Winter Hymnal” is a great demonstration of their ability to blend different genres to come up with something entirely unique. The band performed on Saturday Night Live and is currently touring over seas. Plus they are working on some new stuff, due out around the end of the year. The last animal band name is simply Animal Collective. Let me warn you, their music is definitely abstract but if you are feeling a bit adventurous you should give these guys a listen. Their music is a compelling merge of pop melodies with bizarre industrial sounds. The grouping is like nothing I have ever heard, or anything I even knew was possible to create. The New York City trio’s latest album Meriwether Post Pavilion is incredible. I believe that it will earn a spot on many 2009 critic lists. The band took all the good elements from the past albums and put them together. Check out the song “My Girls”. The video is insane so if you find yourself with some downtime, give it a watch. Right now, Animal Collective is on a gigantic tour but sadly, they are not stopping in St. Louis.


12

Spotlight Feb. 18, 2009

Final Thoughts back page

[1] During the Feb. 4 winter pep assembly, the varsity golden girls presented their sixth place large varsity hip-hop trophy and their sixth place large varsity jazz trophy to atheltic director Dave Witter before their performance.

[1]

[2] The half moon sits high in the sky Feb. 2 for photographer Matt Long. Long took the picture during his seventh hour photojournalism “photo walk.” He was working on a composition project and despite the chilly weather, the class went outside for five minutes.

you

In Case

Matt Long

Michael Gulledge

[2]

Missed it

[3]

Michael Gulledge

[4]

Michael Gullege

[3] Trying to break free of Parkway’s hold, junior Tyler Austin wrestles in the 130 pound weight class at Howell Jan. 24. Howell hosted the Kyle Thrasher Tournament all day which brought the major St. Louis area schools together. The wrestling team will compete in the state tournament in Columbia, Feb. 21-22.

[4] During the Feb. 4 Winter Pep assembly, Principal Chris Griener presents FACS teacher Priscila Reed with the teacher of the year award. The other nominees included social studies teacher Carl Wayne, buisness teacher Larry Anders, special services teacher Holly Baker and math teacher Kelli Griebenow.

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