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Emilia Romagna

APT Servizi Emilia Romagna (Regional tourist board) Fax +39 0541 430150 info@aptservizi.com www.emiliaromagnaturismo.it www.aptservizi.com

For information on tourist products of Emilia Romagna Unione di prodotto Appennino e Verde Fax +39 051 4202612 appennino@aptservizi.com www.appenninoeverde.org

Unione di prodotto CittĂ d'Arte, Cultura e Affari Fax +39 051 4202612 cittadarte@aptservizi.com www.cittadarte.emilia-romagna.it

Unione di prodotto Costa Fax +39 0547 675192 info@adriacoast.com www.adriacoast.com

Book your holiday on:

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Land with a Soul

Unione di prodotto Terme, Salute e Benessere Fax +39 051 4202612 info@emiliaromagnaterme.it www.emiliaromagnaterme.it

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Emilia Romagna

Land with a Soul


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3 Publishing project: APT Servizi Texts: Stefano Maldini Text restyling in foreign languages: English – Lisa Gerard Sharp German – Maren Preiss Russian – Gamer  Bautdinov Concept and graphics project: Empresa Creativa - www.empresacreativa.com Translation: Action Line Servizi Linguistici – Forlì Images: APT Servizi Photo Archives Photo Archives of the Unioni di Prodotto Appennino e Verde, Città d’Arte, Costa, Terme and their public partners Federico Fellini Foundation (image pag. 12-13 – Federico Fellini “La dolce vita: Silvia come la Via Lattea” Coloured pens on paper - copyright Federico Fellini Foundation) Forlì – Cesena Province Photo Archives (sangiovese glass pag. 91; montetiffi baking-pots pag. 25; nordic walking pag. 62) Ferrara Province Photo Archives (deer in the woods of Mesola pag. 23; Cento carnival pag. 35; Delta Park hide pag. 46) Reggio Emilia Province Photo Archives (making pasta pag. 37; images of the chapter “Don Camillo and Peppone”) Rimini Province Photo Archives (various images in the Adriatic Riviera section) Cesenatico Town Council Photo Archives (Marino Moretti birthplace pag. 19; recalling garibaldina pag. 22) Modena Town Council Photo Archives (Pavarotti & Friends pag. 33) Ravenna Town Council Photo Archives (sapanno Garibaldi pag. 22) Sarsina Town Council Photo Archives (Sarsina arena pag. 94) Oasi costiera dei 4 comuni Photo Archives (small flamingo pag. 22) Museo della Figurina Photo Archives (images pag. 35) Savor of Montegelli Feast Photo Archives (images pag. 71) Motorvalley Museum and Collections Photo Archives (images for the chapters Enzo Ferrari and Ducati) 

Alessandro La Motta (front page)

Printed in October 2009 by Grafica Editoriale Printing srl – Bologna

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Via Emilia: the ancient Roman road that recounts the centuries of history of this extraordinary region. A road that encloses an entire universe: from Rimini to Piacenza, a world of surprises and new experiences. To the east the horizon follows the coastline where for over a century millions of tourists have been attracted by the sun, beaches and theme parks for a holiday of fun and wellbeing. The Adriatic coast always offers visitors a warm welcome which is appreciated all over the world; all guests enjoy a unique and true experience filled with opportunities. To the west of the via Emilia gently rolling hills give way to the relaxing and mysterious grandeur of the Apennines overflowing with fascinating itineraries and thermal baths with a tradition of wellbeing. To the north the road borders with the Po River that flows to the Delta: a natural paradise waiting to be discovered. Wherever you stop this land offers extraordinary food and local products of amazing quality; a real paradise for food and wine lovers, home of Pellegrino Artusi, born in the province of ForlÏ, author of one of the most famous Italian cookery books. Bologna is the navel of this extraordinary territory, surrounded by charming villages and unforgettable cities of art: from the Estense city of Ferrara to Byzantine Ravenna, the jewel cities of Parma and Modena and the great heritage declared Patrimony of Humanity by UNESCO. Theatres, cultural events, and museums of all types entertain visitors in all corners of this territory. This fertile land is the birthplace of the genius of Guglielmo Marconi and of the music of Giuseppe Verdi. This is the region that fired Enzo Ferrari’s passion for motors and inspired Federico Fellini’s dreamlike vision. United and multifaceted, welcoming and curious, bound to tradition and open to the world, Emilia Romagna is a fascinating and sincere "land with a soul": listen to the voices of who knows this land well and let the words accompany you on an endless journey.

Massimo Gottifredi President of APT Servizi Emilia-Romagna (Regional tourist board)

Andrea Babbi Managing Director of APT Servizi Emilia-Romagna (Regional tourist board)


Index

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Introduction

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Index

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Map

8 10 12 16 20 24 26

Adriatic Riviera

28 30 32 36 40 44 48 52

Art Cities

56 58 60 64 68 72

Appennine mountains and countryside

76 78 80 84 88 92

Spas

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Map of D.O.P. and I.G.P. products and of the Food and Wine Routes

Map Federico Fellini Leonardo da Vinci Eel Piadina Mussels and clams

Map Giuseppe Verdi Pellegrino Artusi Porticoes The River Po Enzo Ferrari Ducati

Map Alberto Tomba Matilde di Canossa Don Camillo & Peppone Woodland

Map Francesca da Rimini Miss Italy Water Ancient Romans


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Tips and top picks Art Deco masterpiece: the Palazzo Berzieri in Salsomaggiore

Head for opera houses in Verdi’s homeland to listen to the Maestro’s great arias

Piacenza

Parma Reggio Emilia Modena

Fast speed myths: Ferrari & Ducati

Wolf howling in the Apennines

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Learn the handmade pasta masters’ secrets in traditional cooking academies

City adventure: explore Bologna’s secret waterways in a dinghy

Gourmet shopping: parmigianoreggiano, prosciutto di Parma, culatello di Zibello, aceto balsamico tradizionale

Where to drink Emilia Romagna’s high quality wines? at the Enoteca Regionale in Dozza


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for Emilia Romagna Ravenna and its Byzantine mosaics

Pink flamingos in Po Delta wetlands

Ferrara

Bologna

Ravenna

ForlĂŹ Cesena

Rimini

FaĂŻence: the world of clay, colour and fire

For adrenalin-addicts: the theme parks on the Riviera

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Stage your holiday in the Adriatic Riviera when the Pink Night in on

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costa adriatica

Artist: Alessandro La Motta

emilia romagna


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The Adriatic

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Piacenza

Parma Reggio Emilia Modena

Amusement Parks 1

Acquajoss

13 Beach Village

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Acqualand

14 Delfinario di Rimini

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Acquaparco Auai Auai

15 Eden Park

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Belafonte Minigolf

16 Fiabilandia

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La Casa delle farfalle

17 Imax

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CerviAvventura

18 Indiana Golf

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Parco della Salina

19 Italia in Miniatura

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Mirabilandia

20 Oltremare

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Atlantica

21 Palestina in miniatura

10 Indiana Park

22 San Marino Advertures

11 Acquario di Cattolica – Le Navi

23 Skypark

12 Aquafan

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Riviera

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Ferrara • •

Lido delle Nazioni Lido degli Scacchi

Lidi di Comacchio

• Lido degli Estensi • Lido di Spina 1

• Marina di Ravenna

Bologna

Ravenna

Le Spiagge di Ravenna

• Punta Marina Terme • Lido Adriano 8• Milano Marittima

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Forlì 10

Cesena

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ADRIATIC SEA 5

Cervia 4-6-7 9 Cesenatico Gatteo a Mare Savignano Mare San Mauro Mare Bellaria - Igea Marina

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Rimini 21 22

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Rep. di San Marino

12-13-17-18-20 Riccione Misano Adriatico Cattolica 11


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Federico FEDERICO FELLINI Rimini, 20-01-1920 • Rome, 31-10-1993 Scriptwriter and director. Oscar for lifetime achievement - 1993. He “portrayed” in dozens of feature films a small crowd of memorable characters.

Dream

In a sense, all Fellini ever did was to make films about Rimini, his home-town. Fellini was born and made in Rimini. He was inspired by the Fulgor cinema, the local foods and flavours, the emptiness of the sea, and the charm of the women. To the great director, everything wonderful in life came from

this well-known Adriatic resort. This was his canvas, his raw

material. You can imagine Fellini giving silent thanks to Rimini for each of his five Oscars. What would Fellini have been without

Rimini? It was Rimini that sparked his imagination and helped him to dream. He saw the sea and the land as one large screen coming alight. At night, the lights still glimmer at sea and a gentle sea breeze sweeps the resort and hills with cooling night air. Fellini’s films, from Dolce Vita to Amarcord, or 8 1/2 to Vitelloni, were all set in different locations. But spiritually Fellini never left Rimini. Instead, he took his spectators by the hand and led them on a journey to savour the magic places of his childhood. Despite Rimini’s changes, the resort still remains a gentle place where dreamers are welcome and fantasies fostered.

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Fellini

‘Pink Night’ Staged in July, this Adriatic beach party is the high point of the Italian summer. With the sky lit up by fireworks, the Pink Night is a party involving Emilia Romagna’s Adriatic Coast, all 100 kilometres of it. From Comacchio to Cattolica, from sunset to dawn, thousands of events turn the coastal resorts into party central –for one night only. The beaches, bars and shops are open round the clock, with partying spilling out of the restaurants and discos. Pink is the colour of hospitality, kindness and emotions. Rimini sees the occasion in Fellini-esque terms: it’s a film that starts when the resort’s lights go out. If so, it’s a never-ending film, an enchanted dreamscape inhabited by dreamers with their eyes wide open.

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Grand Hotel Fellini recalled the summer evenings of his boyhood when Rimini’s legendary Grand Hotel transported him to Istanbul, Baghdad, or Hollywood. As a famous director, Fellini still felt the transformational power of this time-warp hotel. Every time Fellini set foot on the elegant terrace, he saw a film set where the `dance of life’ was played out. Little has changed. Ever since 1908, when its doors first opened, this iconic hotel has conjured up images of elegance and exoticism. The allure of this grande dame hotel lives on, much like the dreamscape of Rimini and the Riviera itself.

Printed fabric If you have time, drop into in Gambettola, Fellini’s father’s home town. Slip into the old Pascucci shop and sniff the vinegar-scented air. Then take a look around: take in in the workshop full of rust-coloured prints which have been transferred to linen, cotton or hemp. You might meet the writer Tonino Guerra drawing butterflies or even run into the Nobel Prize winning author,

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Dario Fo, looking for material for his work or dreams. If you have time, go to Santarcangelo and peep into the old Marchi dye-works. You will discover a rare mangle that dates back to the 17th century. It’s a weird and wonderful world.


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Queen of the home In Rimini, dreams are fixed; they do not fly away with youth. This ability to dream is linked to the local talent for envisioning creative solutions and fully enjoying every stage of life. The traditional figure of the azdora seems to have come out of a collective dream: with her hair swept into a headscarf, this wise woman is busy preparing the dough for the pasta. She is queen of the hearth, a busy mother and wife, and a guiding light for future generations. Dreams never fade; they are just reborn.

The poetry of places: Pennabilli “It is great to arrive in a place where you rediscover yourself”. These are the words written by poet and screenwriter Tonino Guerra who has decided to let his dreams flourish again in Pennabilli, at first home of the Malatesta family and then under the rule of the Dukes of

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Urbino. You can understand his words by strolling through the LUOGHI DELL’ANIMA (places of the soul) conceived and created by Tonino Guerra: from the “Orto dei frutti dimenticati” (orchard of forgotten fruits) to the “Strada delle meridiane” (road of sundials) or “Santuario dei Pensieri” (sanctuary of thoughts); or you can simply walk around the streets of the village during the famous National Antiques Fair which takes place in the summer and enjoy the sounds, shapes and colours of times gone by, soft and gentle like memories.


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Leonardo LEONARDO DA VINCI Vinci, 15-04-1452 • Amboise 02-05-1519 Unique talent of the Italian Renaissance period. Painter, sculptor, architect, engineer, anatomist, literary man, musician and inventor. Paul Klee wrote about him: “Having seen Leonardo it is difficult to imagine making any more progress”.

Arts & invention

It is often forgotten that Leonardo da Vinci, the painter of the Mona Lisa, was also a complete Renaissance Man: scientist, civil and military engineer, scholar and draughtsman, to name but a few of his talents. And some of these talents were employed in Romagna. In 1502 Leonardo da Vinci traversed the Emilia Romagna region in his role as engineer and master architect (architecto et ingegnero generale) to Cesare Borgia, his patron. Leonardo’s role was to measure and calculate any number of civil and military projects in accordance with his master’s whims. While studying fortifications for his patron in Emilia Romagna, Leonardo came across the village of Cesenatico. He was impressed by the harbour canal, and the combination of the natural setting and the man-made design. Leonardo da Vinci promptly jotted down a few sketches in his notebook, along with possible improvements of his own. It is intriguing to walk along the banks of the canal today and realise how, after 500 years, the scientific side of the site has been complemented by beauty. In particular, the floating section of Cesenatico’s Marine Museum displays trabaccoli (fishing luggers), bragozzi (two-masted trawlers) and lugsails - all of which form a lovely palette of colours in the wind. If Leonardo could speak to us today, he would urge us to visit Emilia Romagna. If it weren’t for the misadventures of Cesare Borgia, Leonardo would have stayed far longer.


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International Kite Festival This is a magical festival weaving in elements of wind, water and life. The flight of the kites carries all sorts of symbolism but can also just be viewed as an entertaining day out for all the family. The International Kite Festival takes place every spring on the beaches of Cervia. During the festival, the kites twist and turn in the sky as competitions and kite fights unfold. Anyone who has seen the film, The Kite Runner, will know how evocative kites can be.


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The Food and Wine Routes While wandering through Emilia Romagna, Leonardo da Vinci was intrigued by the way that the farmers hung their grapes for the winter, so he sketched what he saw. To follow in his footsteps, study his drawing and, as if by magic, you will find yourself transported to the Food and Wine Route in the Forli and Cesena hills. The image is of gentle hills and fortified villages, with the pale blue sea viewed from above. The mood is in keeping with the local novello wine and the tasty pasta dishes.

Writers’ homes At the beginning of the last century a young writer called Marino Moretti dedicated a poem to Leonardo da Vinci. He was a friend of Alfredo Panzini who wrote a poetic diary of a journey by bicycle; these were also the last years of life of the poet Giovanni Pascoli. To sense the atmosphere in which these writers’ works were conceived, simply look around their former homes, now transformed into museums and shrines. These places can be found in Cesenatico, Bellaria, and San Mauro Pascoli, by the Riviera.


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Theme parks on the Riviera It is important to know how to have fun when not working or studying. What better way than to head for the parks and gardens on the Adriatic Riviera. Choose between the various water parks and theme parks. Apart from Oltremare, there are the heady water slides of Aquafan in Riccione or the big Le Navi aquarium in Cattolica. Or what about the adrenalin-fuelled roller-coaster rides at Mirabilandia? Or the discoveries awaiting you at Italia in Miniatura (Italy in Miniature)? Many of these water adventures are ingenious enough to have challenged Leonardo, the Renaissance Man himself. Perhaps even Leonardo da Vinci might have learnt a trick or two.


Eels

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EEL In Comacchio (and surrounding area) all parts of an eel were used, nothing was thrown away. The fat produced when cooked was used for lighting. The dried skin was used to make shoelaces. Even the bones were used: they were eaten fried and crunchy.

Slithering

It’s a mystery why some people find eels so fascinating. Maybe it’s because of the way they wriggle and slip away so speedily. Maybe it’s because these creatures belong to an insubstantial landscape that is neither earth nor water.

between

They live in a mysterious place that seems to be without clear boundaries. The

land and

great poet, Eugenio Montale, dedicated a poem to an eel. Sofia Loren wanted eels to feature in a film set in Comacchio. Set within the Po Delta wetlands, Comacchio is a `Little Venice’ made up of 13 small islands. This is a protected mosaic of

water

marshes, dunes, mudflats and salt pans flanked by windmills. Home to fish farms and water fowl, these lagoon waters provide a perfect habitat for eels.

Comacchio is a beguiling little town, with its quaint Trepponti bridge suspended between water and the sky. The canals flow into the Adriatic while the reddish stone houses evoke the Emilian plains. Foodies find eels fascinating because of their silvery-hued sheen and the tasty flesh that can be eaten roasted, stewed or

marinated. Eel is best accompanied by such local wine as Bosco Eliceo. More poetic visitors equate the eel’s charm with the winter fogs that turn the fishing huts into a magical mirage. Others are intrigued by the eels’ monumental voyage: in winter, they travel all the way to the Sargasso Sea to reproduce. In any case, if you’re in Comacchio, you’ll find it difficult to escape these slithering creatures. Eels take pride of place on every restaurant menu, or can be spotted slithering around at the fish market.


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Cervia’s Salt Pans Have you ever seen a chessboard that changes colour during the day, which reflects the clouds at dawn and turns red at sunset? The salt pans are a stunning feature of the wetlands, an area that is home to gregarious flamingos. The wetlands, with their atmospheric stretches of land and water, are the preserve of salt-workers in search of `white gold’, once one of the world’s most precious commodities. Comacchio grew rich on the salt trade. You can see this in Cervia, a land of salt, with its salt museum and spectacular Salina Camillone salt pans. Taste the coarse sea salt still collected in the traditional way and savour its sweet taste.

Anita Garibaldi It is hard to forget those desperate days back in August 1849. On certain summer evenings, the sight of the cane fields helps recall a tragic story. Giuseppe Garibaldi and Anita, his beloved wife, were looking for shelter in the Comacchio wetlands. They had sailed from Cesenatico, in flight from the Austrian forces. The revolutionary hero survived but Anita, who was already suffering from a fever, did not, and died at Guicciole Farm, in Mandriole. This is a tale of how a man lost his greatest treasure in a land as changeable as water.


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The Boscone della Mesola This woodland is the last remaining tract of the great forests of holm oak, ash and elm that once covered the coastal strip. The Adriatic coastline used to be dotted with forests and access to the sea was an adventure. In fact, Boscone della Mesola is what remains of the d’Este dynasty’s Grand-Ducal hunting estates. To relive those times, stroll or cycle through Bosco Eliceo and look out for the deer that now go unhunted.

Pomposa Abbey Eels are not the only creatures to have settled in this striking patch of Emilia Romagna. In the 7th century, Benedictine monks founded a monastic complex near the Via Romea. Within a few centuries, Pomposa became a very prestigious cultural and spiritual centre where Guido D’Arezzo lived most of his life. He revolutionised the teaching and writing of music, and invented the system of musical notation still used today. Maybe he was inspired by the `silent music’ of this watery, other-worldly land.


Piadina

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PIADINA Traditional recipe 1 kg of flour not sieved too much; 4 g of baking soda; 300 g of lard (certain “azdore” - the housewives in Romagna - guarantee that 100 g are sufficient), and salt. Half a glass of extra virgin olive oil can be used instead of the lard.

You don’t really know Emilia Romagna until you’ve

Piadina

sampled piadina, the local but genuine fast-food, prepared according to time-honoured methods. It’s a type of doughy bread that is used as a base for a

and

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huge range of fillings. It makes a cheap, filling and tasty snack at any time of day.

A piadina is a simple peasant dish made from flour, lard, water and salt.

Its simplicity is part of its appeal, as is its versatility. It’s delicious with salads,

squacquerone cheese and cured meats, from hams to salami. Try it at a roadside

kiosk or at bars and restaurants. A piadina has lots of nicknames and deserves respect as ‘the queen of the table’.


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Music: from liscio to discos

Montetiffi baking-pots Make sure you try the stuffed version of piadina made in a terracotta baking-pot like those peasants once had in their homes. The stuffed version is called crescione or cassone. Cooking in this way produces wonderful, unforgettable aromas. To indulge in nostalgia, why not buy one of these old-fashioned baking-pots? Every pot is unique and handmade in Montetiffi di Sogliano. Crafted with local clay according to centuries-old tradition, the pot makes an evocative souvenir.

Piadina isn’t the only simple pleasure on offer in Emilia Romagna. After dinner you can choose music to match your mood. Ballroom dancing is very popular in these parts, largely thanks to an orchestra created by Secondo Casadei, known as `the Strauss of Emilia Romagna’. Known as liscio, this type of dancing is undergoing a big revival abroad but in Italy it has never gone out of fashion. Ballroom dancing is an opportunity for twirling around the floor, along with local `strictly ballroom’ fans. If, instead, you want to unleash your dancing demon, kick up you heels to the latest sounds on the Riviera Romagnola. The Adriatic Riviera is Italy’s disco mecca. You can dance all night, even on the beach, from family-oriented resorts like San Mauro Mare to trendier resorts like Marina di Ravenna. For cool cats, Gatteo Mare, which stages a Micizia festival dedicated to cats, is the place to dance at dawn. The Bagno Corrado bathing establishment becomes an open-air dance floor: start the day with a waltz, mazurka or cha cha cha. There is music for all tastes!


Mussels

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COZZA - MUSSELS Scientific name: Mytilus galloprivincialis The inside colour varies according to whether it is female or male: the female tends to have a creamy colour whereas the male’s colour is orange.

CLAMS Scientific name: Tapes decussatus (Linneo) The term “vongola” originates from Naples and it derives from the latin volgare “conchula”, diminutive of “concha”, or rather shell.

Beach

Along the Adriatic coast, from Comacchio to Cervia, from Cesenatico to Cattolica,

fun

mussels and clams find their way into the feast. Depending on taste, they can be served as clam chowder, or spaghetti and clams. Or eat them served with shallots, parsley, cherry tomatoes, or even strozzapreti. Try mussels and clams on their own, or with shrimps, king prawns and mantis prawns. Taste the shellfish in every permutation and discover a sea of flavours. Or resort to a classic fry-up - fritto dell’Adriatico.


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Fishing food safari

Partying on the Beach You might have guessed you’d have fun here. The first tourists came to Romagna’s Adriatic beaches in 1843 to sunbathe and escape the stress and strain of city life. The elegant Riviera resorts developed in all their Belle Epoque splendour. Vestiges of glamour remain in such resorts as Rimini, which is undergoing a revival. Brash beach fun prevails along the coast, from family games to flirting under beach umbrellas. The bigger beaches offer games ranging from beach volley ball to boules (bocce). Enjoy a sailing regatta or a dip - under the watchful eye of lifeguards. The beach strip from Comacchio to Cattolica offers non-stop entertainment, from beach games by day to live music and discos by night. Happy hour on the Riviera Romagnola is a chance to parade around, sip aperitivi and spot girls in silver heels at ice cream parlours. Do not miss the “Riviera Beach Games” event the Olympia games of the Riviera in summer.

Be tempted by a fishy trail that takes you from the Adriatic Sea to a restaurant terrace and a tasty fish risotto or Adriatic grill. Fishing boats set sail in search of bluefish and whitefish, shellfish and lobster. To savour this trail, just join the crew. The Pescaturismo (fishing tourism) service will take you on an unforgettable food safari, combing fishing and adventure. The voyage starts with a hunt for snails or cuttlefish, with snails gathered in baskets and cuttlefish caught in traps.


Artist: Alessandro La Motta


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città d’arte emilia romagna


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The Art Piacenza

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Parma 3

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Reggio Emilia 6

Modena 14 18 20 15

Motorvalley highlights Circuits and race tracks 1 2 3 4

“Santamonica” International race track “Enzo e Dino” International race track “Riccardo Paletti” race track Parma go-kart track

Museums and Collections 5 Museum "Ferruccio Lamborghini" 6 Mario Sassi “Old Racing Spare Parts” 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15

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collection “Benito Battilani” Collection “Bruno Nigelli" Collection “Mauro Pascoli”  Collection  “Nello Salsapariglia” Collection “Parmeggiani” Collection “Mario Righini” Collection ATC - public transport historical Museum Enzo Ferrari Birthplace Foundation “Galleria Ferrari”

16 “Maranello Rosso” Museums 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 26

(Abarth museum & Ferrari museum) Museum of industrial heritage “Stanguellini” Museum of historical cars Car Museum “Umberto Panini” Classic Car and Motorcycle Museum

“Bandini” Car Museum DEMM - Museum of motorcycles and mopeds “Ducati” Museum ”Francesco Baracca” Museum ”Lamborghini” Museum (Centro Eccellenza) National museum of motorcycle


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Rep. di San Marino

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Giuseppe GIUSEPPE VERDI Roncole, 10.10.1813 • Milan 27.10.1901 Italian composer, author of operas performed in opera houses all over the world. The most popular and loved musician in Italy during that period. He composed the famous aria "Va' pensiero", from the Nabucco.

Music musique

Giuseppe Verdi’s life story owes much to the countryside of Emilia Romagna.

This was a land he left to achieve glory at La Scala in Milan. He often thought about about Roncole, where his vocation for music first became apparent. His

father, a landlord with the ability to recognise the power of music, bought Verdi

his first spinet. Roncole was where he saw his first organ. Then Verdi moved to Busseto where his benefactor Antonio Barezzi lived. He gave Verdi freedom by

funding his studies and giving him permission to marry his daughter Margherita. To Verdi, Emilia was a generous, nurturing homeland so he decided to return to the peace and quiet it represented. With the profits of his early success, he

bought the Sant’Agata estate in Villanova sull'Arda, where he lived happily for many years with his beloved Giuseppina. Verdi’s arias were heard at major opera houses as well as on the street. Verdi was in demand in Paris and in Parliament; he was even asked to inaugurate the Suez Canal. Verdi’s lyrics were deigned to raise people’s spirits. Yet the composer’s thoughts kept returning to his homeland as he tried to keep his feet on the ground and not forget his roots. At heart, he considered himself a country gentleman who simply put his talents and good fortune to good use. That is why he wrote great operas all his life - not just ones designed as crowd-pleasers at the opera house.


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The generosity of song: Luciano Pavarotti A life devoted to music is a good life and that is exactly what Pavarotti chose to do. In the last few years, nobody expressed the generosity and passion of Emilia better than Luciano Pavarotti. The great tenor from Modena cultivated his operatic talents, as well as friendship, the good life and social responsibility. His breadth of vision was in keeping with the open, generous spirit of the region. When he left his homeland, it was only to fulfil his dream and scale the heights of his ambitions abroad, dominating the international stage.


Musical theatre tradition If you were wondering why anyone would want to dedicate his whole life to opera, then dress elegantly, invite the person you love out to dinner, and walk smartly towards an opera house. Head for one of the traditional opera houses in Emilia’s great cities of art, which all offer enticing programmes. These traditional opera housescum-theatres embrace the cities of Bologna, Modena, Ferrara, Piacenza, Reggio Emilia and Ravenna – not forgetting the celebrated Regio Theatre in Parma. This cluster of gems represents almost a third of the opera houses in Italy. This is proof, if any were needed, of the region’s deep love of music. The musical tradition lives on.

Along the musical road The Via Emilia has been the backbone of this region since 187 BC. The road connects Rimini and Piacenza, running through the rolling countryside and Apennines. This is a musical road, linked to many celebrated voices. The names that crop up en route range from conductor Arturo Toscanini to Lucio Dalla and Zucchero, king of soul and blues. Then there’s old crooner Gianni Morandi and Francesco Guccini, or Vasco Rossi, the metropolitan rocker, or Luciano Ligabue, who conjures up the atmosphere of the plains.


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Folk theatre between Cento and Ferrara Emilia’s passionate spirit can be sensed in song, dance and swirling colours. All this is typified by the Carnival of Cento, which is twinned with Rio de Janeiro. Expect competing floats and a parade of huge papier-mâché figures. The same passion also spills over in Ferrara, where the summer Buskers Festival is held - the greatest event of its kind in the world.

The invention of cards and stickers Many inventions changed the world during Verdi’s lifetime. One in particular was the chromolithographic print, invented in the mid19th-century. Verdi witnessed some of the earliest cards, which he saw in Paris. He found them a diverting way of passing on information, especially to children. If you want to get a sense of the charm of the invention and savour those times, visit the Cards and Stickers Museum in Modena, international capital of the genre.


Pellegrino PELLEGRINO ARTUSI Forlimpopoli, 04.08.1820 • Florence 30.03.1911 Italian literary critic, writer and gastronome He became famous thanks to his book “The Science of Cooking and the Art of Eating Well” with which he conferred dignity to the “mosaic” of regional traditions that make Italy so special. In Forlimpopoli, the ancient walls of the block of buildings of the Chiesa dei Servi house Casa Artusi, the first centre of gastronomic culture dedicated to Italian home cooking, which includes a library, a restaurant and a cooking school, and offers many events.

When you hear the cuisine of Emilia Romagna praised, bow to it. It deserves respect. This is rich, robust yet refined cuisine - an opulent parade of pasta, velvety sauces, meat, charcuterie and cheese. If eating and loving are two of life’s great pleasures, they come together in Emilia Romagna, and in the passion of Pellegrino Artusi. The locals match their passion and skill to a selection of the finest raw materials.

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Pellegrino Artusi was not just a great gastronome but a foodie pioneer. He was the first to research and collate Italian regional recipes in a systematic way. Such recipes form the basis of Italian cuisine and are still in use today. The cooking of Emilia Romagna is showcased in Forlimpopoli, where Artusi lived. As well as doubling as a cookery school and gastrodome, the Artusi centre serves as a shrine to the great gastronome. Artusi spent twenty years collecting recipes from all over Italy but appreciated his ‘home’ cuisine. Emilia Romagna celebrates the art of eating well. Where else can you find such a succulent array of dishes, prepared with such culinary skill? Pasta mania: Simply savouring the names of the traditional pasta dishes is a deep pleasure. Pellegrino Artusi, like many a gastronome since, believed these dishes were actually good for your soul. In Romagna, savour hat-shaped cappelletti, passatelli in broth, or ricotta-stuffed ravioli. Bologna boasts tagliatelle and tortellini, inspired by Venus’s navel. Enjoy pumpkin-filled cappellacci in Ferrara - or anolini in Parma and Piacenza.


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Parma, European food capital Parma justly deserves its reputation as a temple to gastronomy. As the seat of the European Food Authority, Parma is a capital of culinary delights. The whole province is studded with specialities and criss-crossed by food trails. Explore the hills along the Food & Wine Routes, or visit the food museums to savour the history and magic of local delicacies. Langhirano is the home of Parma ham while Felino is a byword for superior Salame. Zibello is the home of Culatello, another prestigious cured meat. The pigs live like princes, fattened on chestnuts and whey. Soragna is cheese country, renowned for its Parmigiano Reggiano museum. Look out for signs to producers on the cured meat routes (eg Strada del Culatello di Zibello and Strada del Prosciutto e dei vini dei colli di Parma)


Prince of cheeses: Parmigiano-Reggiano Parmesan cheese is infinitely versatile and suits the simplest or most sophisticated dishes. It’s been produced in its wheel-shaped form for over eight centuries. The hard and slightly gritty texture is adored by both gourmets and the health conscious. Parmesan eschews additives and is simply the result of raw milk matured for up to 24 months. The cheese is rich in proteins and highly digestible so is perfect for children and the elderly. Instead, squacquerone cheese works wonderfully with rocket and piadina while formaggio di fossa, aged underground, has a strong, distinctive flavour.


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Traditional Balsamic Vinegar from Modena or Reggio Emilia What would a salad be without a touch of Traditional Balsamic Vinegar from Modena or Reggio Emilia? Forget the industrial versions: this artisanal nectar transforms a bland side salad into a delicious dish. This viscous but delicious vinegar is made from the must of top-quality grapes, and aged in barrels for at least 12 months. In recent years, it has (almost literally) come out of the attic to win glory on the international stage. Used in many recipes to add flavour, it has an irresistible sweetand-sour aroma.

Branding Emilia Romagna: Italy follows a quality control system along the lines of the French appellation controllee wine classification. `Parmesan cheese’ (parmigiano reggiano) must come from a strictly bound area named ‘place of origin’ Parma and be produced according to stringent requirements. Unique regional produce are classified to protect the brand, identity and quality. Top charcuterie, such as Parma ham, Modena ham and Culatello, are classified `DOP,’ as is Parmesan cheese and Traditional Balsamic Vinegar. Coppia bread from Ferrara is an IGP while certain wines are classified DOC or DOCG.

Hamming it up Parma ham (Prosciutto di Parma) is perfect for all occasions, whether a tasty snack or a sumptuous feast. The same is true of Modena ham, also made from pork. Foodies contrast Parma ham or Culatello with other cured meats, such as pale-pink Bolognese mortadella, studded with black peppercorns and green pistachios. Savour Parma ham with bread – possibly coppia from Ferrara. Other tasty speciality breads include tigelle and crescentine, as well as focacce from Modena and the classic piadina from Romagna.


Porticoes PORTICOES Of the 40 km of porticoes in Bologna 8 can be walked without ever changing direction. Some of the most beautiful ones are: the great Loggia del Palazzo della Mercanzia, the Quadriportico of the Chiesa dei Servi in Strada Maggiore and those decorated with paintings in Piazza Malpighi.

Bologna’s elegant yet intimate porticoes are one of the most civilised and civilising features imaginable. The medieval period was when Bologna’s sinuous porticoes were built. These are the longest arcades in the world, and the city’s most distinctive feature. Called portici, over 40 kilometre of these graceful covered arcades link the streets in this terracotta city. The porticoes provide both a refuge from the elements and a meeting place for Bolognese of all backgrounds. As medieval versions of the modern shopping mall, the porticoes are also an excuse for strolling, chatting and eating. One of the bestloved porticoes is the Pavaglione, off Piazza Maggiore, where students mingle with chic matrons and gossip about city life. The essence of the portico is that everyone is constrained to go at the pace of the slowest tortoise, a charming concept. The porticoes date back to the Middle Ages, when Bologna boasted the oldest university in Europe. Known as the Alma Mater Studiorum, it was established in the shadows of the famous towers. The porticoes would have been the place where professors and students discussed such esoteric topics as laws and theorems, philosophy and the planets. Montaigne would have walked under these porticoes. Verdi and Rossini would have wandered under these arcades in search of inspiration. Little has changed: the poticoes are still a place for children to play or for lovers indulge in their first kiss. Always try and look at this surprising city from different perspectives. For instance, the ‘secret’ waterways that run under the city can now be explored in a dinghy.

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Land of artists Emilia Romagna is both forward-looking and deeply traditional, passionate and pragmatic, creative and concrete. This seemingly contradictory character is ever-present on the artistic scene, including in Bologna’s prestigious new Modern Art Museum of Bologna (MAMbo). In terms of literature, the region boasts Ludovico Arioso, author of L'Orlando Furioso; his home can be visited in Ferrara. Another famous character was the controversial Pier Paolo Pasolini. As for art, the region’s painters run from the Renaissance to modern times. Correggio’s magnificent Renaissance frescoes can be seen in Parma. As for modern artists, Giorgio Morandi’s famous still lifes are on display in Bologna, in the museum named after him. Regional galleries display works of art by such luminaries as Carracci, Guido Reni and Guercino. The world of cinema owes much to Oscar-winning directors from the region. Several of the greatest names come from here, including Federico Fellini (Rimini), Michelangelo Antonioni (celebrated in a Museum in Ferrara) and Bernardo Bertolucci (Parma) who claimed that beauty was in the DNA of inhabitants from the region.


Mosaics and ceramics Ravenna has gone from being capital of the Western Roman Empire to capital of mosaic design. The Ravenna Festival is part of the city’s charm and was chosen by conductor Riccardo Muti as the backdrop to the prestigious festival. The monuments, from San Vitale to Sant'Apollinare in Classe, also showcase the world’s finest Early Christian mosaics. The mosaicmaking tradition survives thanks to the workshops dedicated to this subtle decorative technique. Neighbouring Faenza has a long tradition of making ceramics (majolica) - from ornamental vases to vibrant objets d’art. Faenza is so well-known that the place name is often used as synonym of ceramics itself. Visit the museum of ceramics and choose a painted plate or jug.

Saving art treasures for posterity Many of the region’s art treasures have been classified as UNESCO World Heritage sites, worthy of saving for posterity. Ravenna’s major Byzantine monuments are classified, including those magnificent mosaics. Ferrara’s historical centre is equally protected, as it was in the days of the ducal D’Este dynasty. Look out for the grand palaces, especially Palazzo dei Diamanti and the splendid Palazzo Schifanoia. As for natural sites, the neighbouring Po Delta area is a magical mix of wetlands and historical sites. As for Modena, the central square, the Piazza Grande, is UNESCOlisted, along with the octagonal Torre della Ghirlandina belltower and the Cathedral, the purest Romanesque cathedral in Italy. It is studded with reliefs created by a medieval


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Celebrating quality of life Emilia Romagna remains a paradigm of the good life. Friendliness, efficiency and elegance: the cities of art share these values. The region’s quality of life is considered among the best in the world. It is not by chance in fact that The Times praises Reggio Emilia’s play-schools as models of their kind. It is no coincidence that Ferrara boasts nearly as many bicycles as inhabitants: almost 90% of the locals are fans and regular users of this Green-friendly form of transport. Nor is it by chance that shopping is such a treat for fashionistas. Whether in the Cities of Art or in the Riviera resorts, the boutiques are tempting. Try some window shopping in resorts such as Riccione, Bellaria, Milano Marittima.

master-builder, Wiligelmus (Wiglielmo). The cathedral is a veritable `Bible in stone’ designed to teach and inspire medieval pilgrims, including the illiterate. The region also boasts lesser-known art treasures that have been singled out for praise and protection. In Cesena, the Malatesta Library contains illuminated manuscripts which have been preserved intact down through centuries. As for Bologna, UNESCO has singled out the regional capital on several scores. The city has been declared a `creative city of music’. Native sons of the region include Verdi and Toscanini - and Paganini by adoption. Bologna also boasts a superb Museum of Music.


The river PO RIVER The largest river in Italy in terms of length and capacity. It was called Eridanus by the Greek and Padus by the Latins. It has 141 tributaries. It flows into the Adriatic sea with a large 6 - branch delta.

Emilia Romagna is the proverbial land of plenty, with fertile plains, vineyards

Travel

and nature reserves, as well as medieval castles and Renaissance palaces. Much of this splendour is thanks to the River Po, which has brought fertility, trade, wealth and innovation. The great river runs from the Alps to the Adriatic on a course covering over 600 kilometres. By the time the Po reaches Emilia Romagna, it has acquired a stately, sluggish calm. The Po passes through Piacenza, the northernmost city in the region. After meandering past poplar trees, the Po gathers pace after Ferrara, as it opens into the sandbanks and mudflats of the wide Po Delta and runs into the Adriatic. The Po Delta has played a key role in the development of the region since Etruscan times. Felsina, modern-day Bologna, was founded as an Etruscan settlement in the 5th century BC, and flourished as a trading centre linked to the port of Spina on the Po Delta. Later, as borderlands between rival dukedoms stretching from the Apennines to the river Po, the region was fertile ground for agriculture and art. Today, the Po still ensures that agriculture and wildlife thrive. The Po Delta bristles with bird life, from egrets to herons, cormorants, flamingos and a swathe of migratory birds.


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Elephants along the Trebbia river A journey of this kind certainly doesn’t go unnoticed. When the Carthaginians reached the Pianura Padana, the Po Plain, and crossed the river with their elephants, the locals watched in amazement. On the banks of the River Trebbia, not far from Piacenza, the Romans, led by Cornelius Scipio and Sempronius Longus, fell into the trap prepared by Hannibal and suffered a bitter defeat. This happened in 218 BC, at the onset of a winter when everyone thought that hostilities were about to cease. Instead, twenty thousand Roman legionaries were sacrificed in the conflict.

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Exploring the Po Delta Wetlands This is a voyage through a land with shifting boundaries. You will lose your bearings and sense of time when you travel into the heart of the Po Delta. This regional reserve is the largest protected wetlands in Italy. You can indulge in bird-watching or contemplate the myriad waterways. The wetlands can be explored by bicycle or on horseback. You can even paddle yourself in a canoe, rent a houseboat or go on a mini cruise. This delightful area, which seems as insubstantial as a mirage, resembles nothing else in Emilia Romagna.

Naïve art on the River Po Following the river Po inland reveals artistic gems as well as landscapes of outstanding beauty. For an arty escapade, visit Gualtieri, Guastalla and Luzzara, villages strung out along the river bank north of Reggio Emilia. Gualtieri was home to Antonio Ligabue, a visionary painter known as `the natural version of Van Gogh’. Luzzara boasts the only National Museum of Naïve Art, a project envisioned by the scriptwriter Cesare Zavattini.


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Hitting the salami trails Not that art and food can’t be combined. Within easy reach of the Po Delta are tempting gastro trails. The region is criss-crossed with such trails, especially ones devoted to cured meats and Parmesan cheese. One prized delicacy is the celebrated cured meat from Ferrara, known as salama da sugo. Instead, closer to Parma, Zibello is noted for Culatello di Zibello. The cured meat ages protected by the thick winter fogs that rise from the river banks. Spalla cotta comes from the neighbouring village of San Secondo. Towards Piacenza are equally tasty cured meats, including coppa, salame and pancetta. All the prestigious cured meats in Emilia Romagna are designated DOP, meaning that the brands are protected, quality is guaranteed –and that provenance of the meat is clear.

Etruscan town of Spina Coming to Spina means a journey back in time. Spina was an important Etruscan port which traded with the Greek world. Elsewhere in the Delta, travel back in time by visiting the Archaeological Museum in Ferrara or the Museo della Nave Romana (Museum of the Roman Ship) in Comacchio. Although now better known for eels, Comacchio grew rich on the salt industry. The traditional salting of pork was introduced by the Etruscans and is still carried out today.


Enzo ENZO FERRARI Italian car racing driver and entrepreneur. Founder of the car manufacturing company named after him. When he was still alive the Ferrari racing team won 9 Formula One Driver’s Championships and 15 in total.

The most beautiful car is the one that has yet to be built. Enzo Ferrari was ten when he saw his first one. His father took him to see a race at the Bologna racetrack on Via Emilia. Enzo Ferrari’s lifelong passion for racing was born that very day. A fuse was lit: Ferrari fell in love with cars, entranced by their sex appeal and power. This passion for racing cars was shared by his team – and by his drivers, in particular. Naturally, the boss adored red, the colour representing Italy in International car and motorbike races but also the colour of passion. Ferrari’s factory transformed his dreams into reality and the dream lives on. Ferrari fans, including kings and famous artists, are happy to queue up to acquire one of Enzo Ferrari’s extraordinary creations. Ferrari started out on this path when he was a young test driver but his passion was there from the outset. Very soon he was promoted to being the official Alfa Romeo driver. He rated himself pretty highly as a driver but his determination and ambition drove him on to far greater challenges. Ferrari wanted to win in his own way, and to create cars he could fall in love with and feel at one with. That’s how the Ferrari brand was born. From 1950 until today, Ferrari team has never missed a Formula One championship. The first racing driver he chose was Alberto Ascari. Ferrari liked the young man’s meticulous yet assured driving style and time proved Ferrari right: Ascari delivered. Ferrari won the first title in 1952 but this was only the first of many victories. The firm has achieved over 5000 wins to date –to the delight of spectators, Ferrari fans and those behind the racing circuits and championship. But Ferrari’s pragmatic attitude prevails: win or lose, move onto the next race. You are only as good as your last race; the next challenge lies just around the corner.

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The famous Ferrari logo `Mr. Ferrari, do put my son’s prancing horse on your cars as it will bring you luck.’ This was the curious yet inspired request of Countess Paolina whose son, fighter pilot Francesco Baracca, died during combat in World War One. Baracca was born in Lugo, near Ravenna, where a museum dedicated to the pilot still displays a fighterbomber SPAD VII. On the famous Ferrari logo, the horse remains black, as it was originally designed. Ferrari added the canary-yellow background, which is the colour of Modena, his home-town. But if Modena, a cultured city of art, has become famous well beyond its boundaries, it is partly due to the all-conquering Ferrari brand.


Pilgrimage to Maranello Everything in a small plot of land: that’s the way Ferrari wanted it, just like one big family. The headquarters are in Maranello, along with the Wind Tunnel designed by Renzo Piano and the Ferrari Gallery. Maranello, just fifteen kilometres from Modena, also boasts a church where the bells peal every time a Ferrari notches up another victory. The Ferrari Gallery acts as both a museum and a showcase to the brand. On display is everything from rare vintage models to the latest Ferrari creations. Nearby, in Fiorano, there’s a state-of-the-art 3-kilometre circuit designed to test single-seaters and GT cars. Why would Enzo Ferrari ever wish to leave such a temple to speed?

Imola circuit The Ferrari brand also embraces the Imola circuit, named after Ferrari and his son Dino. It was tested by one of Ferrari’s 340 sport cars and a Ferrari driver beat a Maserati to win the first race ever staged here, back in 1954. Many great champions have competed on the circuit, racing anti-clockwise. Numerous championships have been staged there, such as the San Marino stage of the Formula One Grand Prix from 1981 to 2006. The refurbished circuit is once again a feature of the racing world.


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Not only Ferrari Conductor Herbert von Karajan once said that Ferrari’s 12-stroke engine played notes no other maestro could emulate. To create cars which are works of art you need passion and imagination: just look at the 250 GT, the Testarossa or the F40. The blend of love, passion and technology is typical of Emilia Romagna in that other rival brands were created there, notably Maserati and Lamborghini cars. You can admire these stars in museums dedicated to the brands or call in at any of the thirteen private car collections that form part of the Terra di Motori association.

Spearheaded by the Casa Natale Foundation, a new multimedia space opens in Modena in 2011. This will be a showcase, not just to Ferrari, but to all sports car brands from Modena.


Ducati DUCATI Ducati, sports motorcycle manufacturer par excellence, was originally founded as company specialising in the research and production of radio communication technologies. The motorcycle section was established in 1946 with the production of the Cucciolo, a single cylinder engine to be mounted on a normal bicycle; 250,000 units were sold all over the world. An interesting fact: Ducati was the first motorcycle manufacturer to sell a motorcycle exclusively on the Internet.

You can tell what stuff Ducati motorcycles are made of from the noise they make.

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Those who love and understand bikes call it music. And it’s easy to see why. We’re not saying that design is irrelevant or that looking beautiful doesn’t matter. Think of those long summer evenings driving along the coast or spring afternoons spent climbing winding roads into the hills. Ducati’s unmistakable design will make you proud.

But the true Ducati spirit lies elsewhere. Its heart is in the racing pistons; in the clever way the bike leans into corners; in the perfect way the throttle works. Ducatilovers care about the way the bike slices the air in a display of consummate speed and power. The Australian racer, Casey Stoner, can tell you all about it. In 2007 he rode a Ducati, the Desmosedici, and won the top class in the MotoGP World Championship. Ducati have been running so fast that the first four-stroke single cylinder engine seems like ancient history. (Note to petrol-heads: it was called Cucciolo and created in 1946). Ducati has certainly come a long way since then. Car country: Ducati plays an important role in the region’s proud motoring history. Known as Italy’s car country, Emilia Romagna is home to Ferrari, Lamborghini and Maserati, which are manufactured around Modena and Bologna.


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Ducati Museum Instead, Ducati is based in Borgo Panigale, near Bologna, the motorbike capital of the province. Come and visit the factory where Ducati bikes are manufactured and see the motorbike museum. The company, founded in 1926, is one of the most prestigious brands in Emilia Romagna. The museum traces a journey back in time that will bring shivers down your spine. It’s a race against your imagination, with mythical models displayed against a background of old films.


Misano World Circuit Set between the hills and the sea, the Misano Adriatico circuit is a mecca for bikers. It has recently been refurbished and can now hold 60,000 spectators. Naturally, it is a cult place for motorcycle fans from Emilia Romagna. Here, they can watch famous international races, such as the MotoGP world championship, or experience the thrill of riding on the circuit themselves. Why not join them?

The myth of motorcyclists Emilia Romagna is the land of roaring engines. This irrepressible passion for speed revs into life at weekends, when you can hear the roar of motorbikes on the roads. This love of motorbikes is reflected in success at international competitions. Simoncelli, Capirossi, Melandri and Dovizioso are just a few of the champions. Even though champion motor cyclist Valentino Rossi was born a few miles outside this region, his spirit fully belongs here.


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Restoration workshop In their own way, motorcycles and cars can be considered an art form. So why not give them the attention they deserve? Curiously, Emilia Romagna is home to an institute dedicated to the restoration of Italian vintage motorcycles and cars. Naturally, it is supported and partly sponsored by the Ducati Foundation in Bologna. If you’re interested, bear in mind that the waiting list is very long. But when your time comes, seize the moment. The experience should propel you, full throttle, into the heart of the Italian motorbike industry.

The Motor Show For petrol-heads, the Motor Show is the most important international car and motorcycle exhibition. What makes this show such a success with fans is the mix of new models and prototypes and the meetings with the champions. The Motor Show is staged in Bologna every December.


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Artist: Alessandro La Motta

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Passo Penice (Bobbio) 1150-1450 m Le Vallette - Ceci (Bobbio) 1040-1110 m Schia 1200-1500 m Pratospilla 1303-1800 m Cerreto Laghi 1350-1980 m Appenninia (Civago) 1115-1657 m Alpe di Cusna (Febbio) 1203-2063 m

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Alberto ALBERTO TOMBA One of the greatest Italian skiing champions. He won 50 World Cup races. He won 3 Gold and 2 Silver Olympic medals and 2 Gold and 2 Bronze medals in the World Championships.

Alberto Tomba, one of the greatest ski champions of all time, was born in Bologna in winter. Perhaps it was destiny. His father used to take him down the pistes on his shoulders when he was very young. Alberto and his brother first donned a pair of skis when they were only 4 or 5 years old. Their father never over-did the pressure or the training: he just wanted his sons to have fun. Tomba senior believed it was very important to do open-air sports. He believed it was healthy and that it would teach his sons to respect nature, to be disciplined and to be respectful of their opponents. Tomba senior started out by taking his sons onto the Apennines at weekends. But the enthusiastic boys put on their skis whenever they could. All it had to do was snow and they’d shoot down the slopes around their home –either on skis or on a toboggan. The boys loved the excitement of hurtling downhill and then trekking all the way back up again. Somebody noticed Alberto’s talent and he soon started training seriously and took part in his first competitions on the Apennines. Emilia Romagna marked the start of Tomba’s ski career. After that, success took him to competitions all over the world. In his long career, Tomba has achieved many goals, from the Olympic medals in Calgary, Albertville and Lillehammer to the World Cup and, the final accolade, gold medals at the World Championships in Sierra Nevada. Between competitions, Tomba always used to return to ‘his’ mountains to train. Even now, these slopes are close to his heart -and still part of him.

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On the snow Snow fills you with joy, cleanses your soul and dispels any winter gloom. So what are you waiting for? Launch yourself down Emilia Romagna’s 250 kilometres of pistes –all linked to the region’s 18 ski resorts. Try out the Cimone ski area, with its new piste called `Slalom Stadium’ and ski to the Corno alle Scale and Cerreto Laghi, with its impressive ice rink. Skiing, cross-country skiing, snow-boarding and snow-shoeing are all on offer. Or what about snow-tubing in special rubber `dinghies’, or snow-kiting or dogsledging?


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Trails for all The thrill of trekking is linked to the sensation of being in the great outdoors. Nordic walking, horseback-riding and mountain-bike riding are exciting ways to explore the area. In the Modena area, trails from the Via Vandelli lead to trails along the mountain ridges. The Apennines appeals to everyone and suit all needs: certain parks have now opened trails to those with reduced mobility or some sort of visual impairment. Such visitors just need to close their eyes and touch the information panels. They will then feel confident enough to explore further.

The great outdoors Visit our mountains, nature reserves and parks. Consider jogging in the woods. Bring your children to learn about plants and animals –and to help develop a passion for sport. The green heart of the region offers rock climbing and rafting, orienteering and wolf-tracking as well as wolf-howling at night. You can learn how to track wolves. If safety is a big concern, then consider the adventure parks in the Apennines. Tree-climbing will put you in touch with a different side of yourself. Such rugged but simple activities will help you achieve a level of concentration and harmony that will amaze less adventurous friends you’ve left behind in the city.


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Cycling fiends The inhabitants of Emilia Romagna have a fighting spirit. These are vital, energetic folk who never give up, even when the going gets tough. Whether it’s skiing downhill or mountainbiking uphill, expect a gutsy performance. Pedal power is the name of the game. This passion is linked to a couple of racing legends: Ercole Baldini from Forlì, Olympic and world champion in the ‘50s, and the `Pirata’ Marco Pantani, a spirited climber. Pantani, winner of the Giro d’Italia and Tour de France in 1998, has a museum in his honour in Cesenatico -Spazio Pantani. At weekends, the cycling hordes hit the roads. Cycling fans are looking for their moment of glory, perhaps in the famous Nove Colli race. But there are also cheerful groups of tourists out exploring the hills and villages. Many hotels have workshops to help out in case of mechanical problems.


appennino e verde emilia romagna

Matilde MATILDE DI CANOSSA Mantua 1046 • Bondeno di Roncore 24.07.1115 Countess, duchess, marquise and queen in the Middle Ages. A lady always at the forefront, powerful feudatory and ardent supporter of the Church in the Investiture Controversy.

If Matilde di Canossa had never existed, the saying “andare a Canossa” (literally: ‘going to Canossa’) would simply mean going to a small village in the Apennines near Reggio Emilia. But Matilde did exist and the saying has a deeper meaning. (In Italian, ‘andare a Canossa’ means to beg forgiveness and eat humble pie). Matilde was one of the leading female figures in Medieval Europe. The Grand Duchess was courageous, learned, cosmopolitan and enlightened. She mediated between the two great powers of the age: the Holy Roman Empire and the Papacy. The Matildic dominions acted as a buffer zone between the territories owned by the Emperor and the Church. Matilde played a role as mediator, culminating in the legendary meeting between Emperor Henry IV and Pope Gregory VII at Canossa Castle in January 1077. Maltilde was not overly impressed by Emperor Henry, a relative of hers. She recalled him as small, bare-foot, dressed in a habit and prostrating himself before her great friend Ildebrando (Hildebrand) Pope Gregory VII. Matilde considered the Pope ‘a real man’, a leader who came from Cluny and knew what had to be done to foster faith. To Matilde, he was a true guide, exactly what was needed - while Henry wanted to appoint bishops himself and would not understand that he could not win. At the fateful meeting in January 1077, Matilde played her part well. After all, she was the undisputed queen of feudal domains stretching from the foothills of the Alps to Lazio, near Rome. She owned the largest estates in Italy. If viewed from the top of mountain ridge, her lands would have been adorned with castles, churches, towers and villages. Fittingly, a trail in Matilde’s name now runs through her former lands.

Strength


di Canossa

Medieval mood The region is renowned for its medieval heritage and is dotted with medieval fortresses, castles and villages. Bobbio is just one well-preserved site, with its Ponte Gobbo and an abbey founded by San Colombano. Then there’s Castell'Arquato, near Piacenza, or Bardi, which boasts the Ghibelline fortress linked to the Landi dynasty. In Parma Province, Fontanellato is an intriguing castle, famous for its `optical illusion chamber’ and frescoes attributed to Parmigianino. In Brisighella, there’s Via degli Asini (Donkey Street), a charming arcaded street. Longiano is a princely residence that once belonged to the Malatesta, one of the region’s most powerful dynasties.

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Natural bastions At times, nature creates its own impregnable fortresses. The sandstone peaks of the imposing Sassi di Roccamalatina rise vertiginously, like a castle. Set in gentle landscape, this rugged natural formation looks every bit the fortress. In the Apennines, the Pietra di Bismantova is another awe-inspiring natural rock formation: just ask the rock climbers, hikers or dreamers who stand at the stop, contemplating a magnificent structure which lay under the ocean millions of years ago. Equally impressive are the small volcano-like cones of Salse di Nirano, which fascinated Pliny the Elder –or the Gessi Bolognesi, an atmospheric rock formation studded with cliffs.

Via Francigena The Via Francigena was the route travelled by pilgrims, merchants and wayfarers from Britain and France. They made for the Cisa Pass and crossed the mountains into Tuscany’s Lunigiana area en route to Rome. In Emilia Romagna, a section of the Via Francigena thoroughfare runs from Piacenza to Parma. This famous route was described in the year 990 by Sigeric, Archbishop of Canterbury, and is lined with Romanesque treasures in the Emilia stretch. The architectural wonders include the Romanesque Baptistery in Parma, a masterpiece by Benedetto Antelami, as well as the Duomo in Fidenza, decorated with bas-reliefs that even feature helpful route directions. To follow in the footsteps of medieval pilgrims, contemplate the Sentieri della Luce in the Modena area or the Via degli Dei in the valleys around Bologna.


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Nonantola Abbey When the Lombard Duke Anselmo became a monk, he received land as a gift from King Astolfo. In 752 he founded a Benedictine abbey here, which became a medieval power-house. The abbey, dedicated to Saint Sylvester, is just outside Modena. Over the centuries, the abbey became increasingly powerful thanks to its strategic position and to the patronage of kings, popes and emperors. To follow in the footsteps of the medieval pilgrims, visit the crypt: dozens of slender columns fill the crypt like trees bathed in light.

San Leo: an impregnable fortress If you wish to understand the meaning of the word impregnable follow the Marecchia Valley up to San Leo built high on a rock and accessible only along a road cut into the rock. The medieval village - always at the heart of battles between Byzantines, Goths, Franks and Longobards and capital of the Kingdom of Italy for two years under the rule of Berengario II – is dominated by the imposing fortress restored by Francesco di Giorgio Martini in the 15 the century and transformed into a practically unattackable work of MILITARY ART. However, it was also almost impossible to escape if you were so unfortunate to be imprisoned its dungeons. Count Cagliostro, alchemist and adventurer who fascinated Europe in the 18th century soon found out; the walls of this fortress were his last earthly prison.


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DonCamillo DON CAMILLO & PEPPONE Literary characters created by Guareschi. They appeared for the first time in the weekly magazine Candido. They became famous thanks to the successful film and the actors Fernandel and Gino Cervi.

The tale of Don Camillo and Peppone is a classic story of two mortal enemies who eventually achieve a sort of friendship despite their differences. Don Camillo was a passionate priest and committed Christian while Peppone was a fundamentalist Communist and the local Mayor. The tale of their ideological conflict, set in Emilia Romagna, reveals much about both the region and human nature. The author, Giovanni Guareschi, describes it all in `Mondo Piccolo’ (literally, `It’s a Small World’). As Guareschi relates it: `You might ask me why I am telling you these stories? Because I want to. Because it is important to realise that this stretch of land between the river and the mountains witnesses things that don’t happen elsewhere. Whatever happens is in harmony with nature. The special wind that blows here is beneficial for both the living and the dead; even the local dogs have souls. By narrating such things you will come to understand more about Don Camillo, Peppone and the rest. Against this setting, you won’t be surprised to hear Christ talking and to learn that two individuals might almost come to blows over differing ideologies. But it will be a fair fight in the name of differing faiths. You will discover that two sworn enemies can agree on essential matters. All this is possible because the broad river cleanses the air. In the evening, on the banks of the majestic river, Death itself may cycle by. Or you might walk along the river bank and see a small cemetery just below. If the shadow of a dead person sits beside you, you won’t be frightened but will chat peaceably. This is the atmosphere of this quiet backwater.’

Friendship


& Peppone

Opposition man: Giovannino Giovannino Guareschi, an Italian writer renowned for his humour, toughness and truthfulness, created the `small world’ of Don Camillo and Peppone where he himself grew up. `The Bassa’ lowlands created these characters. It was as if I met them, and we walked arm in arm up and down the alphabet,’ he said. Memories of these characters can be found in the Brescello museum dedicated to these two enemies who were also friends. On display are film sets from the movie version, starring Fernandel and Gino Cervi.

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Gothic Line The Gothic Line was the war front that once ran through the region, and became a battleground between the Nazi Wermacht and the Allies in 1944-5. The Apennines were caught up in the conflict and the land was scarred. In peacetime, bridges have been built, with reconciliation and friendship founded on the ashes of the conflict. It’s no coincidence that Emilia Romagna is proudly part of the European Union.


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Taste of the country This region offers an array of traditional cakes, pastries and desserts, ranging from ciambella to pampapato, torta di riso and zuppa inglese. There’s also a traditional peasant dish called Savor. This thick jam is made by boiling down the must of black grapes with quinces, pears, dried fruit and lemon and orange rinds.

Country classes As Guareschi has shown us, the countryside is a great source of stories. To promote the countryside further, the region created several `open-door’ farm projects. Fattorie Aperte (`Open Farms’) and Fattorie Didattiche (`Educational Farms’) welcome locals, holidaymakers or students. Here you can take part in rural activities and taste the farm produce. This is a fun day out and creates a bond between urbanites and country-dwellers.


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Woodland WOODS The woods of the Apennines are mainly made up of beech, ash, chestnut and elm. Silver fir grows at high altitudes. They are also rich in fauna. Deer, fallow deer, roe and hawks can be found here.

Feasts& flavours

In Emilia Romagna, the locals are keen on ‘going down to the woods’. If you know where to look, the forests are full of such delicacies as chestnuts, mushrooms and truffles. There are even smelly cheeses buried in caves underground.

Children have a field day collecting chestnuts, or helping their parents and

grandparents hunt for wild blackberries, blueberries and elderberries to make

delicious jams. There is also an opportunity for animal-spotting, with sightings of roe deer, foxes and squirrels. At night, be silenced by the grandeur of the forests, and the impact of standing in a mysterious clearing under the stars.

Many parts of the region are covered in forest, ranging from pine or oak to maple, hazelnut, beech, linden or fir trees. Forests can also be linked to folklore, legends or heartfelt traditions. In times past, country families used to celebrate the birth of a baby by planting a tree for good luck. Forests are respected and cared for in the region, with the most ancient trees especially revered. In the hinterland of Rimini, Verucchio boasts the Cypress of Saint Francis. According to legend, the tree was transformed from the staff of a beggar from Assisi. Then there’s Saint Paul’s Pear Tree, one of the oldest in Italy, set in the Casentinesi forest, a majestic national park. Anywhere on your travels, leave time to look at curious gnarled trees and let yourself dream –both of folklore or forest feasts.


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Porcini Mushrooms of Borgotaro IGP Always keep your eyes open when hiking in the Apennines in autumn. Lurking in the undergrowth below conifers or oak trees may be one of the region’s tastiest woodland treats. We are talking mushrooms, and the prized funghi porcini mushrooms in particular. (These are often called wild mushrooms in English). The four types of porcini from the countryside around Borgotaro are famous and highly-prized. Borgotaro is the main market town for mushrooms. The porcini have a wonderful scent and find their way into tasty sauces, soups, salads, escallops and risotto. The fame of these mushrooms has spread abroad thanks to the many locals who emigrated from the area at the end of the 19th Century.


appennino e verde emilia romagna

Chestnuts from Castel del Rio What would the civilisation of the Apennines be without chestnuts (marroni)? Locally, chestnut trees are also called `bread trees’ because chestnuts were once essential to the survival of mountain folk. Nowadays, the delicious autumn crops can be eaten roasted or boiled. Chestnuts also find their way into traditional recipes reinterpreted by a new generation of chefs. Delicious marroni (a special type of chestnut) are tastier than normal chestnuts and have a different shape. The chestnut museum is dedicated to marroni from Castel del Rio, in the Santerno Valley. These chestnuts have been awarded IGP status, meaning that they are

classified and protected in much the same way as other prized produce, such as Parma ham or Parmesan cheese. An ancient chestnut fair is the place to taste `peasant’ treats, such as castagnaccio, a cake made from chestnut flour, along with other delicious dishes.


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Prized White Truffle: the Festival of Savigno and the Fair of Sant’Agata Feltria

Formaggio di Fossa (cheese matured in underground caves) Every year a fair is organised in the villages of Sogliano al Rubicone and Talamello at the end of November when an unmistakable PUNGENT AROMA fills the air. This is in fact the moment when the tuff caves are opened to reveal the cheese “buried” there three months before in canvas sacks. The anaerobic fermentation process changes the shape of the cheese and makes it more digestible; but above all it gives it its famous characterising bitter and STRONG TASTE. The formaggio di fossa, also poetically called “Amber of Talamello” by Tonino Guerra because of its almost golden hue, was already known in the 15th Century; its origins however are still uncertain: perhaps it was a way of hiding and defending food supplies from enemy incursions.

An embarrassingly wide choice of DELICACIES welcomes you whenever you stop to rest and relax during your journey through woods and across hills: the dilemma is which one to taste first! It is not easy to choose but we are sure that the place of honour will be reserved for the White Prized Truffle, a delight for your PALATE! In October and November, at the Fair of Sant'Agata Feltria in the Marecchia Valley and at the Festival of Savigno, along the Food & Wine Route of the Colli Bolognesi (hills surrounding Bologna), food is carefully prepared with simple and local ingredients that combine well with and enhance the first class characteristics of truffle. Truffle finders with their trained dogs are well aware of these characteristics and are happy to go out on cold autumn mornings to uncover the secret and hidden tracks of truffle!


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Francesca FRANCESCA DA RIMINI Ravenna, 1255 • ?, 1283/1285 “Love, that on gentle heart doth swiftly seize, Seized this man for the person beautiful That was ta'en from me, and still the mode offends me Love, that exempts no one beloved from loving, Seized me with pleasure of this man so strongly, That, as thou seest, it doth not yet desert me; Love has conducted us unto one death; Caina waiteth him who quenched our life !" These words were borne along from them to us. (Dante Alighieri, Inferno V, 100-108)

Francesca da Rimini was born on the coast, where the Po River peacefully enters the sea. She sought her own peace for many year and finally found it where her HEART felt at home. That was no easy feat. In those times priorities were different: alliances, battles, and the power of noble families...these were the important things. In that period marriage was like a business contract, so she was forced to marry Gianciotto Malatesta: everyone was satisfied with the agreement between the two rival families. Even Francesca’s husband was pleased: she was young, beautiful and desirable... But Francesca had set her eyes on Paolo, her brother-in-law, and could not stop thinking about him. And to think that Paolo was sent to ask Francesca’s hand in marriage! He was so GRACEFUL... He exuded kindness; his eyes were as deep as the sea. Francesca sighed and quivered with delight just at the thought of him. He was her peace. She had no doubt: true love rules the heart, without boundaries and cannot be stopped. What happened afterwards was just the natural course of love, as for all lovers around the world. Gianciotto never understood her feelings so he killed Francesca and Paolo; with this action however he only violated their bodies without stealing their souls which had found happiness within each others hearts: they had already reached their eternity. Paolo and Francesca had met for the first time in this sweet and gentle land embraced by its scents. They would have liked to visit the many delightful and beautiful places nearby, walking hand in hand, dissipating all fears and allowing joy to break through..... So what are you waiting for? You can express you LOVE freely, so allow yourself to enjoy these wonderful places. Take the initiative: run quickly to you KNIGHT and invite him for a romantic holiday in Emilia Romagna! You will come back more in love than ever.

Love


da Rimini

The treasures of the Senio valley The amazing wonders of nature are full of astonishing surprises. The Senio river valley will ENCHANT you with its Herb Garden in Casola Valsenio: stirring aromas and colourful plants used in health products and cosmetics and to enhance the flavour of food will gently fill you with light EMOTIONS. To complete your sense of well-being stop at Riolo Terme; in this town, much loved by Lord Byron, built around a 14th century Fortress, you can enjoy and benefit from the virtues of its water and century old woods.

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Tuscany Romagna When Francesca’s father gave her in marriage to Gianciotto he was lord of Ravenna. The family however, originated from Polenta a village in the hills surrounding Forlì, near Bertinoro and Fratta Terme: right on the border with a corner of Romagna which was once part of Tuscany under the dominion of the illustrious dé Medici family. Take some time to discover the towns that testify the historical period of these Renaissance patrons dedicated to beauty, COURTESY and elegance: Castrocaro Terme, a thermal resort that will take care of your wellbeing and Terra del Sole, an innovative fortress town with elegant architecture and an “ideal” urban plan that restores the feeling of long lost HARMONY.


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In love with the radio Never do what you are told, don’t be stopped by the prejudices of those who do not understand you, always follow your FEELINGS! This is the meaning of true loyalty! Just think what would have happened if Guglielmo Marconi had not believed in his intuitions and DESIRES when he was a boy and nobody had faith in him! To create his wireless telegraph he was forced to leave Bologna and Italy. Without his courage and his first experiments in Pontecchio the wireless would never have been invented: many tried in vain to invent it to no avail; only he was successful. Can you imagine a world without the radio? How would have songs travelled to every corner of the world? Less people would probably have fallen IN LOVE. Thanks to Guglielmo Marconi words and notes travel quickly in the air and suddenly arrive, today like in the past, to keep us company.

The pleasure of Blues This region taught Francesca to fully savour the JOYS of life and not to get disheartened in difficult moments. This is a FERVENT region that enjoys the PLEASANT things in life. This is exactly the atmosphere of the music festival Castel San Pietro in Blues, held in the thermal town nestled between the hills and plains, with exceptional national and international guests every year: the last editions included artists such as James Cotton, the greatest living blues harmonica player and Mick Taylor the legendary guitar player of the Rolling Stones.


Miss Miss Italia The most famous women’s beauty contest in Italy Since 1994 the contest is also open to mothers and married women Some of the most famous contestants include: Sophia Loren, Lucia Bosè, Silvana Pampanini, Stefania Sandrelli, Simona Ventura and Martina Colombari

It’s not easy to become a beauty queen, much less Miss Italia. You might think that it’s all down to nature but nature isn’t everything. Genetically, to some extent, we inherit a great deal from our parents: from our physique to the shape of eyes or face. But for real beauty to bloom, we also need a healthy body, mind and sprit. There’s a lot to be said for a well-balanced diet and for daily physical exercise. That’s without mentioning an environment that enhances and fosters beauty in all its forms. Salsomaggiore Terme, a celebrated spa resort, is just that healthy environment –and the stage for Miss Italy. Abroad, such beauty contests may be mocked but in Italy they still have a place in people’s hearts. In the past, the jury has included such luminaries as De Chirico, Carrà, both great artists and connoisseurs of beauty. Not forgetting judges of the calibre of Visconti, De Sica and Mastroianni, all icons of the Italian cinema. The pageant dates back to 1939, when it was charmingly entitled: “5000 lira for a smile.” Since then the beauty contest has moved on, and emotions run high. In some ways, it’s like a contemporary fairy tale. These are girls who dream of becoming ‘princesses’ in the world of showbiz. Such starlets may well launch their careers by first becoming beauty queens. These starlets occupy a particular place in Italian hearts and may well go on to be in the public eye in other fields. Sofia Loren, the great actress and Italian icon, has been involved in past editions of the pageant. She once said that the beauty contest was a reflection of Italy because everything was done in the light of day. Rather like the authentic beauty of Salsomaggiore Terme: what you see is what you get, without tricks or artifice.

Beauty


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Salt and water Salsomaggiore has been a leading spa resort since the late 19th century. It has a fascinating history linked to the extraction of salt and subsequently rose to prominence as a mineralrich spa resort. The waters are rich in salt and bromide and these particular properties have always been key in the mineral-rich treatments and water cures. The beauty of Salsomaggiore is another of its great assets, particularly the Art Nouveau Berzieri baths, famed for their Oriental-style decorations.

Neighbouring Tabiano Terme, specialised in the treatment of the respiratory tract, is another significant spa resort. Tabiano is set in the lovely rolling hills around Parma. In their own way, Salsomaggiore and Tabiano are both stars of the spa world, much like the beauty queens themselves in the world of showbiz.


Good food from times past Why not attend an historical banquet? Known as Ricordanze di Sapori, these old-world feasts take place in lovely castles in the former Dukedom of Parma and Piacenza. Soak up the courtly atmosphere with banquets attended by knights and ladies. These costumed ladies will be as gorgeous as beauty queens. In Emilia Romagna, beauty and well-being are ever-present.

Health eating A well-balanced diet (with plenty of fruit and vegetables) is essential to keep us looking gorgeous. Emilia Romangna has this in abundance, including in the countryside around ForlĂŹ and Cesena. Taste the pears, strawberries, apricots, plums and peaches, including the juicy, sweet-scented nectarines. As for cherries, head for the Vignola hills. In spring, the white blossom is gorgeous.


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Sport, well-being & fairplay “I owe a lot to football and I hope it will always be a sport that brings joy and relieves stress. I am one of those people who love football in the sense of a good clean fun and fair-play". So said Arrigo Sacchi, the great football coach from Emilia Romagna. Sacchi’s search for balance and beauty won him many great victories. He was in charge of AC Milan in its glory days, when the team included Baresi, Van Basten, Gullit and Maldini. This focus on harmony in `the beautiful game’ filtered down to other squads coached by Sacchi, from Rimini to Parma and even the Italian national team.


Water WATER It is a fundamental component for plant and animal organisms. The human body is 65% water. It plays a fundamental role in the control of body temperature and of the salt and water balance.

Water is the font of life. Mankind has always sought water and settled near a

Well-being

water source. In ancient times, water was considered divine, even miraculous, and worshipped like a goddess. As one of the most fertile regions in Italy, Emilia Romagna still worships water (and wine). From the Adriatic Coast to the spa resorts and coastal wetlands, water has shaped the culture of the region.

andwine

Water is at the heart of Emilia Romagna’s well-being, from the vineyards to the fertile plains of the River Po or the chestnut groves in the Apennines. Even

Bologna has a scenic ‘secret river’. On the Adriatic coast, the wild Po Delta

coastal wetlands is a mosaic of marshes, dunes and mudflats. Dubbed the Italian Camargue, it lies between Ferrara and Comacchio. Look out for water defences and drainage schemes, from locks and flood plains to raised canal banks which serve as cycle trails.


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Spas as a way of life Geological good fortune has fostered the development of spa resorts (terme). Whether tucked away in the hills or strung out along the coast, the spas flourish thanks to the healing properties of water. These are not snooty spas but good-value, family-friendly affairs. Their appeal is enhanced by lovely settings, a warm welcome, and robust food and wine. From Porretta to Cervia, Riolo and Fratta, the spas offer everything from innovative beauty treatments to cures dating back to Roman times.


Recharge your batteries The spa resorts make a relaxing base, with outings to ancient castles, parks and classic cities of art. Parma province boasts the Reggia di Colorno, dubbed `a Versailles in miniature’. This is where the princely Farnese dynasty summered. Then there’s the cliff-top castle of Montechiarugolo, perched above the river Enza. As for combining scenery and sport, golf is increasingly popular and many golf clubs offer special rates.

The poetry of water Water has always inspired poetry. How could the magnificent waterfalls of Acquacheta not inspire sublime verse? One waterfall in the Apennines has been immortalised by Dante Alighieri, Italy’s greatest poet. Dante, who stayed in the area while in exile from Florence, wrote about the waterfall in The Divine Comedy. The waterfall’s deafening roar is likened to the terrifying Flegetonte river in Hell. It’s an easy walk to the lofty waterfall, which is set in clearing that was once home to Benedictine monks.


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Turning water into wine Much as the locals love drinking water, they are even fonder of wine. A popular saying gives the game away. `If you ask for a glass of water but you are given a glass of wine, then you are in Romagna’. Hardly surprising when this is the land of full-bodied Sangiovese DOC. The Italian DOC system is similar to the Appellation Controllee system used in France. (DOC literally means `controlled denomination of origin’ while DOCG is a variant, meaning `controlled and guaranteed designation of origin’). Two recommended regional wines are Albana DOCG Trebbiano DOC. Where to drink? Sample local wines in old-world wine shops and wine bars, as well as in the wine estates themselves. Look out for the word `enoteca’, meaning vintner or wine store, where you can quaff as well as buy. These are friendly places which reflect the warmth of the region. To immerse yourself in wine lore, begin in the Enoteca Regionale di Dozza. This showcase to regional wines occupies an intriguing medieval fortress between Bologna and Imola. Known as the Rocca Sforzesca, the castle stocks over 800 different labels. But don’t ignore the rest of the region. Superb DOC wines include Gutturnio from Piacenza, Fortana from Ferrara, and Pignoletto from the hills around Bologna. And the local fizz? The best-known is Lambrusco DOC, and the wine most closely associated with

the region. As a celebrated DOC wine, Lambrusco reigns supreme between Modena and Reggio Emilia. Lambrusco is highly individualistic and slightly sharp: it’s a sparkling, cherry-red wine that goes well with all local dishes. Did you know that wine could take years off you? Spa-lovers can indulge in wine-and-wellbeing cures. Known as vinotherapy, such treatments are available at Salvarola spa. Freshly picked grapes are used in bathing and massage treatments and revitalise the skin. The antioxidant properties of grapes are beneficial in anti-ageing treatments.


Ancient ANCIENT ROMANS Today’s passion for thermal spas owes much to the Ancient Romans who used them as a place of rest, socialisation and well-being; this passion was exported to all the regions they colonised. Some state that the term SPA derives from the acronym Salus Per Aquam.

The body

Ad Balneum, ad Balneum - ‘to the baths’ was the rallying cry in these parts in Roman times. As the Roman cavalcade approached Emilia Romagna, the cry became even louder. The journey from Rome to Ravenna was long and arduous, particularly as an array of goods had to be transported in tandem. The exhausted contingent could

beautiful

hardly wait for solace for their aching limbs. As the troops crossed the mountain

passes, the town now called Bagno di Romagna beckoned appealingly. Some Roman merchants were so fond of the resort they retired there. Rest and recreation were the order of the day. In the baths, the Romans appreciated the health benefits of

the healing waters, with alkaline and sulphurous waters gushing out at 45°C. The superior Romans marvelled at the fact that ‘prehistoric barbarians’ had been capable of discovering these places and settling nearby. Although illiterate, the ‘barbarians’ presumably had good instincts and sniffed the spas out. The Valle del Savio was occupied by the Umbrian Sapinates for several centuries. When the Romans arrived, they respected the ancient cults but also introduced the first thermal baths. On one side, around the sacred spring, would have stood a temple dedicated to Nymph, the queen of waters. On the other side would have been the baths for ablutions and immersion in hot water. Between these sections there would have been a long colonnaded section. These thermal baths were in no way inferior to those used by gentlewomen and emperors: even Martial sang their praises.


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Via dei Romei Pilgrimage route to Rome In the Middle Ages, European merchants and travellers to Rome had to cross the Apennines. This route, the Via dei Romei, reached Via Emila from the coast or the Po River before crossing the passes atop the Tuscan-Romagna border. Travelling along roads dotted with parish churches, wayfarers travelled on foot, on donkeys or on carts, taking only a few basic possessions with them. Pilgrims, friars and the poor found free lodgings while the inns and taverns offered true Roman hospitality to all who sought bed and board.


Sarsina - where time stands still A visit to the Archaeological Museum of Sarsina is an affecting experience. It’s a place where time has stood still, from the mausoleum dedicated to Rufus to the mosaic depicting the triumph of Dionysius. Plautus, the great Roman playwright, bequeathed us an even greater gift. The playwright was born in this splendid municipium in the Apennines. Nowadays, a theatre festival in his honour fills the cool summer evenings with laughter.

Roman land legacy Signs of Roman times are still visible in the countryside around Cesena, Faenza, Imola and Lugo. In fact, Roman colonisers reclaimed and remodelled the land, using a rational grid system unequalled in the modern era. Roman planning made use of roads and canals and divided the land into square plots called centuriae. This formed a functional grid system linked to the cardinal points or the axis of the main road. The Roman grid is still apparent in areas with smallholdings that weren’t swallowed up by vast estates under the latifundismo system, whereby great estates were created by absentee landlords.


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Roman dwellings The Romans perfected the art of relaxation and well-being and could teach modern city-dwellers a lesson in living well. If in any doubt, visit a typical Roman dwelling in Rimini, the oldest established Roman colony in the Po valley. In the historic heart of town is a fascinating villaclinic that has been restored recently. Known as the Domus del Chirurgo (the Surgeon’s House) this once belonged to Dr. Eutyches, who also left an intriguing collection of Roman surgical instruments. In Ravenna, admire the richly

-decorated mosaics in the Domus dei Tappeti di Pietra (`House of the Stone Carpets’). Ravenna is also home to the world’s finest collection of Classically-inspired Early Christian mosaics. The link with Roman mosaics is hardly surprising given that Ravenna was the capital of the Western Roman Empire and the base of the Roman fleet in the Mediterranean. `Glory to Jupiter and the Gods of the Pantheon’ might well have been the Roman cry.


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D.O.P. and I.G.P. Products, STRADA DEI VINI E DEI SAPORI DEI COLLI PIACENTINI

STRADA DEL PO E DEI SAPORI DELLA BASSA PIACENTINA

STRADA DEL CULATELLO DI ZIBELLO (Strade dei vini e dei sapori di Parma)

Torino

Milano

Brescia

Piacenza

Mantova

Parma Reggio Emilia Modena

La Spezia

STRADA DEL FUNGO PORCINO DI BORGOTARO

STRADA DEL PROSCIUTTO E DEI VINI DEI COLLI DI PARMA

(Strade dei vini e dei sapori di Parma)

(Strade dei vini e dei sapori di Parma)

Cheese Parmigiano - Reggiano • DOP

STRADA DEI VINI E DEI SAPORI COLLINE DI SCANDIANO E CANOSSA

Grana Padano • DOP Provolone Valpadano • DOP

Meat Prosciutto di Parma • DOP Prosciutto di Modena • DOP Culatello di Zibello • DOP Coppa piacentina • DOP Salame piacentino • DOP Italian salamini “the hunter's way” • D.O.P. Salame Cremona • IGP Pancetta piacentina • DOP Mortadella Bologna • IGP White young beef of the central Apennines • IGP

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STRADA DEI VINI E DEI SAPORI CITTÀ CASTELLI CILIEGI (Colline fra Bologna e Modena)

Fruits and Vegetables Romagna shallot • IGP Borgotaro porcini mushroom • IGP Castel del Rio marron • IGP Emilia-Romagna pear • IGP Peach and nectarine of Romagna • IGP Altedo green asparagus • IGP

Extra virgin olive oil

Zampone Modena • IGP

Olio extra vergine d’oliva di Brisighella • DOP

Cotechino Modena • IGP

Olio extra vergine d’oliva Colline di Romagna• DOP


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Food and Wine Routes STRADA DEI VINI E DEI SAPORI DELLE CORTI REGGIANE

STRADA DEI VINI E DEI SAPORI DELLA PIANURA MODENESE

STRADA DEI VINI E DEI SAPORI DELLA PROVINCIA DI FERRARA

Venezia

Padova

(La via del grande fiume - La via delle corti estensi - La via del delta)

Ferrara STRADA DEI VINI E DEI SAPORI DEI COLLI D’IMOLA

STRADA DEL SANGIOVESE E DEI SAPORI DELLE COLLINE DI FAENZA

Bologna Ravenna

STRADA DEI VINI E DEI SAPORI DEI COLLI DI FORLÌ E CESENA

Forlì Cesena Firenze

STRADA DEI VINI E DEI SAPORI DEI COLLI DI RIMINI

Rimini

STRADA DEI VINI E DEI SAPORI DELL’APPENNINO BOLOGNESE

Ancona

Vinegar

Perugia

Traditional balsamic vinegar of Modena • DOP Traditional balsamic vinegar of Reggio Emilia• DOP Balsamic vinegar of Modena• IGP

Baked products Coppia ferrarese • IGP

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D.O.P. Protected designation of origin (pdo) I.G.P. Protected geographical indication (pgi)


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3 Publishing project: APT Servizi Texts: Stefano Maldini Text restyling in foreign languages: English – Lisa Gerard Sharp German – Maren Preiss Russian – Gamer  Bautdinov Concept and graphics project: Empresa Creativa - www.empresacreativa.com Translation: Action Line Servizi Linguistici – Forlì Images: APT Servizi Photo Archives Photo Archives of the Unioni di Prodotto Appennino e Verde, Città d’Arte, Costa, Terme and their public partners Federico Fellini Foundation (image pag. 12-13 – Federico Fellini “La dolce vita: Silvia come la Via Lattea” Coloured pens on paper - copyright Federico Fellini Foundation) Forlì – Cesena Province Photo Archives (sangiovese glass pag. 91; montetiffi baking-pots pag. 25; nordic walking pag. 62) Ferrara Province Photo Archives (deer in the woods of Mesola pag. 23; Cento carnival pag. 35; Delta Park hide pag. 46) Reggio Emilia Province Photo Archives (making pasta pag. 37; images of the chapter “Don Camillo and Peppone”) Rimini Province Photo Archives (various images in the Adriatic Riviera section) Cesenatico Town Council Photo Archives (Marino Moretti birthplace pag. 19; recalling garibaldina pag. 22) Modena Town Council Photo Archives (Pavarotti & Friends pag. 33) Ravenna Town Council Photo Archives (sapanno Garibaldi pag. 22) Sarsina Town Council Photo Archives (Sarsina arena pag. 94) Oasi costiera dei 4 comuni Photo Archives (small flamingo pag. 22) Museo della Figurina Photo Archives (images pag. 35) Savor of Montegelli Feast Photo Archives (images pag. 71) Motorvalley Museum and Collections Photo Archives (images for the chapters Enzo Ferrari and Ducati) 

Alessandro La Motta (front page)

Printed in October 2009 by Grafica Editoriale Printing srl – Bologna

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Emilia Romagna

APT Servizi Emilia Romagna (Regional tourist board) Fax +39 0541 430150 info@aptservizi.com www.emiliaromagnaturismo.it www.aptservizi.com

For information on tourist products of Emilia Romagna Unione di prodotto Appennino e Verde Fax +39 051 4202612 appennino@aptservizi.com www.appenninoeverde.org

Unione di prodotto CittĂ d'Arte, Cultura e Affari Fax +39 051 4202612 cittadarte@aptservizi.com www.cittadarte.emilia-romagna.it

Unione di prodotto Costa Fax +39 0547 675192 info@adriacoast.com www.adriacoast.com

Book your holiday on:

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Land with a Soul

Unione di prodotto Terme, Salute e Benessere Fax +39 051 4202612 info@emiliaromagnaterme.it www.emiliaromagnaterme.it

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Emilia Romagna

Land with a Soul

Emilia Romagna Land with a Soul  

Emilia Romagna Land with a Soul

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