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MADE BY K−IWIS FOR K−IWIS

100+ FRESH RECIPES & IDEAS

EASYideasfor ENTERTAINING

r e m um e l z z Si

PLATTERS TO PLEASE A CROWD

Ourbest all-day barbecue Just

Sticky maple bacon & chicken skewers with cherry pecan salad

ING SEASONAL PRODUCE EASYAS

FRESH +FAST

NEW IDEAS

And... CAFÉ STYLE PANCAKES

DINNERS IN UNDER 30 MINS

MAKE MORE OF MERINGUE

★ ALL THINGS RICE ★ SENSATIONAL SALAD DRESSINGS ★ GET CREATIVE WITH COOKIES


Butterfly Cakes

Cute little sponge cakes topped with whipped cream and jam make a delightful tea-time treat. Difficulty Easy

Prep time 15 mins

Cook time 15 mins

Makes 10-12

Watch our quick video at chelsea.co.nz/butterfly-cakes

Ingredients 125g butter, softened ¾ cup Chelsea Caster Sugar 2 eggs 1 ½ cups plain flour 1 ½ tsp baking powder ½ cup milk 1 tsp vanilla essence 150ml cream ½ cup berry jam Chelsea Icing Sugar, to dust

Method Preheat oven to 180˚C bake. Line a 12-hole muffin or cupcake tin with paper cases (this recipe makes 10 cakes that will fill the cupcake cases just perfectly – you can make 12 slightly smaller cakes if you prefer). Place the butter and Chelsea Caster Sugar in a large bowl and beat with an electric mixer until pale and fluffy. Add the eggs one at a time, beating well after each addition. Add the flour, baking powder, milk and vanilla essence and stir until smooth. Spoon the mixture evenly into the paper cases and bake for 15-20 minutes or until cooked and lightly golden. Leave to cool for 5 minutes, then remove cakes from the tin and place on a wire rack to cool completely. Once the cupcakes have cooled, use a knife to cut a circle from the top of each cake. Cut the circles in half. Whip the cream. Just before serving, place a dollop of whipped cream on each cake, followed by a dollop of jam. Press two of the half circles on top of each cake to form the wings. Dust with Chelsea Icing Sugar and serve.

More delicious recipes at chelsea.co.nz


Apricot Fudge Slice This popular no-bake slice just oozes old school style. It’s easy to make and even easier to eat! Difficulty Easy

Prep time 20 mins

Cook time 5 mins

Serves 12

Watch our quick video at chelsea.co.nz/apricot-fudge-slice

Ingredients 125g ½ cup 200g 1 cup 250g

butter Chelsea Soft Brown Sugar sweetened condensed milk chopped dried apricots wine biscuits, crushed

Lemon Icing 100g butter, softened 1 ½ cups Chelsea Icing Sugar Grated zest and juice of 1 lemon 1 Tbsp hot water ¼ cup desiccated coconut (to decorate)

Method Grease a 20cm x 30cm sponge roll tin and line with baking paper. In a medium to large saucepan heat the butter, Chelsea Soft Brown Sugar and condensed milk until the butter has melted. Do not boil. Remove from the heat and add the chopped apricots and crushed biscuits. Mix well. Press mixture into the prepared tin. Refrigerate while you make the icing. Lemon Icing Beat butter until pale and fluffy. Add Chelsea Icing Sugar and lemon zest, then beat in sufficient lemon juice and hot water so that you have a light, fluffy mixture. Spread over the slice and sprinkle with coconut. Set in refrigerator before cutting into squares.

Memories are made in the kitchen


Editor’s letter

1 If you leave acidic food such as fruit or tomato based dishes in a skillet for more than a few hours, they develop an evil metallic flavour. 2 Frozen watermelon can be whizzed into great drinks and slushies, so if you buy a big one that may go to waste, cut into chunks and freeze. 3 A basic digital thermometer is the best way to ensure barbecued food is safe to eat. Pick one up in a kitchenware shop and you won’t have to worry about undercooked anything spoiling your holiday. Stress buster!

Get in

TOUCH

I love your feedback, pictures, tips and ideas, so keep them coming in. You can connect with us on Facebook (www.facebook.com/foodmagnz), on Instagram with the hashtag foodmagnz, or email us at foodmagazine@bauermedia. co.nz. I look forward to hearing from you!

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FOOD JANUARY / FEBRUARY 2018

Welcome

For many of us, summer means holidays spent in a tent, caravan or bach, where we happily drift through the days with one ear tuned to the sound of the kids playing, complete with the repetitive thwack of a ball from a seemingly endless game of beach cricket. If you recognise this scenario, then you’ve probably also experienced the queue for the campground kitchen, wondered if it’s okay to feed the kids sausages for four meals in a row and quite likely wished you had packed more towels. But however you spend your summer, the chances are that at some point you’ll want to break out the barbecue. If you are away, it’s an essential outdoor kitchen, seamlessly taking you from breakfast through to the bedtime hot chocolate. But even when you’re at home, or just visiting the local park, cooking your meals alfresco and eating outdoors just makes them taste better. With this in mind, we have put together this ‘grillicious’ issue, featuring many great recipes and tips for flaming good food. We are also making the most of the season’s bounty, with plenty of fresh, seasonal dishes that are just perfect for the hot weather. And if your New Year’s resolution was to get inspired in the kitchen, don’t forget to sign up for a subscription – or renew your existing one. We have a special treat if you do; everyone who subscribes gets a Joseph Joseph Chop2Pot bamboo chopping board worth $70. It has a unique folding design that allows you to transfer food from board to the pan in one smooth movement. Genius! Turn to page 88 for more details. Enjoy a sizzling summer,

SOPHIE GRAY, EDITOR

PHOTOGRAPHS TODD EYRE

3 things I have learned this issue


66 97

73

What’s in JANUARY / FEBRUARY 2018

80

Food for thought

Family first

11

91

Fresh ideas 21 22

26

30 36

40 52 54 64 70 80 82

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FOOD JANUARY / FEBRUARY 2018

FOODIE NEWS, TASTES, TRENDS, EVENTS AND GIVEAWAYS

FRUIT RICE PAPER WRAPS Filled with flavour and as pretty as a picture IN SEASON: WATERMELON We’re tickled pink with this juicy, sweet, summertime favourite IN SEASON: PEACHES Pickled, poached or puréed– the options are endless with this versatile fruit IN SEASON: EGGPLANT Now is the time to reign purple IN SEASON: TOMATOES Saluting these little red bursts of deliciousness and goodness HOT OFF THE GRILL Create a tasty all-day menu on the barbie SALAD DRESSINGS Flavour plus MAKE AND TAKE Fabulous platters for fuss-free entertaining WHIP IT GOOD Go beyond the pav NEW WAYS WITH... Rice FOUR WAYS WITH... Pancakes THE COOKIE JAR Add some fun and sweetness to the holidays

CATERING WITH CANAPÉS Creating finger food at its finest doesn’t have to be difficult or costly 92 EAT THE WEEK Dinner that’s ready in 40 minutes or less 102 SUPER CHARGED Recipes that are not only full of flavour, but pack a nutritional punch as well

Cook School 109 110 114 115

AL DENTE Pasta perfection MAKE THE PERFECT Gnocchi MAKE YOUR OWN Peanut butter ASK THE EXPERT Editor Sophie Gray shares her tips 116 KIDS IN THE KITCHEN Our little cooks prepare Hidden Vege Burgers and Tropical Custard Tarts

Smart living 121 OFF THE RAILS Smart solutions for creating extra kitchen space

122 KITCHEN GARDEN 125 TRENDING IN HOME A resurgence of 1950s cool

127 WINE NOTES The best value pinot gris and introducing summer’s coolest drink


128

48 25

this issue

119

128 FOODIE FOLK Meet entrepreneurial Wellingtonian Vicky Ha

132 HEALTH Nutrition and fitness trends on the menu for Kiwis in 2018

134 BEAUTY Top tips for fixing your summer beauty woes

136 TRAVEL The Bay of Islands – the perfect family escape, even if the kids don’t play ball...

Regulars 4 8 144 146

EDITOR’S LETTER LETTERS Comments and feedback INDEX Find that crucial recipe COOK THE COVER Sticky Maple Bacon & Chicken Skewers with Cherry Pecan Salad

Making life easier

6o

Don’t

FORGET Sign up or renew your Food magazine subscription, and receive a chopping board worth $70, free! See page 88 for details.

NUTRITIONAL KEYS For dietary and nutritional values of recipes, look for the panels as well as these symbols:

DF DAIRY-FREE

GF GLUTEN-FREE

V VEGETARIAN LS LOW SUGAR

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LETTERS WE LOVE HEARING FROM YOU! SEND AN EMAIL WITH YOUR FEEDBACK, TIPS AND NEWS TO FOODMAGAZINE@BAUERMEDIA.CO.NZ – OR CONNECT WITH US ON FACEBOOK OR INSTAGRAM. PLEASE INCLUDE YOUR FULL NAME

Star letter winner

Family favourites Ready in

40

cook’s

NOTES

Much of the heat in ch lli peppers is in the seeds if you prefer a m lder resu t you can scrape out the seeds wi h a teaspoon prior to slicing

MARRIED TO GREAT RECIPES I clearly remember one morning, when I was first married, standing in my kitchen wondering what to cook for dinner. I had a real moment of panic – how was I going to think up meals for the rest of my life?! That was 46 years ago, but somehow, over that time I have managed – often with the help of your magazine. I have read Food for many years, and included recipes from it in a book of dishes I make frequently, which has travelled with me everywhere – even overseas. I do still have moments when I wonder what to cook that’s different – in fact it happened last week. But then my husband brought the post in, and included in it was Food magazine. I was so pleased, I made a cup of coffee, as you do, and sat down to enjoy looking for some inspiration. Once again the magazine came up trumps and I cooked the Chicken in Turmeric and Yoghurt. It was delicious, as you can see from my picture. Many thanks – the layout, pictures and information makes Food my favourite magazine.

Coriander

Also known as cilantro th s herb adds unique flavour to Mex can Thai and Indian d shes It ll zest up salads and currie s and make a subl me Asian style pesto Superb He b Cor ander pots are available in supermarkets $2 99

Eileen Pomeroy

show and tell We love to see photos of your homemade creations from the recipes in Food magazine. Take a picture of a dish you’ve made from this issue, and email it to us at foodmagazine@bauermedia.co.nz, post it on our Facebook wall (www.facebook.com/foodmagnz), or upload it to Instagram with the hashtag foodmagnz, and you could win a great prize. We also have giveaways in Food for Thought; and there are even prizes for kids who are getting busy in the kitchen – check out our competition on page 119.

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FOOD JANUARY / FEBRUARY 2018

win

minutes

Our star letter this issue wins a Russell Hobbs Ice Cream Waffle Cone Maker, worth $99.99. This nifty gadget will add some fun to your summer, as you can roll your own homemade waffle cone to fill with your favourite icecream, fruit or yoghurt. Get creative by making large or small, flat or rolled waffle cones – or be adventurous with sweet tacos and filled cannoli. The non-stick, easy cleaning plate makes this machine simple to use and easy to maintain.

Get more from the team at Food by receiving our regular newsletter – just click the ‘Sign Up’ box on our Facebook page To be part of our Food community, visit us at:

instagram.com/foodmagnz facebook.com/foodmagnz


Community (probably called a cafeteria in the day) in Heretaunga Street, Hastings. When Mum was pregnant with me 62 years ago, she used to go to Adams Bruce every Friday for an icecream sundae with lots of chocolate. The staff used to ask how the ‘Adams Bruce’ baby was doing. Needless to say I was nearly 10lbs when I was born, and no doubt the Friday visits to Adams Bruce contributed to this! The shop has long disappeared but I do remember visiting it and seeing all the Queen Anne chocolates (still my favourite) and not knowing the history of how the names and brand tied up, so thank you for such an enlightening story.

GROWING INTO FOOD

BAKING UP MEMORIES I always read Sophie Gray’s editorial, and last issue I found we have something in common. Like Sophie, I cannot resist minc pies! They also bring with them wonderful memories of time I ha with my mother. She made her own fruit mince and we’d make two trays at a time. Mum would make the pastry, I would cut the bases and fill, then pop the tops on with the egg wash. Copious cups of tea and more than one pie at a time disappeared. Cooking with family makes such lovely memories! Sally Clarke

PHOTOGRAPHS INSTAGRAM, FACEBOOK AND SUPPLIED

Snap Shot

While volunteering in the hospice shop in Katikati, I picked up the January 2017 edition of Food magazine. As a keen gardener I was delighted to find uses for much of what I’ve grown. I turned over the first page and there was a recipe for Mixed Berry Jam; a few more pages in were delicious recipes for plums. Then I spotted all the things I could do with capsicums – I planted mine out a month or two ago. Reading on I was into summer salads – and almost all the ingredients were right there in the garden. The recipe for Cauliflower and Chickpea Curry was a real bonus, as at the moment I have more of the white flowering heads than I know what to do with. I was so inspired I’ve taken out a subscription. I can’t wait for my magazines to start arriving in the mail!

Lynn Evans

PROOF IN THE PUDDING I was most interested to read the article about Sarah Adams in the latest Food magazine. Many years ago my uncle was friendly with Ernest Adams. My grandparents managed a high country sheep station called Whalesback in north Canterbury. One year my uncle brought Ernest home for Christmas. He was so taken with my grandmother’s Christmas pudding that he took the recipe. So for a time the Ernest Adams Christmas puddings were made to my grandmother’s recipe!

Jeanette Shepherd

BONNY BABE I really enjoyed the story on Sarah Adams and the connection with Adams Bruce, as my late mother often spoke about the Adams Bruce Café

Joanne Barraclough

kids in the kitchen We love seeing pictures of your enthusiastic little cooks stirring up a storm in th – shows you’re never too young to have a love of cooking. Here is a selection of what you sent: Mila (2)

Michael (2)

Che (6)

FOOD JANUARY / FEBRUARY 2018

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LevEl-uP yoUr sizZling Game by ThroWing somE frEsh HerbS strAighT on the GriLl!


Foodie news and views, tastes and trends

cook’s

NOTES

Fresh pineapple contains an enzyme that penetrates meat, not only adding flavour but actually breaking down the protein. This tenderising effect makes pineapple and its juice a useful addition to summer marinades.

Tropical hideaway Looking to add a little fun to your alfresco dining this summer? A stuffed pineapple bowl is a great way to serve a variety of foods, from pineapple fried rice to fruit salad. To make, stand pineapple upright and slice downwards, cutting about a third off one side. Cut around the inside of the large portion, taking care not to cut through the skin, then slice the flesh lengthways, then crossways. Scoop out the cubes of pineapple, leaving the hollow shell to work as a bowl. For the filling try:

PHOTOGRAPH GETTY IMAGES

Sweet & sour Fill one end of bowl with pork & pineapple stir-fry, and rice at the other.

Fresh & fruity Fill with tropical fruit salad including pineapple, mango, kiwi & fresh mint.

Sensational salad Mix cooked shredded chicken with capsicum, celery, red onion and red chilli in a creamy dressing.

FOOD JANUARY / FEBRUARY 2018

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Top five

FOOD TRENDS FOR 2018

Super stars Last year it was all about the turmeric, and while that fragrant yellow spice will remain popular, some new superfoods are snapping at its heels. This year, expect to hear a lot about cassava, jackfruit, monk fruit, maca powder and tart cherries.

Flower power Fancy a lavender latte? An elderflower fritter? How about rose icecream? In 2018 flowers won’t just be a pretty decoration, they will take centre-stage as popular ingredients.

Get busy with fizzy It’s no secret that sugar-laden soft drinks are falling out of favour, but the world of sparkling is far from dead; it’s simply heading in a new direction. Justt last year a Nelson company launched Rad Cold Brew Coffee – a chilled, fizzy version of a long black, and you can expect to see more twists on fizzy in the coming months.

Pop out for puffed snacks Forget potato chips and popcorn, snacks are taking on a whole new angle as a variety of grains and produce get puff , popped and dry roasted. Puffed rice clusters, pasta bow-ties and dry roasted edamame are just some of the options. We’re We re confident all will sit well ell next to our favourite Kiwi Onion Dip.

Middle Eastern Safarii The likes of hummus and falafel have become mainstream in recent years, but expect a wave of new flavours from the likes of Israel, Syria and Iran in the coming months. Harissa, tahini and za’atar are just some of the ingredien nts that will enjoy popularity. Get started d with our Za’atar Pizza on page 57.

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FOOD JANUARY / FEBRUARY 2018

Salad Days We all love a good salad at this time of year, but it can be a chore doing all that slicing and dicing. Reduce your workload with the new range of chopped salads from Taylor Farms, which come in tasty flavours. Our favourites include Asian, with cabbage, almonds and wonton noodles; as well as Southwest, which boasts pumpkin seeds, tortilla strips and cilantro with creamy coriander dressing.

win Keep sweet I QUIT SUGAR: SMOOTHIES, BOWLS AND DRINKS by Sarah Wilson (Macmillan) $30 If you’re on a mission to minimise your sugar intake, start small with drinks. To help you along, this book contains more than 60 recipes for smoothies, smoothie bowls and other fruit and vege-filled drinks. The recipes are full of flavour and easy to make – perfect for when you’re on the go. We have three copies to give away; to enter, email foodmagazine@ bauermedia.co.nz with ‘Smoothie’ in the subject line by February 28, 2018.


Food for thought

1 essentials

9

Grill’n’chill THESE BBQ GADGETS WILL HAVE YOU COOKING LIKE A PRO

2 4 3

1. Gascraft stainless steel and wood BBQ five-piece tool set, $25, The Warehouse. 2. Le Creuset Marseille Grillit, 26cm, $339.99, Stevens. 3. Wiltshire BAR B egg rings with handle, $29.99, Briscoes. 4. Hanging hurricane lamp, $5, K-Mart. 5. Davis & Waddell BBQ slider mini burger press, $39.99, Stevens. 6. Enamel cup, 330ml, $3, K-Mart 7. Gascraft BBQ skewers, four-pack, $4, The Warehouse. 8. Fish jug, $45, Redcurrent. 9. Studio melamine dinner plate, $17.99, $ Steven ns.

5

Going to the beach this summer? So are we Need refreshments and food for the barbie? We’re delivering to beaches and baches all over NZ this summer. Find out more at countdown.co.nz/summer

8 6 7


Food for thought

The recipes you ask for... AT YOUR REQUEST “My cousin has just returned from the Auckland Art Gallery and was raving about the mini pumpkin and feta quiches at Mojo café. I would love to have the recipe!” Maureen Lee MOJO GALLERY, Auckland Art Gallery, Cnr of Kitchener and Wellesley, Auckland. (09) 366 0647 Open Monday to Saturday, 8am-5pm; Sunday, 9am-5pm. www.mojo.coffee FOOD talked to Stephanie Archer, Mojo’s national food manager

do you think makes Q What this pumpkin tart such a standout? The combination of the sweet and salty with the caramelised onion and the feta works so well with the roast pumpkin. Plus the pastry is a special combination, resulting in a delicate crust.

Q

Are there any tricky bits in the recipe?

Nothing tricky, just don’t over-work the pastry dough.

do you get Q Where inspiration from for new

feedback and analysis. We love keeping it simple – some of the best things are just that.

there any particular Q Isingredient that always seems to be popular in your café cabinet selection? Salads are extremely popular this summer, with more and more people looking for vegetarian options.

would be your main Q What advice for home cooks who

dishes for Mojo?

want to make their families café-quality treats at in their kitchen at home?

From a variety of sources, such as reviewing latest food trends, seasonal produce, and listening to customer

Buy the best ingredients you can afford; and keep it simple. Don’t beat yourself up if it doesn’t look like the café version!

Write

& SHARE If you find a café dish you love and want to see the recipe, send a picture of it to foodmagazine@ bauermedia.co.nz.

MOJO PUMPKIN TARTS MAKES 10 ●

● ● ● ●

14

120g caramelised sliced onion (sauté very slowly in butter with a pinch of brown sugar and a dash of balsamic vinegar) 500g diced roast pumpkin (toss in crushed garlic, salt and ground cumin and roast until golden) 100g feta cheese, crumbled 5 free-range eggs 100ml cream salt and pepper, to taste

FOOD JANUARY / FEBRUARY 2018

100g parsley, finely chopped

PASTRY BASE ● 90g plain flour ● 90g wholemeal flour ● 90g rolled oats ● 90g parmesan cheese, grated ● 45g wholegrain mustard ● 1 teaspoon cumin seeds ● 45g sesame seeds ● 120ml canola oil ● 70ml water, approx

1 Make the Pastry base (see right). 2 Preheat oven to 160⁰C. 3 Press the pastry base mixture into 10 small pie tins or moulds, ensuring it is not too thick. 4 Put 12g of caramelised onion into each base, top with 50g of pumpkin and finish with 10g of feta. 5 Beat the eggs, cream, salt and pepper together and pour over the filling, taking

care not to overfill. 6 Sprinkle with parsley and bake for 20-25 minutes or until tart is golden. Pastry base Mix all the dry ingredients together, then add the oil and mix to combine. Slowly add the water – you may not need it all. The mixture should not be too wet but just pliable enough to press into a pie tin.


FOODIE COLUMN

Emi’s world

Food magazine direct advertising account manager Emi Hooper can’t get enough of Kiwi cuisine. Each issue she reveals an incredible dish she has sampled in a New Zealand café, and shares her twist on making it at home

T

he summer is a great time to get away from the cities and explore the many incredible cafés that pepper holiday hotspots. One I have discovered this summer is Blackies Café in Whangamata. Set in an idyllic location by the water, I knew it had to be good as it is always packed with locals. I often find it hard to look beyond a classic eggs benedict or granola loaded up with fruit, but on my visit to Blackies I spotted another diner tucking into a giant stack of pancakes, and knew I had to try them. I can’t say pancakes and I have a great history. As a child I remember eating gluey, gluggy versions that were more dense than the plate they were sitting on. But when someone makes me a good one, I find them hard to beat. And these were spectacular. Soft, fluffy and perfectly matched with crisp bacon, coconut yoghurt and grilled banana, they were so delicious I pledged to work out the secret to homecooked perfection. After much trial and error, what I have discovered is that whisking eggs separately until thick and pale before adding to the dry mixture ensures a fluffy result. I also realise that investing in a good non-stick pan means you don’t need to cook them in butter. If you don’t have a good pan, use 1 teaspoon of butter for the first pancake, and the rest should be fine. I have also realised the flavourings are key. My favourite is fresh fruit, coconut yoghurt and a drizzle of honey, with cinnamon and chia seeds added to the batter. Avocado and soft-boiled eggs sprinkled with some homemade dukkah are also delicious, and you can’t go far wrong with a dollop of crème fraîche with ribbons of smoked salmon. ➼ For a no-fail buttermilk pancakke recipe and four sensational toppings, turn to page 80.

Blackies Café’s pancakes, far right, inspired Emi to start creating and flipping, right.


A chat with... KYLIE KWONG Kylie Kwong, celebrity chef and owner of celebrated Sydney restaurant Billy Kwong, is proud of her Chinese heritage and passionate about creating bold fresh dishes that combine the best flavours from the East and West. With Chinese New Year fast approaching, we caught up with her while she was in New Zealand to get her cooking tips and insights would be your top Q What tips for those who are

you have any clever Q Do ideas for using up

novices in Chinese cooking?

leftovers?

I like cooking food simply, which allows the natural qualities of the ingredients to shine through. The ‘personality’ of the raw ingredient dictates to me the best way for it to be cooked; for example: ➼ Fish fillet, silken tofu and oysters I tend to steam because these ingredients are delicate. ➼ Finely sliced vegetables, chicken fillets, beef fillets and noodles I tend to stir-fry as they work well with highheat cooking. ➼ Braised pork belly and prawn wontons I would deep-fry because these ingredients are rich and robust and take on a delicious texture from being deep-fried. ➼ Wontons, Asian greens and noodles I boil because these ingredients work well with a quick blanching in boiling water.

Barbecued or braised meats are great in a fried rice dish the next day.

in their pantry? Murray River salt flakes, good quality extra virgin olive oil and Japanese soy.

are an ambassador Q You for Furi knives; how important are good knives in cooking?

West-style celebratory meal?

They are essential in order to create good quality results, and, just as importantly, in order to prepare safely. Also, quality knives are far more efficient when preparing meals every night for a busy family household and for preparing each day in commercial kitchens. In my kitchen, I couldn’t live without my Furi East/West Santoku knife – it’s like a Chinese cleaver and cook’s knife all in one!

At the heart of any Cantonese feast is creating large plates to share, so that would be a good place to start. For any family celebration my mother, her sisters and I spend many hours together in the kitchen, producing traditional dishes such as soy-braised chicken, sweetcorn soup and steamed fish with ginger and shallots, then we mix these with more traditional Australian plates – my Aunty June always brings a huge pile of prawns.

‘I have always found New Zealanders to be passionate about food and wine, which gives Kiwi cuisine a great sense of place’

you share any tips for Q Can creating an East-meets-

16

three staples Q What should everyone have

FOOD JANUARY / FEBRUARY 2018

do you make of Kiwi Q What cuisine – and how does it compare to Australian? I have always found New Zealanders to be incredibly passionate about food and wine, which gives Kiwi cuisine a great sense of place. In a similar way to Australia, I love how New Zealand cuisine heroes its stunning fresh and high-quality produce. I think chefs in both countries realise how incredibly privileged we are to live in clean, green and abundant natural environments, and to be able to draw on these national assets in our profession.

do you think will Q What be the biggest food trends in 2018? Hopefully more chefs and restaurateurs will engage in ‘food for good’ projects – which involve and support the local community and its surrounding social services.


Food for thought

BILLY KWONG CRISPY SKIN DUCK WITH CITRUS SAUCE ● 1.5kg whole free-range duck ● 2 tablespoons Sichuan pepper

and salt ● ¼ cup plain flour ● sunflower oil, for deep-frying

CITRUS SAUCE ● 1 cup water ● 1 cup brown sugar ● ⅓ cup fish sauce ● 6 star anise ● 2 cinnamon quills ● juice of 3 limes ● 1 orange, peeled and sliced crossways

1 Rinse duck under cold water. Trim away excess fat, and trim off neck, parson’s nose and winglets. Pat dry and rub all over with Sichuan pepper and salt. Cover; chill overnight. 2 Transfer duck to a steamer basket. Steam over a deep saucepan of boiling water for about 1 hour 15 minutes or until cooked through. Remove; place

on a tray, breast-side up, to drain. Cool slightly, then refrigerate to cool further. 3 Make the Citrus sauce (see below). 4 Place cooled duck breast-side up on a chopping board and, using a large knife or meat cleaver, cut in half lengthways through breastbone and backbone. Carefully ease meat away from carcass, leaving thighs, legs and wings intact. Lightly toss duck halves in flour to coat, shaking off any excess. 5 Heat oil in a wok until the surface seems to shimmer. Deep-fry duck halves one at a time, for 3 minutes each side or until well-browned and crispy. Remove from oil and drain on paper towel; rest for 5 minutes. 6 Cut duck into pieces, spoon over hot Citrus sauce and serve. Citrus sauce Combine water and sugar in a small pan and bring to the boil. Reduce heat to low and simmer, stirring

A Refreshing Taste with 1R$UWLßFLDO&RORXUVDW D 6HULRXVO\ *RRG3ULFH

Look for the Countdown green label in-store and online at countdown.co.nz Range may vary by store.

occasionally, for about 7 minutes, or until slightly reduced. Add fish sauce and spices and simmer for a further minute. Stir through lime juice and orange, then remove pan from stove.

TIP For a fresh finish, add oranges, mandarins or plums to the sauce.


Food for thought Marlborough Wine and Food Festival Meatstock

Beast of a Feast Mt Maunganui, Thursday January 4 Celebrate the new year with a day of craft beer and street food. A variety of breweries and food vendors will be on hand to satisfy your tastebuds, while brass and jazz bands playing throughout the day will be music to your ears. Tickets are $20. www.littlebigevents.co.nz

Beast of a Feast

EVENTS

Cromwell Food and Wine Festival

Meatstock

Cromwell, Saturday January 6 For a day of sun and relaxation, head to the Cromwell Heritage Precinct to indulge in Central Otago wines. Local food stalls will compliment your tipple, and to top it all off, Otago musicians will be playing their best tunes. www.cromwell.org.nz

Auckland, Saturday February 24 – Sunday, February 25 Summer calls for music and barbecues, so take your pick of meats from restaurants like Miss Moonshine’s and Morepork BBQ at this popular event. Music will be playing all day and don’t miss the Barbecue and Butcher Wars. Tickets are $35. www.meatstock.co.nz

Local Wild Food Challenge

Marlborough Wine and Food Festival Blenheim, Saturday February 10 Experience the belt of beautiful Marlborough with award-winning wine and food, ranging from dumplings to whitebait patties. The main musical act is the NZ All-Stars, who will be channelling Bob Marley. R18; tickets are $62. www.wine-marlborough-festival.co.nz

Whakatane, Saturday February 3 Become a hunter-gatherer for a day, foraging for wild food at this popular challenge. If you’re entering a dish, it will need at least one wild ingredient, but you can make anything you want with it. If you’re not cooking, there will be food stalls and live entertainment on show at this free event. www.localwildfoodchallenge.com

win IN THE MIX

Well seasoned recipes

win

THE MODERN COOK’S YEAR by Anna Jones (Harper Collins) $55 Make the best of bountiful produce with a collection of recipes that showcase seasonal fruit and veges. Whether you are looking for wintery baked apple porridge or a summery beetroot tart, this new cookbook from a chef dubbed ‘the new Nigella’ will supply you with recipes for every season. We have three copies to give away; to enter, email foodmagazine@bauermedia.co.nz with ‘Modern’ in the subject line by February 28, 2018.

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FOOD JANUARY / FEBRUARY 2018

If your New Year’s Resolution was to get fit and boost your nutritional intake, then you won’t want to miss out on our giveaway. We have one George Foreman SuppMix to give away, worth $49.99. This clever little contraption will perfectly mix your powdered supplements with liquid to create a smooth shake – with no leftover clumps. To enter, email foodmagazine@bauermedia. co.nz with ‘SuppMix’ in the subject line. Entries close February 28, 2018.


Pink Lemonade MAKES 2

100ml Hansells Lemon, Raspberry and Elderberry Fruit Syrup 150ml pink grapefruit juice 50ml lemon juice Handful of ice Sparkling water Mint sprigs Fresh raspberries Spray-free small rosebuds Pour Hansells Lemon, Raspberry and Elderberry Fruit Syrup, pink grapefruit juice and lemon juice into a cocktail shaker. Add ice and shake well. Pour into glasses and top with sparkling water. Top drinks with mint, raspberries and rosebuds. We’d love to see your creations, share them at:

Entertain your guests THIS summer

All natural

No artificial colours, flavours, preservatives or sweeteners, and lower in sugar*. Hansells All Natural Fruit Syrups are specially crafted for those who want a refreshing, natural drink with a slight twist. Mix with still or sparkling, soda or tonic, over ice or with added fruit – make it your way.


FRESH ideas

New recipes to inspire & delight

Kiwifruit & strawberry rice paper wraps

cook’s

NOTES

Dip your fruit rice paper wrap into yoghurt or chocolate sauce, or make a fruit dipping sauce. Simply purée your fruit of choice, add a squeeze of lime and sweeten with honey or maple syrup.

PHOTOGRAPH SHUTTLESTOCK

Pretty as a picture: it’s a wrap! Delicious, healthy and gluten- and dairy-free, fruit rice paper wraps are the perfect summertime snack. Pretty as a picture, they are easy to make with endless variations. To prepare the wraps, pour boiling water into a shallow bowl, dip a wrapper in the water for 15-20 seconds, then place on a board. Arrange thinly

sliced fruit down the centre – this will be what you see through the wrapper so arrange it as prettily as you can. Top with chopped fruit and roll up like a burrito. Ripe, bright fruits such as kiwifruit, strawberries, pineapple, peaches and apricots work well, and be creative with added ingredients.

Some of our favourite fillings include: MINTY Tuck a mint leaf into each one for a pretty pop of freshness SWEET & STICKY Add some sweet sticky rice or coconut for a more substantial snack. CRUNCHY MUNCH Include a sprinkle of toasted muesli or some lightly toasted seeds or chopped nuts before rolling.

· · ·

FOOD JANUARY / FEBRUARY 2018

21


inseason fruit DRINK IN OUR IDEA S FOR THIS REFRESHING SUMMERY FRUIT, WHICH IS AS GOOD WITH SWEET A S IT IS WITH SAVOURY DISHES

RECIPES & STYLING SOPHIE GRAY PHOTOGRAPHS TODD EYRE

watermelons

S

omething of a hidden beauty, with its sweet, juicy, perfectly pink flesh disguised inside an unassuming hard green rind, watermelon is the perfect fruit for a hot summer’s day. From a family of vines that originates in southern Africa, the watermelon is technically a kind of berry, unlike the strawberry, which is, strictly speaking, not a berry at all. Moving on... Watermelons are about 90 per cent water and six per cent sugar – which accounts for why they are so refreshing. They can grow to be very large, with the heaviest watermelon ever recorded weighing in at 159kg. As well as being very hydrating, they are also filled with substantial amounts of vitamin C, vitamin A and vitamin B6, along with the antioxidant phytonutrient lycopene. There are also decent amounts of potassium and fibre on offer. At this time of year, there’s nothing better to snack on than giant chunks of fresh watermelon. It also works well in fruit salads, as well as savoury salads, where it happily partners with feta cheese and fragrant herbs. When choosing, go for a heavy watermelon that sounds hollow when tapped – this indicates it’s ripe. Ensure your cut watermelon is covered with plastic wrap and kept refrigerated.

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FOOD JANUARY / FEBRUARY 2018


Perfect produce WATERMELON & BASIL SALAD PREP TIME 10 mins SERVES 4-6

DF GF ● ● ● ● ● ● ●

v

LS

2 tablespoons olive oil 2 tablespoons balsamic vinegar 3 cups cubed watermelon 3 cups cubed peaches or nectarines ½ cup basil leaves, torn 3 cups baby spinach leaves a handful of toasted hazelnuts

1 In a small bowl whisk together the oil and vinegar and set aside. 2 In a large bowl toss the watermelon,

peaches, basil and spinach until mixed. Add the oil and vinegar dressing and transfer to a serving dish. 3 Crush the hazelnuts with the flat side of a knife or place in a small resealable plastic bag and bash with a rolling pin. Scatter on the hazelnuts and serve. PER SERVE Energy 139kcal, 581kj • Protein 3g •

cook’s

NOTES

You could use a mix of spinach and kale, or a mesclun salad blend. Canned peaches can be used; go for those in juice – not syrup – and drain well.

Total Fat 7g • Saturated Fat 1g • Carbohydrate 15g • Sugars 15g • Fibre 4g • Sodium 9mg

TIP To add a salty, creamy element, try adding some crumbled feta cheese just before serving.

FOOD JANUARY / FEBRUARY 2018

23


WATERMELON & GINGER ALE COOLER PREP TIME 10 mins + freezing SERVES 4

DF GF ● ● ● ● ● ● ●

v

4 cups diced watermelon, diced, plus extra, to serve 1⅓ cups ginger ale 2 limes crushed ice 2 mint sprigs, plus extra, to serve ¼ cup caster sugar frozen melon balls, to serve (optional)

PER SERVE Energy 178kcal, 745kj • Protein 1g • Total Fat 1g • Saturated Fat 0g • Carbohydrate 40g • Sugars 40g • Fibre 2g • Sodium 16mg

cook’s

NOTES Use a melon baller or measuring spoon to make melon balls, then freeze in a plastic bag. Frozen melon produces a slushy-style drink; fresh melon results in a more fluid consistency. Using melon balls instead of ice cubes prevents the drink diluting.

PROPS STEVENS AND STYLIST’S OWN

1 Freeze the watermelon in a freezer bag for six hours or overnight. 2 Purée the frozen watermelon in a food processor or blender. Add the

ginger ale, lime juice to taste, ice and a couple of sprigs of mint. 3 Place the caster sugar in a saucer. Rub the rims of the glasses with a cut lime then dip in the caster sugar to frost the rim. 4 Place a few melon balls in each glass, if using, and fill glasses with the cooler. Decorate with slices of lime, watermelon and mint sprigs.

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FOOD JANUARY / FEBRUARY 2018


Perfect produce

cook’s

NOTES For the fruits, try kiwifruit, strawberry, banana, mandarin or blueberries. You can add flaked coconut or almonds for crunch, or swap the ricotta for your favourite flavoured Greek yoghurt or whipped coconut cream.

WATERMELON PIZZA WITH VANILLA CREAM PREP TIME 10 mins SERVES 4

v ● ● ● ● ● ● ●

LS

½ cup ricotta ¼ cup cream cheese, softened ½ teaspoon vanilla essence 2 tablespoons icing sugar, approx 2 whole watermelon slices, 2.5cm thick 1 cup mixed fruit pieces or berries fresh mint or edible flowers such as viola or nasturtium, to garnish

1 In a small bowl, mix ricotta, cream cheese and vanilla together until combined. Add the icing sugar and beat until smooth. 2 Wipe the surface of the melon slices with kitchen towel to remove surface moisture. Spread half the ricotta mixture onto each slice. 3 Decorate with fruit pieces or berries, mint or edible flowers. Cut into wedges and serve chilled. PER SERVE Energy 171kcal, 715kj • Protein 4g • Total Fat 9g • Saturated Fat 5g • Carbohydrate 19g • Sugars 19g • Fibre 2g • Sodium 124mg

TIP You could use honey or maple syrup instead of icing sugar, if desired.

FOOD JANUARY / FEBRUARY 2018

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inseason fruit ADD SOME SUN - KISSED SUMMER FLAVOUR WITH OUR PEACHY KEEN RECIPES

RECIPES & STYLING SOPHIE GRAY PHOTOGRAPHS TODD EYRE

peaches

T

he downy yellow skin, blushed with orange, the succulent flesh, the aromatic sweet juice... who doesn’t love a good peach? Delicious eaten raw, peaches are also extremely versatile in cooking. They can be grilled, baked, poached, stuffed, pickled, chopped into salsa or chutney or blended into a sauce or purée. From classic desserts like peach melba and peach cobbler, to healthy smoothies, through to decadent bellini or julep-style cocktails, you’ll never get bored with peaches in the kitchen. From the Rosaceae family, which includes fruits like plums and cherries, peaches are vitamin-rich, extremely low in calories and contain no saturated fat or cholesterol. It’s best to eat the skin where possible, as that’s where you’ll find most of the dietary fibre. One peach will get you well along the way in your recommended daily allowance of vitamins, including vitamins A, C, E; and they are also rich in minerals such as potassium. When choosing, the best peaches will be fairly firm, vibrant in colour and will have a nice aroma. Avoid those with brown spots or shrivelled skin. Store at room temperature, stem-end down, until they give a little when squeezed – at which point eat, or refrigerate.

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Perfect produce PEACH & ROSEMARY PORK CHOPS PREP + COOK TIME 35 mins SERVES 4

DF GF LS ● ● ● ● ● ● ● ● ●

1½ tablespoons oil salt and pepper, to taste 4 x pork loin chops, fat trimmed 1 red onion, finely chopped ½ teaspoon rosemary, finely chopped 3 tablespoons brown sugar 2 tablespoons cider vinegar 1 tablespoon wholegrain mustard 500g ripe peaches, peeled, chopped

1 Heat half the oil in a heavy frying pan. Season the chops and cook for around 4 minutes until each side is well browned. Cover with a lid or foil and set aside for 10 minutes. 2 In a separate pan, heat the remaining oil and cook the onion and rosemary until softened. Add the sugar, vinegar, mustard and peaches and bring to a simmer. Cover and cook

3-5 minutes or until the juice runs. 3 Add the cooked chops to the pan, cover with sauce, and heat gently to a simmer – around 4 minutes. Serve the pork chops with the sauce spooned over the top. PER SERVE Energy 261kcal, 1093kj • Protein 22g • Total Fat 10g • Saturated Fat 2g • Carbohydrate 19g • Sugars 19g • Fibre 4g • Sodium 169mg

TIP If fresh peaches are not available, this dish works well with drained canned peaches.

cook’s

NOTES Cooking chops this way uses residual heat, so they brown on the outside while remaining tender and juicy inside. The safe internal temperature for pork is 71°C.


PEACHY BARBECUE WINGS PREP + COOK TIME 35 mins + marinating SERVES 4

DF LS ● ● ● ● ● ● ●

3 large ripe peaches, peeled, coarsely chopped ¼ cup store-bought barbecue sauce 1 tablespoon cider vinegar 3 tablespoons of peach or apricot jam pinch of cayenne pepper 1kg chicken wings salt and pepper, to taste

1 In blender or food processor, place chopped peaches, barbecue sauce, vinegar, jam and cayenne pepper. Process until smooth. Reserve ½ cup of sauce for serving. 2 Season wings with salt and pepper. Place in a large bowl or resealable plastic bag with remaining sauce and mix to coat. Marinate for at least 30 minutes. 3 Preheat oven to 210°C. Arrange wings on a roasting tray in a single layer and bake, turning once or twice, for 25 minutes or until rich golden brown and cooked. Serve with the reserved peachy sauce.

cook’s

NOTES

To peel peaches, cut a cross in the stalk end. Plunge into a pot of boiling water for 1 minute, then plunge into iced water. The skins should slip off.

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FOOD JANUARY / FEBRUARY 2018

PER SERVE Energy 105kcal, 438kj • Protein 12g • Total Fat 3g • Saturated Fat 1g • Carbohydrate 6g • Sugars 6g • Fibre 1g • Sodium 87mg

TIP Use the sauce to bake drumsticks or boneless chicken breast, or use to glaze a pork fillet for roasting.


Perfect produce PEACHES & CREAM PIE

cook’s

NOTES

PREP + COOK TIME 2 hours + chilling SERVES 8-10

● ● ● ● ● ● ● ● ● ●

flour, for dusting ¼ cup rolled oats 1 egg, separated ¼ cup brown sugar ½ cup white sugar ¼ teaspoon cinnamon ⅓ cup sour cream ¼ cup cornflour 4 large peaches, peeled, sliced 1 tablespoon sugar, for sprinkling (optional)

PROPS STEVENS AND STYLIST’S OWN

SWEET PASTRY ● 2½ cups plain flour ● 1 tablespoon sugar ● ½ teaspoon salt ● 220g butter, cubed ● ¼ cup cold water ● 2 teaspoons white vinegar 1 Make the Sweet pastry (see right). 2 Preheat oven to 200°C. Dust a 23cm pie dish with flour. On a floured bench, roll a Sweet pastry disc out to line the pie dish, leaving just over 1cm overhang all the way around. Scatter the oats in the bottom, place on a baking tray. 3 In a large bowl combine egg yolk, sugars, cinnamon, sour cream and cornflour and mix. Fold in the peach slices and pour into the prepared tin; don’t overfill. 4 Roll the second disc of pastry into a large rectangle, slightly thinner than the first. Cut into 12-14 strips. Place strips across pie, spacing evenly. To create a lattice effect, fold alternate strips back on themselves, then lay a pastry strip crossways to the others. Replace the strips that were folded back, bringing them over the crossways one. Repeat, using the alternate strips that stayed in place the first time. Continue this process, using our picture as a guide. 5 Fold pastry overhang up over the edge of the lattice, forming a rim on the

edge of the pie dish. Crimp with your fingers or a fork. Brush pastry with egg white and sprinkle with sugar, if desired. 6 Bake for 10 minutes then reduce the temperature to 190°C. Bake a further 40-50 minutes until the filling in the centre is bubbling. Cover edges with foil if becoming too brown. Filling will set when cool. Serve chilled or reheated. Sweet pastry Stir together flour, sugar and salt. Using a knife, pastry blender or processor, cut in butter until pieces are pea-sized. Add water and vinegar and mix lightly, then turn onto bench. Mixture will be crumbly. Don’t knead; instead gather the crumbs, lift, fold, press and repeat, folding and pressing for 2 minutes or until dough forms. Roll into a log, divide in 2, flatten each half into a disc. Wrap and refrigerate for 1 hour.

The filling must reach bubbling point in the middle in order to set; increase overall cooking in 5 minute increments if required. You can omit the lattice and cover the pie completely with pastry; crimp the edges and slice in vents.

TIP You could use 500g canned peaches, drained, instead of fresh, if preferred.

PER SERVE (10) Energy 449kcal, 1877kj • Protein 6g • Total Fat 22g • Saturated Fat 14g • Carbohydrate 55g • Sugars 24g • Fibre 4g • Sodium 248mg

FOOD JANUARY / FEBRUARY 2018

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Perfect produce

inseason vege DON’T BE DARK ON THIS NUTRIENT - RICH VEGETABLE – IT’S MORE VER SATILE THAN IT MAY APPEAR

RECIPES & STYLING SOPHIE GRAY PHOTOGRAPHS TODD EYRE

eggplant

T

his member of the nightshade family really looks the part, especially if you’re talking about the oval-shaped, dark-purple globe variety. But eggplant, or aubergine as it is also known, can be white, yellow, green and light purple and comes in a variety of shapes and sizes. Originally from South and East Asia, eggplant journeyed into Europe and Africa with the Arab incursions of the Middle Ages, and has inveigled its way into much of their cuisine. Without eggplant, we’d not have French ratatouille or Greek moussaka – not to mention a plethora of Middle Eastern dishes like baba ganoush and makdous. And let’s not forget the presence of eggplant in African, Indian and Persian stews, tagines and curries. A nutrient-dense food, eggplant delivers good amounts of dietary fibre, manganese, potassium, folate, vitamin K and vitamin C, with few calories. It is incredibly popular among vegetarians for its nutritional profile and versatility. In the past it was common to slice then salt eggplant before using, ostensibly to draw out the bitter liquid. However, today eggplant is bred to remove the bitterness, so it’s not really necessary. Using salt, however, will draw out liquid – meaning they won’t soak up so much oil when you are frying them.

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FOOD JANUARY / FEBRUARY 2018


ROASTED EGGPLANT CURRY PREP + COOK TIME 45 mins SERVES 4-6

v ● ● ● ● ●

cook’s

NOTES

This curry is fragrant rather than hot – if you want more heat, increase the chilli to ½ teaspoon. Try replacing the dry spices with a Thai green curry paste and adding a squeeze of lime.

● ● ● ● ● ● ● ● ● ● ●

LS 2 eggplants, cut into 15mm cubes 3 tablespoons olive oil 1 teaspoon fennel seeds 1 onion, chopped 1 teaspoon of grated ginger 4 garlic cloves, chopped 1 teaspoon garam masala 1 teaspoon ground coriander ½ teaspoon turmeric ¼ teaspoon chilli powder 400g canned chopped tomatoes 400ml coconut cream salt and pepper ⅓ cup natural yoghurt a handful of coriander rice or naan bread and toasted cashews, to serve (optional)

with 2 tablespoons of the oil. Roast for around 25 minutes or until beginning to colour, turning a couple of times. 2 Heat remaining oil in a medium saucepan, add fennel seeds and heat until popping. Stir in onion, ginger and garlic and cook for 2- 3 minutes until soft, then add the spices and cook gently for 2 minutes. 3 Stir in the tomatoes, coconut cream and roasted eggplant; season. 4 Simmer the mixture for 20 minutes or until thickened. Top with a spoonful of yoghurt and a sprinkle of coriander. Serve with rice or naan bread. Scatter with toasted cashews, if desired. PER SERVE (6) Energy 240kcal, 1003kj • Protein

1 Preheat oven to 220°C. Place diced eggplants in a roasting tray and toss

3g • Total Fat 21g • Saturated Fat 13g • Carbohydrate 8g • Sugars 8g • Fibre 4g • Sodium 91mg

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Perfect produce

cook’s

NOTES Known as berenjenas con miel, fried eggplant with honey is a traditional Spanish tapas. The salty, savoury sweet mix is very moreish. In Andalusia, cane syrup is used but any fragrant honey works well.

FRIED EGGPLANT WITH THYME HONEY PREP + COOK TIME 20 mins + standing SERVES 4, as a snack

v ● ● ● ● ● ● ● ●

1 large or 2 small eggplants, cut into 1cm slices 350ml milk 4 tablespoons honey 4 sprigs of thyme, plus extra, to serve 2 tablespoons plain flour 2 tablespoons fine polenta ⅓ cup olive oil, approx pinch of salt

1 Layer eggplant slices in a shallow dish and pour over the milk, leaving them to soak for an hour. Turn once or twice so all slices get a good soaking. 2 Heat honey and thyme in a saucepan until bubbling. Set aside to cool.

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FOOD JANUARY / FEBRUARY 2018

3 Combine the flour and polenta and sprinkle onto a plate. Pour oil into frying pan to a 5mm depth. 4 Drain the eggplant slices then dredge them in the flour and polenta mixture, coating both sides. Fry in batches, until golden brown both sides. Drain on kitchen paper. 5 Sprinkle with salt then spoon over the honey and scatter with thyme. Serve warm with other tapas or as a pre-dinner nibble. PER SERVE Energy 324kcal, 1354kj • Protein 4g • Total Fat 22g • Saturated Fat 5g • Carbohydrate 28g • Sugars 22g • Fibre 1g • Sodium 81mg

TIPS Presoaking the eggplant in milk reduces the quantity of oil that can be absorbed. You can also slice it into wedges.


GOOD FOR YOU High in natural antioxidants such as Vitamin E and Oryzanol, a naturally occurring plant sterol which has been shown to reduce cholesterol absorption, making it one of the healthiest cooking oils.

GOOD FOR YOUR FOOD Alfa One BBQ Grill & Pan Spray is an environmentally friendly spray can that is naturally propelled. It contains 100% pure rice bran oil. It has a non-flammable propellant and high smoke point making it the perfect choice for the BBQ.

For tasty recipes visit alfaone.co.nz


Perfect produce TERIYAKI BAKED EGGPLANT WITH SESAME SEEDS PREP + COOK TIME 35 mins SERVES 4, as a side dish

v

LS

2 eggplants 1 tablespoon sesame oil ● 1 tablespoon sesame seeds, toasted ● spring onion, to decorate (optional) ●

TERIYAKI MARINADE ● ¼ cup soy sauce ● ¼ cup shin mirin ● 2 tablespoons brown sugar ● 2 cloves garlic, crushed ● 1 teaspoon grated ginger 1 Preheat oven to 180°C and line a tray with baking paper.

2 Make Teriyaki marinade (see right). 3 Slice the eggplants in half, lengthways, then score the flesh in a diagonal pattern, taking care not to slice through the skin. 4 Brush all over with sesame oil and cook, skin-side down, in a frying pan for 2-3 minutes until the bottoms flatten and the incisions begin to open. Turn over and cook cut-side down for around 2 minutes until lightly browned. Transfer to prepared tray. 5 Spoon marinade over the cut sides of the eggplant until it runs into the

incisions. Leftover marinade can be refrigerated. Bake for 20-25 minutes until tender and caramelised. Scatter with toasted sesame seeds and sliced spring onion, if desired. Teriyaki marinade Combine all the ingredients in a small saucepan and simmer for 3-4 minutes, until slightly reduced. PER SERVE Energy 324kcal, 1354KJ • Protein 4g • Total Fat 22g • Saturated Fat 5g • Carbohydrate 28g • Sugars 22g • Fibre 1g • Sodium 81mg

cook’s

NOTES Precooking the eggplant halves in the frying pan creates flat bottoms, which prevent them from tipping over in the oven and spilling the marinade out.

PROPS STEVENS AND STYLIST’S OWN

DF ●


Summer BBQ at Seriously When you’re planning a BBQ this summer ZHoYHPDGHLWHDV\DQGDáRUGDEOHDW Countdown. Look out for the green Countdown label in-store and online at countdown.co.nz for everything you need for your perfect summer BBQ.

For more recipes and tips visit countdown.co.nz/foodhub


inseason vege IS IT A FRUIT OR IS IT A VEGE? REGARDLESS, COOKED OR RAW, THIS DELICIOUS PRODUCE IS A SUMMERTIME ESSENTIAL POPULAR IN MULTIPLE CUISINES

RECIPES & STYLING SOPHIE GRAY PHOTOGRAPHS TODD EYRE

tomatoes

Y

es, yes, we know that just like cucumbers, courgettes and squash, tomatoes are technically a fruit, but in culinary terms they are treated as vegetables. And it’s in the kitchen they’ve proven to be one of the most versatile, beneficial and popular veges on the planet. A member of the Solanaceae family, also known as nightshades, they are related to potatoes, eggplant, peppers and chillies. Tomatoes are not only an excellent source of the antioxidant lycopene, which creates that red colour, they also have good quantities of vitamin C, vitamin A, folate and potassium. A key ingredient in most of the world’s great cuisines, it’s hard to miss the fact that tomatoes work with just about everything. Part of the reason is the naturally occurring glutamate, which adds an umami character (or a ‘savouriness’) to foods. They pair well with olive oil, cheese and fragrant herbs in the Mediterranean diet; while their acidity makes them an excellent ingredient in curries and as a base for casseroles. Their freshness and texture makes them perfect for salsas, and where would your banger in bread be without tomato sauce? Tomatoes even make a star turn in the iconic Bloody Mary cocktail. When choosing, go for plump, heavy tomatoes with smooth skins, and a sweet, earthy aroma. Store at room temperature, out of direct sunlight.

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FOOD JANUARY / FEBRUARY 2018


Perfect produce ROASTED TOMATO, CHEESE & HERB STRATA PREP + COOK TIME 1 hour 45 mins + chilling SERVES 6

v ● ● ● ● ● ● ● ● ● ● ●

LS 8 tomatoes, halved ½ tablespoon thyme, chopped 2 tablespoons olive oil salt and pepper, to taste 3 cups milk 8 eggs 3 cups grated tasty cheese 1 cup grated parmesan cheese pinch of cayenne pepper 1 store-bought baguette, cut into cubes (approx 8 cups) 4 cups baby spinach

1 Preheat oven to 220°C. Line a tray with baking paper. 2 Toss the tomatoes with the thyme, oil, salt and pepper in a bowl. Spread on tray and roast, stirring once or twice, until the tomatoes are slightly dried and starting to brown. Cool completely.

3 Whisk the milk, eggs and some salt and pepper in a large bowl. Add grated tasty cheese, ¾ cup of the parmesan and cayenne pepper. Mix in the cubed bread and spinach. 4 Pour into a 3-litre baking dish and scatter on the roasted tomatoes. Refrigerate for at least 1 hour – ideally chill overnight. 5 Heat oven to 180°C. Sprinkle the strata with the remaining ¼ cup parmesan and bake, uncovered, for 45 minutes or until golden brown and almost set. Turn off the heat and let the strata rest in the oven for 10 minutes before serving. PER SERVE Energy 824kcal, 3449kj • Protein 52g • Total Fat 61g • Saturated Fat 38g • Carbohydrate 14g • Sugars 12g • Fibre 3g • Sodium 1193mg

cook’s

NOTES An average-sized supermarket baguette yields around 8 cups of bread cubes. Sourdough bread also works well in this dish. Use the recipe as a base and add other ingredients like sliced sausage or chorizo and mushrooms.

TIP If you like a little more heat, increase the cayenne pepper, or add a little chilli to the mixture in step 3.

FOOD JANUARY / FEBRUARY 2018

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TOMATO,POMEGRANATE & MINT SALAD PREP TIME 15 mins SERVES 4-6

DF GF ● ● ● ● ● ●

v

LS

3-4 cups mixed colour cherry tomatoes, halved ½ red capsicum, deseeded, chopped 1 cup cucumber, peeled, deseeded, diced ¼ red onion, finely chopped seeds of 1 pomegranate a handful of mint leaves, torn

HONEY VINAIGRETTE

2 teaspoons red wine vinegar ¼ cup olive oil ● pinch of salt ● 1-2 teaspoons of honey, to taste ● ●

1 Make Honey vinaigrette (see below). 2 Combine the tomatoes, capsicum, cucumber, onion and pomegranate seeds in a bowl. 3 Add the Honey vinaigrette and sprinkle over the mint leaves. Spoon onto a serving dish. Honey vinaigrette Combine all the ingredients in a bowl. PER SERVE (6) Energy 155kcal, 650kj • Protein 2.5g • Total Fat 10g • Saturated Fat 2g • Carbohydrate 12g • Sugars 12g • Fibre 5g • Sodium 46mg

cook’s

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FOOD JANUARY / FEBRUARY 2018

PROPS STEVENS AND STYLIST’S OWN

NOTES The acidity in this sweet tangy salad goes well with sticky, spicy or fatty foods. The pomegranate seeds have an interesting popping texture. You can add some baby spinach leaves if you prefer a leafier salad with more greens.


Perfect produce

TIP You can replace the fresh red chilli with a pinch of dried chilli, if desired.

cook’s

NOTES EASY TOMATO JAM PREP + COOK TIME 1 hour 30 mins MAKES 3 x 200ml jars, approx

DF GF ● ● ● ● ● ● ● ● ●

To peel tomatoes, cut a cross in the stalk end, plunge into boiling water for 30 seconds then transfer into iced water. The skins should slip off easily. For longer storage, bottle while piping hot into sterilised jars and seal with sterilised lids.

v

500g (2-3) red onions, cut into quarters 1kg ripe tomatoes, peeled 4 garlic cloves, sliced 1 red chilli, chopped (optional) 1 tablespoon grated ginger 250g brown sugar 150ml red wine vinegar 5 cardamom pods ½ teaspoon paprika

1 Place onion, peeled tomatoes, garlic, chilli and ginger in a processor and pulse to a purée. 2 Tip all the ingredients into a large heavy-based pan, add the sugar, vinegar, cardamom pods and paprika and bring to a simmer, stirring frequently. Simmer for 1 hour, stirring occasionally. 3 Increase heat to a gentle boil; cook for around 15 minutes or until the

mixture turns dark, jammy and shiny. Cool then refrigerate. Will keep for up to 6 weeks in the fridge. PER 17G SERVE Energy 30kcal, 125kj • Protein 0g • Total Fat 0g • Saturated Fat 0g • Carbohydrate 7g • Sugars 7g • Fibre 1g • Sodium 8mg

FOOD JANUARY / FEBRUARY 2018

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Simply

GRILLICIOUS AN ESSENTIAL PART OF THE KIWI SUMMER, A GOOD BARBECUE IS S O MUCH MORE THAN A FEW SAUSAGES AND A LOAF OF BREAD. IN FAC T, IT CAN TAKE YOU THROUGH BREAKFA ST, LUNCH, DINNER AND BEYOND RECIPES & STYLING SOPHIE GRAY PHOTOGRAPHS TODD EYRE

W

hether you’re at a bach or in your backyard, staying on a campground or by the beach, the barbecue is a key component of the holiday kitchen. The smell of food slowly grilling is synonymous with summer – and happily it’s a form of cooking most can handle with ease. But how many of us really push the boat out when it comes to using the trusty old barbecue? While there is nothing wrong with a few sausages, the odd slab of steak and some charred corn on the cob, the same old line-up can feel a little repetitive – and your grill is capable of an awful lot more. Over the following pages we will show you how you can use your barbie to deliver an all-day menu of beautiful dishes. From Breakfast Pizza to Grilled Madeira Cake, there are endless options when it comes to alfresco cooking. And don’t feel you need an endless supply of bulky equipment. A heavy frying

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FOOD JANUARY / FEBRUARY 2018

pan or skillet and some long-handled barbecue tongs and toasting forks should do the trick. If you’re packing for a trip away, measure out the dry ingredients for the recipes and store in resealable plastic bags, which you can also write the method on. Take a good roll of foil too – it’s perfect for keeping dishes warm, providing a layer between the grill and the food, and acting as a drip tray. Garlic-infused oil is also a handy ingredient to have on hand as it saves on time and mess. As well as experimenting with our recipes, don’t forget the old classics. Bananas stuffed with a few lumps of chocolate then baked in foil are always popular with the kids – as are simple toasted marshmallows. Another one for sweet-toothed youngsters is baking brownie mix inside a scooped out orange skin. Just wrap in foil and barbecue for about 15 minutes. The options are endless, so get fired up about barbecuing, and happy grilling!


All-day barbecue

Menu BR EA KFAS T

• Camp Crumpets with Cinnamon Bu tte • Bushman’s Bread Breakfast Pizza r LU NC H

• Griddled French Melts

• Campsite Barbecue Baked Beans DI NN ER

• Balsamic Beef Skewers with Flatbre ad • Summer Vegetable Tart DE SS ER T

• Grilled Madeira Cake with

Brandy Syrup & Ro

asted Fruit

• Campground Cobbler


Camp Crumpets with Cinnamon Butter RECIPE ON PAGE 48

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FOOD JANUARY / FEBRUARY 2018


All-day barbecue

Bushman’s Bread Breakfast Pizza RECIPE ON PAGE 48


All-day barbecue GRIDDLED FRENCH MELTS PREP + COOK TIME 20 mins SERVES 4

LS ● ● ● ● ● ● ● ● ●

● ●

4 x 2.5cm thick slices of bread 3 eggs ¾ cup milk salt and pepper 40g butter, melted 4 tablespoons plain flour 2 teaspoons dijon mustard a dash of milk 4 tablespoons store-bought caramelised onion relish or onion jam (optional) 4 large slices of gruyère cheese 100g shaved champagne ham

1 Place the bread slices flat on a board and slice each horizontally, keeping one edge intact to create a flap you can lift and lower back in place. 2 Combine eggs, milk and salt and

pepper in a shallow dish; whisk lightly and set aside. 3 In a small bowl mix the butter, flour, mustard and milk to form a spreadable paste. Spread the insides of each slice of bread with the paste. Add onion jam, if using, then fill with a good slice each of cheese and some ham. 4 Heat an oiled grill to medium heat. Dunk each sandwich quickly on both sides in the egg mixture and place on the oiled grill. If your barbecue has a cover, close it. Cook gently for around 5 minutes each side until golden and crisp outside and melting in the middle. PER SERVE Energy 339kcal, 1419kj • Protein 24g • Total Fat 15g • Saturated Fat 7g • Carbohydrate 26g • Sugars 10g • Fibre 2g • Sodium 872mg

TIP Use your favourite chutney instead of onion jam, or try the Easy Tomato Jam on page 39.

cook’s

NOTES Similar to emmental and comté, gruyère is an Alpine cheese which has high moisture and melts cohesively. A really hard cheese, like parmesan, will melt as individual shavings; a soft cheese like brie will melt and flow; and young cheese like mozarella is all stretch. The best cheeses combine both age and moisture for flavour, melt and stretch.


CAMPSITE BARBECUE BAKED BEANS

TIP If you like a little heat, you could swap the can of baked beans in sauce for a can of hot chilli beans in sauce.

PREP + COOK TIME 40 mins SERVES 6

DF LS ● ● ●

cook’s

NOTES You can use any mix of canned beans, even a three-bean one. Use ½ red and ½ yellow capsicum for colour. Tomato and barbecue sauce are quite sweet, but low sugar options are available.

● ● ● ● ● ● ● ● ● ●

5 rashers streaky bacon, chopped ½ cup store-bought barbecue sauce 1 cup store-bought tomato sauce or ketchup 1 tablespoon molasses 1 teaspoon wholegrain mustard 400g canned low-sugar baked beans 400g canned kidney beans, drained, rinsed 400g canned butter beans or cannellini beans, drained, rinsed 1 tablespoon garlic-infused olive oil 1 capsicum, chopped 1 onion, chopped salt, to taste bread, to serve (optional)

1 Preheat the grill to high. Place a heavy-based frying pan or skillet on the grill to heat. When hot, reduce the heat to medium and cook the bacon until almost crisp. 2 In a bowl combine sauces, molasses, mustard and all the beans. Set aside. 3 Add oil to pan, then add capsicum and onion and cook until tender. Stir in beans and sauce, add salt to taste and simmer uncovered for around 25 minutes, stirring frequently until slightly thickened and beginning to caramelise around edges. 4 Serve beans on thick slices of bread toasted on the grill. PER SERVE Energy 341kcal, 1426kj • Protein 21g • Total Fat 9g • Saturated Fat 3g • Carbohydrate 38g • Sugars 17g • Fibre 13g • Sodium 1299mg


Balsamic Beef Skewers with Flatbread RECIPE ON PAGE 50

46

FOOD JANUARY / FEBRUARY 2018


All-day barbecue

Summer Vegetable Tart RECIPE ON PAGE 50

FOOD JANUARY / FEBRUARY 2018

47


CAMP CRUMPETS WITH CINNAMON BUTTER PREP + COOK TIME 45 mins SERVES 4

v ● ● ● ● ● ● ●

LS 700ml milk 2½ cups plain flour 1½ teaspoons salt 2 teaspoons sugar ½ teaspoon baking soda 1½ sachets instant yeast 50g butter

CINNAMON BUTTER ● 110g butter, soft ● ⅓ cup brown sugar ● ½ teaspoon vanilla essence ● ½ teaspoon cinnamon

TIP You can top crumpets with honey, maple or golden syrup, or use the syrup from the recipe for Grilled Madeira Cake, opposite.

1 Preheat barbecue to a medium heat. Place the milk in a saucepan to warm gently then set aside. 2 In a bowl combine the flour, salt, sugar, baking soda and yeast. Gradually whisk in the warm milk. The mixture should resemble thick cream. Cover with a tea towel or place the bowl inside a plastic bag

and set in a warm place for 25-30 minutes or until bubbly and risen. 3 Meanwhile, make Cinnamon butter (see below, right). 4 Turn the grill to high and heat a heavy-based frying pan or skillet. Melt a knob of butter in pan, reduce the heat to medium and pour in ¼ of the batter, covering the bottom of the pan. 5 Cook gently for around 5 minutes. When the surface is covered in small tubular air holes and set and the bottom is golden, flip the crumpet out of the pan. Toast the top directly on the grill. 6 While toasting the top of the first crumpet, melt more butter in the pan and start making the next one. 7 When lightly toasted on top, spread the crumpet with

BUSHMAN’S BREAD BREAKFAST PIZZA

cook’s

NOTES

Milk made from milk powder is convenient when camping and has no discernible difference when used in cooking. Place the yeast sachets unopened in a bag with the other dry ingredients.

the Cinnamon butter, cut into segments and serve while warm. Cinnamon butter Beat the butter and sugar together in a small bowl until combined, then beat in the vanilla and cinnamon. PER SERVE Energy 773kcal, 3235kj • Protein 17g • Total Fat 39g • Saturated Fat 24g • Carbohydrate 87g • Sugars 23g • Fibre 4g • Sodium 1418mg

TIP

PREP + COOK TIME 40 mins SERVES 6

LS ● ● ● ● ● ● ● ● ● ● ● ● ●

2½ cups self-raising flour 1 teaspoon baking powder pinch of salt 40g butter 1¼ cups milk, approx ⅓ cup garlic-infused olive oil 6 portobello mushrooms 3 tomatoes, halved 3 sausages, cooked, sliced 6 eggs 3 tablespoons basil pesto 1 cup grated pizza cheese (optional) a handful of baby spinach leaves (optional)

1 Preheat grill and grill plate to medium. Combine flour, baking powder, salt and butter, rubbing or pulsing in a processor. Mix in enough milk to form a dough. Divide into 6 pieces and shape on a floured board into discs

48

FOOD JANUARY / FEBRUARY 2018

around 12cm in diameter. Brush lightly with garlic oil and cook gently on each side on an oiled grill until puffed and golden. 2 While the bases are cooking, brush the mushrooms and tomatoes with oil and cook on the grill plate. Reheat the sausages and fry the eggs in an oiled pan or on the grill plate. 3 Turn grill to low, spread pesto on pizza bases; add cheese, if using. Close hood; cook for 1-2 minutes to melt cheese, frequently checking to avoid burning. Top with spinach leaves, an egg, mushroom, tomato and sausage slices; serve. PER SERVE Energy 624kcal, 2612kj • Protein 30g • Total Fat 33g • Saturated Fat 17g • Carbohydrate 49g • Sugars 5g • Fibre 5g • Sodium 1572mg

Bushman’s bread or damper is also good with a sweet topping. Swap the oil for melted butter and serve with golden syrup, or roll into long sausage shapes, wind around a toasting fork, and let the kids toast the dough.

cook’s

NOTES

Cook extra sausages to have cold. This is a great recipe to use up leftovers; top the bases with whatever you have on hand.


All-day barbecue

GRILLED MADEIRA CAKE WITH BRANDY SYRUP & ROASTED FRUIT PREP + COOK TIME 20 mins SERVES 4

v 4 firm, ripe peaches, nectarines or apricots, halved, stones removed ● 1 store-bought Madeira cake, cut into 8 thick slices ● 4 tablespoons butter, melted ● whipped cream or icecream and fresh berries, to serve (optional) ●

BRANDY SYRUP ● 1¼ cups brown sugar ● 1 cup water ● 1 teaspoon vanilla essence ● ¼ cup brandy

1 Make the Brandy syrup (see right). 2 Brush the cut-side of the fruit with syrup and place cut-side down on an oiled grill over medium heat for around 4 minutes, until caramelised on cut side. Flip and move to a cooler, outer edge of grill for 5-10 minutes, or until softened but still holding their shape. Keep warm. 3 Brush cake slices with melted butter and toast on grill 1-2 minutes each side. Turn with spatula gently, as cake is fragile. 4 To assemble, place toasted cake on plates. Top with grilled fruit, then pour a

generous amount of syrup over peaches. Top with a dollop of whipped cream and a few slices of fresh fruit, if desired. Brandy syrup Preheat the grill to medium. Combine the brown sugar, water, vanilla essence and brandy in a saucepan and set on the grill to heat and reduce by a third. PER SERVE Energy 656kcal, 2748kj • Protein 8g • Total Fat 24g • Saturated Fat 13g • Carbohydrate 100g • Sugars 84g • Fibre 5g • Sodium 437g

cook’s

NOTES You can grill all sorts of fruit – pineapple, bananas and stone fruits will all work well with this dish. Omit the brandy from the sauce if you prefer. Serve leftover sauce on breakfast pancakes or French toast, or swirl into porridge.

FOOD JANUARY / FEBRUARY 2018

49


All-day barbecue BALSAMIC BEEF SKEWERS WITH FLATBREAD PREP + COOK TIME 45 mins SERVES 6

LS ● ● ● ● ● ● ●

TIP Make homemade balsamic glaze by simmering ½ cup balsamic vinegar and 1 tablespoon brown sugar until reduced to a syrupy consistency.

● ●

½ cup store-bought balsamic glaze 2 tablespoons garlic-infused olive oil 1 tablespoon Worcestershire sauce 1 tablespoon rosemary, finely chopped a large handful parsley, coarsely chopped 500g rump or sirloin steak, cut into 2cm cubes 12 large button mushrooms, halved salt and pepper green salad, to serve

EASY BARBECUE FLATBREAD ● 1½ cups self-raising flour, plus extra, for dusting ● ½ tablespoon baking powder ● ½ tablespoon salt ● 1 cup natural yoghurt ● ¼ cup garlic-infused olive oil ● 1 egg yolk

1 Combine half the glaze, the oil, Worcestershire sauce and herbs in a bowl or resealable plastic bag. Add the chopped beef and mushrooms and season with salt and pepper. Mix well and refrigerate for 30 minutes. 2 Make the Easy barbecue flatbread (see right). 3 Thread the marinated meat onto skewers, alternating with mushroom halves. Allow around 3 pieces of meat and 2 mushroom halves per skewer. 4 Heat grill to medium and spray or brush it with oil. Place the skewers on the grill and, if your grill has a hood, put it down. Cook the beef skewers for 3 minutes each side or until done to your liking. Serve with warm flatbread, salad and a drizzle of the remaining balsamic glaze.

Easy barbecue flatbread 1 Mix the flour, baking powder, salt and yoghurt in a bowl or processor to a soft dough. Knead on a floured board for 1 minute until smooth. Allow the dough to rest for 5 minutes. 2 Combine the oil and egg yolk and set aside. Roll the dough into 6 4mm-thick flat pieces. Brush one side with oil mixture. 3 Grill, oiled side facing the heat, until puffed and golden. Turn the dough over, brush the uncooked side, and grill until puffed and golden. PER SERVE Energy 614kcal, 2571kj • Protein 24g • Total Fat 45g • Saturated Fat 12g • Carbohydrate 27g • Sugars 2g • Fibre 2g • Sodium 1318mg

SUMMER VEGETABLE TART v ● ● ● ● ● ● ● ● ● ● ●

TIP Add other toppings such as mushrooms, or strips of charred corn, leftover sausage or a handful of olives.

50

● ●

LS ⅓ cup garlic-infused olive oil, plus extra for cooking 1 eggplant, sliced into rounds 2 courgettes, sliced lengthways into 4 1 capsicum, halved, deseeded 8-10 cherry tomatoes ½ red onion, sliced non-stick cooking spray 2 sheets store-bought puff pastry ¼ cup tomato paste ¼ cup store-bought chutney a handful of thyme, oregano or parsley 85g feta cheese salt and pepper

1 Preheat the barbecue plate and grill to medium. Oil the grill and drizzle the vegetables with oil on both sides. 2 Cook the eggplant and courgette strips on both sides

FOOD JANUARY / FEBRUARY 2018

on the grill until tender and slightly charred. Remove and set aside. Cook capsicum halves until blackened; place in a plastic bag to cool. When cool enough to handle, slip off the skins. Cut the flesh into smaller pieces. 3 Cook tomatoes and onion on the grill plate, adding a splash of oil if needed, until softened. Remove all the vegetables and close the barbecue hood to allow the inside to heat. 4 Spray a 32cm x 18cm x 3cm slice tray with non-stick spray. Line with pastry sheets, overlapping in the middle. Prick the pastry all over with a fork. 5 Combine tomato paste and chutney and spread over base. Layer in the grilled vegetables and chopped herbs, scatter on the crumbled feta and season

cook’s

NOTES Roll a long strip of foil into a ring and place it under the tray to lift it up off the grill, if needed. You need a barbecue with a hood for this dish as the tart needs to heat on both the top and bottom.

with salt and pepper. 6 Turn off the centre burners, leaving the other burners on low so the tart cooks slowly. Place the tart in the middle and close the hood, cooking for 20-30 minutes. Check from time to time to ensure the base isn’t scorching. PER SERVE Energy 677kcal, 2832kj • Protein 13g • Total Fat 46g • Saturated Fat 19g • Carbohydrate 50g • Sugars 13g • Fibre 7g • Sodium 1044mg

PROP SOURCING EMILY SOMERVILLE - RYAN PROPS FATHER RABBIT, FLOTSAM AND JETSAM, ALEX AND CORBAN, JUNK AND DISORDERLY

PREP + COOK TIME 45 mins SERVES 4


cook’s

NOTES CAMPGROUND COBBLER

Heating the fruit while adding the topping helps the topping to cook from the bottom up. Remove leftovers from the skillet as acids in the fruit can interact with the iron pan, spoiling the flavour.

PREP + COOK TIME 40 mins SERVES 6

v ● ● ● ● ● ● ● ● ● ● ● ●

Alfa One cooking spray 550g canned apple pie filling 2 cups berries ¼ cup sugar 1 tablespoon arrowroot 115g butter 1½ cups plain flour 2 heaped teaspoons baking powder ⅓ cup brown sugar ½ teaspoon mixed spice ½ teaspoon cinnamon ¾ cup milk

1 Preheat barbecue grill to medium. Spray a heavy-based frying pan or well-seasoned skillet with non-stick spray. Mix pie filling, berries, sugar and arrowroot

together; pour into pan or skillet. 2 Rub butter into flour with fingertips, then add remaining dry ingredients. Stir in the milk to form a thick batter that will drop off the spoon. 3 Place skillet onto grill to heat and dollop spoonfuls of batter over fruit. Close the barbecue hood and reduce heat to low. Cook for around 25 minutes or until the topping is puffed and lightly golden. Serve warm or cold. PER SERVE Energy 437kcal, 1829kj • Protein 6g • Total Fat 17g • Saturated Fat 11g • Carbohydrate 64g • Sugars 37g •

Oil in one The perfect choice when barbecuing, Alfa One Rice Bran Oil BBQ Grill & Pan Spray is completely non-flammable and has a high smoke point. You can spray it directly onto food, grill or skillet, happy in the knowledge you are using 100% rice bran oil. RRP $5.99

Fibre 4g • Sodium 120mg

FOOD JANUARY / FEBRUARY 2018

51


Barbecue sides

Dress up your

TIP

1

SALAD 1 OREGANO VINAIGRETTE

Dressing can taste harsh when tested with a spoon. Taste it the way it’s meant to be eaten – with a lettuce leaf or some other ingredient in your salad, and adjust accordingly.

PREP TIME 5 mins MAKES ½ cup

DF GF

v

LS

Place ⅓ cup olive oil, 2 tablespoons red wine vinegar, 1 clove crushed garlic and 1 tablespoon finely chopped oregano in a screw-top jar; shake well. Season with salt and black pepper. Serving suggestion Great with a Greek salad, or anything with grilled haloumi or feta cheese. PER 15ML SERVE Energy 88kcal, 368kj • Protein 0g • Total Fat 10g • Saturated Fat 2g • Carbohydrate 0g • Sugars 0g • Fibre 0g • Sodium 38mg

2 LIME DRESSING PREP TIME 10 mins MAKES ¾ cup

DF GF

2

LS

Blend 1 tablespoon coarsely chopped coriander root and stem, 5 cloves coarsely chopped garlic, 1 teaspoon black peppercorns, ½ cup lime juice, 1 tablespoon fish sauce, 1 tablespoon grated palm sugar and 2 stalks coarsely chopped lemongrass. Season with salt and black pepper. Serving suggestion Suits Asian-style salads and seafood. PER 15ML SERVE Energy 7kcal, 32kj • Protein 0g • Total Fat 0g • Saturated Fat 0g • Carbohydrate 1g • Sugars 1g • Fibre 0g • Sodium 122mg

3

3 SWEET CHILLI DRESSING PREP TIME 5 mins MAKES ¾ cup

DF

v

Combine ½ cup sweet chilli sauce, ¼ cup rice wine, 1 tablespoon soy sauce, 2 cloves crushed garlic, 1cm piece finely grated ginger and 2 tablespoons finely chopped coriander in a small bowl. Season to taste with salt and black pepper. Serving suggestion Serve with grilled tofu, or with beef or pork ribs. PER 15ML SERVE Energy 21kcal, 90kj • Protein 0g • Total Fat 0g • Saturated Fat 0g • Carbohydrate 4g • Sugars 3g • Fibre 0g • Sodium 0mg

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FOOD JANUARY / FEBRUARY 2018


COMPLETE YOUR ALL - DAY BARBECUE WITH A SIMPLE SUMMER SALAD. JUST CHOP UP WHATEVER DELIGHTS YOU HAVE ON HAND, THEN ADD A FLAVOUR BOMB WITH OUR SIMPLE BUT SENSATIONAL DRESSING S

4

4 GREEK-STYLE DRESSING PREP TIME 5 mins MAKES 1 cup

DF GF

v

LS

Combine 3 cloves crushed garlic, ⅔ cup lemon juice, ¼ cup olive oil, 2 tablespoons oregano leaves and 2 teaspoons lemon thyme leaves in a small bowl. Season to taste with salt and black pepper. Serving suggestion A good option for seafood salads as well as with lamb, beef, chicken and pork dishes. PER 15ML SERVE Energy 38kcal, 158kj • Protein 0g • Total Fat 4g • Saturated Fat 1g • Carbohydrate 1g • Sugars 1g • Fibre 0g • Sodium 21mg

5 BALSAMIC DRESSING

5

PREP TIME 5 mins MAKES ½ cup

DF GF

v

LS

Combine ⅓ cup olive oil, 2 tablespoons balsamic vinegar and 1 clove crushed garlic in a bowl. Season to taste with salt and black pepper. Serving suggestion Works well with roasted-vegetable salads and lamb and beef.

TIP If you don’t have lemon thyme, use the same amount of regular thyme and a little lemon zest.

PER 15ML SERVE Energy 91kcal, 383kj • Protein 0g • Total Fat 10g • Saturated Fat 2g • Carbohydrate 0g • Sugars 0g • Fibre 0g • Sodium 21mg

6 THYME VINAIGRETTE PREP TIME 5 mins MAKES ½ cup

DF GF

v

LS

6

Place ¼ cup olive oil, ¼ cup white wine vinegar, 2 teaspoons lemon thyme leaves and 2 cloves crushed garlic in a screw-top jar; shake well. Season to taste with salt and black pepper. Serving suggestion Delicious with asparagus or beef or any leafy green salad. PER 15ML SERVE Energy 62kcal, 261kj • Protein 0g • Total Fat 7g • Saturated Fat 1g • Carbohydrate 0g • Sugars 0g • Fibre 0g • Sodium 18mg

FOOD JANUARY / FEBRUARY 2018

53


r e t t a Pl

MAtters IT’S THE SEASON TO ENTERTAIN – AND TO RELAX AND ENJOY TIME WITH YOUR GUESTS. MUCH OF THIS FABULOUS FINGER FOOD CAN BE PREPARED IN ADVANCE FOR FUSS - FREE ENTERTAINING

RECIPES & STYLING BAUER TEST KITCHEN PHOTOGRAPHS BAUER PHOTO STUDIOS

W

ith the summer social season in full swing, easy-butimpressive platters are a saviour for entertaining. Part of being a great host is making it look effortless, and platters are straightforward to prepare in advance, you don’t need to mess around plating individual portions, and you can keep utensils to a minimum. Wooden boards or white crockery are ideal for serving, as the neutral palette allows the food to star. Try varying the heights of different items on your platters to add visual interest, and don’t forget to include small dipping bowls and condiment jars. If you want the really straightforward version, simply stock up in advance on the likes of ham, salami and olives from the supermarket deli – throwing in some smoked salmon, mussels and prawns if the occasion warrants it. Don’t forget some fresh fruit, pastes and liquid honey to complement your selection. On the day of your soirée, grab fresh bread – perhaps sourdough or a baguette – and you’re good to go. However, if you feel like pushing the boat out a little more, read on for our great selection of summer sharing plates. All work in isolation, but can also be mixed and matched to suit a variety of tastes.

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FOOD JANUARY / FEBRUARY 2018


Make and take

Smoked Salmon & Pickled Fennel Buns RECIPE ON PAGE 60

FOOD JANUARY / FEBRUARY 2018

55


Make and take

Sushi Squares RECIPE ON PAGE 60

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FOOD JANUARY / FEBRUARY 2018


cook’s

NOTES To make your own za’atar, mix 1 teaspoon dried thyme with ½ teaspoon crushed sesame seeds, ¼ teaspoon sumac and ¼ teaspoon salt. Pizza can be made ahead and reheated.

ZA’ATAR PIZZA PREP + COOK TIME 15 mins MAKES 24

v

LS

430g loaf Turkish bread 2 tablespoons extra virgin olive oil ● 2 tablespoons flat-leaf parsley ● 1½ cups Greek yoghurt ● ●

ZA’ATAR TOPPING ● ½ teaspoon sumac ● ¼ teaspoon salt ● 2 tablespoons za’atar (see Cook’s notes) ● ¼ cup olive oil 1 Preheat oven to 230°C. 2 Make Za’atar topping (see below). 3 Cut bread in half horizontally. Spread Za’atar topping over the cut halves. 4 Place bread on an oven tray; bake for 7 minutes. 5 Drizzle bread with oil; cut each into 12 triangles. Sprinkle with parsley; accompany with yoghurt. Za’atar topping Combine all the ingredients in a small bowl. PER SLICE Energy 96kcal, 402kj • Protein 2g • Total Fat 6g • Saturated Fat 2g • Carbohydrate 9g • Sugars 1g • Fibre 1g • Sodium 164mg

FOOD JANUARY / FEBRUARY 2018

57


Make and take

cook’s

NOTES Risotto can be made and rolled 1 day ahead and kept in fridge. Roll in crumbs just before frying. Oil is hot enough when a cube of bread turns golden in 10 seconds.

CHICKEN YAKITORI PREP + COOK TIME 30 mins + chilling MAKES 24

DF GF LS ● ● ● ● ● ● ● ● ● ●

and the rice is just cooked. Add the cream; cook, stirring, for a further 2 minutes. 3 Remove from heat, stir in both cheeses. Cool for 20 minutes, then add egg yolks; season to taste with salt and black pepper. Spread rice over an oven tray lined with baking paper; cool for 15 minutes. 4 Divide risotto into slightly rounded tablespoons of mixture. With wet hands, roll the rice mixture into balls, then into breadcrumbs to coat. 5 Fill a large saucepan or deep fryer one-third full with oil; heat to 180°C. Fry the risotto balls, in batches, for 2 minutes, stirring occasionally, or until browned and heated through. Drain on paper towel. Cool the balls for 5 minutes before serving.

1 Heat a frying pan over medium heat. Add rice; toast, stirring frequently, for 5 minutes or until fragrant and light golden. Transfer to a mortar; pound with pestle until finely ground. 2 Place tamari, sake, mirin, sugar and spice in a small saucepan over medium heat. Bring to a simmer; cook for 2 minutes or until sugar dissolves. Remove from heat, add zest and oil. Transfer to a small bowl; refrigerate marinade until cool. 3 Combine tenderloins with marinade; refrigerate for 3 hours or overnight. 4 Heat a barbecue or a grill pan over high heat. Drain chicken tenderloins from marinade; reserve marinade in a small bowl. Thread 1 tenderloin onto each skewer in an ‘S’ shape. Cook skewers, brushing with reserved marinade, for 8 minutes, turning frequently, until charred and chicken is cooked through. 5 To serve, place skewers on a platter, then sprinkle over toasted rice and spring onions.

PER BALL Energy 193kcal, 812kj • Protein 2g •

PER TENDERLOIN Energy 96kcal, 403kj • Protein

Total Fat 16g • Saturated Fat 3g • Carbohydrate

11g • Total Fat 2g • Saturated Fat 0g • Carbohydrate

9g • Sugars 0g • Fibre 0g • Sodium 147mg

7g • Sugars 6g • Fibre 0g • Sodium 258mg

CHEESY RISOTTO BALLS PREP + COOK TIME 1 hour 15 mins + cooling MAKES 50

v ● ● ● ● ● ● ● ● ● ● ● ● ●

LS 40g butter 1 onion, finely chopped 2 cloves garlic, crushed 2 cups arborio rice ½ cup dry white wine 1 litre hot vegetable stock ½ cup cream ½ cup grated mozzarella cheese 1 cup grated parmesan cheese 2 egg yolks salt and black pepper 1½ cups panko breadcrumbs vegetable oil, for deep-frying

1 Heat butter in a medium saucepan over medium heat; add onion and garlic, then cook, stirring, for 2 minutes or until onion is softened. Add rice; stir to coat rice in mixture. 2 Add wine to pan; cook, stirring, for 2 minutes or until wine has evaporated. Gradually add hot stock, 1 cup at a time, stirring continuously, for 25 minutes or until all stock is used

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FOOD JANUARY / FEBRUARY 2018

2 tablespoons jasmine rice ⅓ cup tamari ¼ cup sake (optional) ¼ cup mirin ½ cup caster sugar 2 teaspoons five-spice powder 2 tablespoons finely grated orange zest 2 tablespoons grapeseed oil 24 chicken tenderloins 2 spring onions, thinly sliced on the diagonal


TIPS Use 24 x 15cm bamboo skewers, soaked in water for at least 30 minutes before using to prevent burning. Chicken can be skewered and marinated 1 day ahead.

FOOD JANUARY / FEBRUARY 2018

59


Make and take SUSHI SQUARES PREP + COOK TIME 1 hour + chilling + cooling MAKES 50

DF LS ● ● ● ● ● ● ● ● ● ● ● ●

cook’s

NOTES Try salmon, cucumber, avocado and pickled veges for a filling variation. Sushi seasoning is a mix of rice vinegar, sugar and salt; it’s available from supermarkets.

2 x 200g beef sirloin steaks ¼ cup store-bought teriyaki marinade 3½ cups water 2⅔ cups sushi rice 2 bunches thin asparagus, trimmed ⅓ cup Asian mayonnaise 1 teaspoon wasabi paste 1 tablespoon finely chopped fresh chives ½ cup sushi seasoning 2 nori sheets 2 tablespoons toasted sesame seeds 2 tablespoons black sesame seeds (optional) soy sauce, for dipping

1 Grease a 20cm x 30cm slice pan; line with plastic wrap, extending above sides. 2 Combine beef with marinade, cover; refrigerate for 2 hours or overnight. Drain beef; discard marinade. Heat an oiled large frying pan over medium-high heat.

Cook beef for 2 minutes each side or until cooked as desired; remove from pan, cover with foil, cool. Thinly slice just before assembling. 3 Place water and rice in a saucepan; bring to the boil. Reduce heat; simmer, covered, for 12 minutes or until water is absorbed. Remove from heat; stand, covered, for 10 minutes. 4 Meanwhile, boil asparagus for 2 minutes until just tender; refresh under cold water, drain on paper towel. 5 Whisk mayonnaise, wasabi and chives to combine. 6 Transfer rice to a large stainless steel or glass bowl. Gradually add sushi seasoning, stirring continuously until combined. Cool completely, stirring occasionally. 7 Using wet hands, press one-third of rice mixture into base of slice pan; spread with half the mayonnaise mixture. Top with asparagus, then

nori sheets, overlapping in centre. Spread over another third of rice mixture; top with remaining mayonnaise and beef slices. Spread remaining rice mixture over beef; sprinkle with half the combined sesame seeds. 8 Cover sushi cake with plastic wrap. Carefully turn out onto a chopping board. Remove plastic wrap from top; sprinkle with remaining sesame seeds. Replace plastic cover, turn sushi cake back into pan. Place a chopping board and a few heavy cans on top of sushi cake; refrigerate for 1 hour. 9 Turn out onto a chopping board. Using a sharp, wet knife, cut into 4cm x 3cm rectangles. Serve sushi with soy sauce. PER SQUARE Energy 68kcal, 283kj • Protein 3g • Total Fat 2g • Saturated Fat 1g • Carbohydrate 10g • Sugars 1g • Fibre 0g • Sodium 89mg

SMOKED SALMON & PICKLED FENNEL BUNS PREP TIME 20 mins + chilling MAKES 20

LS ● ● ● ● ● ●

20 medium bread rolls, halved 1 cup spreadable cream cheese 480g hot-smoked salmon fillets, flaked 2 baby cos lettuces, leaves separated 4 radishes, thinly sliced 1 red onion, thinly sliced into rings

PICKLED FENNEL ● 2 tablespoons caster sugar ● 2 tablespoons finely chopped dill ● 1 tablespoon mustard seeds, toasted

60

FOOD JANUARY / FEBRUARY 2018

⅓ cup lemon juice 1 tablespoon white wine vinegar ● 2 teaspoons sea salt flakes ● 4 baby fennel bulbs, trimmed, thinly sliced ● ¼ cup extra virgin olive oil ● ●

1 Make the Pickled fennel (see right). 2 Spread bread roll bases with cream cheese; top with salmon, lettuce, Pickled fennel, radish and onion, then bread roll lids. 3 Serve the buns straight away on a large platter.

Pickled fennel Whisk the sugar, dill, mustard seeds, lemon juice, vinegar and salt until sugar dissolves. Add fennel, season to taste; toss to combine. Cover; refrigerate for 30 minutes. Drain fennel mixture; discard pickling liquid. Combine pickled fennel with the olive oil. PER BUN Energy 289kcal, 1212kj • Protein 11g • Total Fat 14g • Saturated Fat 4g • Carbohydrate 30g • Sugars 4g • Fibre 3g • Sodium 881mg


Summer Entertaining at Seriously Good Prices

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TIP:

For well-deďŹ ned layers of fruit, freeze thoroughly between additions. For a sweeter green layer, swap kiwifruit with melon.


Get away from

tooth pain

Summer holidays are a chance to escape the daily grind – and now you can leave sensitive tooth pain behind too. Thanks to Colgate® Sensitive Pro-Relief™, this year you’ll be enjoying ice blocks in the sun.

FRUIT SALAD ICE BLOCKS

DOES IT HURT TO EAT ICE CREAMS AND ICE BLOCKS?

“Not being able to enjoy a nice cold ice block while on holiday in Hawaii.” – Sandra, Lower Hutt

SERVES 8 PREP 20 MINS (plus freezing) 1½ cups (350g) seedless watermelon, peeled, chopped ½ punnet (about 5) strawberries, hulled 2 cups mango, chopped (1 large mango) ½ cup pineapple juice, plus ½ cup, extra 2 cups kiwifruit (about 6), peeled, chopped 1. Place 8 x ¾ cup ice block moulds or 8 plastic cups in a large tray. 2. In a blender, combine watermelon and strawberries. Blend until smooth. 3. Pour evenly among moulds. Freeze 1 hour, until almost set.

4. Slice off mango cheeks, score flesh and scoop out cubes. Cut off sides and slice flesh from seed. 5. In a blender, pulse mango and juice together. Pour into moulds and freeze 30 minutes. 6. Slice top and base from each kiwifruit and slice around sides to remove skins. Cut into quarters and blend with extra juice until smooth. Pour into moulds. 7. Press in paddle pop sticks. 8. To serve, dip cups in hot w t a few seconds to release ice blocks from moulds.

COLGATE’S ADVICE FOR SANDRA

> For instant relief, apply Colgate®

Sensitive Pro-Relief™ toothpaste directly to each sensitive tooth with your fingertip and gently massage for one minute.

> After consuming acidic food and drink, wait 30 minutes before brushing your teeth to reduce the risk of further enamel erosion. > Ensure you brush your teeth gently for two minutes twice daily, paying attention to the gum line.

For the relief of tooth sensitivity. Always read the label. Use only as directed. See your dentist if symptoms persist. Colgate-Palmolive Ltd, Lower Hutt. TAPS PP1485


M

VELLO R A

e u g n i r Me GO BEYOND THE PLAIN OLD KIWI PAV WITH OUR EASY DESSERTS, WHICH ARE SURE TO PLEASE A CROWD

RECIPES & STYLING BAUER TEST KITCHEN PHOTOGRAPHS BAUER PHOTO STUDIO

hen you want to please a crowd on a sunny summer’s day, there are few sweet delights that go down better than a good meringue. Hugely versatile, meringues are as delicious plain with cream and berries as they are flavoured with nuts and turned into a roulade with orange filling and chocolate sauce. While store-bought meringues work perfectly well for a quick throw together dessert, whipping one up yourself is easier than you may think – as long as you avoid some common mistakes. Firstly, ensure your equipment is scrupulously clean; a rogue trace of fat in your bowl can be fatal. Use room temperature eggs, and separate them into small bowls before adding them to the mixing bowl – that way if you have a burst yolk, the whole lot won’t be wasted. Whisk whites until they reach the soft peak stage before gradually adding the sugar – all our recipes use caster or icing sugar as this dissolves more easily. You can try warming the sugar slightly to further help with this. You’ll know the mixture is ready when you can hold the bowl upside down and it doesn’t come out – only do this over your head if you’re feeling confident you’ve nailed it! Adding cornflour and vinegar creates a chewier texture, while the secret to crispy meringues is cooking them long and low in the oven. And finally, it’s never guaranteed in a Kiwi summer, but try to pick a nice dry day for your meringue making – just like most of us, meringues aren’t fans of damp and humidity. And if the heavens do open just as you are getting your whisk on, add a teaspoon of cream of tartar with the sugar to avert disaster.

W

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Indulge

Mango Passionfruit Vacherin RECIPE ON PAGE 68

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PEANUT & CARAMEL MERINGUE CAKE PREP + COOK TIME 1 hour 40 mins + chilling + cooling SERVES 8 ● ● ● ● ● ● ● ● ●

3 egg whites 1 cup icing sugar, sifted, plus 1 tablespoon, extra 3 teaspoons cornflour ¾ cup ground almonds 3 teaspoons powdered gelatine 2 tablespoons cold water ½ cup smooth peanut butter ½ cup canned caramel condensed milk 2½ cups cream

NUTTY CARAMEL SAUCE ● ½ cup caster sugar ● 2 tablespoons water ● 1 cup cream ● ⅓ cup smooth peanut butter ● ⅓ cup roasted peanuts, chopped

bake for a further 5 minutes or until browned. Cool. 5 Stir the condensed milk, butter, syrup and salt in a small heavy-based saucepan over medium heat for 12 minutes or until caramel-coloured. Stir in cream. Spread the filling into the pastry cases. 6 Beat egg whites with an electric mixer until soft peaks form. Gradually add sugar, beating until sugar is dissolved and mixture is thick and glossy. Spoon over tarts. 7 Bake tarts for 5 minutes or until browned lightly. Stand for 20 minutes before serving.

1 Preheat oven to 150°C. Lock bases in two 22cm springform pans upside down; grease, line bottom and sides. 2 Beat egg whites until soft peaks form. Gradually add sugar, beating until glossy. Beat in cornflour and ground almonds. Divide between pans; smooth. 3 Bake for 40 minutes. Cool in oven. 4 Make Nutty caramel sauce (see below). 5 Sprinkle gelatine over water; stand for 5 minutes. Whisk peanut butter, caramel and 1 cup of the cream over low heat for 2 minutes. Increase heat; bring to the boil. Remove from heat; stir in gelatine until dissolved. Cool. 6 Whisk remaining 1½ cups cream to soft peaks; fold into cooled mixture. Spoon over 1 meringue in pan. Remove other meringue from its pan; place on top. Refrigerate for 4 hours or until set. 7 Dust cake with extra icing sugar and serve with Nutty caramel sauce.

Sweet pastry Process the flour, icing sugar and butter until crumbly. Add egg yolk and enough of the water, while processing, for the ingredients to just come together. Briefly knead dough on a floured surface until smooth. Enclose pastry with plastic wrap; refrigerate for 30 minutes.

Nutty caramel sauce Stir sugar and the water over low heat, without boiling, until sugar dissolves. Increase heat; boil for 10 minutes, without stirring, remove from heat. Allow bubbles to subside; add cream. Return to heat; stir until smooth; stir in peanut butter and peanuts. Cool.

LITTLE SALTY CARAMEL MERINGUE PIES PREP + COOK TIME 1 hour + chilling + cooling + standing MAKES 8

v ● ● ● ● ● ● ●

395g canned sweetened condensed milk 30g butter ¼ cup golden syrup or treacle 2 teaspoons sea salt flakes ¼ cup cream 4 egg whites 1 cup caster sugar

SWEET PASTRY ● 1 cup plain flour ● ⅓ cup icing sugar ● 90g butter, cold, chopped ● 1 egg yolk ● 1 tablespoon iced water, approx 1 Make Sweet pastry (see right). 2 Grease eight 8cm-round loose-based fluted flan pans. Divide pastry into 8 portions. Roll a portion of pastry at a time between sheets of baking paper until large enough to line pans. Ease pastry into pans, press into sides; trim edges. Prick bases with a fork. Place on an oven tray; refrigerate for 20 minutes. 3 Meanwhile, preheat oven to 170°C. 4 Line pastry with baking paper and fill with some dried beans or rice. Bake for 10 minutes. Remove paper and beans;

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PER SERVE Energy 596kcal, 2495kj • Protein 9g •

PER SERVE Energy 422kcal, 1766kj • Protein 14g

Total Fat 28g • Saturated Fat 18g • Carbohydrate

• Total Fat 21g • Saturated Fat g • Carbohydrate

79g • Sugars 66g • Fibre 1g • Sodium 739mg

45g • Sugars 43g • Fibre 3g • Sodium 85mg


Indulge

cook’s

NOTES The meringue layers can be made up to three days ahead; keep stored in an airtight container at room temperature until you are ready to assemble.

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Indulge

LEMON MERINGUE CUPCAKES

MANGO PASSIONFRUIT VACHERIN

PREP + COOK TIME 1 hour 15 mins + chilling + cooling MAKES 12

PREP + COOK TIME 1 hour 45 mins + freezing + cooling SERVES 6

v ● ● ● ● ● ● ● ●

GF 125g butter, soft 2 teaspoons finely grated lemon zest 1⅔ cups caster sugar 2 eggs ¾ cup desiccated coconut 1¼ cups self-raising flour, sifted ⅓ cup milk 4 egg whites

LEMON CURD ● 4 egg yolks ● ⅓ cup caster sugar ● 1 teaspoon finely grated lemon zest ● ⅓ cup lemon juice ● 40g butter 1 Make the Lemon curd (see right). 2 Preheat oven to 170°C. Line a 12-hole muffin pan with paper cases. 3 Beat butter, zest, ⅔ cup of the sugar and the eggs until light and fluffy. Stir in coconut, then flour and milk. Spoon into cases; smooth. 4 Bake for 20 minutes or until a skewer inserted

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comes out clean. Cool. Increase oven to 210°C. 5 Cut a 2cm deep hole in centre of each cake, fill with Lemon curd; discard tops. 6 Beat egg whites until soft peaks form. Gradually add the remaining 1 cup sugar, beating well until glossy. 7 Using a piping bag fitted with a 1cm plain tube, pipe meringue onto cupcakes. Place on an oven tray; bake for 5 minutes until meringue is lightly browned. Lemon curd Place all ingredients in a small bowl over a saucepan of simmering water – don’t let the water touch the base of the bowl. Stir constantly until the mixture thickens. Remove from the heat. Cover the surface of the curd with plastic wrap; chill until cold. PER CAKE Energy 350kcal, 1466kj • Protein 6g • Total Fat 21g • Saturated Fat 14g • Carbohydrate 35g • Sugars 25g • Fibre 2g • Sodium 212mg

● ● ● ● ● ● ● ●

v

1 litre mango frozen yoghurt, softened slightly ⅓ cup passionfruit pulp cornflour, for dusting 3 egg whites ¾ cup caster sugar ½ teaspoon vanilla bean paste ¾ teaspoon white vinegar 1 mango, finely chopped

1 Grease a deep 22cm round cake pan; line base with baking paper. 2 Combine yoghurt and passionfruit. Spoon into pan; level. Freeze for 2 hours until firm. Cut six 7cm rounds from the frozen yoghurt. Return to freezer. 3 Meanwhile, preheat oven to 110°C. Line 2 baking trays with baking paper, then mark 12 x 7cm circles on paper. Turn paper, marked-side down; lightly grease paper and dust with cornflour. 4 Beat egg whites in a small clean bowl with an electric mixer until soft peaks form. Gradually add sugar; beat

until sugar dissolves and mixture is glossy and stiff. 5 Fold in vanilla bean paste and vinegar until combined. Using a 1cm plain piping nozzle, pipe meringue evenly over marked circles. 6 Bake for 1 hour until dry to touch. Turn oven off; cool in oven with door ajar. 7 To assemble, place half the meringue discs on serving plates. Top with yoghurt rounds, then remaining meringue discs. Serve with mango. PER SERVE Energy 263kcal, 1100kj • Protein 6g • Total Fat 2g • Saturated Fat 1g • Carbohydrate 55g • Sugars 55g • Fibre 2g • Sodium 69mg

TIP You can swap the mango yoghurt for mango icecream, and also use storebought meringue.


Rice e t i Wh on

LONG , SHORT, STARCHY OR STICKY, RICE COMES IN MANY DIFFERENT FORMS. IT’S ALSO MORE VERSATILE THAN YOU MIGHT THINK – AS OUR CLEVER TWISTS ON THIS PANTRY STAPLE SHOW

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popular food staple for most Kiwis, not to mention the rest of the world, rice is one of those pantry essentials that never seems to go out of fashion. What changes is what we do with it – and that is often dictated by the type of rice we favour. The size of the rice grain determines what types of dish it is suitable for, as well as the way it is cooked, and there are clear preferences among different cuisines. Fragrant long-grain jasmine rice tends to feature in Thai and Chinese dishes. Another popular rice in Asia is medium-grained glutinous black rice, which was once known as ‘forbidden rice’ because it was exclusively reserved for the Chinese Emperors. This develops into a deep purple colour when cooked and is commonly used in porridges and desserts. In Japan, a favourite is short-grain japonica rice, which cooks to tender softness with just enough cling to be eaten with chopsticks. It’s perfect for sushi and is used to make the alcoholic rice wine sake. On the Indian subcontinent they favour aromatic long-grain basmati rice. Further afield, the Italians use the starchy, medium-grain arborio rice, which helps to create rich, creamy risottos. Any type of white rice is also available brown, an option that has a mild, nutty flavour, and is chewier than white rice. As only its outermost hull is removed, brown rice retains most of its nutritional value, making it the healthiest rice choice. Just be aware it takes longer to cook than white rice.

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New ways Baby Carrot & Black Rice Salad RECIPE ON PAGE 76


Chilli Prawn Nasi Goreng RECIPE ON PAGE 76

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New ways SPICED VEGETABLE BIRYANI PREP + COOK TIME 45 mins SERVES 4

DF GF ● ● ● ● ● ● ● ● ● ● ● ● ● ● ● ● ● ●

v

LS

2 onions 1 tablespoon vegetable oil 1 clove garlic, crushed 2 teaspoons garam masala 400g canned chopped tomatoes 1 potato, cut into 1cm pieces 2 cups water 1 red capsicum, thinly sliced 1½ cups basmati rice 8 cardamom pods, bruised ½ teaspoon chilli powder ¼ teaspoon ground turmeric ¼ cup sultanas 1 carrot, cut into long, thin strips 1 courgette, cut into long, thin strips ½ cucumber, peeled into ribbons salt and black pepper ¼ cup roasted flaked almonds

● ●

⅓ cup loosely packed coriander ⅓ cup loosely packed mint leaves

1 Thinly slice 1 onion. Heat half the oil in a large saucepan over medium-high heat; cook garlic and sliced onion, stirring, for 5 minutes or until onion softens. Add garam masala; cook, stirring, for 1 minute. 2 Stir in tomatoes, potato, and ½ cup water; bring to the boil. Reduce heat; simmer, covered, for 10 minutes. Add capsicum; simmer, covered, for a further 10 minutes or until vegetables are tender. 3 Meanwhile, heat remaining oil in a saucepan over medium-high heat. Finely chop the remaining onion; cook,

stirring until soft. Add rice and spices; cook, stirring, for 1 minute until fragrant. 4 Stir in 1½ cups water and sultanas; bring to the boil. Reduce heat; simmer, covered, for 15 minutes until rice is just tender and the water is absorbed. Remove from heat. Stand, covered, for 5 minutes. Fluff with a fork. 5 Combine carrot, courgette and cucumber in a medium bowl. Season. 6 Place half the rice mixture in serving dishes; top with vegetable mixture, then remaining rice mixture and carrot mixture. Sprinkle with nuts and herbs. PER SERVE Energy 475kcal, 1990kj • Protein 11g • Total Fat 10g • Saturated Fat 1g • Carbohydrate 81g • Sugars 16g • Fibre 7g • Sodium 167mg

TIP Add a dollop of natural yoghurt, if desired. For nut allegy sufferers, simply omit the nuts.

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RICE PATTIES & TEMPEH SATAY SALAD PREP + COOK TIME 30 mins + standing SERVES 4

DF ● ● ● ● ● ● ● ● ● ● ●

v

LS

250g tempeh, cut into 5mm slices 2 tablespoons kecap manis 1 tablespoon finely chopped lemongrass 250g packet microwave brown rice 2 tablespoons peanut oil ¼ pineapple, peeled, cored, thinly sliced crossways ½ cucumber, deseeded, coarsely chopped 250g cherry tomatoes, halved 1 cup bean sprouts, trimmed 2 spring onions, cut into thin strips 1 cup loosely packed mint leaves

SATAY SAUCE ● ½ cup crunchy peanut butter ● 2 tablespoons kecap manis ● ¼ cup water ● 1 cup coconut cream ● 1 teaspoon chilli flakes ● 2 tablespoons lime juice

STICKY TERIYAKI RICE WITH CHICKEN & THYME PREP + COOK TIME 45 mins SERVES 4

DF LS ● ● ● ● ● ● ● ● ● ●

400g chicken breast fillets 1 tablespoon store-bought teriyaki marinade 2 teaspoons grated orange zest 2 tablespoons olive oil 2 cloves garlic, crushed 1 onion, finely chopped 1⅓ cups arborio rice 3 cups chicken stock 2 tablespoons coarsely chopped lemon thyme, plus extra, to serve 150g baby spinach leaves

1 Combine chicken with marinade and zest in a bowl; toss chicken to coat. 2 Heat half the oil in a saucepan; cook garlic and onion, stirring, until onion softens. Add rice and stock; bring to the boil. Reduce heat; simmer, covered,

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for 15 minutes, stirring halfway through cooking. Remove from heat; cover. 3 Meanwhile, heat remaining oil in a frying pan; cook chicken for 5 minutes each side. Rest for 5 minutes; thinly slice. 4 Stir thyme into risotto. Serve over a bed of spinach, topped with chicken and extra thyme. PER SERVE Energy 444kcal, 1857kj • Protein 29g • Total Fat 10g • Saturated Fat 2g • Carbohydrate 58g • Sugars 3g • Fibre 3g • Sodium 1012mg

TIP You can make your own teriyaki marinade – see our recipe on page 34.

1 Combine tempeh, kecap manis and lemongrass. Stand for 10 minutes. 2 Meanwhile, heat rice following packet directions. Pulse rice in a food processor for 30 seconds or until breaking down and slightly sticky. Heat oil in a frying pan over medium-high heat. Shape tablespoons of rice into small patties; cook patties, in batches, for 2 minutes each side or until lightly browned and crisp. Drain on paper towel. 3 Make Satay sauce (see below). 4 Cook tempeh in same frying pan for 30 seconds each side or until browned. 5 Arrange rice patties and tempeh on a large serving platter with pineapple, cucumber, tomato, bean sprouts, spring onions and mint. Serve with Satay sauce. Satay sauce Stir peanut butter, kecap manis and the water in a saucepan over low heat for 2 minutes until smooth. Add coconut cream and chilli; bring to a simmer, stirring constantly. Remove from heat; stir in juice. Will thicken on standing. PER SERVE Energy 496kcal, 2076kj • Protein 18g • Total Fat 32g • Saturated Fat 13g • Carbohydrate 31g • Sugars 10g • Fibre 8g • Sodium 1141mg


New ways

cook’s

NOTES

Tempeh is made from fermented cooked soy beans and is high in protein; you can use firm tofu instead. Use a mandoline to cut pineapple into very thin slices.


New ways

CHILLI PRAWN NASI GORENG PREP + COOK TIME 40 mins SERVES 4

DF LS ● ● ● ● ● ● ● ● ● ● ● ● ●

720g king prawns, cooked 2 tablespoons peanut oil 175g dried spicy sausage, thickly sliced 1 red capsicum, thickly sliced 2 cloves garlic, crushed 2 teaspoons grated ginger 1 teaspoon shrimp paste 2 red chillies, thinly sliced 4 cups cold cooked white long-grain rice 2 tablespoons kecap manis 1 tablespoon light soy sauce 4 spring onions, thinly sliced 4 eggs

1 Shell and devein prawns, leaving tails intact.

2 Heat a quarter of the oil in a wok over high heat; stir-fry sausage for 2 minutes until browned. Remove from wok. 3 Add half the remaining oil to wok; stir-fry capsicum, garlic, ginger, paste and three-quarters of the chilli for 2 minutes until soft. Add prawns and rice; stir-fry for 2 minutes or until prawns are heated. Return sausage to wok with sauces and half the onions; stir-fry until heated. 4 Place the remaining oil in a large frying pan over medium heat; fry eggs, one side only, until just set. 5 Divide Nasi Goreng between bowls, top each

with an egg; sprinkle with remaining onions and chilli. PER SERVE Energy 1141kcal, 4774kj • Protein 64g • Total Fat 22g • Saturated Fat 7g • Carbohydrate 166g • Sugars 3g • Fibre 4g • Sodium 1904mg

TIP Ensure cooked rice is well chilled before using in this recipe. White rice almost triples in volume when cooked.Extra rice will freeze well.

BABY CARROT & BLACK RICE SALAD PREP + COOK TIME 45 mins SERVES 6

DF GF

v

LS

⅔ cup black rice 400g multi-coloured baby carrots, trimmed ● 250g rocket leaves, torn ● 1 cup mint leaves ● 1 cup almonds, roasted, coarsely chopped ● ●

PRESERVED LEMON DRESSING ● 1 tablespoon preserved lemon zest ● ⅓ cup lemon juice ● ½ cup olive oil ● 1 clove garlic, crushed ● 2 teaspoons fennel seeds, toasted, lightly crushed ● 2 teaspoons ground cumin ● 1 teaspoon sweet paprika ● ¼ teaspoon cayenne pepper ● 1 teaspoon honey ● salt and black pepper

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1 Cook the black rice in a saucepan of boiling water, uncovered, for 30 minutes or until tender; drain. Rinse under cold running water; drain well. 2 Meanwhile, make the Preserved lemon dressing (see below). 3 Thinly slice carrots using a mandoline or V-slicer. Alternatively use a vegetable peeler to peel the carrots lengthways into ribbons. 4 Place carrots and rice in a large bowl with rocket, mint, almonds and Preserved lemon dressing; toss gently to combine. Preserved lemon dressing Remove and discard flesh from preserved lemon. Rinse

zest well; finely chop. Place in a large screw-top jar with remaining ingredients; shake well. Season. PER SERVE Energy 631kcal, 2641kj • Protein 10g • Total Fat 54g • Saturated Fat 7g • Carbohydrate 25g • Sugars 7g • Fibre 8g • Sodium 38mg

TIPS Preserved lemons are available from the supermarket. To toast fennel seeds, stir in a dry frying pan over medium heat for 2 minutes until fragrant. Dressing can be made up to 2 days ahead; refrigerate in a jar.


At the heart of every great dish

Our rice is made with only natural ingredients. Wholesome, delicious, genuine goodness. Available in Countdown, instore and online.

look out for these new flavours in store soon!


New ways

TIP Pear poaching liquid can be used in smoothies, to moisten cakes and to soak oats for bircher muesli.

COCONUT RICE PUDDING & POACHED PEARS PREP + COOK TIME 30 mins SERVES 4

GF ● ● ● ● ● ● ● ● ● ● ●

A rice solution

Cooking brown rice can be a time-consuming process, but with Tilda Steamed Brown Basmati you can have it ready in just two minutes. This classic rice, which is one of several in Tilda’s microwave rice range, boasts all the natural nutrients, texture and flavour you get when the bran is untouched, plus it has a medium to low GI and is a good source of fibre. RRP $2.30.

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2 cups clear apple juice 1 cinnamon stick 2 pears, peeled, quartered lengthways 500g packet microwave brown rice 1½ cups light coconut milk ⅓ cup firmly packed brown sugar 1 teaspoon ground cinnamon 1 teaspoon vanilla bean paste 2 tablespoons honey ⅓ cup dried apricots, finely chopped 1 cup Greek yoghurt

1 Place juice and cinnamon stick in a small saucepan. Bring to the boil. Add pears, reduce heat to medium; cook for 10 minutes or until fruit is just tender. Remove pears from pan; reserve cooking liquid for another use, discard cinnamon stick. 2 Combine rice, coconut milk, ¼ cup of the sugar, ground cinnamon and vanilla bean paste in a medium saucepan. Bring to a simmer; simmer over low heat, stirring, for 5 minutes or until heated through. 3 Meanwhile, combine honey and remaining 2 tablespoons sugar in a small frying pan over medium heat, stirring until sugar dissolves. Add apricots; cook, stirring, for 2 minutes or until coated and heated through. 4 Divide the rice pudding among bowls; top with the pear, yoghurt and apricot mixture. PER SERVE Energy 551kcal, 2309kj • Protein 8g • Total Fat 16g • Saturated Fat 10g • Carbohydrate 94g • Sugars 56g • Fibre 5g • Sodium 238mg


THE TASTE IS SIMPLY SUPERB NOW AWARDED 5 GOLD MEDALS

CHALLENGES MORE EXPENSIVE WINES


Four ways with pancakes FEBRUARY 13 IS PANCAKE DAY – SO GET READY TO FLIP OVER OUR DELICIOUS, FLUFFY SELEC TION, IN FLAVOUR S FOR EVERY TA STE RECIPES BAUER TEST KITCHEN PHOTOGRAPH BAUER PHOTO STUDIO

1

2

1 DOUBLE-CHOCOLATE PANCAKE STACK BASIC BUTTERMILK PANCAKES PREP + COOK TIME 40 mins MAKES 8

v ● ● ● ● ● ●

LS 2 eggs, at room temperature 1½ cups buttermilk ¼ cup caster sugar 2 cups self-raising flour, sifted ½ teaspoon baking soda, sifted 40g butter, chopped

1 Whisk eggs, buttermilk, sugar, flour and baking soda until smooth.

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2 Melt an eighth of the butter. For each pancake, pour ⅓-cup measures of batter into pan; cook for 2 minutes until bubbles appear on surface. Turn; cook other side until browned; remove.

v Stir ½ cup dark choc bits into Basic Buttermilk Pancakes batter before cooking. Melt 100g chopped dark chocolate with ½ cup cream in a saucepan over low heat for 2 minutes or until melted and smooth. Serve pancakes topped with scoops of vanilla icecream and the chocolate sauce. PER STACK OF 4 Energy 1687kcal, 7063kj •

PER STACK OF 4 Energy 917kcal, 2840kj • Protein

Protein 38g • Total Fat 79g • Saturated Fat 48g

30g • Total Fat 26g • Saturated Fat 14g • Carbohydrate

• Carbohydrate 206g • Sugars 95g • Fibre 6g •

138g • Sugars 37g • Fibre 5g • Sodium 1802mg

Sodium 1897mg


Four-way favourites

cook’s

NOTES

Make your own cheat’s buttermilk by adding 1-2 tablespoons lemon juice to 1 cup milk, then waiting a few minutes until curds form.

3

4

2 MIXED SEED, FIG & HONEY PANCAKE STACK v Stir 1 tablespoon pumpkin seeds, 1 tablespoon sesame seeds and 1 tablespoon sunflower seeds into Basic Buttermilk Pancakes batter before cooking. Serve pancakes topped with Greek yoghurt and halved fresh figs. Drizzle with honey.

3 BLUEBERRY & CINNAMON SUGAR PANCAKE STACK v Stir ½ cup blueberries into Basic Buttermilk Pancakes batter before cooking. Serve pancakes topped with extra blueberries and 2 tablespoons cinnamon sugar. Drizzle with pure maple syrup.

4 BANANA & SALTED CARAMEL PANCAKE STACK v Stir 100g butter, ½ cup firmly packed brown sugar, ½ cup cream and ¼ teaspoon sea salt in a small saucepan over low heat for 2 minutes or until combined. Serve Basic Buttermilk Pancakes topped with sliced banana and this caramel sauce.

PER STACK OF 4 Energy 1032kcal, 4320kj • PER STACK OF 4 Energy 1088kcal, 4554kj •

Protein 30g • Total Fat 26g • Saturated Fat 14g

PER STACK OF 4 Energy 1684kcal, 7051kj •

Protein 34g • Total Fat 33g • Saturated Fat 16g

• Carbohydrate 166g • Sugars 65g • Fibre 7g •

Protein 32g • Total Fat 90g • Saturated Fat 55g

• Carbohydrate 162g • Sugars 60g • Fibre 7g •

Sodium 1806mg

• Carbohydrate 188g • Sugars 85g • Fibre 7g •

Sodium 1815mg

Sodium 2388mg

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r e v e l C

Cookies THE SUMMER HOLIDAYS ARE THE PERFEC T OPPORTUNIT Y TO GET CREATIVE IN THE KITCHEN, WITH BISCUITS THAT WILL ADD A SWEET NOTE TO ANY PICNIC

RECIPES BAUER TEST KITCHEN PHOTOGRAPHS BAUER PHOTO STUDIO

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s handy for keeping the kids quiet as they are for treating friends when they drop by for coffee, a batch of freshly baked cookies is something that will make any home cook popular. At this time of year they are also a great addition to picnics, and useful to have in the car for road trips to the beach. To ensure yours turn out well, it’s essential to measure out the ingredients rather than using guesstimates. This is particularly important when it comes to flour – as too much will turn your biscuits into bullets. It is also worth buying an oven thermometer – many are under $15. You may be surprised by how much the actual heat in your oven differs to what you had set on the dial! Several of our recipes recommend chilling the dough before rolling it out – try not to skip this step as it will make the mixture easier to work with, especially when trying to achieve more delicate shapes. Aim to make all your cookies of a uniform thickness to ensure even baking, and when positioning on the oven tray, don’t forget to allow for spread. There’s no such thing as a baking disaster, but if you feel your biscuits don’t look as good as they taste, whizz up and use as a crumb topping over icecream, blend into a smoothie or mix with melted butter to create a cheesecake base. All the above are also great ways to use up leftover cookies... but really, who has those?!

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Baking

PASSIONFRUIT SHORTBREAD HEARTS PREP + COOK TIME 1 hour MAKES 32

GF ● ● ● ● ● ● ●

v

125g butter, cold, coarsely chopped ¼ cup caster sugar ¾ cup rice flour, sifted, plus extra, for dusting ¾ cup gluten-free plain flour, sifted 2 tablespoons gluten-free icing sugar 1 tablespoon xanthan gum 1 tablespoon passionfruit pulp

PASSIONFRUIT GLAZE ● 1 teaspoon butter, soft ● ½ cup gluten-free icing sugar ● 2 tablespoons passionfruit pulp

cook’s

NOTES

Store in an airtight container in the fridge for up to 2 weeks. You could swap passionfruit for 2 teaspoons of finely grated lemon or orange zest to make a citrus shortbread.

1 Preheat oven to 140°C. Grease 2 oven trays; line with baking paper. 2 Beat butter and caster sugar in a small bowl with an electric mixer until just combined; gradually beat in the flours, icing sugar and xanthan gum. Stir in the passionfruit pulp. 3 Turn out dough onto a lightly ricefloured surface; knead until just smooth. Roll out dough until 5mm thick; using a 6cm heart-shaped cookie cutter, cut 32 hearts from dough. Place hearts, about 2.5cm apart, on trays. 4 Bake biscuits for 15 minutes or until browned lightly and just firm. Stand on trays for 5 minutes before transferring to wire racks to cool. 5 Make Passionfruit glaze (see below). 6 Spread one side of the hearts with Passionfruit glaze. Stand on wire racks until set. Passionfruit glaze Stir ingredients in a bowl until smooth. PER BISCUIT Energy 72kcal, 302kj • Protein 0g • Total Fat 3g • Saturated Fat 2g • Carbohydrate 10g • Sugars 4g • Fibre 0g • Sodium 44mg

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cook’s

NOTES Biscuits will keep in an airtight container for up to 1 week. Don’t use boiled lollies for the centres as they will melt. While gelatine-based ones work well, vegetarians should opt for chocolate ones.

LEMON DAISY BISCUITS PREP + COOK TIME 40 mins + chilling + standing MAKES 16

v ● ● ● ● ● ● ● ●

180g butter, soft ⅓ cup icing sugar, sifted 1 teaspoon vanilla extract 1 tablespoon grated lemon zest 1¼ cups plain flour, sifted ⅓ cup cornflour, sifted 16 round lollies 2 tablespoons caster sugar

1 Preheat oven to 160°C. Grease 2 oven trays; line with baking paper. 2 Beat butter, icing sugar, vanilla extract and zest in a small bowl with an electric mixer until smooth. Stir in combined flour and cornflour to form a smooth dough. Flatten dough into a disc, wrap in plastic wrap and refrigerate for 1 hour. 3 Roll dough between baking paper sheets until 1cm thick. Using a 6cm flower-shaped cookie cutter, cut out shapes. Gather dough scraps; repeat rolling and cutting until all dough is used. 4 Place flowers on a chopping board; using a small knife, make cuts either side of the petals, cutting towards the centre of the flower to make individual petals. Place flowers on oven trays, turning petals up on their sides. 5 Bake for 13 minutes, then lightly push a lolly into the centre of each daisy; bake for a further 2 minutes or until lightly golden. 6 Sprinkle daisies with caster sugar; stand on trays for 10 minutes before transferring to a wire rack to cool. PER BISCUIT Energy 160kcal, 669kj • Protein 1g • Total Fat 9g • Saturated Fat 6g • Carbohydrate 18g • Sugars 6g • Fibre 0g • Sodium 67mg

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Baking

PIÑATA BISCUITS PREP + COOK TIME 1 hour + chilling + standing MAKES 8

a whole biscuit to enclose the lollies. Continue until all biscuits are used; stand for 1 hour to set.

ROYAL ICING ● 1½ cups icing sugar, sifted ● 1 egg white ● 1 teaspoon lemon juice

Royal icing Sift the icing sugar through a fine sieve. Lightly beat the egg white in a small bowl with an electric mixer until mixture is just broken up – don’t whip it into peaks. Beat in the icing sugar, a tablespoon at a time, to get the required consistency. When the icing reaches the right consistency, stir in the juice.

250g butter, soft ½ cup caster sugar ● 2½ cups plain flour, sifted ● pink, green, yellow and blue food colouring ● ½ cup mini lollies ●

1 Preheat oven to 170°C. Grease 2 oven trays; line with baking paper. 2 Beat butter and sugar in a medium bowl with an electric mixer until pale and creamy. Stir in flour until a firm dough forms; gently knead on a lightly floured surface until smooth. Divide dough into four equal portions; tint pink, green, yellow and blue. Flatten each portion into a disc; wrap separately in plastic wrap and refrigerate for 30 minutes or until firm. 3 Roll one dough portion between sheets of baking paper until 3mm thick. Using a 7cm star cookie cutter, cut out 10 stars, rerolling dough scraps if necessary. Using a 5cm star cutter, cut a star from the centre of 6 stars; you don’t need the small cut-out stars. 4 Place the whole and hollow stars on separate oven trays. Bake hollow stars for 7 minutes and whole stars for 10 minutes or until a biscuit can be pushed gently on the tray without breaking. Cool on trays. 5 Meanwhile, roll and cut stars in the same way from remaining coloured dough portions. 6 Make Royal icing (see right) and use to three quarter fill a piping bag. 7 To assemble piñatas, pipe icing around the edge of a whole star, top with a hollow star; pipe icing around hollow star and repeat, to create layers, using alternating colours for a pretty effect. Fill cavity with mini lollies. Pipe icing around the edge and top with

PER BISCUIT Energy 607kcal, 2541kj • Protein 6g • Total Fat 27g • Saturated Fat 17g • Carbohydrate 86g • Sugars 51g • Fibre 2g • Sodium 185mg

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Baking

GIANT PIZZA BISCUITS PREP + COOK TIME 1 hour + chilling + standing MAKES 24 wedges ● ● ● ● ● ● ● ● ● ● ● ●

125g butter, soft ⅓ cup caster sugar 1 teaspoon vanilla extract 1 egg 2 cups plain flour, sifted ¼ cup custard powder, sifted ⅓ cup strawberry jam 8 red sour straps 5 yellow musk sticks 8 spearmint leaves 10 black jelly beans 100g white chocolate melts

1 Preheat oven to 170°C. Grease 3 oven trays; line with baking paper. 2 Beat butter, sugar and vanilla with an electric mixer until smooth and pale. Add egg; beat to combine. Stir in flour and custard powder until a soft dough forms. Shape dough into a disc, wrap in plastic wrap; refrigerate for 1 hour.

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FOOD JANUARY / FEBRUARY 2018

3 Divide dough into 3 equal portions. Using a rolling pin, roll out one portion at a time between sheets of baking paper until 20cm round. Place rounds on oven trays. Cut rounds into 8 wedges each, but don’t separate the wedges. 4 Bake ‘pizzas’ for 15 minutes or until lightly golden and they can be pushed gently without breaking. 5 Cut pizzas into slices again (in case the wedges have baked together), but don’t separate. Stand biscuits on tray for 10 minutes before transferring to a wire rack to cool. 6 Spread jam over pizzas leaving a 1cm border. To make ‘salami’, use a 3cm round pastry cutter to cut rounds from the sour straps. To make ‘pineapple pieces’, cut musk sticks widthways into 3mm slices. To make ‘olives’, cut spearmint leaves and black jelly beans widthways into thin slices.

7 Place two slices of ‘salami’ on each pizza biscuit; scatter with ‘pineapple pieces’ and ‘olives’. 8 Melt white chocolate. Spoon into a small resealable plastic bag; snip end and drizzle chocolate over pizza to make ‘melted cheese’. Stand at room temperature until set. PER WEDGE Energy 148kcal, 618kj • Protein 2g • Total Fat 6g • Saturated Fat 4g • Carbohydrate 22g • Sugars 11g • Fibre 0g • Sodium 45mg


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FAMILY first

Quick and easy weekday food

cook’s

PHOTOGRAPH BAUER PHOTO STUDIO

NOTES

Small, but perfectly formed

W

hen you have a house full of hungry people and the barbecue is taking it’s time to heat up, the ability to rustle up a quick canapé is invaluable. It really doesn’t need to cost much time, money or effort to create finger food at its finest. Simply start with a bite-sized biscuit, pastry shell or piece of bread, then get creative with

toppings. These can be as simple or as extravagant as you like. Some of our favourite combos include: Creamy ripe brie, ham & fresh fig Cream cheese & salmon Roast beef & horseradish Lamb & mint jelly Hummus, carrot & coriander Egg mayonnaise, chorizo & chives Prawn & avocado

For a low-carb alternative, put your toppings on slices of cucumber. You can also make savoury mini toasts by brushing a sliced baguette with garlic oil and baking in the oven until lightly toasted.

·· ·· ·· ·

FOOD JANUARY / FEBRUARY 2018

91


t a E theWEEK

NEED DINNER IN A DA SH? WE HAVE TAKEN THE STRESS OUT OF MIDWEEK MEALS WITH 10 DISHES THAT WILL BE ON THE TABLE IN UNDER 40 MINUTES

RECIPES & STYLING BAUER TEST KITCHEN PHOTOGRAPHS BAUER PHOTO STUDIO

Steak & Spuds with Salsa Verde 92

FOOD JANUARY / FEBRUARY 2018


Pork Steaks with SautĂŠed Lentils

Spicy Red Beans with Rice

Chilli Chicken with BLAT Salad

Lamb Farfalle with Roasted Veges

Potato & Chorizo Salad with Romesco Sauce

Chicken with Blue Cheese & Apple Slaw

Dukkah Lamb Cutlets with Cauliflower

Salt & Pepper Tofu with Soba Noodles

Thai Beef Noodle Salad


Family favourites Ready in

30

minutes

POTATO & CHORIZO SALAD WITH ROMESCO SAUCE PREP + COOK TIME 35 mins SERVES 8

DF LS ● ● ●

cook’s

NOTES Try serving with kumara crisps – simply slice kumara into thin strips and shallowfry, in batches, in hot oil until crisp. Drain on paper towel.

DUKKAH LAMB CUTLETS WITH CAULIFLOWER PREP + COOK TIME 30 mins SERVES 4

DF GF LS ● ● ● ● ● ● ● ● ● ● ● ● ● ●

1 small cauliflower, trimmed ¼ cup olive oil salt and black pepper ¼ cup natural sliced almonds 2 teaspoons lemon juice cooking oil spray ⅓ cup dukkah 2 tablespoons balsamic glaze 12 x lamb cutlets, French trimmed 1 tablespoon flat-leaf parsley leaves 1 tablespoon mint leaves ½ cup store-bought baba ganoush or any eggplant dip ¼ teaspoon smoked paprika lemon halves, to serve

1 Preheat grill. 2 Cut cauliflower into 1.5cm-thick slices. Place on an oven tray; drizzle with half the oil, season. Place the cauliflower under grill for 8 minutes, turning halfway through cooking time, or until tender. Scatter with almonds; grill for a further 20 seconds or until nuts are browned lightly.

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3 Remove cauliflower mixture from grill; drizzle over lemon juice. 4 Meanwhile, spray a large frying pan with cooking oil; heat over medium-high heat. 5 Place dukkah in a shallow bowl. Combine balsamic glaze with remaining oil; rub onto lamb, season. Press lamb firmly onto dukkah to coat both sides. Cook lamb in heated pan for 3 minutes on each side or until cooked as desired. 6 Arrange lamb on cauliflower mixture, top with herbs. Serve with baba ganoush, sprinkled with paprika, and with lemon halves on the side. PER SERVE Energy 712kcal, 2979kj • Protein 31g • Total Fat 63g • Saturated Fat 17g • Carbohydrate 4g • Sugars 4g • Fibre 5g • Sodium 389mg

TIP You can make your own balsamic glaze, see the tip on page 50.

● ● ● ● ●

1kg waxy potatoes, unpeeled, cut into large chunks 1 cured chorizo sausage, thinly sliced ½ cup store-bought aioli, plus 1 tablespoon, extra 200g store-bought roasted capsicum, drained 170g jar marinated artichoke halves, drained ½ cup loosely packed flat-leaf parsley leaves ½ cup Sicilian green olives 1 red onion, thinly sliced

ROMESCO SAUCE ● ⅓ cup blanched almonds ● 200g store-bought roasted capsicum, drained ● 1½ teaspoons smoked paprika ● 1 tablespoon sherry vinegar ● 1 tablespoon extra virgin olive oil ● salt and black pepper 1 Place potatoes in a saucepan; cover with cold water. Bring to the boil. Boil, covered, for 15 minutes or until tender. Drain. Cover to keep warm. 2 Meanwhile, make Romesco sauce (see below). 3 Cook chorizo in a frying pan over high heat for 3 minutes or until browned. Drain on paper towel. 4 Add Romesco sauce and ½ cup aioli to the potatoes; toss to coat. Add chorizo, capsicum, artichokes, parsley, olives and onion; toss to combine. 5 Serve salad with extra aioli. Romesco sauce Blend or process almonds. Add capsicum, paprika and vinegar, processing until smooth. Add oil; blend until combined. Transfer to a bowl; season to taste. PER SERVE Energy 291kcal, 1216kj • Protein 9g • Total Fat 16g • Saturated Fat 2g • Carbohydrate 26g • Sugars 5g • Fibre 7g • Sodium 434mg


Ready in

35

minutes

cook’s

NOTES You can make your own roasted capsicum. Split, deseed and oil capsicum, then grill until blackened. Cool in a plastic bag; slip off skin and discard.

FOOD JANUARY / FEBRUARY 2018

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Ready in

30

minutes

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FOOD JANUARY / FEBRUARY 2018


Family favourites Ready in

20

minutes

THAI BEEF NOODLE SALAD PREP + COOK TIME 30 mins SERVES 4

DF LS ● ● ● ● ● ● ● ● ● ● ● ● ● ●

250g wide flat noodles 2 teaspoons peanut oil 500g beef, thinly sliced 1 tablespoon finely chopped lemongrass, white part only 1 clove garlic, crushed ⅔ cup lime juice ⅓ cup fish sauce 1 tablespoon coarsely grated palm sugar 100g baby spinach or cos lettuce, coarsely chopped ½ cucumber, thinly sliced 1 cup bean sprouts ½ cup loosely packed coriander leaves ½ cup loosely packed mint leaves, torn 1 spring onion, thinly sliced

1 Place noodles in a large heatproof bowl, cover with boiling water; stand for 5 minutes or until tender; drain. 2 Heat half the oil in a wok; stir-fry the beef, in batches, until browned. Remove from wok. 3 Heat remaining oil in wok; stir-fry lemongrass and garlic until fragrant. Return beef to wok with lime juice, fish sauce and sugar; stir-fry until everything is heated through. Add noodles; stir-fry until combined. 4 Serve on a bed of greens and cucumber, topped with bean sprouts, herbs and spring onion.

CHILLI CHICKEN WITH BLAT SALAD PREP + COOK TIME 20 mins SERVES 6

LS ● ● ● ● ● ● ● ● ● ●

6 x chicken thigh fillets, each cut into 3 pieces 1 teaspoon dried chilli flakes ½ teaspoon sea salt flakes 2 tablespoons olive oil 10 thin slices ciabatta cooking oil spray 6 rashers bacon, rindless 1 lettuce, leaves separated 1 avocado, sliced 2 tomatoes, sliced

PER SERVE Energy 284kcal, 1188kj • Protein 34g • Total Fat 10g • Saturated Fat 4g • Carbohydrate 12g • Sugars 5g • Fibre 2g • Sodium 2072mg

TIPS Sprinkle with thinly sliced red chilli for a kick of heat. If you don’t have palm sugar, replace with brown sugar.

BUTTERMILK DRESSING ● ⅓ cup buttermilk ● ⅓ cup sour cream ● 1 tablespoon finely chopped chives ● 1 tablespoon finely chopped dill ● 1 tablespoon white wine vinegar ● 1 clove garlic, crushed ● salt and black pepper

2 Combine chicken, chilli, salt and oil in a large bowl. Cook chicken on a heated, oiled grill plate or barbecue over medium heat for 3 minutes each side or until cooked through. Clean grill plate. 3 Spray the ciabatta lightly with cooking oil. Cook ciabatta and bacon on heated grill plate over high heat for 1 minute each side or until bacon is golden and crisp. 4 Arrange bacon, lettuce, avocado and tomato on plates, top with chicken; drizzle with the Buttermilk dressing. Serve with ciabatta. Buttermilk dressing Whisk ingredients in a small bowl until combined; season to taste. PER SERVE Energy 752kcal, 3148kj • Protein 39g

1 Make the Buttermilk dressing (see right).

• Total Fat 56g • Saturated Fat 18g • Carbohydrate 22g • Sugars 5g • Fibre 4g • Sodium 1060mg

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SALT & PEPPER TOFU WITH SOBA NOODLES PREP + COOK TIME 35 mins + standing SERVES 4

DF ● ● ● ● ● ● ● ● ● ● ● ● ●

v

LS

2 x 300g firm tofu 2 tablespoons sesame oil, plus 1 teaspoon, extra 2 tablespoons rice flour 2 tablespoons sesame seeds 1 teaspoon ground white pepper 1 teaspoon freshly ground black pepper 1 teaspoon sea salt flakes 180g dried soba noodles 170g asparagus, trimmed, halved crossways on the diagonal vegetable oil, for shallow-frying ⅓ cup teriyaki sauce ½ cucumber, halved lengthwise, deseeded, thinly sliced 1 spring onion, thinly sliced

1 Line a plate with paper towel. Place tofu on plate; top tofu with another piece of paper towel and a plate. Stand for 10 minutes to drain. 2 Meanwhile, place 2 tablespoons sesame oil on another small plate. 3 Combine rice flour, sesame seeds, white and black peppers and salt in a small shallow bowl. 4 Bring a medium saucepan of water to the boil; cook the noodles for 1 minute. Add asparagus to noodles, then cook for a further 3 minutes or until tender, and drain. 5 Cut each block of tofu into 6 cubes; lightly coat each cube in sesame oil, then coat in the rice flour mixture.

6 Heat 1.5cm-deep oil in a large frying pan over medium heat. Shallow-fry tofu, in 4 batches, for 2 minutes each side or until golden. 7 Warm the teriyaki sauce in the same pan over medium heat. Add the noodle and asparagus mixture, and then the cucumber to the pan. Stir everything together until it is all combined and warmed through. 8 Divide noodle mixture between bowls. Top with tofu and onion; drizzle with extra sesame oil, to serve. PER SERVE Energy 499kcal, 2089kj • Protein 24g • Total Fat 24g • Saturated Fat 5g • Carbohydrate 17g • Sugars 2g • Fibre 15g • Sodium 2032mg

Ready in

35

minutes

cook’s

NOTES

Swap asparagus for green beans or brocollini, if preferred. You could also use rice in place of the noodles.

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FOOD JANUARY / FEBRUARY 2018


Family favourites Ready in

30

minutes

Ready in

30

minutes

STEAK & SPUDS WITH SALSA VERDE

SPICY RED BEANS WITH RICE

PREP + COOK TIME 30 mins SERVES 4

PREP + COOK TIME 30 mins SERVES 4

DF LS ● ● ● ● ●

500g waxy potatoes, sliced lengthways 1½ tablespoons olive oil salt and black pepper 8 x 100g beef fillet medallions 1 bunch watercress, trimmed

SALSA VERDE ● 1 clove garlic, crushed ● 1 teaspoon dijon mustard ● 2 teaspoons baby capers ● 2 anchovy fillets ● 3 teaspoons red wine vinegar ● 3 cornichons ● ¼ cup mint leaves ● ¼ cup basil leaves ● 2 tablespoons coarsely chopped flat-leaf parsley ● ¼ cup extra virgin olive oil 1 Preheat oven to 210°C. 2 Line an oven tray with baking paper. Toss potatoes with half the oil in the tray;

GF season. Roast for 20 minutes or until golden and tender. 3 Make the Salsa verde (see below). 4 Heat remaining oil in a frying pan over medium-high heat; cook beef for 2 minutes 30 seconds each side, or until cooked as desired. 5 Serve steak with potatoes, watercress and Salsa verde.

Salsa verde Process ingredients until finely chopped; season.

PER SERVE Energy 583kcal,

● ● ● ● ● ● ● ●

2440kj • Protein 53g • Total Fat 32g • Saturated Fat 9g • Carbohydrate

21g • Sugars 1g • Fibre 3g • Sodium

330mg

TIP You can use a salad blend with watercress, if you like.

v

LS

1½ cups basmati rice 2¾ cups water salt and black pepper 1 tablespoon olive oil 1 onion, finely chopped 3 cloves garlic, crushed 1 stick celery, trimmed, coarsely chopped 1 red capsicum, coarsely chopped 200g button mushrooms, halved 200g Swiss brown mushrooms, quartered 1 tablespoon gluten-free Mexican chilli seasoning 400g canned kidney beans, drained, rinsed 1 cup tomato purée ½ cup sour cream 2 spring onions, sliced ½ cup coriander sprigs

bring to boil. Reduce heat to low; cook for 8 minutes or until water is absorbed. 2 Meanwhile, heat oil over medium heat; cook onion, garlic, celery, capsicum and mushrooms, stirring, for 5 minutes or until softened. Add the chilli seasoning; cook, stirring, for 1 minute or until fragrant. 3 Add beans, the remaining 1 cup water and tomato purée to pan; bring to the boil. Reduce heat to low; simmer for 15 minutes or until sauce thickens. Season. 4 Divide rice and bean mixture among bowls. Serve topped with sour cream, spring onions and coriander. PER SERVE Energy 575kcal,

1 Rinse rice in cold water; drain well. Place rice in a saucepan with 1¾ cups of the water; season. Cover;

2405kj • Protein 17g • Total Fat 17g • Saturated Fat 9g • Carbohydrate 83g • Sugars 9g • Fibre 12g • Sodium 533mg

FOOD JANUARY / FEBRUARY 2018

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TIP If you can’t find asparagus, serve with steamed green beans or your favourite veges.

Ready in

20

Ready in

minutes

minutes

35

CHICKEN WITH BLUE CHEESE & APPLE SLAW

PORK STEAKS WITH SAUTÉED LENTILS

PREP + COOK TIME 20 mins SERVES 4

PREP + COOK TIME 35 mins SERVES 4

GF LS

DF GF LS

⅓ cup flaked almonds 2 carrots 1 green apple, unpeeled ¼ red cabbage, finely shredded 3 cups shredded barbecued chicken ⅓ cup chopped chives 100g mild blue cheese, crumbled freshly ground black pepper

3 Cut carrots and apple into fine matchsticks. Add to a large bowl with cabbage, chicken, chives and cheese; toss gently to combine. 4 Transfer slaw to a platter, drizzle with creamy dressing; season with black pepper.

CREAMY DRESSING ● 2 tablespoons mayonnaise ● 1 tablespoon lemon juice ● 1 tablespoon water ● ¼ teaspoon caster sugar

PER SERVE Energy 539kcal, 2257kj •

Protein 62g • Total Fat 27g • Saturated

Fat 9g • Carbohydrate 10g • Sugars 9g

● ● ● ● ● ● ● ●

● ● ● ● ● ●

Creamy dressing Whisk ingredients together in a small bowl; season to taste.

● ● ●

1 Make Creamy dressing (see right). 2 Place almonds in a dry frying pan over low heat, tossing frequently, for 2 minutes or until golden.

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FOOD JANUARY / FEBRUARY 2018

• Fibre 5g • Sodium 454mg ●

TIP You will need a barbecued chicken weighing about 900g for this recipe.

2 tablespoons olive oil 1 red onion, finely chopped 2 cloves garlic, crushed 6 slices pancetta, finely chopped 1 tablespoon finely chopped rosemary 4 sprigs thyme 2 x 400g canned brown lentils, drained, rinsed ½ cup water 1 tablespoon lemon juice 4 x 150g pork schnitzel 1 lemon, halved crossways 175g asparagus, trimmed, sliced thinly lengthways salt and black pepper

1 Heat half the oil in a frying pan; cook onion, garlic and pancetta, stirring, for 2 minutes until onion softens. Add rosemary and 3 sprigs of the thyme; cook,

stirring, for 1 minute. 2 Add lentils and the water; reduce heat, simmer, uncovered, for 2 minutes. Stir in juice. 3 Meanwhile, cut pork in half crossways. Heat remaining oil; cook pork, in batches, until browned and cooked. Remove from pan; rest, covered, for 2 minutes. 4 Cook lemon, cut-side down, in pan for 3 minutes. 5 Boil, steam or microwave asparagus until tender; drain. Season to taste. 6 Serve pork with lentils, asparagus and lemon, sprinkled with remaining thyme. Season with pepper. PER SERVE Energy 441kcal, 1845kj • Protein 52g • Total Fat 14g • Saturated Fat 4g • Carbohydrate 22g • Sugars 4g • Fibre 10g • Sodium 501mg


Family favourites

cook’s

NOTES Roasted Mediterranean veges make a great base for a warm, hot or cold salad. Instead of lamb, you can use chicken, pork, beef or fish.

LAMB FARFALLE WITH ROASTED VEGES

Ready in

30

PREP + COOK TIME 30 mins SERVES 6

minutes

DF LS ● ● ● ● ● ● ● ● ● ● ● ● ● ● ● ●

1 eggplant, chopped 1 courgette, chopped 1 red onion, thickly sliced 250g cherry tomatoes, halved 2 cloves garlic, crushed cooking oil spray salt and black pepper 375g farfalle pasta 600g lamb loin 1 teaspoon ground coriander 1 teaspoon ground cumin ¼ cup olive oil ⅓ cup lemon juice 1 cup mint leaves 50g baby spinach leaves ⅓ cup pine nuts, toasted

1 Preheat oven to 170°C. 2 Place eggplant, courgette, onion, tomatoes and garlic on an oven tray; spray with cooking oil, season. Roast for 15 minutes or until tender. 3 Meanwhile, cook pasta in boiling salted water until almost tender; drain. 4 Combine lamb, coriander, cumin and 1 tablespoon of the oil in a large bowl; turn to coat lamb in spices. 5 Cook lamb on a heated oiled grill plate for 4 minutes or until browned and cooked as desired. Cover; rest for 5 minutes. Thickly slice. 6 Place pasta, roasted vegetables, lamb and remaining oil in a large bowl with

remaining ingredients; toss gently to combine. Season to taste. PER SERVE Energy 582kcal, 2437kj • Protein 38g • Total Fat 25g • Saturated Fat 5g • Carbohydrate 48g • Sugars 4g • Fibre 0g • Sodium 84mg

TIP Farfalle is also known as bow-tie pasta, but you can use any short pasta you like instead – try short tubular types, such as penne or rigatoni. FOOD JANUARY / FEBRUARY 2018

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Carrot & Harissa Falafel with Tahini Yoghurt RECIPE ON PAGE 106

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FOOD JANUARY / FEBRUARY 2018


Superfoods

Super

charged Chicken Tikka with Cauliflower Rice RECIPE ON PAGE 106

LOOKING FOR A FRESH SUMMER DISH THAT’S FULL OF FLAVOUR WHILE PACKING A NUTRITIONAL PUNCH? WHETHER YOU LIKE FRIED, BAKED, GRILLED OR CHILLED, WE HAVE A RECIPE TO SUIT

RECIPES & STYLING BAUER TEST KITCHEN PHOTOGRAPHS BAUER PHOTO STUDIO

FOOD JANUARY / FEBRUARY 2018

103


CAULIFLOWER PIZZA BITES

GREEN QUINOA WITH SESAME EGGS

PREP + COOK TIME 45 mins MAKES 24

PREP + COOK TIME 25 mins SERVES 4

GF ● ● ● ● ●

● ● ● ● ● ● ● ●

v

LS

300g cauliflower, chopped ½ cup ground almonds ¼ cup finely grated cheddar cheese 1 teaspoon finely chopped rosemary 1 teaspoon finely chopped oregano, plus extra, to serve 1 egg, lightly beaten salt and black pepper 1 eggplant 2 courgettes 1 cup canned crushed tomatoes 1 clove garlic, crushed 20g feta cheese, crumbled ¼ cup pine nuts, toasted

DF GF base and sides to form a tart shell. Bake for 10 minutes or until golden and crisp. 3 Meanwhile, thinly slice eggplants and courgette lengthways; cook in an oiled frying pan for 2 minutes. Remove; season. 4 Combine tomatoes and garlic; spoon 1 teaspoon of mixture into each tart shell; top with vegetables and feta. 5 Return to oven; bake for 5 minutes or until feta is golden. Serve topped with pine nuts and extra oregano.

PER PIZZA BITE Energy 48kcal,

203kj • Protein 2g • Total Fat 4g •

● ● ● ● ● ● ● ● ● ● ●

v

LS

2 cups vegetable stock 1 cup white quinoa, rinsed 8 eggs, at room temperature 1 tablespoon coconut oil 1 clove garlic, crushed 1 red chilli, thinly sliced 4 cups thinly sliced kale 2 cups thinly sliced silverbeet 2 tablespoons lemon juice salt and black pepper ½ cup finely chopped flat-leaf parsley 4 tablespoon sesame seeds (we used white and black) 2 teaspoons sea salt flakes

saucepan. Add garlic and chilli; cook stirring, for 2 minutes until fragrant. Add kale and silverbeet; stir until wilted. Add the cooked quinoa and lemon juice; season with salt and pepper. 4 Combine parsley, sesame seeds and salt in a bowl. Peel eggs and roll them in parsley mixture. 5 Serve the quinoa mixture topped with the eggs. PER SERVE Energy 439kcal, 1837kj • Protein 25g • Total Fat 21g • Saturated Fat 7g • Carbohydrate 34g • Sugars 5g • Fibre 9g • Sodium 1528mg

Saturated Fat 1g • Carbohydrate 1g •

1 Preheat oven to 210°C. Grease 2 flat-based 12-hole patty pan trays; line with rounds of baking paper. 2 Pulse cauliflower in a food processor until it resembles fine crumbs. Place in a bowl with ground almonds, cheese, herbs and egg; season; mix. Spoon mixture into holes; press firmly on

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Sugars 1g • Fibre 1g • Sodium 34mg

TIPS You can use any cheese in place of the cheddar. Make a double batch of bases and freeze half for another meal.

1 Bring stock and quinoa to the boil in a saucepan. Reduce heat; simmer for 15 minutes. Take off heat; cover, stand for 5 minutes. 2 Meanwhile, cook eggs in boiling water for 5 minutes. Remove immediately; cool under running cold water for 30 seconds. 3 Heat coconut oil in a

TIPS You will need around 2 bunches of kale and 2 bunches of silverbeet for this recipe. Leftover greens can be wilted in a little olive oil or chopped and added to soups.


Superfoods

CHILLED CUCUMBER SOUP WITH WHIPPED FETA TOASTS PREP + COOK TIME 20 mins + chilling SERVES 8

v ● ● ● ● ● ●

● ●

LS 4 cucumbers, coarsely chopped 2 cups Greek yoghurt 2 cloves garlic, crushed 1 tablespoon lemon juice 2 spring onions, coarsely chopped 2 tablespoons coarsely chopped dill, plus extra, to serve 3 tablespoons extra virgin olive oil salt and black pepper

WHIPPED FETA TOASTS ● 16 slices sourdough baguette ● ⅓ cup extra virgin olive oil ● 200g feta ● 1 clove garlic, crushed ● 1 teaspoon lemon juice ● ½ cucumber, thinly sliced ● dill sprigs, to garnish 1 Process cucumber, yoghurt, garlic, juice, onions, 2 tablespoons dill and 2 tablespoons of the oil until smooth. Strain mixture through a sieve over a large bowl, pressing down firmly on solids. Discard solids. Season liquid; cover; refrigerate for 2 hours or until chilled. 2 Make Whipped feta toasts (see below). 3 Pour chilled soup into serving bowls; top with extra dill; drizzle with extra oil. Serve with the Whipped feta toasts. Whipped feta toasts Heat a grill pan. Brush baguette with half the oil; chargrill, in batches, for

TIPS around 1 minute each side or until lightly charred. Pulse feta and garlic in a food processor until mixture forms a spreadable consistency. With motor operating, gradually add juice, then remaining oil; process until

light and fluffy. Spread on toasts; top with cucumber, garnish with the dill sprigs. PER SERVE Energy 430kcal, 1798kj • Protein 14g • Total Fat 25g • Saturated Fat 10g • Carbohydrate 35g • Sugars 8g • Fibre 4g • Sodium 749mg

You can use any baguette for the toasts, or even serve the Whipped feta on crackers. It also makes a nice dip, served with crunchy carrots and slices of cucumber. FOOD JANUARY / FEBRUARY 2018

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CARROT & HARISSA FALAFEL WITH TAHINI YOGHURT PREP + COOK TIME 1 hour SERVES 4

v ● ● ● ● ● ● ● ● ● ●

TIP You can use a zester to create the strips of lemon zest. If you don’t have one, peel 2 long, wide strips of rind from the lemon. Remove the white pith, then cut lengthways into thin strips.

● ●

● ● ● ●

LS 2 carrots, coarsely grated 400g canned chickpeas, drained, rinsed 1 red onion, chopped 1 teaspoon ground cumin 1 tablespoon harissa ¼ cup plain flour ½ teaspoon baking powder 1 egg salt and black pepper 1½ cups panko breadcrumbs vegetable oil, for frying 150g green beans, trimmed, halved lengthways 2 baby cos lettuces, leaves separated ½ cucumber, thinly sliced ¼ cup flat-leaf parsley 2 teaspoons lemon zest strips

TAHINI YOGHURT ● 1 clove garlic, crushed ● 2 tablespoons lemon juice ● 2 tablespoons tahini ● ¾ cup Greek yoghurt ● 1 tablespoon flat-leaf parsley, shredded 1 Process carrots, chickpeas, onion, cumin, harissa, flour, baking powder and egg until mixture just comes together; season. Transfer to a bowl; stir in ¾ cup of the breadcrumbs. Roll tablespoons of carrot mixture into balls – about 28. Roll falafel in remaining breadcrumbs to coat. 2 One-third-fill a large saucepan with oil and heat

to 180°C. Deep-fry falafel, in batches, for 2 minutes until golden. Drain on paper towel. 3 Meanwhile, make Tahini yoghurt (see below). 4 Boil, steam or microwave beans until tender; drain. Rinse under cold water. 5 Combine beans, lettuce and cucumber in a bowl. Serve salad topped with falafel and Tahini yoghurt; sprinkle with parsley and lemon zest strips. Tahini yoghurt Combine ingredients; season. PER SERVE Energy 727kcal, 3045kj • Protein 19g • Total Fat 45g • Saturated Fat 8g • Carbohydrate 56g • Sugars 9g • Fibre 12g • Sodium 924mg

CHICKEN TIKKA WITH CAULIFLOWER RICE PREP + COOK TIME 50 mins SERVES 4

GF LS ● ● ● ● ● ● ● ● ●

cook’s

NOTES This low-carb dish swaps low-nutrient traditional white rice for cauliflower rice, while the curry itself is high in protein.

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1 tablespoon peanut oil 800g chicken thigh fillets, thickly sliced 1 onion, cut into wedges 1 red capsicum, chopped 250g cherry tomatoes ⅓ cup tikka curry paste 2 long green chillies, thinly sliced 300ml lite cooking cream 1 small cauliflower, stems finely chopped, florets coarsely chopped salt and black pepper ¾ cup loosely packed coriander leaves

RAITA ● ¾ cup low-fat Greek yoghurt ● ½ cucumber, deseeded, finely chopped ● 1 tablespoon finely chopped mint ● salt and black pepper

1 Heat oil in a deep frying pan over medium-high heat; cook chicken, in batches, for 2 minutes each side or until browned all over. Remove from pan. 2 Add onion, capsicum and tomatoes to same pan, reduce heat to medium; cook, stirring, for 5 minutes or until onion softens. 3 Remove the tomatoes from pan; cover to keep warm. Add curry paste and half the chilli to pan; cook, stirring, for 2 minutes. Return chicken to pan with cooking cream; bring to the boil. Reduce heat; simmer, uncovered, for 10 minutes or until chicken is cooked through. Remove from heat; return tomatoes to mixture. 4 Meanwhile, process cauliflower until it is finely chopped and resembles rice. Place cauliflower in

a large frying pan over medium heat; cook, stirring occasionally, for 10 minutes or until just tender. Season to taste. 5 Make Raita (see below). 6 Top chicken with coriander and remaining chilli. Serve with cauliflower rice and Raita. Raita Combine yoghurt, cucumber and mint in a small bowl; season to taste. PER SERVE Energy 571kcal, 2392kj • Protein 47g • Total Fat 32g • Saturated Fat 16g • Carbohydrate 21g • Sugars 18g • Fibre 5g • Sodium 593mg


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TIP For a smoother Chermoula paste, add 1 tablespoon of warm water to the mix.

cook’s

NOTES You can swap the tuna for salmon, if preferred. To segment lemons, cut off the rind with the white pith; then cut down either side of each segment to release.

FOOD JANUARY / FEBRUARY 2018

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SUMMER SMOOTHIES with

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G r e e n C o c o n u t Y o gh u r t S m o

T r o p i c a l C o c o n u t Y og h u r t S m o o t h i e

PIÑA COLADA COCONUT YOGHURT SMOOTHIE

TROPICAL COCONUT YOGHURT SMOOTHIE INGREDIENTS

INGREDIENTS

rative

¾ of a pineapple onut 1 handful of chopped coc 1 glass of water al!) 2-3 shots of rum (option ice of l 1 large handfu

SERVES 3

SERVES 3

SERVES 3

t Collabo 2 x 300g tubs of Coconu Natural Yoghurt

GREEN COCONUT YOGHURT SMOOTHIE

laborative 300g tub of Coconut Col t hur Yog ural Nat 1 mango 2 passionfruit

INGREDIENTS

laborative 300g tub of Coconut Col Natural Yoghurt 2 peaches 3 kiwis onut 1 handful of chopped coc 1 glass of apple juice 1 large handful of spinach 1 large handful of ice

1 banana 1 glass of orange juice 1 large handful of ice

OY!

IL SMOOTH, SERVE IN A CHILLED GLASS AND ENJ

SIMPLY BLEND INGREDIENTS IN A BLENDER UNT

FOR AN EXTR ONE OF OUR FLA BOOST TRY USING AVOURED YOGH IN YOUR SMOO THIE INSTEADURTS

FREE FROM DAIRY, BUT NOT TEMPTATION.

DAIRY FREE

NO ADDED SUGAR

GLUTEN FREE


COOK School

Techniques, how-tos, & expert advice

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PHOTOGRAPH BAUER PHOTO STUDIO

Pasta pronto , use, dried pasta isn’t necessarily inferior to fresh – in fact, a good dried pasta may be superior with the added bonus of convenience. Follow our pro pasta tips for great results:

1

Use a large pot Pasta trebles in volume as it cooks. You need enough water for the pasta to swell and still have room to move.

2

Salt the water Salt adds savour to the pasta, buoyancy to the water and changes the chemical structure of the water so it boils at a higher temperature. Aim to add 1 tablespoon per large pot of

Tagliat

water. Most will be drained away after it has done its job.

3

Don’t oil the water Adding oil will not prevent the pasta sticking; oil and water don’t mix, so it floats on the top and doesn’t coat the pasta in any way. Instead, bring water to a rolling boil before adding pasta and stir once or twice to ensure the pieces remain separate as they soften.

elle

TIP Don’t throw away broken pieces of pasta in the bottom of the pack. Tuoni e lampi is an Italian dish made from mixed pieces of broken pasta – proving they are perfectly useable! FOOD JANUARY / FEBRUARY 2018

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MAKE THE PERFECT

Gnocchi THESE POPULAR ITALIAN DUMPLING S ARE HEALTHY AND EA SY TO PREPARE

RECIPES BAUER TEST KITCHEN PHOTOGRAPHS BAUER PHOTO STUDIO

GNOCCHI PREP + COOK TIME 1 hour + chilling SERVES 4

v ● ● ● ● ● ●

LS 500g potatoes, unpeeled 1 egg pinch of salt 2 tablespoons finely grated parmesan cheese 1 cup plain flour creamy pasta sauce and fresh herbs, to serve

PER SERVE (without sauce) Energy 246kcal, 1029kj • Protein 10g • Total Fat 2g • Saturated Fat 1g • Carbohydrate 45g • Sugars 0g • Fibre 3g • Sodium 87mg

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FOOD JANUARY / FEBRUARY 2018


Know how

STEP - BY - STEP method

1

2

3

4

5

6

BOIL Boil whole, unpeeled potatoes in a large saucepan. Choose a dry variety and try to pick equal-sized potatoes to ensure even cooking. When potatoes are cool enough to handle, peel away the skin with a small knife.

CUT Divide gnocchi dough into 4 portions. On a lightly floured surface, roll one portion of dough with your fingers into a long rope about 2cm thick. With a small knife, cut into 2.5cm pieces. Repeat with remaining dough. It’s important that each rope is the same width for equal cooking times.

MASH If you have one, push the potatoes through a ricer into a bowl. A ricer is ideal for making super-smooth mash. Otherwise, use a traditional potato masher until as smooth as possible, or push the potatoes through a sieve.

ROLL Lightly roll each piece of gnocchi dough into a ball. Run each ball down the back of a fork over the tines to create light indents – these will help the sauce cling to the gnocchi. Place in a single layer on a floured tray. Cover; refrigerate for 1 hour. You can make the gnocchi up to a day ahead.

COMBINE Lightly beat the egg with the salt. Combine with potato, parmesan and ½ cup of flour until mixture forms a firm dough. Bring together on a lightly floured surface, adding more flour until dough is smooth and loses its stickiness. Don’t add too much flour as this will change the consistency of the gnocchi.

SIMMER Bring a large saucepan of salted water to the boil. Working in batches, add gnocchi to the boiling water. Gnocchi are cooked when they float to the surface. Use a slotted spoon to remove from water; transfer to a bowl and cover to keep warm. Serve with creamy sauce and fresh herbs.

Turn the page for four variations to try »


Know how

ORANGE KUMARA GNOCCHI

PARSNIP GNOCCHI

PREP + COOK TIME 1 hour + chilling SERVES 4

PREP + COOK TIME 1 hour + chilling SERVES 4

v

v

LS

Finely grate 175g orange kumara. Heat 1 tablespoon olive oil in a frying pan; cook kumara, stirring, for 10 minutes or until soft. Purée in a food processor. Make Potato Gnocchi (recipe on previous page), combining kumara purée and mashed potato in step 2; continue recipe as directed.

Finely grate 175g parsnip. Heat 1 tablespoon olive oil in a frying pan; cook parsnip and 1 teaspoon caraway seeds, stirring, for 10 minutes or until soft. Purée in a food processor. Make Potato Gnocchi (recipe on previous page), combining parsnip and mashed potato in step 2; continue recipe as directed.

PER SERVE Energy 306kcal, 1281kj • Protein 10g • Total Fat 6g • Saturated

PER SERVE Energy 304kcal, 1271kj • Protein 10g • Total Fat 6g • Saturated

Fat 1g • Carbohydrate 51g • Sugars 3g • Fibre 4g • Sodium 91mg

Fat 1g • Carbohydrate 50g • Sugars 3g • Fibre 5g • Sodium 95mg

BEETROOT GNOCCHI

KALE GNOCCHI

PREP + COOK TIME 1 hour + chilling SERVES 4

PREP + COOK TIME 1 hour + chilling SERVES 4

v

112

LS

LS

v

LS

Finely grate 150g beetroot. Heat 1 tablespoon olive oil in a frying pan; cook beetroot, stirring, for 10 minutes or until soft. Purée in a food processor. Make Potato Gnocchi (recipe on previous page), combining beetroot purée and mashed potato in step 2; continue recipe as directed.

Finely shred 100g kale leaves. Heat 1 tablespoon olive oil in a frying pan; cook kale, stirring, for 5 minutes or until soft. Leave to cool. Make Potato Gnocchi (recipe on previous page), combining kale and mashed potato in step 2; continue recipe as directed.

PER SERVE Energy 290kcal, 1212kj • Protein 10g • Total Fat 6g • Saturated

PER SERVE Energy 251kcal, 1052kj • Protein 10g • Total Fat 2g • Saturated

Fat 1g • Carbohydrate 47g • Sugars 0g • Fibre 5g • Sodium 118mg

Fat 1g • Carbohydrate 46g • Sugars 1g • Fibre 4g • Sodium 92mg

FOOD JANUARY / FEBRUARY 2018


Food + Peter Yealands

Savour Slowly PETER YEALANDS RESERVE PINOT NOIR IS THE PERFEC T PINOT FOR YOUR FAVOURITE SLOW - COOKED DISHES

SLOW-ROASTED LAMB LEG WITH PLUM GLAZE PREP + COOK TIME 3 hours 30 mins SERVES 6 ● ● ● ● ● ● ● ● ●

1 leg of lamb, around 2kg 6 fat cloves garlic, peeled 6 rosemary sprigs 4 shallots, peeled 2½ cups chicken stock 1½ cups red wine ½ cup store-bought spicy plum sauce ½ cup blackberry jam 1 tablespoon cornflour mixed with 1 tablespoon cold water

1 Preheat oven to 160°C. Poke 6 small incisions deep into the lamb and insert a garlic clove and rosemary sprig into each. Place the lamb and

shallots into a roasting pan. 2 Combine stock, wine, sauce and jam, and pour into pan. Cover tightly with foil and roast for 3 hours, basting with the liquid from time to time. Remove the foil and increase the temperature to 220°C for a further 15 minutes if a well-browned top is desired. Remove from the oven and rest, covered with the foil for 10 minutes. 3 While the lamb is resting, strain the pan juices into a jug, skim off the fat, then boil rapidly in a saucepan for 5-8 minutes until reduced by half. Reduce the heat, stir in the cornflour and water. When thickened, serve with the lamb.

tasting

CS23927 01/18 ADVT2017

NOTES Peter Yealands Reserve Pinot Noir is soft, silky and layered with ripe fruit. Enjoy it with red meats, such as venison or slow-roasted leg of lamb.


Know how

Make your own peanut butter SLATHERED ON TOAST, USED IN BAKING, OR SIMPLY EATEN FROM THE SPOON, YOU CAN’T BEAT A DELICIOUS HOMEMADE PEANUT BUTTER

cook’s

PEANUT BUTTER PREP + COOK TIME 20 mins MAKES 1½ cups

DF GF

v

LS

450g raw, skinned peanuts 2 tablespoons vegetable oil ● salt, to taste ● 1 tablespoon honey (optional) ● ●

oil to adjust the consistency if needed. 4 Taste and season with salt and honey. Pack into a sterilised jar. PER 15G SERVE Energy 91kcal, 380kj •

1 Preheat oven to 180°C. 2 Place peanuts and a drop of the oil in a baking tray and stir. Roast the peanuts, stirring from time to time for about 10 minutes or until golden and toasted. 3 In a processor or blender process the nuts to a paste. Add a pinch of salt and pulse to mix, then add a drop of

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Protein 3g • Total Fat 8g • Saturated Fat 1g •

TIPS

Carbohydrate 2g • Sugars 1g • Fibre 1g • Sodium 1mg

Now try… Chocolate peanut butter Add cocoa powder and icing sugar, to taste. Peanut and almond butter Use 225g peanuts and 225g almonds.

If you prefer crunchy peanut butter, reserve some toasted nuts, pulse into chunks and stir into mixture. Skip the roasting stage if you prefer raw peanut butter. Any mild oil, such as coconut or peanut, will work. Use 1 tablespoon sugar, stevia or maple syrup instead of honey, if desired.

RECIPE & STYLING SOPHIE GRAY PHOTOGRAPH TODD EYRE

NOTES

The oils present in natural peanut butter can go rancid, a process accelerated by heat and humidity. It will keep in a cool, dark place for several weeks; the fridge will keep it fresher longer. The oil in peanut butter will naturally separate and come to the surface – simply stir it back in.


Know how

Ask Sophie

FROM WARM POTATO SALAD TO CARING FOR CAST IRON, EDITOR SOPHIE GRAY SHARES HER TIPS

I’ve inherited an old cast iron skillet; it looks a bit rough and rusty. Is it okay to use? A Lucky you – you’ve inherited a treasure. A cast iron pan can go from stovetop to oven and is a very dense metal so heats evenly, resulting in quick cooking and even browning. Cast iron is also naturally non-stick when well-‘seasoned’. To use, first rub off rust to the base metal with a steel wool scouring pad. Wash and dry the pan. To season an old (or brand new) skillet, preheat oven to 160°C. Rub the pan inside and out with vegetable oil. Place upside down in the centre of the oven and ‘bake’ pan for an hour. Turn off the heat and allow to cool completely. The pan is now seasoned. To maintain it, avoid scouring and always wipe the pan with oil after washing.

TIP

icing sugar need to Q Does be sifted? A It depends on the recipe. Icing sugar can become quite lumpy and hard; sieving aerates it, and ensures it distributes and dissolves quickly. But in some cases it is not necessary.

you have any tips for Q Do cleaning a baking tray? I scrub mine for ages and still can’t get it very clean! A A blackened tray is a wellseasoned tray, and as long as it’s not greasy or sticky, it’s perfectly serviceable. However, if you want the tray shiny, sprinkle it with baking soda and scrub with a ball of aluminium foil, reapplying baking soda frequently. This isn’t suitable for coated or painted cookware.

If the pan accidentally goes through the dishwasher or is cleaned with a scourer, simply repeat the process of seasoning it.

PHOTOGRAPHS GETTY IMAGES, TODD EYRE

Warm welcome love a nice chilled Q Ipotato salad, but I often run out of time cooling the potatoes in preparation for adding the dressing. Can potato salad be dressed and served warm? A European-style potato salads are frequently served warm and use vinaigrette-style dressings instead of mayonnaise. The

vinaigrette soaks into the warm potatoes, imparting a delicious tanginess. Heat also dissolves salt and sugar and begins to emulsify the oil in the dressing, providing a smoother consistency. Some recipes even call for warming the dressing to promote maximum flavour absorption, but simply tossing warm sliced potatoes in a good vinaigrette is perfectly acceptable.

FOOD JANUARY / FEBRUARY 2018

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Kids TO K ❤ C

3 Ella, our Meet ooks little c

Zach, 4

CHILD’

Pla THE KIDS WILL BE HAPPY TO SWAP THE PLAYROOM FOR THE KITCHEN A S THEY GET CRAFT Y WITH OUR EA SY RECIPES

RECIPES SOPHIE GRAY PHOTOGRAPHS REBEKAH ROBINSON

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FOOD JANUARY / FEBRUARY 2018


Know how

HIDDEN VEGE BURGERS PREP + COOK TIME 25 mins MAKES 12 sliders

LS ● ● ● ● ● ● ● ● ● ● ● ● ●

1 carrot, grated 1 courgette, grated ½ cup grated broccoli 500g beef mince ½ teaspoon garlic, crushed ½ teaspoon salt ground black pepper, to taste ½ teaspoon mixed herbs 1 slice bread, made into breadcrumbs ¼ cup tomato sauce, plus extra, to serve ½ tablespoon Worcestershire sauce ½ tablespoon oil burger buns, lettuce and cucumber, to serve

GOLDEN VEGE CHIPS ● 1 orange kumara, peeled, sliced into wedges ● 3 carrots, cut into ½cm strips ● 2 tablespoons olive oil ● salt, to taste

Jobs for the kids Our preschoolers loved grating the vegetables. It was also fun for them to rub oil onto the vegetable chips in the plastic bag before cooking. While you can get them to make free-form burgers (the mixture is as malleable as Play-Doh!), using a burger press is fun and makes it easier for them to get uniform shapes. This will also help ensure even cooking.

1 Make the Golden vege chips (see below). 2 Put the grated vegetables into a clean tea towel and wring out the excess liquid. Place in a mixing bowl or processor. Add the mince, garlic, salt and pepper, herbs, bread and sauces, and mix or pulse until combined. Divide into portions and shape into patties. 3 Heat the oil in a frying pan and cook the patties for 4 minutes on each side or until cooked through. Place patties into buns with salad vegetables and extra sauce, if desired. Serve with Golden vege chips. Golden vege chips Preheat oven to 220°C. Place the vegetables and oil in a large plastic bag, and rub to coat with the oil. Arrange on a greased tray in a single layer and bake, turning once or twice, for about 25 minutes or until golden brown. Season with salt.

cook’s

NOTES

Uncooked patties can be frozen. Separate each one with a piece of non-stick paper and wrap tightly in plastic wrap to prevent freezer burn.

PER SERVE Energy 218kcal, 914kj • Protein 15g • Total Fat 7g • Saturated Fat 2g • Carbohydrate 21g • Sugars 5g • Fibre 3g • Sodium 376mg

FOOD JANUARY / FEBRUARY 2018

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L

e t d r d t h yc a e av s of t e f l es a uit to ep br a kn e o o s l . ea , tr r fn r a l. t rs t

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cooking up new skills These recipe provide opportunities to strengthen understanding of numbers and measurements: ESTIMATION How much mixture is needed for each patty? How much fruit on each tart? FINE MOTOR SKILLS

Lining up the burger press with the base and applying the correct pressure to make a patty that holds its shape; grating the vegetables; pricking the pastry bases; spreading chocolate in the tart shells. UNITS OF MEASURE

Using measuring

cups and spoons to get correct amounts. DIRECT AND INDIRECT COMPARISON Is the

patty the right size for the bun? Do all the tarts have the same amount of custard mixture? COUNTING How many wedges are there? And how many tarts? STACKING

Assembling the burger so all the bits don’t fall out!


Know how

cook’s

NOTES Pricking the base of the pastry helps to prevent it puffing up while baking. Mix and match fillings – fresh or canned fruit, lemon curd and custard on its own all work well.

LITTLE COOKS ELLA WALKER AND ZACH STEPHENS ART DIRECTION MIKE WATSON PROPS STEVENS, BRISCOES AND ST YLIST’S OWN

TROPICAL CUSTARD TARTS

Win

PREP + COOK TIME 30 mins MAKES 5

v ● ● ● ● ● ●

1 sheet store-bought sweet shortcrust pastry, thawed a handful of plain flour 100g white chocolate melts ⅓ cup cream 2 pottles Dole Fruit & Custard 2 pottles Dole Fruit & Juice, drained

spread to cover the base. Chill in fridge 5 minutes or until set. Remove from tins. 5 Meanwhile, whip cream to soft peaks. Fold in the peaches in custard. Spoon custard mixture into tart shells and top with drained tropical fruit. PER SERVE Energy 366kcal, 1532kj • Protein 5g •

1 Preheat oven to 190°C. 2 Cut the pastry into quarters. Place a quarter over a 5cm loose-bottom tart tin and gently press into place. Press around the edges to remove excess. Repeat with other three quarters, then reroll the trimmings on a floured board and use to fill remaining tin. 3 Prick all over the base of each tart with a fork, place on a baking tray and bake for 15-20 minutes until golden. Cool. 4 Melt the chocolate melts according to the pack directions. Spoon chocolate into the tart shells with a teaspoon and

Total Fat 21g • Saturated Fat 12g • Carbohydrate 39g • Sugars 25g • Fibre 2g • Sodium 169mg

TRUCKING ON Send us a picture of your kids’ food creations and they’ll go in the draw to win one of four copies of The Tallest Truck Gets Stuck by Pat Chapman (Upstart Press). This delightful rhyming story, worth $19.99, is ideal for preschoolers. Email your picture to foodmagazine@bauermedia.co.nz with Kids in the Kitchen in the subject line by February 28, 2018.

FOOD JANUARY / FEBRUARY 2018

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ECO3655_FOOD

the future begins at home + safer for you and our world


SMART living

Foodie folk, home style, health, beauty & more...

smart

IDEA

To attach items to the rail, pick up some packs of S-hooks from your local hardware store.

Hang tough

PHOTOGRAPH GETTY IMAGES

No matter how big your kitchen, it can be tough finding places to store everything, let alone making space for decorative touches. This is where hanging rails are a great solution. Our

tips for success are:

1

Hang baskets from a rail to either display herbs and plants, or to store small utensils.

2

If you already have an open

shelf, mount a rail underneath to double your storage.

3

Attach a rail to the side of your kitchen bench or cabinets for a more subtle option.


Kitchen

GARDEN SEA SONAL PRODUCE TO PLANT AND HARVEST, PLUS TIP S AND INSIGHTS

Time to Grow For many of us, the idea of a bountiful kitchen garden producing edible delights is a great one – we just don’t have time. And even if we think we do, we start off strong… then end up guilt-ridden over a dry, weed-choked wasteland that was meant to be sprouting veges. If you’re big on fresh produce but short on time, here are our top tips: ➼ Start off small – with a couple of veges and a few herbs. You can expand later if that is successful. ➼ Go for easy-growing, low-care varieties that don’t need daily attention. For the herbs, rosemary, parsley and mint are good options, and for vegetables consider leafy greens, beans and garlic. ➼ Ensure you pick the right spot – check the best conditions for your crops to thrive and plant to account for sun, wind and shade. ➼ Your crops will be more selfsufficient if they are strong – so ensure the earth is nutrient rich by adding compost or manure. Adding a layer of compost, bark or decaying leaves will also reduce weeds and retain moisture – meaning if you forget to water, it won’t be a disaster. ➼ If you can afford it, install a watering system on a timer. ➼ Encourage wildlife to do the hard work for you. Cabbage trees, borage and lavendar will attract helpful hoverflies, ladybirds, lacewings, bees and earwigs.

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FOOD JANUARY / FEBRUARY 2018

‘I grew up around gardens, growing my own food. My family did that a lot; that was a real source of community growing up’ – Jake Gyllenhaal

Milky Milky We know it’s good for us – and it turns out milk is great for your plants too. Dilute it to create a solution that’s 80 per cent water and use to spray leaves to help with growth. You can also pour it around the base of your crops for the roots to gradually absorb. Using well-diluted milk will also help reduce powdery mildew, which is a common plant fungus.


Get growing

WHAT TO PLANT NOW

Silverbeet

Parsnips

Courgette

The plant that keeps on giving, silverbeet is a hardy crop that will provide leaves for several months – and can re-sprout if cut at the base when it goes to flower. For best growth, plant in nutrient-rich soil at a depth of three times the seed diameter. Avoid planting close to potatoes. Leaves will be ready in around three months.

Parsnips are a crop for those with plenty of patience; soak seeds overnight before sowing in the garden, and ensure they don’t dry out after planting. Hedge your bets by sowing about three seeds every 15mm; germination can take three weeks. The parsnips will be ready in about 4-5 months; for best flavour, harvest after a frost.

A thirsty vege that loves the warmer weather, courgettes are often best started in trays, then after four weeks planted out into well-composted soil. Space plants around 70cm apart – be warned, they have large leaves so need plenty of room. Keep well watered and you will be able to harvest after a couple of months.

The root of the problem In these warmer months, certain crops will require more care than others. While deep rooting vegetables – such as carrots, parsnips and kumara – tend to be fairly resilient, shallow rooting crops may wilt quickly. Many of these are popular summer fare, including lettuce, radish and spinach, so show them some love by keeping them well watered.

Inside the

PHOTOGRAPHS GETTY IMAGES

(MAIL)BOX Want to keep your garden tools handy but have nowhere to store them? When space is at a premium and a garden shed not an option, use a mailbox positioned near your crops. Grab one second-hand, or buy an affordable one from a hardware store. Just don’t put it too near your gate or you may confuse the postie….

DIDYOU KNOW… The average strawberry has 200 seeds? No wonder the little blighters get stuck in our teeth. But they pale in comparison to pomegranates, which boast around 600. And no, we don’t recommend you count to check…

Hot tip

When you think you’ve watered enough, take a trowel and dig a few inches into the ground. If the soil is still dry, more water is needed, so soak again.

FOOD JANUARY / FEBRUARY 2018

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Ambitious goals for a better tomorrow COUNTDOWN REVEALS ITS NEW SUSTAINABILIT Y TARGETS

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s a large New Zealand business, Countdown has a role to play in responding to environmental, economic and social challenges. In November 2017, the supermarket chain released an ambitious new sustainability strategy, by launching 20 commitments to be achieved by 2020. They fall into three categories, People, Planet and Prosperity, and align with the United Nations’ 2015 Sustainable Development Goals. Countdown’s Managing Director Dave Chambers says that embedding sustainability into Countdown’s core business strategy is the right thing to do. “It is a key vehicle for our future growth and will underpin how we measure our success,” he adds.

Aiming high Highlights from Countdown’s new 2020 commitments include: Ensuring at least 40 per cent of executive and senior manager positions will be held by women. Removing any salary wage gap between male and female employees of equivalent positions on a per-hour rate at all levels of the company. Achieving Rainbow Tick certification in New Zealand, demonstrating a commitment to LGBTI inclusion. Moving towards zero food waste going to landfill.

· · · ·

Highlights include removing the gender wage gap and a reduction in carbon emissions

· ·

The Free Fruit for Kids initiative has so far given out five million pieces of fruit.

Reducing carbon emissions to 10 per cent below 2015 levels. A pledge to support and inform customers in making healthier choices.

Countdown cares Countdown also released its Corporate Responsibility Report, detailing progress on community and environmental commitments over the past financial year. Some of the highlights from last year included: The donation of $5.8 million worth of food through the Countdown Food Rescue Programme. Celebrating the second year of Free Fruit for Kids, giving away 50,000 pieces each week, and in total more than five million pieces of fruit over two years.

· ·

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Being one of the first companies in New Zealand to introduce a Family Violence Policy and Transgender Transitioning Policy for its team. The introduction of The Odd Bunch, a New Zealand-first initiative to cut down food waste at source and make produce more affordable for families, saving 500 tonnes annually from landfill.

·

You can check out the full details of Countdown’s Corporate Responsibility Report and 2020 commitments at www.countdown.co.nz/ corporateresponsibility


Arianna ceiling pendant, $499, Freedom Furniture.

Mid-century

Modern

Home

Joshua Lee light, $399, YOYO Design by Kiwis.

A COMBINATION OF NOSTALGIA AND TV SHOWS LIKE MAD MEN HAS LED TO A RESURGENCE OF ‘50S COOL Felt storage box with lid, $6, Kmart.

Half Circle print, $12, Kmart.

Attica armchair in Union Caramel, $1699, Freedom Furniture.

NUDE NEUTRALS This trend involves showcasing a few standout pieces. Keep the walls and floors neutral and let your artwork and furniture sing.

Frey tea towel, $18.90, Citta Design.

Tarhong Amazon Leaf dipping bowl, $6.99, Stevens. Resene Marigold.

PHOTOGRAPHS BAUERSYNDICATION.COM/AU/DEREK SWALWELL AND SUPPLIED ALL PRICES CORRECT AT TIME OF PRINT

Max Benjamin White Lilies candle, $49.99, Stevens.

l Isabella vessel, 95; $17.9 ti and Bastien $17.95; vessel, $ eedom both Fre Furnitture. Maxwell & Williams Boat Club mugs, $7.99 each, Briscoes. Living & Co bird’s nest fern, $15; and brass pot with stand, $10; both The Warehouse.

Get the look Resene Avocado.

R Resene Tangerine.

LIGHT IT UP A statement light emphasises high ceilings and is enhanced by a simple backdrop.

TIPS & IDEAS

1

AVOID THE FUSS Mid-century modern pieces are about clean lines and simple shapes. Avoid too many fussy details.

2

TOUCH WOOD The wood detailing is important, whether on the legs of a sofa or in a picture frame. Don’t be afraid to mix and match grains; just make sure the backdrop is neutral.

3 Chevron cushion, $12, Kmart.

Simona cushion, $74.95, Freedom Furniture.

COLOUR ME BEAUTIFUL It’s not just about neutrals. Add interest with dusky colours your nana may have favoured – avocado, tangerines and mustards.

4

ADD SOME WARMTH Because this look is quite minimal, it risks feeling cold. Warm with floor-to-ceiling linen curtains in soft white or grey.


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Cheers!

Summer’s coolest drink

LIQUID GOLD

Last year we told you about the trend for wine slushies, and it seems this summer it’s all about frosé. In essence it’s just frozen rosé with some sugar and fresh strawberries, but experimental bar tenders and on-trend Instagramers alike are putting their own twist on the drink, by adding the likes of elderflower liqueur, vermouth, Campari, watermelon and raspberries. To make your own, simply freeze 750ml rosé in a slice pan overnight. Make a sugar syrup by bringing ½ cup sugar and ½ cup water to the boil, then chilling. Blend frozen rosé with sugar syrup, a punnet of strawberries, 2 tablespoons lemon juice and 1 cup of crushed ice, and serve immediately.

If you fear you spent too much on booze over the Christmas period, take heart you’ll have a long way to go to match the spending of a wine lover in Mississippi. In November 2017, the unnamed private collector splashed out US$350,000 (NZ $508,000) on The Setting, a 2015 cabernet sauvignon. Created by winemaker Jesse Katz for movie agent Shep Gordon, it’s touted as the most expensive bottle of wine ever sold.

Wine

NOTES PHOTOGRAPHS GETT Y IMAGES AND SUPPLIED

‘I never taste the w wine first in restaurantss, I just ask the waiteer to pour’- Nigella Lawsoon

RESEARCH AND INSIGHTS FROM THE WINE WORLD, PLUS OUR PICK OF PINOT GRIS

TVSHOWS SEERED It’s no longer just star power and ratings that are the mark of a good TV show – they need to have their own wine too. TV2’s popular series The Walking Dead has followed in the footsteps of Downton Abbey, Outlander and Game of Thrones, in releasing three bottles of themed wine. The Californian reds are not yet stocked in New Zealand, so we can’t pass comment on whether drinking them will turn you into a zombie…

PINOT GRIS PICKS UNDER $25 Haha Pinot Gris, 2016, Hawkes Bay

$17.99

The colour of sunshine, this smooth, dry pinot from the award-winning Haha winery mixes stonefruit flavours with delicate floral tones. Fresh and nicely rounded, it matches well with light Asian dishes.

Isabel Estate Pinot Gris, 2016, Marlborough

$24.99

A semi-dry wine with rich aromas, this delicious summer drinker mixes notes of apple and pear with spice and a light hint of coconut. Serve lightly chilled with seafood.

Te Rua Bay Pinot Gris, 2016, Marlborough

$17.99

Lush but with a dry finish, this citrusy white has pronounced notes of guava, honeysuckle and lemongrass. A versatile wine, it is good match with most light, summery meals. FOOD JANUARY / FEBRUARY 2018

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Foodie Folk

LADY of the HOUSE REPRODUCING THE COMFORT FOOD OF HER CHILDHOOD HA S MADE AN ENTREPRENEURIAL WELLINGTONIAN A MA JOR PLAYER ON THE FOOD SCENE

WORDS CATH BENNETT

W

hen Vicky Ha announced she wanted to work in the food industry, the response from her family was less than enthusiastic. Despite being descended from a great line of cooks – her Chinese grandfather was a chef in Teochew cuisine, while her mother’s recipes are now legendary – the 34-year-old was encouraged to aim higher. “Working in restaurants wasn’t really seen as a respectable career,” recalls Vicky, who moved to New Zealand from her native Hong Kong 18 years ago. “My mum said, ‘Only losers become chefs.’” Fast forward more than a decade, and no one could accuse the Otago University graduate of being a loser. The entrepreneurial foodie is the creative genius behind House of Dumplings, an enterprise which in the space of five years has grown from a single market stall into a flourishing

business, with products stocked in supermarkets nationwide. “It’s progress that I never really imagined,” admits the down-to-earth chef, who also runs cookery classes from her Wellington headquarters. “I was initially just happy to have a job. I guess I was lucky people were interested in my food, and it’s gone nuts from there.”

Wrapped in memories She might not have wanted her daughter to work in the culinary world, but it was Vicky’s mum Ming who set her on a path into the food industry. “Chinese families are similar to the Italians in some ways – you make the food together in the kitchen and you eat it together,” explains Vicky, an ex-student of Dunedin’s Columba College. “I’ve been making dumplings with my mum and sister since I was a kid. The homemade ones are a huge FOOD JANUARY / FEBRUARY 2018

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contrast to commercial ones; it’s about the best ingredients – things like fresh prawns and nice mushrooms.” And it was when Vicky recreated those homemade favourites for friends that the idea for House of Dumplings came about. Despite having explored other avenues, completing a degree in marketing and food science, and working for a blinds manufacturer, by her mid-20s Vicky could no longer resist the urge to work in a kitchen. She trained as a chef at WelTec in Wellington, and went on to work at Caffe L’Affare, while also boosting her savings with a stint as a cook on a prawn trawler in northern Australia. “One night I was feeding my chef mates dumplings and the sauces with

my mum’s recipes,” Vicky recalls. “They were saying how there is nothing out there like it at all, and I should totally do it. And that’s how it all started.” By then working as a chef with a catering company, at first Vicky juggled her regular job with producing dumplings, which she then sold from her cargo bike at Wellington’s City Market. But she soon realised the workload was unsustainable. “I was working during the day and then during the night making dumplings – it was ridiculous,” she says. “Dumplings are very labour intensive. The first market I did 17 hours in the kitchen, made around 400 dumplings, and sold out within about two or three hours. Afterwards I was like, ‘I’ve got to get out of my job!’”

The burning questions is your earliest Q What food memory?

Mum’s vege stir-fries, with perfectly julienned vegetables. There was not a lot of sauce and only four ingredients, but it was delicious.

is the key to Q What being successful in the food industry? Looking after your people and looking after your customers are the two most important things; without them you won’t survive.

is the key to good Q What Cantonese cooking? you share your Q Can best budget cooking A wok and a fire; if you’ve got a good fire you can actually taste the food quality. Also everything is very quick and healthy.

makes a perfect Q What dumpling?

It needs to be balanced. The pastry should not be too thick or too thin and the fillings need to be flavoursome. It’s got to have texture as well.

is your favourite Q What filling? I mainly eat the Cantonese one – it’s got chicken, loads of herbs and mushrooms – I can’t get enough of it.

tip? Go to the farmers’ market to buy veges and fruit. For $20 you can feed a couple for the whole week, no problem, and it will be nice and healthy.

has been your Q Who biggest cooking inspiration? My mum; her humbleness and quietness – the way she’s a perfectionist as well. It’s a self-pride and expression of self; Mum doesn’t do it to impress us, she does it because it is how things are done. And even though it’s the hardest way of doing it, she’s not skipping anything.

one ingredient you Q The can’t do without? can people get on Q How board with sustainable Salt and pepper – it is so essential and makes such a huge difference.

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eating? Ask more questions –

free-range didn’t really exist in supermarkets a few years back, now people are demanding it, because they are educated. But also, do what you can afford. As long as you’ve got good soil, you can grow vegetables and herbs at home, and it doesn’t need to cost a lot of money. You can do things like getting seeds from a fresh tomato, or taking a cutting from a mint plant and replanting; think outside the box.

has the New Q How Zealand food scene changed in the past two decades? There is more diversity. Also people are asking more questions when it comes to food.

will you be in Q Where 10 years time?

I want to do something creative and be able to express myself. Right now I am doing more serious stuff to ensure we are surviving and the staff are getting paid. In the future I’m hoping to do something that will influence people in a positive way and help this planet.


Foodie Folk

The building on Taranaki Street houses Vicky’s kitchens as well as the takeaway shop.

PHOTOGRAPHS SUPPLIED

Steaming ahead Although Vicky had some experience of business, having run a short-lived bike taxi company while studying at WelTec, nothing prepared her for the challenges of launching the enterprise. “It was a really spontaneous thing,” she says. “I wasn’t thinking whether I would be able to support myself financially, I wasn’t thinking about food cost. I just thought, ‘There is huge demand, people are going crazy for it – I’ve got to do this.’” ‘Doing this’ involved working out of a cramped kitchen with limited staff, little storage and barely any machinery. “We used to mix the pastry by hand and I’d chop 5kg of chicken thighs at a time to mince,” recalls Vicky, who started House of Dumplings in 2012. “I didn’t think of buying a mincer; I didn’t want to invest because I didn’t know if it was going to work or not.” But it more than worked. Although for the first couple of years Vicky ploughed every dollar back into the business, she

‘It’s an essential thing – it has got to be done. It feels better, it feels right’ soon found she could barely keep up with demand. Three years ago, at about the time supermarkets started stocking her frozen dumplings, Vicky moved the business into its current premises on Wellington’s bustling Taranaki Street. The building now houses their two commercial kitchens as well as a fresh dumpling takeaway shop, in an enterprise employing almost 20 staff. It might sound very commercial but Vicky, who describes herself as “a bit of a hippie”, is determined to always put sustainability front and centre. Her handmade dumplings use local, ethically produced ingredients, the

packaging is biodegradable and the business composts all their food scraps. “For me it’s an essential thing – it has got to be done, it feels better, it feels right,” she says. And while you can pick up her dumplings in your local Countdown store, she also sells freshly cooked ones at markets around the country, proud to explain they are made using family recipes learned in her mother’s kitchen. “The concept was to serve food that my mum would be proud of,” says the no-nonsense foodie, who, cautious of over-expanding too quickly, is yet to open a House of Dumplings takeaway shop outside the capital. “I set the standard high from the beginning and have pretty much stuck with the same recipes.” And does her mum think she has chosen a ‘respectable’ career? “I surprised myself and my mum in terms of starting a business,” admits Vicky. “I think Mum is proud of me – she just wants me to be happy.” FOOD JANUARY / FEBRUARY 2018

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A recipe for

GOOD HEALTH WITH A NEW YEAR COMES RENEWED MOTIVATION TO GET HEALTHY. NICK RUSSELL EXPLORES THE NUTRITION AND FITNESS TRENDS ON THE MENU FOR KIWIS IN 2018

SWIMCATIONS Ocean swimming has been growing in popularity for years, but it’s now turning into a recreational activity that water-lovers can combine with a holiday. Signing up to the popular New Zealand Ocean Swim Series will take you to great local tourism hotspots like Russell, Mt Maunganui and Nelson. And if you are wanting to take your swimcation a little further afield, they’ve recently launched a swim series at resort mecca Denarau Island in Fiji. It takes place in September 2018, leaving you plenty of time to get training and save for a holiday.

Cow’s milk alternatives Pea milk, a vegan version of the dairy staple, is gaining traction. There are all kinds of milk substitutes around, but this neutral-tasting, protein-packed, lactose- and cholesterol-free milk is easily absorbed and doesn’t cause stomach bloating. A yellow pea-based milk drink called Ripple appeared in the US last year as the forerunner, so expect pea milks to arrive on our shores in the very near future. And in the meantime, it’s not vegan, but sheep milk is growing in popularity in New Zealand. Spring Sheep Milk Company were recently named the overall winners of the 2017 New Zealand Food Awards for their product, which is high in vitamins, minerals, amino acids, protein and calcium and is said to be easier to digest than regular milk.

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FERMENTED FOODS Kimchi, kombucha and sauerkraut have come into vogue for their benefits to gut health, and in 2018 you can expect to see a greater range of these fermented products becoming available. Some will draw on traditional methods – such as those which use nukadoko, a Japanese treatment which involves a fermented rice bran mixture and is used to pickle vegetables. Other applications will be a little more scientific, like a fermented vegetable cow’s milk substitute which is being developed. This has real cow’s milk proteins that make it behave in a similar way to the dairy version, but it is vegan, lactose-free, uses less water and is more environmentally friendly.


Health

10,000 STEPS

Standing desks

INSECTS Alternative protein is very on-trend, and while it may turn some stomachs, insect proteins have long been on the menu in African and Asian cuisines. And no wonder – they are high in nutrients, fatty acids and fibre as well as protein. In New Zealand we’ve been slow on the uptake, but in recent years crickets have been turned into flours and protein bars, while deep fried locusts are now being served in the likes of Dunedin’s Vault 21 restaurant. Currently insects are more novelty than food staple here, but space-saving, environment-protecting lean proteins are on the rise.

The often sedentary lives of office workers have led to a host of health problems. Back issues are common, and prolonged periods plonked on our derrieres have been linked to everything from type-2 diabetes to heart disease. After the initial craze of standing desks, a more balanced approach of sitting, standing and moving around is the prescription which will be adopted in workplaces in future years. Although expensive, height adjustable sit-stand desks with anti-fatigue mats are also cropping up in offices.

The magic minimum we should be doing every day to combat the menace of heart disease, strokes, obesity and diabetes is 10,000 steps. Step counting has been on the rise with the popularity of Fitbits and other portable devices, and the trend is expected to continue. It’s not quite as daunting as it may seem, as daily strolls, taking the stairs and chores like vacuuming and lawn mowing quickly add up. Research published last year by The International Journal of Obesity suggests 15,000 steps would be vastly more beneficial, but it’s best to start small and build up.

HIIT

PHOTOGRAPHS GETTY IMAGES

Personalised nutrition One-size-fits-all diets and eating plans are rapidly falling out of favour as DNA testing companies now provide information on how our bodies respond to specific foods. The rapidly developing field of science known as nutritional genomics studies the human genome to establish how it relates to nutrition and health. From there you can discover your food profile – and learn the eating habits that are best for your body. Want to get on board? There are Kiwi companies who will create eating plans based on a mouth swab which will indicate the likes of saturated fat response, coeliac risk or salt sensitivity. This is one trend that is poised to transform the health and fitness industries for good.

The experts have spoken – The American College of Sports Medicine surveyed more than 4000 fitness professionals and they’re predicting High Intensity Interval Training (HIIT) will be the most popular trend in fitness for 2018. It means two things for us: firstly, fitness professionals are mean! Secondly, it means short bursts of frantic activity followed by a short periods of rest. It’s hard and fast and it’s gonna hurt! Many gyms now offer classes featuring HIIT, or you can work it into your usual form of exercise by adding short, intensive bursts of activity. For example, if you enjoy biking, go as fast as you can for 30 seconds several times within a half hour ride.


Time toSHine

THE WARMER WEATHER CAN PLAY HAVOC WITH YOUR APPEARANCE, RESULTING IN DRY SKIN, FRIZZY HAIR AND MELTING MAKEUP. BUT DON’T SWEAT OVER THESE IRRITANTS – ERIN BERRYMAN HAS SOME TOP TIPS TO FIX YOUR SUMMER BEAUTY WOES

Fight the frizz Humidity is synonymous with bad hair days and despite our efforts, it often seems hair has a mind of its own. Thankfully, there’s an easy fix for even the frizziest of flyaways. Coat the ends of your hair in a hydrating hair oil or serum to protect and seal the cuticle. Finish with a light to medium hold hairspray for all-day defence against the elements. Try: Schwarzkopf Beology Hair Treatment Repair Oil Serum, 80ml, $16.99; Schwarzkopf Extra Care Hair Spray Body & Texture, 250g, $7.29; L’Oréal Botanicals Fresh Care Hair Treatment Strength Cure Potion in Coriander, 125ml, $17.99.

Get mean with green If your hair starts to turn a minty hue after a dip in the pool, look for a hydrating, clarifying shampoo to remove unwanted tones, while revitalising dry ends. As chlorine is a chemical disinfectant, build-up can severely damage and dehydrate hair. Following shampoo, massage

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Beauty a repair mask into your tresses, working it through from scalp to ends. Leave on for at least five minutes to strengthen, restore and help manageability of brittle hair. Keeping tresses moisturised is particularly important for coloured hair, and especially blondes, who are prone to brassiness in summer. Try: OGX Weightless Hydration Shampoo Coconut Water, 385ml, $18; Garnier Fructis Coconut Water Shampoo, 250ml, $5.09; L’Oréal Elvive Extraordinary Clay Mask, 150ml, $11.19; Toni & Guy Damage Repair Nourish Reconstruct Mask, 200ml, $17.99.

Avoid meltdown

PHOTOGRAPHS GETTY IMAGES AND SUPPLIED

It’s an unfortunate pattern as the temperature climbs up: makeup slips down the face, and there’s no worse beauty mishap than smudged panda eyes and blotchy foundation. Every summer beauty arsenal should be kitted out with waterproof and sweat-resistant formulas to help keep makeup in place. Where coverage is concerned, apply a primer for your base to ensure long-lasting wear, then follow with an oil-free foundation. For optimum longevity and an airbrush-like finish, set with a finishing powder or spray. Try: Maybelline Lash Sensational Waterproof Mascara in Very Black, 9.5ml, $24.99; Rimmel London Fix & Protect Makeup Primer SPF25, 30ml, $15.99; Rimmel Wonder’Full Mascara with Argan Oil, 11ml, $19.99; Collection Cosmetics Invisible Setting Powder, 15g, $19.99.

Oil check Warmer weather can put your oil glands into overdrive, turning your skin into an oil slick by lunchtime. Swap out your heavier skincare for oil-free alternatives during summer, and also consider those that target enlarged pores, to refine skin tone and texture.

To further counteract shine, apply a thin layer of a pore minimising primer, worn alone or applied prior to makeup. Try: Biore Baking Soda Pore Cleanser, 200ml, $12.99; Maybelline Baby Skin Pore Eraser, 20ml, $16.99; Neutrogena Oil-Free Moisture Day Cream SPF15, 115ml, $15.99.

Lining up While strappy swimwear looks great on the beach, the two-toned lines it leaves behind aren’t so striking. However, levelling out tan lines is easier than you might think – simply reach for your trusty moisturiser and faux glow. Firstly, apply a moisturiser onto the darker areas of skin, being careful not to touch any lighter areas – this will form a barrier between the tanned and paler skin. Follow with a self-tan, blending into the pale areas and allowing to dry before dressing. You may need to repeat this process a few times depending on the prominence of the tan lines. Try: Palmer’s Body Lotion Coconut Oil, 250ml, $8.99; Bondi Sands Self-Tanning Foam in Light/Medium, 200ml, $22.99; Essano Bliss Coconut Oil Body Lotion, 400ml, $16.99.

Walk on sunshine Wearing jandals and going barefoot on the beach will take a toll on your feet, leaving them dry and cracked. Once a week, buff dry skin from your soles using a pumice stone or foot file. Following this, soak your tootsies in a tub of warm water – if you have baby oil handy, add a few drops for silky smooth soles. Apply a foot and heel balm twice daily to intensively nourish and restore feet to original condition. Once improved, scale this back to a few times a week to maintain. Try: Neutrogena Norwegian Foot Cream, 56g, $9.99; Ecostore Baby Oil, 125ml, $8.69; Scholl Velvet Smooth Electronic Express Pedi Foot File, $49.99; Scholl Eulactol Heel Balm Gold, 60ml, $16.59.

Cracked lips Unfortunately, sun and saltwater go hand in hand with a peeling pout, but luckily there are numerous remedies, some lurking within arm’s reach already! There’s plenty to be said for a good lip balm, regardless of season. You never know when chapped lips will strike, so keep a faithful balm in your handbag and glovebox for a quick fix in desperate times. Look for one with nourishing properties like vitamin E, aloe vera or cocoa butter, as well as SPF protection to shield against sunburn and further aggravation. When you have extra time up your sleeve, thinly slice a cucumber and leave the pieces on your lips for five minutes;

the natural antioxidants in cucumber will revive and rehydrate lips. To buff away dead skin, mix a teaspoon of brown sugar and honey with a few drops of olive oil for an easy DIY lip scrub. Try: Blistex Intensive Repair, 7g, $7.10; NIVEA Repair & Protection Lip Balm, 4.8g, $5.99; Blistex Lip Conditioner SPF15, 7g, $5.69. FOOD JANUARY / FEBRUARY 2018

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Commotion by the

OCEAN THE BAY OF ISLANDS HA S ALL THE INGREDIENTS FOR THE PERFEC T FAMILY ESCAPE… A S LONG A S THE LITTLE ONES CAN STOMACH IT, DISCOVER S CATH BENNETT

H

ow many more sleeps until we go to the chocolate factory Mummy?” Zach is obsessed with Roald Dahl’s Charlie and the Chocolate Factory. As soon as he hears our trip to the Bay of Islands includes a visit to a place where, like Willy Wonka, they create all sorts of sweet delights, he is beside himself with excitement. Add in the promise of boat trips, parrots and glow-worms, and we have a fouryear-old convinced he is starring in his own episode of Dora the Explorer. For our part, the prospect of a weekend gorging ourselves on delicious, locally-grown produce – that I don’t have to cook – in stunning surroundings, and perhaps even squeezing in a visit to the odd vineyard

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is just as enticing. Our 18-month-old son Cody is just eyeing up the biscuits I’m packing for the journey. Ahead of our arrival at Kawiti Caves, which are around a three hour drive north of Auckland (not including coffee, nappy change, jumper removal and hunting-for-biscuit stops), Zach wants to know more about glow-worms. We tell him they’re a bit like The Very Hungry Caterpillar, but with lights in their tales and the ability to turn into flies rather than butterflies. “So will you kill them with the fly spray Daddy?” Zach asks.

Oh, The Places You’ll Go Kawiti Caves, which are named for the notorious Maori chief whose descendants own the land here, are

nestled in an unobtrusive spot just off SH1. A family-run enterprise, they can only be explored by one of the regular 30-minute guided tours, which are perfect for young kids with endless questions – though because the walkways feature narrow, winding steps lit by hand-held lamps, buggies need to be left in the car. Brianna, our very patient guide, is a mine of interesting information, and while the revelation that glow-worms eat mayflies, midges, mosquitoes and moths seems to disappoint Zach (“Not apples and pears like The Very Hungry Caterpillar?”) he is fascinated by the twinkling lights which illuminate the 200m limestone caves. The combination of the tour and a picturesque, but hilly, bushwalk by


Travel

The Duke of Marlborough Hotel, left, has a restaurant that serves up a range of seafood delights, below.

Tucked down a winding driveway is a boutique operation up there with the best The views are stunning from Omata Estate.

the caves afterwards makes for thirsty children, and, shortly after, the need for a toilet stop. While this normally wouldn’t warrant a mention, Kawakawa toilets, just up the road from the caves, are not your normal public convenience. In the late 1990s, Austrian artist Friedensreich Hundertwasser, whose architecture includes a Napa Valley vineyard and an indoor market in Switzerland, transformed what could be a very pedestrian facility into a work of art. In the middle of Kawakawa he created a functional but very colourful toilet block, using recycled glass, reused bricks and featuring a live tree in the middle and grasses on the roof. There is something quite magical about catching a boat to get to a destination, and for a couple of excitable kids, the 10 minute car ferry is a wonderful way to get from Opua, just south of Paihia, to Okiato, which is around the corner from Russell. While we were well aware there are plenty of vineyards on the Paihia side of the water – with Ake Ake and Marsden Estate proving particular winners on previous visits, we hadn’t realised that tucked away down a winding driveway, just a five-minute drive from Okiato, is a boutique operation that is up there with the best. Perched on the cliffs between Pipiroa Bay and Te Wahapu inlet, the views at Omata Estate are as impressive as the flavoursome, full-bodied wine. After a tasting I am sold on the crisp 2016 pinot gris while my partner Phil believes the 2014 merlot is almost too easy to drink… almost.

Mr Greedy Our accommodation for the night is at The Duke Motel. While I look rather longingly at its sister operation, the historic Duke of Marlborough Hotel, I concede that for a family with two young kids, the convenience of being in a modern, two-bedroom apartment with a kitchen, spa bath and pool access, outweighs the benefits of staying in a luxury hotel on the water – just. And we don’t completely miss out on the country’s oldest licensed hotel, which began life in 1827, when it had the slightly less distinguished name of Johnny Johnson’s Grog Shop. Tonight we are dining in the hotel’s restaurant, run by executive chef Dan Fraser, formerly of acclaimed Auckland eatery Euro. While Phil and I salivate over the likes of the famous seafood chowder and the melt-in-the-mouth calamari, I am relieved to see the kids’ options are not limited to the usual fried food that pepper most childrens’ menus. The incredibly obliging staff also don’t seem to mind when Cody nearly takes out a waiter with a flying spoon and Zach knocks over an ornate standing lamp. In fact, the only downside to the dining experience is FOOD JANUARY / FEBRUARY 2018

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Travel

The Hole in the Rock, left, Rainbow Falls, bottom left, and parrots at The Parrot Place, bottom, enchant Cath’s family, below, from left, Cath, Zach, Cody and Phil.

that, while my entrée of Blue Fin Tuna Tartare and main of ‘Charolais Beef’ Eye Fillet with Bone Marrow both appear rather dainty on their elegant oversized plates, they are more filling than they look…. especially when I have been dipping into Cody’s risotto. It’s with regret that we have to give the Banana Tarte Tatin for dessert a miss.

Green Eggs and Ham

Other family attractions in the area WAITANGI MOUNTAIN BIKE PARK Bring your bikes – or hire them – and explore the network of trails in this new attraction which is constantly expanding. KAYAKING If you want to combine exploration with exercise, hire a kayak and get out on the water. While it’s easy to explore alone, a guided trip will ensure you get the best experience. KERIKERI MISSION STATION Home to two of New Zealand’s oldest buildings – the Stone Store

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FOOD JANUARY / FEBRUARY 2018

and Kemp House, the heritage gardens here are stunning, and perfect for a picnic with the kids. WAIARIKI POOLS, NGAWHA SPRINGS A 30-minute drive from Paihia is a rustic complex of natural hot pools. It is perfect for a relaxing afternoon – especially when the weather isn’t the best WAITANGI TREATY GROUNDS Interesting for kids and parents alike, swing by to experience a historic and picturesque landmark that every Kiwi should visit at least once.

I can’t think of a better way to spend a sunny Saturday morning than tucking into street food, and I’m delighted to find the Old Packhouse Market in Kerikeri, a 20 minute drive from the ferry landing at Opua, is one of the best markets I’ve experienced. Phil is torn between the Beef Cheek at Wingless Angel American-style BBQ and the Market Café and Bakery’s Gourmet Rump Steak and Mushroom Pie. Something of a pie snob, he goes for the latter – and declares it one of the best he’s had. It’s a little early for pies for me, but having browsed stalls offering everything from knitwear to natural medicines, Cody and I share crispy and flavoursome Pork Spring Rolls from Thai Tasty, which are made even more delicious with a dollop of Nga Puhi Road Thai Chilli sauce on the side. I could have happily browsed until the market closes at 1.30pm, but restless kids force a move on to The Parrot Place, a tropical oasis made technicolour by the chattering birds. It’s all about the feeding for these tame creatures, and Zach and Cody are delighted to present them with nuts, which the parrots grab with their feet, shell with their beaks and gobble at an incredible rate. I am not overly excited about bird claws in my hair but it certainly makes Zach giggle, who is so enchanted he even tries to share the boiled egg he is snacking on with his new feathered friends. For those who love the raw beauty of a waterfall, there are few more scenic spots than Rainbow Falls, where the thundering torrent of water contrasts with the tranquillity of the surroundings. It’s the perfect spot to stretch your legs and have a picnic. You do need to be a better map reader than me to find the Falls without a lengthy diversion, but they are well worth getting lost for.


Delicious Lunchbox Fillers

Courgette, Ham and Cheese Cups

Makes

8

Prep Time 10

Cook Time 30

Gluten Free GF

Low Sugar LS

Ingredients

Method

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For more recipes and tips, visit countdown.co.nz/foodhub


Travel

Charlotte’s Kitchen.

Makana Confections.

Zachary and the Chocolate Factory As we walk into Makana Confections boutique chocolate factory, explaining to Zach it’s unlikely we will see OompaLoompas, we are struck by a beautiful sweet aroma. Through huge glass windows we see people who are normalsized, but clearly deft with chocolate, as they slather benches in rivers of the stuff, tempering and chopping. Having greedily tucked into the macadamia butter toffee crunch, we sample the 72 per cent dark chocolate orange snaps, which magnificently combine the creamy and smooth, bitter and tart. While Cody soon has a chocolate moustache, we’re surprised Zach isn’t keen to indulge, and has barely lifted his head since we arrived. It’s while manager Scott Manson is explaining to us it is a three day process making the delicate, hand-rolled truffles, that we hear a gurgling sound – which is definitely not bubbling chocolate. Zach has just thrown up, replacing that gorgeous smell of chocolate with something rather more sickly. As we launch him out of the front door, then attempt to clean him up on the doorstep, we marvel at the understanding of Scott and his team, as they gather cloths, buckets and mops for the slick clean-up operation. Unfazed by one child covered in vomit and another still munching on chocolate sitting in their doorway, they deserve a medal for their child-friendly policies.

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FOOD JANUARY / FEBRUARY 2018

Needless to say, we have to give our afternoon tea at the neighbouring Chocolate Café a miss, but as I dash through it to the bathroom to try and wash the sick out of my hair, I catch a glimpse of the most beautiful looking chocolate truffle mousse cake and great pillows of soft icecream. Next time.

The Owl and The Pussycat Went to Sea As is so often the case with kids, the next day you wouldn’t think anything was amiss with Zach, as he tells me off for forgetting his plastic binoculars – which he will need on our Fullers GreatSights boat cruise planned for today. This half-day trip on a vessel that is

large enough to avoid sea-sickness in most small children is a great way to absorb just why the Bay of Islands is named as such. Cruising among the 144 islands, before actually motoring through the iconic Hole in the Rock on Motukokako Island, makes for an idyllic experience. The kids love trying to spot dolphins and seals – despite their uncanny knack of looking in the wrong direction almost every time a sea creature appears. A perfect way to round off the weekend is with a well-deserved Bloody Good Bloody Mary at Charlotte’s Kitchen in Paihia. The new restaurant and bar, named for one of the first white female settlers in New Zealand, sits right on the end of the wharf, meaning you almost feel like you’re sailing on the water as you tuck into Waikare Inlet Oysters and the unmissable Steamed Pork Buns. As we pile back into the car and bid the Bay of Islands goodbye, we reflect that like all good stories, our weekend had a few twists – as well as a bad turn. But there was no doubt that ultimately, our trip had a happy ending. ➼ For more information about the Bay of Islands go to www.visitboi.co.nz

PHOTOGRAPHS GETTY IMAGES AND SUPPLIED

I glimpse the most beautiful truffle mousse cake and pillows of icecream


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SHOW case Products worth shouting about

Chopped & topped You can now bring the delightful tastes of Greece home to your family with the new Taylor Farms Greek Chopped Salad. In this handcrafted blend, fresh romaine lettuce is tossed with Mediterranean-inspired ingredients like green olives and pita-style chips and topped with a unique feta and black olives vinaigrette.

Fresh and tasty New Zealand pork Thanks to a new trustmark from New Zealand Pork, it’s now easier than ever to buy local pork, bacon and ham products. If you’re looking for fresh pork that’s been raised with care by local farmers, look for the new ‘Born and Raised in New Zealand’ label next time you shop.

Dairy-free taste sensation It’s rare that something that tastes so good is free of so many things – dairy, gluten, soy and added sugar! The Coconut Collaborative yoghurts are proudly a vegan product, made with a base of coconut cream and coconut water so bursting with coconutty goodness, along with health-giving live cultures. Available in supermarkets.

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World-class sustainable wines Thinking differently is what they do at Yealands. Their focus on crafting award-winning wines in harmony with nature has seen Yealands lead the world in sustainable winegrowing. Sourced from their vineyards in Marlborough and Hawke’s Bay, the Peter Yealands Reserve wines represent the very best from the Peter Yealands range. RRP from $17.99.

Convenient, fuss-free and perfect for the lunchbox or handbag, Dole has created a range of delicious grab-andgo fruit bowls. Dole Fruit & Juice, Dole Fruit & Jelly and Dole Fruit & Custard each contain a range of flavoursome, quality fruit. Available in packs of four from Countdown supermarkets. RRP from $4.99 per pack.

We love potatoes! Perlas small, new-season potatoes are washed and ready, fresh out of the box. Their small size means they cook easily and consistently, retain their goodness and taste delicious. Perlas are great for every occasion and excellent served hot or cold. RRP $8.99.


Bite back at pain Colgate® Sensitive Pro-Relief™ Extra Protect offers you the freedom to no longer hold back from eating the foods you love. Pro-Argin® blocks exposed channels to the nerves, whilst CalSeal™ technology fortifies the mineral barrier to provide extra protection* against everyday acid attacks. colgatesensitiveprorelief.com.au *Against daily acid attacks. For instant relief, apply directly to each sensitive tooth with fingertip for one minute. For lasting relief, brush twice daily. For the relief of tooth sensitivity. Always read the label. Use only as directed. See your dentist if symptoms persist.

Sweet and simple Convenient and perfectly portion-controlled, Chelsea’s range of sugar sticks and cubes are ideal for taking on summer holidays. Available in both white and raw sugar, they are a great choice for sweetening drinks. Whatever the occasion, Chelsea has the sugar for you! Find hundreds of recipes and inspiration at chelsea.co.nz.

Spray away Make the healthier choice with Alfa One Rice Bran Oil BBQ Grill & Pan Spray. Alfa One BBQ spray is naturally propelled through an environmentally friendly spray can. The nitrogen sits separately from the product, so you are only consuming 100% rice bran oil. It’s completely non-flammable and has a high smoke point – the perfect choice for the BBQ. Whether you are frying or BBQ’ing, the Alfa One BBQ spray is the perfect oil to ensure great performance. Spray directly onto your food or onto the BBQ plate or pan.

Natural wonder Say ‘allo to Yoplait Au Naturel, great taste with no added sugar. C’est parfait for dolloping in a smoothie or serving with fresh fruit, and fantastique for adding to your favourite recipes. Yoplait Au Naturel – oui, s’il vous plaît! Look for the new Yoplait Au Naturel in your supermarket chiller. RRP 900g tub, $6.89.

Summer thirst quenchers Hansells All Natural Fruit Syrups are a great addition to your summer entertaining. The all-natural fruit syrups have no artificial colours, flavours, preservatives or sweeteners, and are at least 25 per cent lower in sugar than the average of the top selling cordials in New Zealand. They come in four great flavours, specially crafted for those who want a refreshing, natural drink with a slight twist. Mix with still or sparkling water, soda or tonic, over ice or with added fruit.

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107 Editor and Food Director Sophie Gray Managing Editor Cath Bennett Editorial Director Sarah Henry Creative Director Louise Thomson Art Director Mike Watson Designer Béla Trussell-Cullen Editorial Assistant Sophie McEwen Contributors Sasha Anderson Victoria Arrowsmith, Erin Berryman, Tessa Burrows, Todd Eyre, Nicola Feeney, Melanie Jenkins, Jo Knight, Sharon Laurence-Anderson, Tony Nyberg Publisher Bauer Media Group (NZ) LP. Street address Bauer Media Centre, 90 Wellesley Street, Auckland. Postal address Food magazine, Private Bag 92512, Wellesley Street, Auckland 1036.

24

Chief Executive Officer Paul Dykzeul Managing Director Brendon Hill GM – Publishing & Insights Tanya Walshe Commercial Director Kaylene Hurley Commercial Brand Manager Kath Gola Direct Account Manager Emi Hooper Finance Business Analyst Esha Lingam Production Manager Susan Lewis Printer PMP Print Distribution Gordon & Gotch Editorial Enquiries Ph (09) 308 2773, email foodmagazine@bauermedia.co.nz. Subscription Enquiries Auckland subscribers phone (09) 308 2721. If outside Auckland please call toll free on 0800 MAGSHOP (0800 624 746), email magshop@bauermedia.co.nz or visit www.magshop.co.nz. Advertising Enquiries Auckland: Direct Account Manager Emi Hooper (09) 308 2897 emihooper@bauermedia.co.nz. Classified Sales Manager Kim Chapman (07) 578 3646 classified@xtra.co.nz The contents of Food magazine are copyright protected and may not be reproduced in any form without the written permission of the publisher. All product claims in Food magazine have been made by and are the sole responsibility of the product marketer or appointed agent. Please note: some products may be available at selected stores only. Publication January/February 2018 ISSN 2253-282X Terms and conditions for prize draws in this issue unless stated otherwise: Entry into competitions is deemed to be

Index: Find DF DAIRY-FREE GF GLUTEN-FREE

Drinks 24 Watermelon & Ginger Ale Cooler DF GF V

Breakfasts&Starters 81 80 81 48 48

acceptance of these terms and conditions. The promoter is Bauer Media Group (NZ) LP, 90 Wellesley Street West, Auckland 1010. Prizes cannot be redeemed for cash,

105

exchanged or transferred. Employees of Bauer Media, associated sponsor(s) or their families or agencies are not eligible for prizes. Entry is open to New Zealand residents only. The winners will be drawn by Bauer Media, the decision is final and no correspondence will be entered into. Food magazine (ISSN 2253-282X) is subject to copyright in its entirety. The contents may not be reproduced in any form, either whole or in part, without the written permission of the publisher. All rights reserved in material accepted for publication, unless initially specified otherwise. All letters and other material forwarded to the magazine will be assumed intended for publication unless clearly labelled ‘Not for publication’. Opinions expressed in the magazine are not necessarily those of Bauer Media Group (NZ) LP. No responsibility is accepted for unsolicited material.

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80 32 81

Banana & Salted Caramel Pancake Stack V Basic Buttermilk Pancakes V LS Blueberry & Cinnamon Sugar Pancake Stack V Bushman’s Bread Breakfast Pizza LS Camp Crumpets with Cinnamon Butter V LS Chilled Cucumber Soup with Whipped Feta Toasts V LS Double-Chocolate Pancake Stack V Fried Eggplant with Thyme Honey V Mixed Seed, Fig & Honey Pancake Stack V

LightMeals 76 Baby Carrot & Black Rice Salad DF GF V LS 45 Campsite Barbecue Baked Beans DF 106 Carrot & Harissa Falafel with Tahini Yoghurt V LS 104 Cauliflower Pizza Bites GF V LS 58 Chicken Yakitori DF GF LS

LS

V VEGETARIAN LS LOW SUGAR

97 Chilli Chicken with BLAT Salad 104 Green Quinoa with Sesame Eggs DF GF V LS 44 Griddled French Melts LS 28 Peachy Barbecue Wings DF LS 37 Roasted Tomato, Cheese & Herb Strata V LS 50 Summer Vegetable Tart V LS 60 Sushi Squares DF LS 57 Za’atar Pizza V LS

LS

Mains 50 Balsamic Beef Skewers with Flatbread LS 112 Beetroot Gnocchi V LS 107 Chermoula Tuna, Chickpea & Broad Bean Salad DF GF LS 106 Chicken Tikka with Cauliflower Rice GF LS 100 Chicken with Blue Cheese & Apple Slaw GF LS 76 Chilli Prawn Nasi Goreng DF LS 94 Dukkah Lamb Cutlets with Cauliflower DF GF LS 110 Gnocchi V LS 117 Hidden Veggie Burgers LS 112 Kale Gnocchi V LS 101 Lamb Farfalle with Roasted Veges DF

LS


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next issue ON SALE FEBRUARY 19

76 let’s celebrate!

that recipe

DF DAIRY-FREE GF GLUTEN-FREE

V VEGETARIAN LS LOW SUGAR

STATEMENT CAKES Create a showstopper

PHOTOGRAPHS STOCKFOOD/ONESHOT AND ISTOCK IMAGES

NEW WAYS WITH... 112 Orange Kumara Gnocchi V LS 112 Parsnip Gnocchi V LS 27 Peach & Rosemary Pork Chops DF GF LS 100 Pork Steaks with Sautéed Lentils DF GF LS 74 Rice Patties & Tempeh Satay Salad DF V LS 31 Roasted Eggplant Curry V LS 98 Salt & Pepper Tofu with Soba Noodles DF V LS 73 Spiced Vegetable Biryani DF GF V LS 99 Spicy Red Beans with Rice GF V LS 99 Steak & Spuds with Salsa Verde DF LS 146 Sticky Maple Bacon & Chicken Skewers with Cherry Pecan Salad DF LS 74 Sticky Teriyaki Rice with Chicken & Thyme DF LS 97 Thai Beef Noodle Salad DF LS

Sides&Sauces 53 39 53 52 52 114 52

Balsamic Dressing DF GF V Easy Tomato Jam DF GF V Greek-Style Dressing DF GF Lime Dressing DF GF LS Oregano Vinaigrette DF GF Peanut Butter DF GF V LS Sweet Chilli Dressing DF V

LS

V

LS

V

LS

34 Teriyaki Baked Eggplant with Sesame Seeds DF V LS 53 Thyme Vinaigrette DF GF V LS 38 Tomato, Pomegranate & Mint Salad DF GF V LS 23 Watermelon & Basil Salad DF GF V LS

Bakes & Cakes 86 84 68 83 85

Giant Pizza Biscuits Lemon Daisy Biscuits V Lemon Meringue Cupcakes V Passionfruit Shortbread Hearts Piñata Biscuits

dried fruit

GREEK ODYSSEY Delicious European flavours

MAKE YOUR OWN Chocolate Marshmallow Eggs

GF

V

Desserts&Sweets 51 Campground Cobbler V 78 Coconut Rice Pudding & Poached Pears GF V 49 Grilled Madeira Cake with Brandy Syrup & Roasted Fruit V 66 Little Salty Caramel Meringue Pies V 68 Mango Passionfruit Vacherin GF V 29 Peaches & Cream Pie 66 Peanut & Caramel Meringue Cake 119 Tropical Custard Tarts V 25 Watermelon Pizza with Vanilla Cream V LS

ideas for Easter FOOD JANUARY / FEBRUARY 2018

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COOK the cover RECIPE & STYLING SOPHIE GRAY PHOTOGRAPHS MELANIE JENKINS

PREP + COOK TIME 55 mins SERVES 4

DF LS ● ● ● ● ● ● ● ● ● ●

½ cup store-bought barbecue sauce ½ cup maple syrup 1 heaped teaspoon wholegrain mustard ½ teaspoon smoked paprika ½ teaspoon cumin salt and pepper 3 x boneless chicken breasts, cut into 2cm pieces 400g streaky bacon ½ red capsicum, cut into bite-sized pieces ½ yellow capsicum, cut into bite-sized pieces

CHERRY PECAN SALAD ● ¼ cup balsamic vinegar ● ¼ cup maple syrup ● 1 teaspoon dijon mustard ● 2 corn cobs ● 4 cups lettuce ● 1 courgette, sliced into ribbons ● ½ thin telegraph cucumber, sliced into ribbons ● ½ red onion, thinly sliced ● 1 cup mixed sprouts or micro greens ● 1 cup edamame beans ● 1 cup cherries pitted, halved ● ½ cup pecans, toasted 1 Preheat a barbecue or grill plate to medium. Combine the barbecue sauce, maple syrup and mustard and set aside. In a small bowl, mix paprika, cumin,

a pinch of salt and a good grind of pepper; sprinkle over chicken. 2 Slice bacon lengthways into long strips. Wind a strip of bacon around a piece of chicken, cut off any excess, then thread onto a metal skewer. Add a piece of capsicum to the skewer, then repeat with bacon-wrapped chicken. Continue wrapping and threading until each skewer has 5 pieces of chicken, separated by capsicum slices. 3 Coat skewers in half the sauce mixture, and set aside a small amount for basting. Heat remaining sauce in a small saucepan. 4 Oil barbecue or grill plate and cook skewers for 4 minutes. Turn each skewer and brush generously with sauce; cook for another 4 minutes. Continue turning and basting until cooked and golden on all 4 sides; the internal temperature of the chicken should be 75°C. 5 While the skewers are cooking, make the Cherry pecan salad (see below). Serve the skewers with the salad and a drizzle of the warmed sauce. Cherry pecan salad Combine the vinegar, syrup and mustard. Use a little of this dressing to brush the corn; grill corn until cooked and slightly charred; cool. Combine remaining salad ingredients on a platter. Use a sharp knife to slice sections of corn off the cob and add to the salad. Drizzle with the remaining dressing. PER SERVE Energy 8711kcal, 3644kj • Protein 54g • Total Fat 44g • Saturated Fat 13g • Carbohydrate 62g • Sugars 54g • Fibre 11g • Sodium 1600mg

TIPS If you have a hood on your barbecue, cook with it down. You can substitute the edamame beans for fresh peas.

PROPS STYLIST’S OWN

STICKY MAPLE BACON & CHICKEN SKEWERS WITH CHERRY PECAN SALAD


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