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APRIL 2018

VOL. XXI NO.3

www.issuu.com/feuadvocate

SAMPALOC,MANILA

With smaller electorate, COMELEC lowers 2018 student elections qualification By Gregory John D. Jingco

Due to the decreased population of students, the Far Eastern University Commission on Elections (FEU COMELEC) amended the Omnibus Election Code (OEC) for the 2018 FEU student elections, lowering the qualifications and requirements for candidacy. Student Development (SDev) Director Lenore Delos Santos expressed that the K-12 program pushed the student government to construct a code which will fit the current status of the University. In line with this, the FEU COMELEC held a seminar and presented the amendments in the OEC for this year’s student election last February 23 at the Library Viewing Room. A few changes have been made in order for students to participate in the 2018 Student Elections. The following are the previous articles of the OEC that were amended: Last year, the candidates were required to carry a minimum load of 62% of the units in compliance with their corresponding curriculum, but now, as long as the candidate is enrolled this current semester, he or she is eligible to run for a position. Before, all candidates were required to have leadership experience by either being an incumbent officer in FEU, elected officer or active committee member of FEU-based organizations, a student-leader in high school or active officer in organizations outside FEU, but currently, only the President is under such requirement. Moreover, precedent elections required the running candidates for the President and the Treasurer positions to have at least two semesters of residency in any FEU branch prior to the election, but this year, only the Presidency position is required to have at least one semester of residency. Last year, the fourth requirement mandated the President and the Treasurer positions of FEUCSO, Institute Student Councils and Academic organization should have a general weighted average (GWA) of 2.00 and a general percentage average (GPA) of at least 2.50. The rest of the positions should have at least a general weighted average (GWA) of at least 2.25 and a cumulative grade point average of 2.00. But this year, all the grade requirements have been voided and only the no failing grade policy is retained. Along with the above-mentioned amendments, The FEU COMELEC has also presented other amendments with the OEC. This includes three legalities which includes the elimination of FEUCSO Representative and Academic Organization Representatives, the necessity of all candidates for President and Treasurer to have attended at least one (1) seminar per semester under the CLIP-TASK organized by SDev, and that all candidates must sign a waiver of the Data Privacy Law for purposes of validating their qualifications in the position that he/she intends to run. By making the qualifications to run for candidacy more lenient, students who were not able to run for candidacy during the previous elections were now allowed and given a chance to run for candidacy either independently or under a Political Party- Isanliyab Servant Leader’s Union, Kadiwa Student Coalition or Lakas Tamaraw. Students respond to change The FEU student body had mixed reactions with the amended articles in the OEC. The presidential candidates for FEUCSO of both the Isanliyab Servant Leaders’ Union and Kadiwa Student Coalition, Russel Batoy and Reuben Sobrevilla disagreed with the amendments specifically about lowering the qualifications for this year’s candidates. Batoy, the FEUCSO presidential candidate for Isanliyab, first commended the FEU COMELEC with their decision to change the qualifications for students to be able to join the election. He said that the amendments will let the aspiring student leaders to have the chance to join the election without having the same outcome if last year’s rules were to be followed, but he had reservations. “For me, sana nagkaroon pa rin ng sa grade. Binabaan rin sana ng qualification at hindi totally tinanggal and of course para sa akin ‘yun lang naman ‘yung sa grade requirements. Kasi dapat ‘yung student leaders natin they should prioritize academics din, hindi lang naman student leadership dapat na-ba-balance, (For me, I wish a grade requirement was still included. Only the qualifications could have been lowered but not totally removed and of course for me, that’s

the only concern, the grade requirement. Because our student leaders should also prioritize their academics, not only student leadership, it should be balanced),” he expressed. On the other hand, Kadiwa’s presidential candidate for FEUCSO, Sobrevilla, completely disagreed with the amendments. He said that having ‘excellence’ as one of the Tamaraw’s core values, we shouldn’t have removed or lowered the qualifications. “I disagree with those kinds of rules, because as one of our core values, ‘excellence’, and tinaggal natin ‘yung (we eradicated the) grading requirement. Parang, naging open for all siya, nawala ‘yung standard (It seems like it became open for all, the standards vanished),” he explained. Alvin Romulo, a student with no political affiliations, also gave his opinion about the above-mentioned amendments about lowering the qualifications for running in the election. He pointed out that, having no grade requirement and minimum units are not the most important when it comes to leading the student body. “In my opinion, grades and units are not that critical when it comes to leadership. For me, a good leader should know how and can make good decisions, empathize with people; he or she ought to have a vision for the future, and of course must know the way to lead everybody there,” he expressed. He also added that what matters is a candidate or a student leader’s love for the student body and the institution he or she belongs to. He included that the person should be honest, passionate and dedicated on his or her role. Reynaldo Agnes, a Political Science professor, shared his insights and knowledge regarding the amendments as well. “Policy-making like politics is context-dependent. Meaning, its nature and functions depend on the context or environment of its operation,” he said. With the grade requirements, Agnes expressed that grades are not the best factor to consider in determining one’s capability to lead, though he expressed that in campus politics, grades are important. “Campus is a special kind of political environment where grade and extra-curricular activities must be given equal attention by the political actors - students. Joining campus politics is more than a part time job because of the fact that there’s a lot of things to do,” he explained. Agnes also gave his opinion about the amendments with residency, before students run for a leadership position. “Residence requirement is very important for a student who is seeking an office. One must be required to have stayed in the university for a semester or so, to make himself familiar with the issues around. One who is seeking an office must have grasped of issues so he/she knows the concerns of his/her fellow students,” he expressed. “Candidates who do not know the key issues and concerns of the majority might not be able to represent you in the student body government,” Agnes concluded. As a response, Delos Santos of SDev explained that the OEC is always open for changes, depending on what the student body needs in a specific time. “The Omnibus of Election is always open and is subject to changes based on the needs of the students. It is always discussed with the student leaders before its implementation,” Delos Santos explained. The birth of the Omnibus Code marked various changes which became both beneficial and disadvantageous for the candidates and for the FEU community as a whole. Lowering the standards for qualifications created opportunities for aspiring student leaders to run for this election, but some viewed it as a devaluing the embodiment of a student leader. This year’s election also accommodated an independent candidate for FEUCSO. The publication tried to reach the student COMELEC but as of writing, a response was not delivered. The voting for the elections will start from April 16-17, 2018. - with reports from Rupert Bhetz D. Marcelo PHOTOS BY RAYMOND DE DIOS, JONAS IAN IGOY


How will you promote unity among the different courses in the institute?

AJ PARAGAS (KADIWA)

We have this GPOA which is the IABF House of Representatives. This is a formal legislative body in which each academic organizations in FEU has their representative and each year level also has their representatives and which they will give a set of priority bills or resolutions that are timely and relevant in the IABF Community as of today. And this IABF House of Representatives will use this resolutions in order for this to be official.

In favor

Canvas Learning System:

in favor

Not in favor

Tuition Increase:

Not in favor

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E-Books

Not in favor

In favor

FEU Attires

In favor

Not in favor

Lower Qualification for candidates

Not in favor

In favor

Gender Neutral Restrooms

In favor

In favor

Centralized org funds

Not in favor

In favor

Org funds increase

In favor

GERALD ORIGENES (ISANLIYAB)

In IABF, we have two main courses which is Internal Auditing and Business Management and these two courses are already prone to comparisons say for example students often think that one course is much easier than the other while for us to break this stigma we have to start the change within ourselves. What do you mean by that, as an internal auditing student, we must not consider BM as people who are much less compared to us and for BM students they should not consider themselves that IA is better than BM, because if you’re going to compare BM and IA, BM has Tambiz and IA is more focused of academics. BM has so much more events compare to IA but that does not mean we are going to disregard IA on our term for the next academic year.

Do you think that instead of promoting FEU as an innovative and technology-focused university, the community should promote FEU through its artistic and cultural treasures? JOHN JOYOUS SORIANO (KADIWA) JAN DERICK ESGUERRA (ISANLIYAB)

I think when promoting something, especially in FEU, we should promote it balancedly, so we need to promote it in a technological way and at the same time we should promote culture because it’s always important that we preserve our culture. As technology arise we project that our culture is also important.

In favor

Canvas Learning System:

in favor

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Tuition Increase:

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E-Books

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FEU Attires

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Lower Qualification for candidates

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Gender Neutral Restrooms

Not in favor

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Centralized org funds

In favor

Org funds increase

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I prefer the artistic and cultural treasures in FEU because naniniwala ako na, as an architecture student, mas mahalaga makita ‘yung kagandahan ng FEU inside and outside our university, and magandang promotion nga na makita ng different universities as well na meron tayong artistic FEU na university because ‘yun ‘yung meron tayo because we are as well a heritage UNESCO site.

Do you think the IAS parliament is effective enough in addressing the needs of the students? Why or why not? Julius Alfred Maguigad ( KADIWA)

The IAS Parliament is effective because first, ‘yung mga problems ay nasasala na before pumunta sa IAS Parliament within the academic organization. So, ina-adjust na ‘yung mga problems nila and then, dadalhin ng mga representatives from the IAS Parliament and then pag naapprove na siya, doon makikita na pwede siayng dalhin sa FEU Congress which is the highest.

In favor

Canvas Learning System:

in favor

In favor

Tuition Increase:

Not in favor

In favor

E-Books

Not n favor

In favor

FEU Attires

In favor

In favor

Lower Qualification for candidates

not in favor

In favor

Gender Neutral Restrooms

In favor

In favor

Centralized org funds

Not in favor

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Org funds increase

in favor

IAS JETZI SANCHEZ (ISANLIYAB) Bilang part ako ng current administration, masasabi ko na effective ang IAS Parliament kasi nakita natin doon na nagsama-sama ‘yung eleven acad orgs at ‘yung IAS SC, at meron na tayong naipasa na isang resolution sa congress at marami pang paparating na resolutions para sa congress. Effective siya kasi ngayon nagsisimula pa lang tayo, meron na tayong strong foundation at sa paparating na administration, alam natin na mas maganda ‘yung mga resolutions na ipapasa sa congress.


Do you think receiving smaller fund compared to other institute is fair? why or why not? JOSE MICRO JOSHUA ESPINOSA (KADIWA) ALLAN SAM RAZALAN (ISANLIYAB) Canvas Learning Not in favor In favor

For me, it’s a little bit unfair naman kasi doon sa funds manggagaling lahat ng bibigay o ‘yung parang source naibibigay para sa speaker, sa mga toek and certificates. So, kapag kulang ‘yung funds ‘yung isang organization parang hindi rin sila makapag… hindi sila active magiging inactive sila dahil doon sa kakulangan sa funds.

RICA QUIJENCIO (KADIWA) I think the issues in our institute would be the having a small institute. Kasi naniniwala kami na, gusto naming as the next IN Student Council na i-disseminate lahat ng mga pangangailangan or bigyan lahat ng pangangailangan ng mga students. So ‘yung nakikita kong problema sa aming institute, nag kukulang kami sa mga estudyante at sa partisipasyon nila.

System:

In favor

Tuition Increase:

In favor

In favor

E-Books

Not n favor

In favor

FEU Attires

In favor

Not in favor

Lower Qualification for candidates

In favor

Not in favor

Gender Neutral Restrooms

In favor

Not in favor

Centralized org funds

In favor

In favor

Org funds increase

In favor

On the context of population of Institute of Education, I think it’s fair. It will just enter the quote of “Quality over Quantity,” that regardless of the small budget that the FEU is giving in the Institute of Education, I believe that we the Educistas are good at maximizing our resources. Whatever we have, I believe that we Educistas can make it creative that the other institute would recognized; that this is IE, that they are creative more than just “Educ lang.”

What are the issues in your institute and how will you address it? In favor

Canvas Learning System:

In favor

Tuition Increase:

In favor

E-Books

In favor

FEU Attires

In favor

Lower Qualification for candidates

In favor

Gender Neutral Restrooms

In favor

Centralized org funds

In favor

Org funds increase

What are the current problems in the current administration? How do you prevent it from happening next year? SABRINA CARA (KADIWA)

With the KADIWA Student Coalition, we believe na there should be a legal process with our school with the grievances. I’ve noticed kasi with our student grievances, sometimes students can’t complain and stuff like that but at the end of the day, nasa school pa rin kung they will comply with it or not. So with KADIWA Student Coalition, we believe na there should be a good process with for that.

In favor

Canvas Learning System:

In favor

Not in favor

Tuition Increase:

Not in favor

In favor

E-Books

Not n favor

In favor

FEU Attires

In favor

Not in favor

Lower Qualification for candidates

Not in favor

Not in favor

Gender Neutral Restrooms

In favor

Not in favor

Centralized org funds

In favor

Not in favor

Org funds increase

In favor

NICOLE F. LEGASPI (ISANLIYAB)

So the following problems that I’ve seen in the administration is stigmatism. There is a chance, actually, there is a situation happening that in some cases the tourism students are becoming superior in different aspects of the institute. I will break that by making both present courses in Tourism and HRM being equal. The projects that we have, it will serve as equality and egalitarianism to the whole ITM community.

PHOTOS BY RAYMOND DE DIOS, JONAS IAN IGOY, MARK BELGA, CHANEL SANTOS


4

1. What do you think is the greatest challenge that you will face after winning the election and how will you address it? Ang problema na tingin kong makakaharap ko after na manalo ako this election is, isa is political partisanship. Like if hindi full slate namin ‘yung mananalo and then how can I resolve this? Parang ginawa naming sa IAS Student Council, kung saan naging inclusive and open ako, as president sa mga suggestion ng mga co-officers ko. 2. What makes you a better student leader than your opponent? I don’t know my opponent personally, pero what I know is I have good general plan of action and it is all incorporated in my core values Equity, Social Justice and Integrity. And also, I came from the grass root, Political Science Society and I became the IAS Student Council Vice-President. So, I think ‘yung transition of my leadership is enough. 3. What are the shortcomings of the current system that you want to change and how will you do it? The problem that I want to solve is the constraint on the system. Usually kasi, outdated na ‘yung ginagamit nating student government. Like, that’s why one of my proposal is to have One FEU Constitution, kung saan mas iinovate natin ang student government structure plus iincorporate natin ang mga students’ rights. So, sa ganon, meron tayong basis kung paano ang good governance and standard inside FEU. 4. What will make you resign? I think there’s no reason for me to resign because, before I ran, I really assessed myself – my capabilities – and the pros and cons in running in FEUCSO. So, for me buo na po ‘yung loob ko dito at kapag nag-commit ako sa isang bagay, pinaninindigan ko siya hanggang huli. 5. Do you think FEUCSO should continue on releasing statements that represents the whole FEU Community without reading the pulse of the student body? I think that the first thing that the FEUCSO, being a central organization, first, is to ask the student council on their opinion about such things and consolidate the ideas, aggregate the ideas, articulate it before releasing. So, meaning, part ng Student Council sa pagbuo ng statement, hindi lamang FEUCSO alone. 6. There are cases where the voice of the students cannot reach the admin and the student leaders will defend themselves by saying, “we’re just student leaders, we’re not admins.” How are you going to bridge the sentiments of the students to the FEU admin? So, I think I don’t believe on that idea, that we’re just a student leader and we cannot intervene with the admin. I believe that as a student leader, we have to amplify the words and the will of our constituents – the students. So, sa mga ganong cases dapat ang student leader ay laging manindigan sa panig ng mga estudyante. And find a compromise between the student and the admin. 7. How will FEUCSO become active in community involvement aside from the required activities of SDEV? So, isa sa plataporma na gusto naming i-propose bilang FEUCSO Kadiwa, ay ang tinatawag naming Angat SK, kung saan tuturuan natin ang mga newly elected SK Chairman ng good governance katulong ng Political Science Department and policy making. Sa ganon ang FEUCSO ma-i-involve outside the university and makakatulong tayo sa nation building.

Canvas Learning System:

In favor

Tuition Increase:

Not in favor

E-Books

Not in favor

FEU Attires

In favor

Lower Qualification for candidates

Not in favor

Gender Neutral Restrooms

In favor

Centralized org funds

In favor

Org funds increase

Not in favor


5

1. What do you think is the greatest challenge that you will face after winning the election and how will you address it? I think that the greatest challenge that I will be facing, if ever I will win the election is the transition of the administration [Bayan’s administration] and of course, the continuity of the projects that he has started, like for example the constitutional assembly because we wanted to reform the constitution. 2. What makes you a better student leader than your opponent? I’ve been an FEU student leader for about six years now and I have encountered diverse issues and struggles of the students inside our university, and having seen such I know that together with the Isanliyab team, we want to be at the forefront of the genuine student representation and I want to bring FEUCSO closer to the students and also I always believe that the sensitivity of hallmark of leadership. 3. What are the shortcomings of the current system that you want to change and how will you do it? First, I want to commend the current administration for the projects that they’ve done, aside from routinary projects they’ve done more in the social issues, I think what they lack is what they have promised in the constitutional assembly, they’ve started and I want to continue it. 4. What will make you resign? I don’t think that there is something that will make me resign firstly because I always have this passion in me, for the past six years I’ve been serving the FEU community and I’ve never surrendered, so I don’t see any reason why I should resign or leave the position because I have invested in this starting from the preparation for the election, I don’t see any reason for me to stop, I just want to serve the FEU student community. 5. Do you think FEUCSO should continue on releasing statements that represents the whole FEU Community without reading the pulse of the student body? That’s my main concern about the last administration because I firmly believe that if we really want a genuine representation from the student body then we should ask the pulse of the student and after which maybe we can release a statement so that this student will know that this is their voice, because I want FEUCSO to be the central voice of collective actions and solutions and of course the opinion of the whole FEU community. 6. There are cases where the voice of the students cannot reach the admin and the student leaders will defend themselves by saying, “we’re just student leaders, we’re not admins.” How are you going to bridge the sentiments of the students to the FEU admin? I think, FEUCSO and the other institute and organization should be the voice of the students, and next I think the way to break idea is that you propose a project. Like for example, the grab system, the grievances of response and breakthrough system of the current administration, we have innovated it to give more platforms and avenue for the students to be actually heard. 7. How will FEUCSO become active in community involvement aside from the required activities of SDEV? What I’m proud of my slate is that these people with me, more than stories we have advocacies and I think when we do a community project it has somehow personal, it has to be something you’ve been doing before you run for the position, so I think in that way we can have more involvement in the community, a deeper involvement in the community. Canvas Learning System:

In favor

Tuition Increase:

Not in favor

E-Books

In favor

FEU Attires

In favor

Lower Qualification for candidates

Not in favor

Gender Neutral Restrooms

In favor

Centralized org funds

In favor

Org funds increase

Not in favor

PHOTOS BY RAYMOND DE DIOS, JONAS IAN IGOY


E D I TO R I A L Choice and change

Well-curated campaign materials flooding the newsfeed and robot-like individuals flashing their fellow Tamaraws with big name cards, rehearsed smiles and recycled platforms, these are the usual scenes indicating the start of the annual student elections. However, with the decrease in population brought by the implementation of K-12, a plot twist has been made to the usual election drama. Giving lesser options to the already apathetic electorate could set another record of a low-voter turnout. Some positions could also remain vacant by the end of the election if changes will not be made. But does having someone seated on the throne a definite guarantee of a student-centered leadership? With Student Development (SDev) and COMELEC decreasing the required residency, incumbency, grade requirements and dissolving representative positions, was setting the bar lower than where it originally was a good decision? It indeed opens the door for almost anyone who wants to assume. This lenient move gives the student body a wider range of options. Unfortunately, it also offers less filtered choices. If leadership experience and proof of actions will be removed from the criteria, then what will be the basis of selection for the electorates? Platforms are idealistically great but these promises will never be enough proof for the Tamaraw community to make a sound decision. Measures have been taken to adjust the elections according to the needs of the current time. Now, it is the political parties’ responsibility to offer the student body qualified leaders amidst amiable requirements. The electorates should have a hard time from choosing who to elect among the best instead of deciding which is a lesser evil pick. Changes will always be present, but so will be the power to choose. Although the changes in the Omnibus Code of Election (OCE) already shaped the roads of this election, it is still in the hands of the student-body with how this year’s election period will end. Being in a democratic state, students have the right to elect who will represent the common welfare – a choice to change the system amidst the changes in the system. We just hope that there are students that are truly qualified to run for their respective positions despite the changes made in the OCE.

Witnessing changes gradually happening around in the campus’ culture has made me realize that change is inevitable. So thank God that the erection season is the only thing that’s been consistent in my college life. I’ve alwayd the change in campus life and the students whenever the erections come around. I’ve always admired how brave these candidates are to walk around campus and approach students they’ve never met. It’s always such a pleasure to stare at them inspire the student-body to vote for them by sharing their plans that won’t even likely happen. For as long as I can remember, I always cared about the erections and made sure to always vote for the candidate with the most recognizable Earning valuable points that you can redeem after election? With all the candidates and their ideal promises, your mind must be clouded with the question: which bet should you invest your priceless vote? To have your personal interest as a return, you, advantage-seekers will invest in someone who will reward you the most. First in your ballot is your closest friend. Posting photos with long testimonies and forcing your circle to vote for him, it cannot be denied that you indeed want him to win. But in the end, what is it to you? You can brag that you have connections. An event or a concert pass, or worse, some unlawful authority may also be waiting for you.

I’ll miss the erections

face. Why? It’s because that’s the reason for erections! Would you want your University’s erection to be won by someone with a forgettable face? No! Duh! I understand that the

candidates put themselves out there because they’re trying their best to get erected into their respective office in order to get the opportunity to serve the community by conducting concerts and renting bouncy

Advantage Card

With your corrupt mind, you will support candidates who promised you an increase in fund, or project acceptance without review. If I’m going list all the ways on how students like you take advantage of elections, it will take me another term to finish.

Student elections are means where the studentbody exercises their suffrage. Unfortunately, it may also resemble warfare. Infamous for mudslinging and character degradation, elections may serve as an avenue of smallscale corruptions.

inflatables for people to enjoy! Every time a group of campaigners seek permission from our professor to campaign, I always pray that my prof would allow them to grace us with their presence. Since this is my last year in FEU, I’ll definitely miss the professionalism displayed between the party lists that we have here. Despite them donning different colors and ideologies, it’s so amazing to see their love and respect for one another - especially the alumni. In case you could tell what I was trying to do based on the title of my column and the content itself, you can drop me a message and share about what you’ll miss about the erect- I mean elections at diamond. melendres@gmail.com. If you are one of them or your intention is parallel to selfcentered benefits, let this sink in your mind (if you have a functional one). Investing your vote to earn after-election rewards may appear as a lump-sum gain but it is actually a long-term loss. Using your vote for personal benefits is like vote buying on credit. Do you want to know what you are actually exchanging? Behind every vote is a chance, and a choice, a character and a conscience. When you don’t vote with integrity, you lose no matter what advantage you gain. Leave your advantage card behind. With collective welfare in your mind, cast your votes and your thoughts at castromarissaa@gmail.com.


by Arianne Jeanel Calumbiran and Arielly-Anne Banuelos

Blue and green - two colors born to celebrate a new era of leadership in Far Eastern University (FEU); colors representing a set of visions that may differ from one another and colors illustrating the two parts of the color wheel- the student elections. Isanliyab and Kadiwa were their names: two coalitions founded upon the need for a more progressive student election. These two may be in different sides of the diagram that some may even opt to run outside their spheres, but at the end of the day, all these candidates are tasked to march their way to meet on a mutual center - a common end goal that is to ensure that the student body receives quality leadership.

New election culture

2017 marked the fading of red and orange, and signaled the foundation of the new coalitions: Isanliyab and Kadiwa. The birth of the two parties is a raised up bar in the current obstacle course that is the FEU elections. More than the usual struggles on time management and effective campaigning, the previous and current electoral candidates are expected to establish new identities and introduce new brands of leadership in the campus. While some students claim that it is to break the walls of dispute solidified by the former parties, the said change in the system is built upon the premise that integration in the nature of elections in the campus must take place so as to suit the demands of the changing time and a new generation of Tamaraw voters. “In the previous elections, there were some stringent measures imposed in order to safeguard the sanctity of the elections,” Atty. Amando Villegas Jr., the chairman of the FEU Commission on Elections (COMELEC) stated, adding that to achieve this goal, the previous and the current election periods should be handled distinctively with a more liberal approach. With this, the first candidates to march the new colors had to start from scratch, with a big amount of pressure in their midst, bearing the knowledge that the shaping of the history of the new generation of parties lies within their hands. “As any founding year of any organization, (it) should be a great start or else there is a higher chance that the following years will be a failure,” Kenneth Mendoza, the former campaign manager of Isanliyab claimed. Aside from establishing their identities, explaining the change to students has also become a major obstacle for both coalitions. Needless to say, the student body was intrigued with the sudden amendments to the point that controversies and hearsays as to why it took place circulated the campus. Amidst this, the candidates safely handled inquiries by pointing towards the bigger goal at hand to avoid negative misconceptions. “It is indeed challenging to explain the changes to students but nevertheless, that was a new start for all political parties in FEU… New set of guidelines was given that I could say really changed the political environment in FEU,” claimed Paula Manuel, the former presidential candidate of Kadiwa. However, on the other side of the coin, David Sucgang, a current independent candidate running for FEU Central Student Organization (FEUCSO) secretary claimed that the changing of colors was a mere rebranding and repackaging of the parties, yet no significant change took place. “Their content remained the same… It was probably an attempt to ‘let go of the past.’ Unfortunately for them, all that did was confuse people,” Sucgang stated. Beyond the reasons behind the sudden revisions in the system, an even bigger question is raised by the Tamaraws: did these changes truly integrate the nature and culture of elections in the campus or did it only cause unintended confusion of the student body?

Inevitable clashes

It is evident that although student leaders are walking towards a common end goal, the paths represented by their ideals and the focal points of their proposed plans of action may differ from each other. As per Mendoza, their political organization, Isanliyab focuses more on the aim for inclusivity and engagement with the student body through a “systematic progress of leadership quality.” Kadiwa, on the other hand, prioritizes the implementation of “long-term policies” to ensure quality leadership in the campus. Anthony Padua, one of the founders and a chairperson of the Kadiwa party list, claimed that elected officers should think more about longterm solutions to pressing University issues. Such political differences may serve as a healthy form of division in elections for it allows voters to align their perceived needs to the offered courses of action presented by the two factions. In contrast, non-partisans like Sucgang chose to stand outside ideologies presented by the two parties.

“There was no specific goal or vision I could ally myself with. I also believed that my platform revolving on “inclusion for all” would not be effective and genuine when running with a party,” he shared. Aside from the clashing of ideals, as many students know, campaign strategies are starting to level up. Fighting volumes of cheers and speeches in in-campus campaigns are taken to the online battlefield, where visual publicity materials and posts speak or even scream louder than spoken words. The medium is now openly utilized by current candidates to boost their campaigns. However, the anonymity it provides also became a means of being able to mudsling some student leaders. This is due to the fact that political candidates are prone to low blows under the heat of competitive elections. For Gabriel Bayan, former Isanliyab candidate and incumbent FEUCSO president, overcoming issues thrown at candidates is one of their biggest struggles. “Some of (the issues) were plainly offensive and were irrelevant. Despite that, the political party which honed my team prepared us for the many possibilities of the election so we were able to move past the challenges and become the leaders that we are today,” he shared. On the other hand, Keith Trinidad, current president of Institute of Arts and Sciences (IAS) and Kadiwa party member claimed that mind management is a key in blocking off the hate thrown towards him for maintaining a dignified composure through controversies is a mark of an excellent leader. “I just told myself that I know myself better than them, and I know that I deserved the position,” he stated. Though such disputes and issues make rounds during campaigns, they were minimal during the preceding election period as per Mendoza; describing that the “founding year” of the two parties were “a lot more peaceful than the past.” This signifies that on some level, the system changes are taking effect in liberalizing the state of elections. Further amendments, however, must still be made, according to him. This is to assure that such disputes are lessened to gain peace and harmony in the elections and that the students’ best interest is still, as described by Atty. Villegas, the “paramount concern” of student leaders.

Breaking point

At the end of the campaign road, no matter how big aspirants’ passions were to head an organization, the reality of the elections stands: some will win and assume their aspired positions, while others will lose and venture to other ways and areas to apply their honed skills in leadership. Manuel from Kadiwa, for instance, shared that it was not easy to accept her loss in the elections because she has been a part of the FEUCSO since 2014. “I took the challenge to go out of my comfort zone and venture into something new: I started my own outside organization,” Manuel stated, adding that she was able to pick her feet back up and keep herself motivated through her passion to serve. However, while it is a great challenge to accept defeat, an even bigger challenge rests in the hands of those who will assume office and take their places as leaders of the FEU community. No matter the coalition they belong to or the colors they paraded during the campaign period, blending must take place to be able to achieve cooperation and run as one unit leading the Tamaraw community. Kadiwa’s Padua claimed that “compromise and consensus” are the best ways in achieving cooperation of elected officers from opposing parties; however, the values imposed to them by the parties they represented must still stand. For Trinidad, elected leaders must set their biases aside to perform their tasks appropriately; saying that such biases “will be a hindrance for (student leaders) to serve wholeheartedly.” This statement is supported by Bayan, who claimed that student leaders must be “unifying figures” that will inspire and create a more wholesome environment for the FEU community. To achieve this, vested interests must be “set aside” for the sake of service. “The elected leaders need to be courageous enough to take a stand on issues important to them even if it means going against some of the members of their own political party,” Bayan stated. Though varying in ideals and visions, elected officers have their eyes set on a common destination; the betterment of the student body. With skyrocketing expectations for future leaders of the campus, the aftermath of the election period is what will determine the fate of the student body. After the election period, a challenge to lead by courage and example is brought to student leaders; keeping in mind that no matter the color they once bore, the only two colors that matter once positions are affixed underneath their names are the colors of the community they chose to serve: green and gold. ILLUSTRATED BY JOHN LORMER DG. DE DIOS


K A D I WA

ISANLIYAB FEUCSO

Reuben Sobrevilla John Jovial Soriano

President

Rhussel Batoy

Vice President Clarice Jane Gerona

Maricon San Antonio

Secretary

Elisa Tangalin II

Aniessa Kasan

Treasurer

Hanson Manubag

Adrian Manucduc

Auditor

Arvin Carlos

Sydney Crespo P.R.O Institute of Accounts, Business and Finance Erin Manila

Gerald Origenes Angelika Joy Paragas President Kate Manalo Charlyne Rabina Vice President Nicole Keith Bringas Secretary Nyro Chloi Mendoza Marc Bryan Punan Jancel Galindo Treasurer Dan Quidilla Auditor Adrian Gabriel San Juan Dexter Neil Solisa Ckashmere Barcelon P.R.O

Institute of Architecture and Fine Arts

President Jan Derrick Esguerra John Joyous Soriano Vice President Vicente Ballono Jr. Eric Renz Secretary Roselyn Kate Balidio Yvaness Sta. Brigida Treasurer Athena Olaez Allyssa Mendoza Auditor Danthea Marie Aquino Jester Zabat P.R.O Louize Ayrah AreĂąo Rochelle Fernandez

Institute of Arts and Sciences

Jetzi Sanchez Julius Alfred Maguigad President Calvin Sesma Danna Reitczielle MagpantayVice President Erico Tabamo Maevelyn Gelacio Secretary Marla Sosa Jassen Jhane Longaza Treasurer Brent Christian Ga-As Auditor Christopher Daniel Singh Monique Pamintuan P.R.O Katherine Resureccion

Institute of Education

Jose Micro Joshua Espinosa President

Allan Sam Razalan

Sid Patrick Uy Vice President Mariel Stephanie Vasquez Secretary Kaylene Simon Fahima Sarigala Treasurer Amabelle Dorotea Tuazon Auditor Kate R. Cadevida P.R.O

Institute of Nursing

President Rica Quijencio Renlyn Delos Santos Vice President Secretary Victoriano Battad Treasurer Jane Enrique Auditor Albert Tejano Jr. P.R.O Alva Tuliao

Institute of Tourism and Hospitality Manangement

Sabrina Porter Lowella Crison Shara Valente Mark Gonzalez Adrian Santelices Hannah Clamor

Nicole F. Legaspi President Vice PresidentCzarina Shaine Fernando Secretary Dana Krischelle C. Cruz Villarico Villarin Treasurer Auditor Carlene Angelie G. Hopida Marko Rafael S. Ramos P.R.O

PHOTOS BY RAYMOND DE DIOS, JONAS IAN IGOY, MARK BELGA, CHANEL SANTOS

Election Primer 2018  
Election Primer 2018  
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