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Bradford Review Issue 21

November 2016

Terence Jo Quinton Blanchard Tulloch

World Curry Evie Festival Manning

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Bradford Review Contents

ISSUE 21 November 2016

05 | Note From The Editor 08 | In The News

12 | Jo Quinton Tulloch 18 | Evie Manning

24 | Women of the World Festival 28 | The Brick Box

34 | Picks Of The Month 38 | What’s On?

48 | Jean McEwan

On The Cover

This month’s cover image is by Jean McEwan. If you’d like to feature on the cover send your entry to submissions@thebradfordreview.co.uk. The deadline for submissions to the next issue is November 15th.

Submissions

If you would like to contribute to the Bradford Review email submissions@thebradfordreview.co.uk, we’re always delighted to hear from writers, photographers and anyone involved in a local group or activity.

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Disclaimer

This magazine is published by Festival Publications Ltd. While every effort has been made to ensure the accuracy of content we accept no liability for any resulting loss or damage. Views expressed by contributors are their own and not those of the publisher. ©Festival Publications Ltd. All rights reserved. No reproduction or copying without permission.

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It’s a massive, shiny honour to be working on this issue of The Bradford Review, which is very deliberately femalefocussed in honour of the Women of the World Festival this month. There’s a danger that making something specifically about women can seem like a bad thing, as though we’re excluded from every other issue, but in Bradford that’s certainly not the case. Instead, we should be proud of the great women we’ve got working for us all, and use this issue to make a note of how lucky we are. We’ve got a new female Council leader in Susan Hinchcliffe, new female Chief Executive in Kersten England, plus a huge number of women working hard to add to Bradford’s cultural life. Notable mentions go to Evie Manning for programming WOWfest, Helen Barraclough for creating the Bradford Science Festival, Jo Quinton-Tulloch for heading up the Media Museum, Ally Jackel for managing Bradford Brewery, Lisa Brook for bringing Live Cinema UK screenings to the city, Jenny Eells for showcasing Bradford via the BBC’s My Bradford, Bana Gora of the Muslim Women’s Council for setting up the UK’s first female-led mosque, and to Irna Qureshi and Syima Aslam for the Bradford Literature Festival. There are so many more incredible women and not enough space to mention them, but I want to give a special shout-out to Eleanor and Rosie, co-directors of The Brick Box, who have relocated to Bradford from London to continue their national projects here. They’re also my new bosses, so I got to interview them for this issue about their surreal pasts and their plans for Bradford.

Guest Editor: Kate Wellham

Content Editor: Haigh Simpson

Proofing: Rob Walsh

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Words & Pictures: Haigh Simpson, Deb Collett Kate Wellham Aina Khan Phil Jackson

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In the News

Bradford misses out on Great Exhibition

Forest Of Light illuminates City Park

Culture Secretary Karen Bradley cited Newcastle and Gateshead’s ‘ambition’ as a major factor behind the panel’s decision, in particular the organisers’ estimate that the exhibition will attract three million people.

Running from Thursday to Sunday, the display attracted huge crowds to look at the installation which featured reed-like lights and more elaborate structures scattered around the pool.

Bradford has lost out to Newcastle and Gateshead in its bid to host the Great Exhibition Of The North.

The Exhibition is a major element of former chancellor George Osborne’s Northern Powerhouse package, with £5 million funding being made available for the exhibition and a further £15 million pledged for legacy projects. Bradford’s bid had centred around innovation and enterprise with City Park and the Media Museum earmarked as host venues.

8 In the News

After a few years away, the Forest of Light returned to City Park for four days in October to light up the dark autumnal nights.

Elsewhere in the space were large flowersculptures and a range of stalls selling hand-held light-up gizmos, all adding to the visual spectacle. The Forest of Light was another delightful and different use of the space and attracted many down to the centre of Bradford to enjoy some moments of tranquillity, peace and reflection, in both senses of the word.


Sports awards return for 2017

Exhibition celebrates father of photography

The life, work and inventions of William Henry Fox Talbot, inventor of modern photography, are presented in a major exhibition at the National Media Museum, Bradford. Fox Talbot: Dawn of the Photograph - 18 November, 2016 to 5 February, 2017, free entry - features more than 200 images and objects, including a selection of the earliest cameras and photographs in existence as well as original documents relating to some of the first experiments in photography. Talbot became interested in the idea of the photograph in 1833 during a trip to Italy. Having traced with a pencil a landscape as seen through the lens of a Camera Lucida, he was inspired to start work on a process that directly reproduced the ‘inimitable beauty of the pictures of nature’s painting, which the glass lens of the camera throws upon the paper’. The exhibition features some of the original apparatus used by the British inventor, including the famous ‘Mousetrap’ camera, his Calotype Camera, and a Camera Obscura.

The Bradford Sports Awards will return to The Bradford Hotel on Thursday 2 March 2017. Nineteen awards across five categories will recognise and celebrate the outstanding achievements of individuals, teams, volunteers and organisations at every level of sport in Bradford district.

Secret gigs in Bradford

Bradford is the latest city to be added to the global Sofar Sounds movement that sees music lovers sign up to mystery gigs held in cities across the world. Events are held in secret locations with fans signing up for an event knowing only a rough location for the venue and not who is playing.

Visit our website for more up to date news www.thebradfordreview.co.uk

In the News 9


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Challenging the Fabric of Society A textile exhibition opening at The Peace Museum on Nov 11th 2016 - Jan 20th 2017

Opening Hours Wednesday - Friday 10:00 - 16:00 The Peace Museum 10 Piece Hall Yard (off Hustlergate, opposite the Wool Exchange)

The Peace Museum holds a unique and varied textile collection, including handmade banners and quilts that have been used at some of the most important peaceful protests and demonstrations of the 20th and 21st centuries. The exhibition will showcase these textiles across the galleries. With a vibrant mix of colour and handmade craftsmanship, these textiles bring to life peace campaigns and tell the stories of those who have campaigned for peace.

Special Opening Event – Thursday 17th November 2016 5.30pm till 7.30pm. Including talks by textile specialists. Free, all welcome. Visit www.peacemuseum.org.uk for more! With generous support from The Textile Society. In partnership with Bradford Libraries WW1 Reading Rug. The Peace Museum is an Accredited Museum, Registered Charity No 1061102, Registered Company No 3297915.

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Jo QuintonTulloch

The Director of the Media Museum discusses the challenges facing the museum sector and what the future holds for the museum. by Haigh Simpson 12 Lead Feature


As the director of the National Media Museum, Jo Quinton-Tulloch holds one of the most culturally significant roles in Bradford. At a time when the museum sector is facing heavy funding cuts and increasing scrutiny, it’s her job to ensure the Museum remains relevant and is able to inspire and educate those who use it. Three years into the role she has overseen the start of a major strategic realignment that has attracted both praise and scrutiny from the public and media. She has also helped to commission a range of original, often groundbreaking, exhibitions that have been enjoyed by an annual audience of almost half a million. She spoke to the Bradford Review about her role and the future of the Museum. Q. Can you explain a bit more about your role and what it involves? I am the Director of the National Media Museum. I guess what that means is that I am in charge of the strategic direction of the Museum. And also the day-to-day management. I’m responsible for a small team of people with a very varied skill set and overall we’re responsible for the collections we hold. But it’s more than just looking after those collections, what we’re really about is making sure as many people as possible have as much opportunity to understand, see, experience and learn from those collections.

Q. What’s your background and how did it bring you to where you are now? My background is in science, and my first degree was in biology. I love science because it is so relevant to the world. It is our world and it’s what makes our world tick. But as much as I love it I didn’t want to carry on being a science researcher working in a lab, I wanted to work with people. So I travelled for a while and then did a masters course in science communication. It was very new at the time but it was basically science journalism. We studied how to cover science through television, print, radio and through museums. At the time I actually thought I wanted to go into television, but as I went through the course I realised museums are

the richest place to communicate science you can imagine. With TV you only have the one medium, whereas in a museum you can use several mediums at the same time. I think it’s one of the best places to inspire people and help them understand the impact science has on their lives.. So I started my career as an explainer at the Science Museum and I’ve worked in a number of roles in different museums. I moved up to Bradford three years ago to take up the challenges that we face here.

Q. What are the most rewarding parts of what you do and what motivates you? I think in part it’s seeing people in our Museum and in our galleries having a fantastic time. It’s that simple. Sometimes it’s watching families come together and having a really rich conversation about something they have seen or done. Or it’s seeing a lightbulb moment, watching school children have that moment of understanding. It really demonstrates what impact the museum is having on their lives and these are experiences that you hope they will take away with them and apply to all other aspects of their lives and their work

Lead Feature 13


A big part of that is seeing where our opportunities lie. We’re part of the Science Museum group, and our collections are all about the technology of film, photography and television. So what we have been doing is making sure we are really clear about where our priorities lie and where our focus and emphasis are going to be in the future. We spent a lot of time talking to local We have been undergoing significant change for more than two years now and the stakeholders and local schools and they have all been telling us that STEM - Science, decision to move the Royal Photographic Society collection was a very small part of a Technology, Engineering and Maths - is really much bigger revisioning of this Museum. The important and that we can have a significant role in supporting local schools to be better museum sector is facing many challenges engaged by drawing the STEM from our and yet we need to make sure we increase collections. our visitor numbers, we need to be better connected, we need to find different ways of So for the last two years we have been working. So you have to think differently, to realigning around the STEM agenda and be constantly thinking about the future. All that puts us in a much stronger position. It of the changes we have been making have means we can be better placed to attract been about ensuring that this museum has a new funding and we have been doing all sustainable and secure future. sorts of things to help realise that vision.

Q. The plans to rebrand the Museum and transfer large parts of its photography collection to London’s V&A were branded by some as cultural vandalism. Was this reaction justified and how do you defend the decisions that were made at the time?

14 Lead Feature


The collections move was just a part of that process. It was a part of us moving towards making sure that the collections we do hold here are absolutely relevant to the vision of the Museum. The ones we are passing on to the V&A are very strongly aligned with art, history and photography and we are not going to be taking that forward. So it makes better sense to make those collections available to a wider number of people by giving them to an institution that can make them more visible than we can.

Q. How important is the Museum as an ambassador for Bradford? Really important. It’s not just that we think this, we know because people tell us. The Museum is an essential part of the cultural landscape here in Bradford. We recognise that. We are free, we have significant collections and we have a huge opportunity to support people’s learning and help people grow and think differently. I don’t underestimate just how important that is for Bradford, which is why we are working so hard to ensure it has a sustainable future.

for funders. It’s a bit of a vicious circle because in order to do that you need to be a successful institution. We’re opening a brand new gallery in March next year called Wonderlab. This is a new hands-on interactive gallery which is all about light, sound and perception. Because they’re the scientific principles that underpin our core collections of photography, film and television. We are essentially trying to provide a more cohesive narrative for the Museum. Down the line we have plans for a £5 million new set of galleries which will showcase our object collections. They will come through in 2021 and we will be putting in bids for funding to support that over the next six to twelve months.

Q. Is there an event or exhibition during your time here you’re particularly proud of ? Every exhibition we have done since I have been here has been very different and I feel very passionately that we should always be taking risks and trying new things. The only way you are ever going to improve is by being ambitious and testing yourselves. So they have all been very varied and I have enjoyed all of them.

Q. What are the biggest challenges facing the Media Museum at the moment and We did a fantastic thing last year where we how can they be overcome? All cultural institutions are facing a difficult economic situation and we are no different. We are now operating at 30% less in real terms than we were in 2010. So we’re having to think differently about how we can continue to deliver new exhibitions, galleries and learning opportunities. We all want to continually refresh the Museum and we recognise how important that is in terms of making people want to come back. One of the ways of tackling that is making yourself an attractive proposition

commissioned an artist called Liz West, who produced a fantastic light installation which had over 300 different neon tubes and mirrors on the walls. That was a great example of trying something new.

In terms of our collections, two years ago we did an exhibition called Nature, Camera, Action, which was all about the challenges that nature photographers and filmmakers face when they’re trying to capture animals. It allowed us to cut across all our collections and made for a very rich exhibition.

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Evie Manning

Evie Manning, director of Common Wealth, talks to Deb Collett of Artworks Creative Communities.

18 Lead Feature


“To me, theatre is a space for exploring, looking and feeling about the world, with other people. You can start some conversations which otherwise don’t necessarily happen except in private. It opens things out a bit. Our theatre is about finding meaning beyond words and allowing things to be quite open so the audience can interpret for themselves. It’s about opening it up, rather than fixing things down which I think is sometimes what a lot of our literary theatre traditions do. “What most offended me - and still does offend me - is sitting in a theatre and being passive and being told things and not being able to have any agency. So right from early on I was really interested in the audience’s role, and what power you’ve got if you’ve got people together for an hour. Actually how much you can inspire or empower or change your audience and not just have this kind of passive audience that receives things.” Waiting in a car park to be guided to a house on Thorpe Edge estate, I had little idea of just how active I was going to be as part of the audience of Our Glass House by Common Wealth - a scrupulously researched piece, inspired by an ambulance arriving at the house of a neighbour of Evie’s, exposing the sustained and violent attacks that had been going on. Having studied drama at Goldsmiths, Evie turned away from theatre and immersed herself in more directly political activity. But thankfully, she returned to theatre as a medium for change and with Common Wealth has developed a distinctive voice. “It’s really important in all our work that people are moved. Political change is not going to come from people thinking about it. It’s going to come about from people feeling – feeling moved physically, gutturally – and that happens quite seldom. Unashamedly we (Common Wealth) were determined to be emotional about this. We are not going to make political theatre that’s dry or too academic or intellectual. We are going to make theatre that’s got an emotional connection, that’s physically and emotionally powerful.” Our Glass House inhabited an ex-council house, transforming it so the audience

moved from room to room, sharing space closely with characters trapped by domestic violence. Their meticulously created environments reflected back their experience and survival - the violent chaos of the fractured furniture of a middle class woman who had endured decades of abuse, the resourceful, isolated woman who hid an escape route behind the wallpaper, the child who always seemed to be on the periphery of your vision no matter where you were. It was up to you to decide where to be throughout. I was painfully conscious of the choices I made throughout that evening. The play toured extensively, winning awards and acclaim, but its main achievement from Evie’s perspective is that people who saw it wanted to do something - they were moved to action. In Edinburgh, although part of the festival, it was on Wester Hailes estate and drew the audience from local residents. The back wall of the garden was emblazoned with ‘You are witnesses’. Evie emphasised the importance of representation in Common Wealth’s work - it’s through recognition of their own experience that audiences can connect with the play. This does not have to be literal, but it does have to be authentic, substantial and honest. Lead Feature 19


No Guts No Heart No Glory illustrated this really well. A fast-paced promenade performance in a boxing gym that really packed a punch. Five young Bradford Muslim women fighting their way into the future, testing each other, pushing boundaries, facing their fears, all to a nightclub soundtrack. It was an exhausting and exhilarating experience. It had begun with anger and frustration at the prevailing image of young Muslim women - it jarred with reality, with lived experience. So Common Wealth set about creating a piece that was rooted in the reality of young, Bradford Muslim women who box, and could resonate with the hunger, hope and ambition that working class youth inhabit. And they don’t get much of a lookin these days.

20 Lead Feature

“Often, we don’t see ourselves on stage. In so much mainstream media, you just don’t see yourself. At the minute, I’m really aware of how much regional accents are side-lined. In kids’ TV today, nobody sounds like they’re from anywhere - we used to have Byker Grove and Grange Hill and kids sounded like they were from somewhere. But now, most of the things you hear have no connection to place. It diminishes the reality, it makes it a nonplace. Our work is about acknowledging we are from somewhere and that we’re complex beings. Common Wealth is interested in truthful representation of that sense of place and complexity, and resistance of defining and labelling people.” “No Guts No Heart No Glory worked so well because it connected with young Aboriginal people in Australia as much as it connected with young, black guys in London, with young Pakistani women in Bradford or white Scottish lads in Edinburgh - because it was about that thing of wanting to be better. Essentially, if you boil it all down, it wasn’t about being a Muslim female boxer. It was about wanting to be better,


being yourself, being truthful, realising your potential.” Evie is currently working on developing Common Wealth’s next long-term project in Port Talbot. Based on extensive interviews with local steelworkers and located in an old tin works – she can’t say much more at the moment except, “That’s the quest we’re on. How do you move an audience from being passive to active?” She is wrestling with being true to the specific experience of those workers and their industry and finding ways to link it and open up to the global movements of capital and the trail of despair and destruction it leaves in its wake. She remains positive about the potential of theatre. “I believe in theatre’s power as a counter challenge to mainstream media, which is getting blander, more controlled and more corporate. Theatre hopefully can’t be contained in these ways, so there is more of a role to play. I hope that people will look to make theatre and go to theatre as a way of seeing themselves and hearing their voice, so it’s not all defined by what you see on the TV.”

somebody and they can tell that something strange or powerful has happened to you. And I feel we’re all on quests for that. We all want to have experiences that move us. So I think there’s a strange hunger for it, and the ripples spread out. Especially when you’re talking about society and people and culture and how we live together and who we are. I feel there is no space where those things are debated. It’s rare to find spaces where you can open up your brain a little bit to explore how you think and feel about the world.” This November, Bradford is bursting with opportunities and spaces to do just that - WOW, Wild Woods on Darley Street, Wur up at Kirkgate Market. Come on and explore that strange hunger.

Evie has also been the programmer for Bradford Women of the World, which is running November 4 – 6 2016 at Kala Sangam. We are all well chuffed that Bradford is the first UK venue for WOW outside London, and that there is a commitment to have it here for two more years. Evie is very upbeat about the programme and the legacy. A strong team of volunteers are already developing ideas for what comes after, and it really fits the positive and creative mood in Bradford. Evie waxes lyrical about the power of theatre. “For me, the beauty of theatre is unexplainable – you can’t actually articulate what’s happened. You’ve just got this feeling that you transmit. There’s this little ripple you might have a small conversation with Lead Feature 21


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Women of the World Festival The Southbank Centre’s Women of the World Festival comes to Bradford to celebrate female achievements and the role women play in society by Aina Khan

Women of Bradford, unite! For the first time, Southbank Centre’s WOW – Women of the World Festival will be coming to Bradford on 5 - 6 November. The innovative Festival celebrates and recognises the achievements of women and girls and takes a frank look at what stops them achieving their potential. Since it was founded by Jude Kelly CBE at London’s Southbank Centre in 2010, WOW has fast become the largest women’s festival movement in the world, taking place across five continents in countries from Pakistan to the USA. Supported by Spirit Of 2012, Southbank Centre is pushing out its global WOW network of festivals to create nine new WOWs in five cities across the UK to mark one hundred years since suffragettes won the right to vote, in 2018. The best news is that Bradford is the only northern city to host one of these WOWs, AND it will be coming back to the city for the next two years! WOW Bradford will take place at Kala Sangam Arts Centre and Bradford Cathedral this year.

WOW is an incredible opportunity for hundreds of women and men, boys and girls from across the city to come together under one roof and celebrate the achievements of women and girls. From music, dance, theatre, performance, poetry, comedy, food – and even boxing - come along, meet new people, and get stuck in. There’ll be something for everyone! WOW also creates a safe space to talk about hard-hitting issues which affect women and girls not just on a local level, but nationally and internationally as well. From domestic abuse; prostitution; grooming; FGM; shame, body image; men and feminism; including an exciting line-up of workshops such as a Beyoncé dance masterclass; Ju-Jitsu workshops; an under-10 feminist corner; and a herbalist workshop - no stone will be left unturned! WOW Bradford is proud to include local organisations at the festival, such as Staying Put, 4women, Karma Nirvana, WUR Bradford, Mind the Gap Studios, Dance United, White


Some of the highlights of the Festival include: •

Nobel Peace Prize Winner Malala Yousafzai, who joins young women from across Bradford on 5 November to talk about how they would like to reorganise their community – and the world – and the actions they will take to achieve it.

Labour MP Naz Shah, founder of Karma Nirvana Jasvinder Sanghera, and Irish Times journalist Róisín Ingle​discuss the universal issue of shame and the Samia Shahid honour-killing case.

Salma Yaqoob ​and Bea Campbell t​alk about women in power and whether it leads to a more equal society.

Kersten England​, Chief Executive of Bradford Council, Naz Shah MP​and Fiona Macaulay​from the University of Bradford Peace Studies department speak on the pioneering foremothers of Bradford who have been lost to history, in Badass Women From Bradford.

Writer Kay Mellor OBE,​campaigners and women from local prostitution services discuss Band Of Gold twenty years after it was televised, and how the landscape has changed.

Asif Quraishi​(whose alter-ego is Muslim drag Queen Asifa Lahore), ​Bradford Bulls’ Omari Caro​and Imam Alyas Karmani​discuss what men bring to the table when it comes to gender equality.

Spoken word artist and basketball coach Asma Elbadawi d​elivers a basketball and spoken word workshop.

Bradford will be honoured for its status as a City Of Sanctuary for refugees and refugee women from various backgrounds.

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Ribbon Campaign, Equity Partnership, E5 project, Peacemakers International, and Tapepuka, as well as local activists and national speakers. Programming the festival is Bradford’s very own Evie Manning. Her award-winning theatre production of No Guts, No Heart, No Glory — telling the story of five Muslim female boxers from Bradford — was a knock-out success when it was featured at Southbank Centre’s WOW - Women of the World festival in 2015. She said, “We’ve been planning the festival with the girls and women, boys and men of Bradford for the past eight months and it’s been a really exciting journey, watching the festival take shape and getting the various volunteer training programmes off the ground. There’s so many brilliant women in Bradford and we hope having everyone together under one roof for the weekend will spark off discussions, ideas and meetings of minds that generate lots of positive action in Bradford in the future.

26 Community Feature

“We’re confident people will travel to the city especially for WOW Bradford to hear some of the amazing speakers who are taking part, to get involved in the many exciting workshops and fun activities that are on offer and to check out the WOW Bradford Marketplace.” Make sure you don’t miss out on what will be a truly memorable and inspiring festival for women and girls in Bradford. You can view the full programme at: https://issuu.com/ southbank_centre/docs/wow_bradford_2016_ brochure_final/1 To book, please call Southbank Centre Ticket Office on 0207 960 4200 or book online at www.southbankcentre.co.uk/ whatson/festivalsseries/wow-bradford


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The Brick Box The women responsible for the Wild Woods project on Darley Street reflect on a colourful past and share their vision for a Bradford of the future. by Kate Welham 28 Lead Feature


As a new recruit to arts organisation The Brick Box, I was immediately thrown into the beautiful chaos of transforming a former department store on Darley Street into The Wild Woods, and preparing for the Independent Street Arts Network to bring their national summit to Bradford. What I hadn’t had time to do was speak to my two new bosses about why they relocated from London, and what that might mean for Bradford. Thanks to the Bradford Review, I got to find out about Rosie’s international incidents, Eleanor’s unfortunate experience with Vanessa Feltz’s custard, and lots more. Kate: What did you do before you were The Brick Box? Rosie: I was working in book publishing, before that I was a journalist for a brief interlude in the revolution in South America, but in more recent years I was volunteering at a place called Shunt in London Bridge. Literally underground, it was a live art venue in the tunnels under the station, which is where Eleanor and I met.

Kate: I’m going to have to go into the whole revolution bit. Did you study as a journalist? Rosie: No, what I did study was Medieval Dream Poetry. For my dissertation I wrote post Chaucerian verse, and read it in that stupid voice. And then decided that I was going to join the revolution in South America. I went and lived with the Zapatistas for a while in the jungle in Mexico, and then I went out to document the re-election of Hugo Chavez in Venezuela, and did some sort of documentary work around the effects of the cocaine trade in Columbia, before having to flee the country, and live on an organic farm in Ecuador for a while where I almost got my leg amputated because I got an infection, so then I had to leave and go to Bolivia where I had a paragliding accident, which is why I think I cracked my rib recently from coughing.

Kate: And I thought moving to Bradford when you come from the Isle of Wight would be a culture shock? Rosie: No, it’s actually quite calm in comparison with some of the places I’ve been. Eleanor: I started off in Bradford, worked with kids in care, and homeless young people and then tried to get into television, which was not very successful. I worked for Granada for a bit and worked on some really awful lifestyle TV. Have you heard of Men and Motors? It’s basically tits and cars, I worked on that. I also worked on a taste testing programme and had to heat up custard for Vanessa Feltz and it wasn’t hot enough so I got shouted at. I often ended up crying in the toilets because it was so awful. Then in my thirties I had a bit of a mad time in Brighton, had my flat repossessed, and hit my own personal crisis. I was feeling really shit because I felt like I didn’t know what I was supposed to be doing. I was trying to be creative myself, as well as trying to help other people be creative but I felt like I didn’t really know how to do it, and I didn’t know who I was, and I’d fucked everything up. And then my friend Lisa took me to this place, Shunt, for Christmas during my rock bottom period and I just fell in love with it, and decided I had to get a job there. I volunteered for months doing absolutely everything I could to be useful

Lead Feature 29


and then I asked for a job and they said ‘yeah, alright then’. It was the first time in my life I felt I’d come straight out and asked for what I really wanted and I think it was a turning point. Then I met Rosie there, and we had some amazing experiences, and we developed a brilliant relationship and we did some ace things together. I moved to Bradford to run The Playhouse for a year in 2009, then I went back to London and founded The Brick Box in 2010. We started in Brixton Village Market, and six years later we’re here. It’s been quite an adventure. Rosie: Eleanor and I have had very different backgrounds and experiences, but it’s like our shared values which make it work together really well. We’re both aiming for this thing that we agree on on a very elemental, political, social level and the rest of it is just how we get there.

30 Lead Feature

Kate: Are there a lot of women in the arts? Eleanor: In some ways yes, but I have to say I have come across a fair few male-led arts organisations where there are a lot of women working in them but there’s a bloke in a hat who is supposedly running everything, and then loads and loads of women called Sophie grafting behind the scenes, about 50 of them. Rosie: No offence to Sophies Eleanor: What was irritating to me when I was working at Shunt was that all these people would apply for jobs there, and in the arts generally, who are all quite similar with similar backgrounds, and often have a sense of entitlement and they haven’t really got much actual life experience. So one of the things I did was recruit people who were often much older from different sorts of backgrounds, didn’t necessarily have experience in the arts, and what I found was that they were often more interesting because they had a different mindset and they’d come in with different sorts of ideas, and so for us life experience is more important than traditional art experience.


Kate: What do you think the people of Bradford might think of as art and what are you actually bringing them?

doing all sorts and getting involved in stuff and that includes art. Whatever we might mean by art.

Rosie: Many people seem to think of art as pictures on walls, or maybe something really inaccessible that only rich people or idiots like. The kind of stuff we do is all live and almost always interactive, so already that’s quite different from what most people think of as ‘I’m going to see some art’, it’s actually more like ‘being some art for a bit’.

Rosie: They come up to you and ask ‘what are you doing? What’s it for?’

Eleanor: And being a bit irreverent about what it is. People get very uptight about curating and think ‘what about this’ and ‘how will you do that’ and ‘how will you ensure the quality’. If you wanted to play some sport on a Sunday afternoon and there’s some kids kicking a football about with Tyskie for goalposts and some other kids playing basketball and someone else playing on a skateboard, they’re all still having fun in the park, it doesn’t matter, it doesn’t always have to be this streamlined, disciplined thing where everyone’s got to be all lined up and someone in charge has to blow a whistle before they’re allowed to do sport. I saw that in Manningham Park and was like ‘yes, I’ll have that for my art metaphor’. I’ve heard arts professionals talk about how to overcome ‘threshold fear’ in museums and stuff, but we wouldn’t have threshold fear if people thought it was more fun in there or if the stuff wasn’t behind a threshold in the first place.

Kate: Have you seen much threshold fear in Bradford so far with The Wild Woods? Rosie: No, people are charging in like ‘when are you open?’ Eleanor: Yeah that is very true. People might think of Bradford as an underconfident place generally because as a city we have a lot of challenges, but actually I think we can be very confident. People seem to be up for

Eleanor: Bradford folk are really bold and they want to get in it. That’s the great joy of doing stuff here. Rosie: I find Bradford really interesting and quite surreal. Creatively it’s an interesting place to be, because on many levels capitalism is obviously failing, there’s lots of empty space, whether it’s a mill or flats that aren’t rented out. There’s a large Muslim population in a time of rising Islamophobia, there are a number of challenges Bradford faces which I think the rest of Britain is a little bit behind in starting to face. It’s the future whether you like it or not. I used to visit Eleanor when she was working at The Playhouse and I remember my first ever time standing outside thinking ‘what is this place? It’s like the Wild West’. People were really welcoming and really friendly, which I didn’t expect, but it was also really lawless, and beautiful and dark and dilapidated. That’s the stuff that really drew me to the place, it’s really exciting and there’s some really unusual characters here as well.

Kate: What are your big plans for Bradford? Rosie: We’ve got this outdoor arts conference at the end of October, so there’s going to be over 200 arts professionals coming to Bradford and we’ll be hosting them in The Wild Woods. I think personally it’s an interesting proposition which will be demonstrated by that weekend when we take them round and introduce them to people. And show them this could be a place to make work, to collaborate, to produce new and exciting projects in the future. Lead Feature 31


Eleanor: I think we need to get hold of all the derelict mills before some other fucker does. Seeing all the awful things that have happened in Brixton and other places with developers just moving in and totally minesweeping everything and changing the entire cultural feel of the place. I want to see community ownership and shared ownership and mixed use developments, and live-work spaces and all the things people talk about. We don’t want it to just morph into Leeds or morph into a London-type place, and it will, because that’s how capitalism works. It’s relentless and it will eat us up if we let it. We’ve got a lot on our plates at the moment but we’ve still got an eye on this as a plan. Rosie: We’re starting to look into models of community development and purchasing. Eleanor: There’s are lots of funds to develop these things, there’s Heritage Lottery and social investment pots of money and Key Fund and all those kinds of things. We haven’t got time right now but it’s massively on our radar to look at it 32 Lead Feature

in the near future. The pop-up thing is an absolute joke, there’s no point having popup things that disappear again and don’t mean anything to anybody, it’s got to be wider, and it’s got to include housing, work spaces and involve genuinely integrated communities. Rosie: These sorts of ideas are fairly new as models in the UK and I think it can be quite hard to convince people that it’s a good idea, because it’s not possible to point to similar working things. There are on the continent. Eleanor: It’s very exciting actually, because we’ve got the opportunity in Bradford to do something different, and to lead the way. It might look like we’re backwards to some people in some ways, but actually we’re dealing with issues now that other cities are going to be dealing with down the line, and we can find ways to actually do things better and lead the way and demonstrate best practise and that’s what I think we can be. Rosie: And we’ve got curry and beer to sustain us all in our mission.


UNIVERSITY OF BRADFORD

“Home to some of the boldest and most interesting work in the region.” Yorkshire Post

SUPPORTING NEW WORK BY INNOVATIVE ARTISTS THEATRE * LIVE ART * DANCE * SPOKEN WORD

Our new Autumn/Winter 2016 season is now live at:

WWW.BRADFORD.AC.UK/THEATRE


Picks of the Month

Bob Pegg @ The Topic Folk Club

Bob Pegg was one of the hotter talents in the British folk-rock boom of the late 1960s and early 1970s. He had previously cut a pair of albums on Transatlantic Records with his wife Carole, who sang and played the fiddle. They organised Mr Fox, a moderately successful folk-rock band of the turn of the decade, which stayed together for two years. The Peggs’ marriage split up in 1971 around the same time that Mr Fox ceased to exist, but they both continued to record for a time for Transatlantic. Since then Bob has remained active as a singer, songwriter, and recording artist. He cut one duet album with his former bandmate Nick Strutt, who also worked with Bob on his second album. Topic Folk Club 17 November 8.30pm at Glyde House, Little Horton Lane, BD5 0BQ

34 Picks of the Month

Dick Whittington by The Bradford Players

The Bradford Players are bringing their take on the classic pantomime Dick Whittington to the Bradford Playhouse between 23 and 27 November 2016. This wonderful pantomime is filled with fun, laughter, great songs, dances and wonderful costumes as the audience follow the adventures of Dick Whittington on his way to London to make his fame and fortune. Carol Green, who has performed with the Bradford Players on stage many times, had originally written the pantomime for a school and has extended and adapted it for these performances. Jeni North, who has been one of the Players’ principal dancers for some time has taken on the role of choreographer. Tickets £12/£10. www.thebradfordplayers.co.uk.


Visit our website for more events www.thebradfordreview.co.uk

Maja Bugge @ Delius Arts Centre

On Friday 11 November Norwegian cellist Maja Bugge performs at Jazz @ The Delius. The acoustics and atmosphere of this intimate venue will make this a rare and remarkable performance. Maja has more than 20 years of professional experience working both as a solo artist and in collaboration with organisations such as Lancaster Arts, the National Theatre Oslo and ULTIMA Festival Oslo. On the Northern Line tour she performs music inspired by the simultaneously beautiful and brutal landscapes of the north of Norway, where she was born and brought up. Maja’s unique sound, as evidenced on Shelter (Euredice, 2012) explores stillness and repetition, harmony and dissonance. Her music balances melody and rhythm with external ambience, acoustics and atmosphere.

Yorkshire Games Festival

The National Media Museum is bringing the big names in video games to Bradford for a brand new five-day event, the Yorkshire Games Festival, from 9–13 November. With workshops, big-screen demos, and keynote talks from games designers, writers and developers, this is a chance to get insights into the industry like never before. The Festival will focus on games culture, design and production, with workshops, master classes and networking opportunities, as well as showcases from major games studios and professionals. Whether you’re new to the industry, studying games design or development, or just want to come and enjoy playing games, this is the festival for you. www.nationalmediamuseum.org.uk

Tickets £10/£8 www.artworkscreative.org.uk Picks of the Month 35


High energy street theatre, dance, pyrotechnics & fireworks

CHRISTMAS LIGHTS

SPECTACULAR 19 November, 5-6pm City Park, Bradford

FREE

www.cityparkbradford.com

#BDXmas


3 CASK CIDER, ALES, LAGERSPREMIUM RANGE & A OF SPIR ITS

RRY U C FREERY EVE NESDAY WEDM 6.30 FRO

25 North Parade BD1 3JL 07545283950


What’s On? Tuesday 1 November

Subveillance – curated by Helen Kaplinsky

All month, Gallery II, University of Bradford This exhibition focuses on the alternative and counter-cultural activity in and around The University of Bradford over the course of half a century, where art has been a means to surveil and speak back to institutions of power whilst creating grassroots networks of mutual support and security. www.bradford.ac.uk/gallery

Wednesday 2 November Mary Poppins

Until 10th December, The Alhambra Theatre The magical story of the world’s favourite Nanny arriving on Cherry Tree Lane has been triumphantly and spectacularly brought to the stage with dazzling choreography, incredible effects and unforgettable songs. www.bradford-theatres.co.uk/

Novi_sad - Mort Aux Vaches

8pm, Fuse Art Space Amplified environmental recordings, drone manipulations, structured ambient soundscapes, microtones vs overtones, all come together in a hyper structure of iconoclastic form. Novi_sad’s artistic output displays a high level of technical ability, as well as a sensitivity to the nuances of location. www.wearefuse.co

Film Screening: THARLO

7.30pm, Kala Sangam A rare chance to see a critically acclaimed drama feature about a Tibetan shepherd and his struggle to come to terms with modern Chinese society. www.reelsolutions.co.uk

38 What’s On?

WEDNESDAY @ ONE

1.00pm, Bradford Cathedral The season of weekly lunchtime organ recitals continues with Cathy Lamb from Lichfield. Recitals start at 1.00pm and are free with a retiring collection. Tel. 01274 777720. www.bradfordcathedral.org

Thursday 3 November

The Simon & Garfunkel Story

7.30pm, The Alhambra Theatre Direct from its success in London’s West End, a SOLD OUT UK tour and standing ovations at every performance, The Simon & Garfunkel Story is back! Using huge projection photos and original film footage for this 50th anniversary performance. http://www.bradford-theatres.co.uk/

AME presents: Miki Yui / Ben Gwilliam and Ryoko Akama

8pm, Fuse Art Space AME presents the first UK tour from Miki Yui, a Japanese musician who has worked with Rolf Julius, Carl Stone (Realistic Monk) and the former husband Klaus Dinger. Support comes in the form of the new duo project from Ben Gwilliam + Ryoko Akama. www.wearefuse.co

James Taplin & Mick Holmes

8pm, Al’s Dime Bar Popular South Yorkshire Blues Duo.

Chaplains of the First World War Until 26th November, Bradford Cathedral The bravery of the chaplains – often on the front line but unarmed - is not well known. this exhibition tells their stories. all welcome - free entry donations appreciated. www.bradfordcathedral.org

Friday 4 November Resilience and Butterfly

7pm, Kala Sangam Arts Centre (runs until 20th December) In Resilience, Jill facilitated the women to explore domesticity through an ordinary object such as a tea towel, hanging like a banner of strength. Shy Burhan spent six weeks working extensively to document the brilliant work of the survivors of domestic abuse, particularly in ‘The Butterfly’ art workshops and the healing process that unfolds through the medium of art and this work is presented as ‘Butterfly’. The Butterfly Project was funded by Staying Put. www.kalasangam.org

Jatpjazz: Eyeshutight

8.30pm - Glyde House THE Musical steal of the century exemplifies the jazz class which is eyeshutight - a real beacon of originality. Compared with Esbjorn Svensson, Avishai Cohen and Jarrett/Haden/Motian, their unique blend of accessible, melodic compositions, fiery, expansive improvisation and engaging stage presence make them an unmissable band. £7 / £5 (members). Tel. 01274 271114

Funkin’ Soul

6pm - 4am, 1in12 club Our monthly funk, soul, ska, reggae, hip hop and breakbeat night returns with a full night of DJ’s and a live band featuring ‘DJ Astral Trip’ (dance punk, nu-disco) and ‘2 Kool Tony’ alongside house DJs ‘Sleazy G’ and ‘Hashfinger’. Late running event so get yer (comfortable) dancing shoes on! £4 members/£5 Guests. Vegan/ Veggie cafe open 6-9 with music starting at 8PM.

Natural Rhythm

8pm, Al’s Dime Bar Well known local Ska legends.


Wine tasting

8pm, The 1875 University of Bradford Russian Society - ALL WELCOME. £8 non members.

Saturday 5 November

Jerry Sadowitz: Comedian, Magician, Psychopath!

7.30pm, The Alhambra Theatre With his unique combination of comedy, hatred, and card tricks, every moment is guaranteed to make you feel better about YOURSELF as Jerry bangs on about some pish or other. Last week it was about how much he wanted Beth Tweddle, this week it could be about the Higgs particle. One thing’s for sure. Whatever he says, it will be ripped off. Except the card tricks. You have to be bl**dy good to do them. Tickets £24. www.bradford-theatres.co.uk/

Sub:Cult

9pm-4am, 1in12 club Sub:Cult featuring Galvatron.

Saltaire Record & Retro Fair

10am - 3.30pm, Caroline Social Club Up to 20 stalls of vinyl and cool collectables including music, film, pop culture, ephemera, the quirky and the offbeat, in a very retro setting. 50p entry on the door. Public bar open. www.roseandbrownvintage.co.uk

Saturday Stop

10.30am to 4.30pm, Impressions Gallery Saturday Stop is our regular free event for families! Visit our exhibition, relax in the lounge overlooking City Park and enjoy free self-led creative activities for children. www.impressions-gallery.com/events

Jela

8pm, Delius Lived Next Door Coming straight from Manchester do a great mix of covers and original material. From the Artic Monkeys to Beatles, Elbow, Black keys and more. Free event.

Fanny Burns Live At The Sun!

8.30pm, The Sun Hotel Outrageous Cabaret Every Saturday Night at The Sun from 8.30pm!

www.facebook.com/sunbradford/events/

A Billion Lions UK Tour

8pm till Late, The Underground Bradford A Billion Lions Bradford/Leeds Based band join us on their tour, Support TBC. After party with Rock, Punk, Alternative and everything inbetween till late. £5 ADV - skiddle.com/e/12849370 www.theundergroundbradford.com

Sunday 6 November 6 Days

8.30pm - late, The Castle If you like Guy Clark, Rodney Crowell, Merle Haggard, Gram Parsons, Chris Hillman, the working man, crying in your beer, riding the range, trains to Nowhere, lucky stars and girls who “tore into my life like a hurricane lookin’ for a trailer park…” then saddle-up and head on down!

Festival of Remembrance

5.00pm, Bradford Cathedral The cathedral hosts the 70th festival of remembrance this year due to the temporary closure of st george’s hall. join the city of bradford brass band and guests for an evening of entertainment concluding with a poignant act of remembrance lead by the bishop of bradford. free entry but ticket essential from the cathedral or ring 01274 777720.

Saltaire Live presents - Karine Polwart plus support

7.30pm, Victoria Hall Another of the leading singers in the Scottish folk scene, Karine Polwart wears her heart on her sleeve as she sings with both passion & compassion about modern day issues as well as more traditional themes. An artist who has built a devoted following for her thoughtful lyrics and moving songs. Tickets £16. www.saltairelive.co.uk

Wednesday 7 November

Vintage Fair at The University of Bradford

10am, Student Central, University of Bradford UniVF is your ONE STOP POP UP SHOP for all your vintage needs, right here at your SU! www.facebook.com/ events/1593013541003063/

Tuesday 8 November The Yalla Yallas

8pm, Al’s Dime Bar Local, boisterous punk band.

An Evening with Gervase Phinn

7.30pm and Wednesday 9th, The Alhambra Theatre An Evening with Gervase Phinn will have you on the edge of your seat, as he shares his hilarious and sometimes poignant tales of life as a schools inspector in the Yorkshire Dales. Tickets £19. http://www.bradford-theatres.co.uk/

Coffee Concert

11.00am, Bradford Cathedral This month’s coffee concerts features thomas carr (piano). Concerts are preceded by coffee & cake from 10.30am. all welcome - free entry donations appreciated. www.bradfordcathedral.org

Wednesday 9 November Open Musicians Night

From 8pm, The 1875 Hosted by Malcolm from Mannings Musical.

Chaplains of the First World War All day, Bradford Cathedral Exhibition opening with talk by the revd cat thatcher ma (cantab) with special guest, author jilly cooper whose grandfather was a chaplain. All welcome - free entry - donations appreciated. www.bradfordcathedral.org

What’s On? 39


WEDNESDAY @ ONE

1.00pm, Bradford Cathedral The season of weekly lunchtime organ recitals continues with Jon payne, assistant director of music at the cathedral. Recitals start at 1.00pm and are free with a retiring collection. www.bradfordcathedral.org

Friday 11 November

Raphael Wallfisch - John York

7.30pm, The Alhambra Theatre A fascinating programme of core repertoire for cello and piano performed by surely one of the most celebrated cello and piano partnerships in the world. Alongside Bach and Beethoven an opportunity to hear two more rarely played masterpieces by Mendelssohn and Grieg. Tickets £15. www.bradford-theatres.co.uk/

Maja Bugge

7.30pm, Delius Arts & Cultural Centre Norwegian jazz cellist performs original compositions. This will be a rare and remarkable performance. Tickets: £10 / £8 (conc.) / £5 (NUS) www.artworkscreative.org.uk

Challenging the Fabric of Society 10am - 4pm, The Peace Museum Your first chance to see the new exhibition. Entrance is FREE. www.peacemuseum.org.uk

Phil Cockerham, Dave Bowie & Dickie Dixon

8.30pm - late, The Castle Phil’s music could be described as contemporary folk but he also performs traditional songs with choruses! He is currently gaining a deserved reputation with his thoughtful, original songs and his entertaining performances. Accompanied Tonight by ace double bass player, Dave Bowie Jnr. and percussionist/harmonist Dickie Dixon.

STAND ALONE // CABEZUDOS

8pm till Late, The Underground Bradford Lucifer’s Live Lounge returns with live music from Stand Alone, Cabezudos and More! After party with Rock, Punk, Alternative and everything inbetween till late. £4 ADV - skiddle.com/e/12855948 www.theundergroundbradford.com

Saturday12 November

Speak Easy Vintage Music Event 8pm, The 1875 Everyone welcome.

Papier Tigre

8pm, Fuse Art Space Ten years after they started, Papier Tigre have built a solid name for their inventive rock with three albums and over 500 shows in more than 25 countries over 3 continent. On their new album ‘The Screw’, the band has matured into a devastatingly efficient unit, with instruments and ideas bouncing off each other in an audible culture of creativity. www.wearefuse.co

Kala Utsav

5pm-10pm, Kala Sangam Arts Centre Kala Sangam’s Academy learners share their achievements in an evening filled with dance, music, visual arts and poetry. In addition there are learners from certain schools where we have had a long term partnership and the young people will also present their artistic skills to the event. www.kalasangam.org

Craig Brauns Band

8pm, Al’s Dime Bar Blues / Soul / Rock local band

Sweet Exile

8pm, Delius Lived Next Door Free live music at the one and only Delius!

Send us your event listings...

Son Ofa Live At The Sun!

8.30pm, The Sun Hotel Outrageous Cabaret Every Saturday Night at The Sun from 8.30pm!

www.facebook.com/sunbradford/events/

Bradford Chorale 40th Anniversary Concert with the Cathedral Choir

7pm, Bradford Cathedral An evening to celebrate with faure requiem and mozart requiem. Tickets £10 from 01274 591644 or tickets@ bradfordchorale.org.uk.

The Strawberries UK Tour

8pm till Late, The Underground Bradford Live Music from The Strawberries and more, After party with Indie, Rock, Alternative and everything inbetween till late £5 ADV - skiddle.com/e/12849376 www.theundergroundbradford.com

Sunday 13 November

Vintage Fair & Tea Dance

From 11am, The 1875 Full bar service, tea and cakes available, £1 entry.

Open Mic Night

6pm till 11pm, The Underground Bradford Jam session for local artists to Jam together on the big stage, and have a bit of fun with it! FREE ENTRY www.theundergroundbradford.com

Monday 14 November

Down To Earth with Monty Don

7.30pm, The Alhambra Theatre Monty Don is a renowned gardening writer and BBC television presenter and the nation’s favourite and most respected gardener. Tickets £19. www.bradford-theatres.co.uk/

If you have an event you would like to feature in our listings please email events@thebradfordreview.co.uk. All listings are free of charge and are administered on a first come first served basis.

40 What’s On?


Hank Williams Lonnie Donnegan, U2, Boom Town Rats, Oasis, Stray Cats, Chuck Berry and more.

Crosscut Saw

WEDNESDAY @ ONE

Nick Byrne

1.00pm, Bradford Cathedral The organ recital season continues with james kealey from london. Recitals start at 1.00pm and are free with a retiring collection. www.bradfordcathedral.org

Thursday 24 November Thanksgiving

6pm, Al’s Dime Bar Dime Bar twist on this traditionally American holiday, with all the NFL action, themed drinks and free American Buffet.

Friday 25 November Buy Nowt Day

3pm – 7pm, Delius Arts & Cultural Centre A creative exploration of value and worth. Take the weight off your credit card and rediscover just how much fun you can have without spending. Featuring workshops, activities, food and festivities – All ages welcome – The perfect antidote to the toxic Black Friday phenomenon. FREE! FREE! FREE! www.artworkscreative.org.uk

Ties - Two Tonne

7.30pm, Theatre in the Mill, University of Bradford The first production by Two Tonne, a new performance and performance research/development company led by Iain Bloomfield. Ties is about power and power that feels invulnerable. £10 full/£6 concessions/£4 discounted. Also showing on Saturday. www.brad.ac.uk/theatre/whats-on/ two-tonne/

8pm, Al’s Dime Bar Soulful Blues band. 8.30pm - late, The Castle Nick has played in the jam sessions in the Castle and impressed the audience a number of times with his guitar playing and singing, so we’re looking forward to full night of his entertainm

Sarah Widdup Live

8pm, The Beerhouse Sarah will be bringing her wonderful acoustic sounds to the Beerhouse. facebook.com/sarahwiddupmusic

Military Wives Choirs Concert

7.30pm, Bradford Cathedral The military wives choirs, which are made up of wives and partners of armed forces personnel and women from within the military community, first shot to fame when they took part in the fourth series of gareth malone’s the choir. Tickets £25 from ticketmaster on 0844 844 0444 or www.ticketmaster.co.uk

Saturday 26 November Thieving Lloyd Cole

8pm, Al’s Dime Bar Delta Blues bad boys return, expect drinking and shenanigans.

Delight of Korea

7pm, Kala Sangam Arts Centre KUM Dance Company was established in 1993 with Professor Unmi Kim of Hanyang University and her graduate students. The company has performed various works of Korean traditional techniques as well as on Korean history, women and the patriotism of ancestors. This performance will feature a piece called ‘1999’ based on ‘March www.kalasangam.org

Fie Fie Fie

8pm, Delius Lived Next Original homegrown, upbeat, electro acoustic indie band Fie Fie Fie Supported by Leeds based band Silverlode unleashing there Folksome indie rock on the Delius.

Divina De Campo Live At The Sun! 8.30pm, The Sun Hotel Outrageous Cabaret Every Saturday Night at The Sun from 8.30pm!

www.facebook.com/sunbradford/events/

Come and Sing Haydn’s Nelson Mass

1.30pm for 4.00pm performance, Bradford Cathedral Join the cathedral consort in a performance of this wonderful mass – open to all ages who enjoy singing together. £8 inc music: £4 audience only. www.bradfordcathedral.org

Black Orchid Empire

8pm till Late, The Underground Bradford As part of their UK tour to promote their album ARCHETYPE, Black Orchid Empire will be appearing at The Underground. free shuttle service to the University after the show for those wanting to attend Trap Door. FREE ENTRY www.theundergroundbradford.com


Temple of Science

7pm, Kala Sangam Arts Centre Temple of Science is a meditative space with ‘living stained glass windows’. The growth of bright yellow slime mould over woodland leaf litter and from mathematics, Conway’s game of Life, an algorithmic process that imitates the growth, reproduction and death of living things. www.kalasangam.org

Wednesday 16 November

Blofeld & Baxter: Rogues On The Road

7.30pm, The Alhambra Theatre Henry ‘My Dear Old Thing’ Blofeld is one of Britain’s most loved and recognisable broadcasters, while legendary producer of TMS Peter Baxter has been corralling lost passports, misplaced visas, and errant broadcasters for over 34 years. They’ve seen plenty of shenanigans, so come ready to be shocked and entertained by good men behaving badly. Tickets £20. www.bradford-theatres.co.uk/

WEDNESDAY @ ONE

1.00pm, Bradford Cathedral The season of weekly organ recitals continues with edmund aldhouse from ely. Recitals start at 1.00pm and are free with a retiring collection. www.bradfordcathedral.org

Thursday 17 November

Challenging the Fabric of Society - Evening Event 5:30pm - 7:30pm, The Peace Museum Special evening event to celebrate the opening of our new exhibition. All welcome. Entrance is FREE. www.peacemuseum.org.uk

Bradford Blues Club

7pm, Al’s Dime Bar Ben Waters hosts a night of Blues music, with at least 3 individual singers/bands

Friday 18 November

Voicemail Harmony

8.30pm - late, The Castle Acoustic and acapella singers .leaving musical messages about the world. Mainly unaccompanied with a blend of styles; They are evocative, provocative, physical and fun.

The Record Café Second Birthday

7pm, The Record Café Film screening Spinal Tap - the legendary film on the big screen, plus our favourite music videos think Beastie Boys Sabotage and Beta Band Assessment

Birthday Beer Launch

8pm, The Record Café The launch of our special birthday beer brewed by North Riding Brewery and vinyl DJs, Shipley’s Vinyl Soulution.

Time for Tea

BUCS Indoors - Yorkshire

9am, University of Bradford A rowing competition open to universities, community rowing clubs and individuals www.facebook.com/ events/268680476864705/

Sofar Sounds - Bradford

7:30pm, Bradford City Centre Live music in Bradford www.facebook.com/ events/1593013541003063/

The 59’ Sound

8pm, Delius Lived Next Door A rock cover band from Leeds, playing the best of the Rolling Stones, Black Keys, Oasis, The who, Queen, White Stripes and many more.

Mary Mac Live At The Sun!

8.30pm, The Sun Hotel Outrageous Cabaret Every Saturday Night at The Sun from 8.30pm!

www.facebook.com/sunbradford/events/

11.30am to 1.30pm, Impressions Gallery Join us for free tea and cake at our friendly, social morning for over 55s. At 12.30pm there will be a short talk about our exhibition Planet Yorkshire and at 1pm we will have live music by the ukulele band Three Chord Max.

Where Fires Are

Mint UK Tour // The Rook // Liberate

Wednesday 23 November

www.impressions-gallery.com/events

8pm till Late, The Underground Bradford Live Music from MINT, Support from The Rook & Liberate. After party with Indie, Rock, Alternative and everything in-between till late £4 ADV - skiddle.com/e/12855946 www.theundergroundbradford.com

Saturday 19 November Barcode Zebra

8pm, Al’s Dime Bar Soul / Pop / Funk full band.

Jazz Café

8pm, The Record Café Laid back cool jazz on vinyl with DJs Jazzdaddy (DigJazz) and Tony Safari

42 What’s On?

(TrainerTrouble).

8pm till Late, The Underground Bradford Live Music from Where Fires Are, Support from Francis. After party with Indie, Rock, Alternative and everything in-between till late £5 ADV - skiddle.com/e/12855957 www.theundergroundbradford.com

Skloniste

7.30pm, Delius Arts & Cultural Centre Imagine running for your life for 1425 days in your own city. Welcome to Sarajevo 1992-1996 A reflection of the longest siege in modern history with live music, poetry, video, photography and personal testament. Tickets: £8 / £6 (conc.). www.artworkscreative.org.uk

Howlin’ Jonny and the Devil’s Rejects

5pm, The Record Café Western punk rock ‘n’ roll, boozing, whisky and hellraisin’. Playing a mixture of original material and some rather off the wall covers including


rather off the wall covers including Hank Williams Lonnie Donnegan, U2, Boom Town Rats, Oasis, Stray Cats, Chuck Berry and more.

WEDNESDAY @ ONE

1.00pm, Bradford Cathedral The organ recital season continues with james kealey from london. Recitals start at 1.00pm and are free with a retiring collection. www.bradfordcathedral.org

Thursday 24 November Thanksgiving

6pm, Al’s Dime Bar Dime Bar twist on this traditionally American holiday, with all the NFL action, themed drinks and free American Buffet.

Friday 25 November Buy Nowt Day

3pm – 7pm, Delius Arts & Cultural Centre A creative exploration of value and worth. Take the weight off your credit card and rediscover just how much fun you can have without spending. Featuring workshops, activities, food and festivities – All ages welcome – The perfect antidote to the toxic Black Friday phenomenon. FREE! FREE! FREE! www.artworkscreative.org.uk

Ties - Two Tonne

7.30pm, Theatre in the Mill, University of Bradford The first production by Two Tonne, a new performance and performance research/development company led by Iain Bloomfield. Ties is about power and power that feels invulnerable. £10 full/£6 concessions/£4 discounted. Also showing on Saturday. www.brad.ac.uk/theatre/whats-on/ two-tonne/

Crosscut Saw

8pm, Al’s Dime Bar Soulful Blues band.

Western Dance

8pm till Late, The Underground Bradford Western Dance, one of Bradford’s most popular bands from the 1980s, are reforming for a special one-off gig to mark the band’s 30th anniversary at the Underground, Bradford on Friday, November 25th, supported by Plastic Letters and special guests. OTD - £3 www.theundergroundbradford.com

Nick Byrne

8.30pm - late, The Castle Nick has played in the jam sessions in the Castle and impressed the audience a number of times with his guitar playing and singing, so we’re looking forward to full night of his entertainm

Sarah Widdup Live

8pm, The Beerhouse Sarah will be bringing her wonderful acoustic sounds to the Beerhouse. facebook.com/sarahwiddupmusic

Military Wives Choirs Concert

7.30pm, Bradford Cathedral The military wives choirs, which are made up of wives and partners of armed forces personnel and women from within the military community, first shot to fame when they took part in the fourth series of gareth malone’s the choir. Tickets £25 from ticketmaster on 0844 844 0444 or www.ticketmaster.co.uk

Saturday 26 November Thieving Lloyd Cole

Delight of Korea

7pm, Kala Sangam Arts Centre KUM Dance Company was established in 1993 with Professor Unmi Kim of Hanyang University and her graduate students. The company has performed various works of Korean traditional techniques as well as on Korean history, women and the patriotism of ancestors. www.kalasangam.org

Fie Fie Fie

8pm, Delius Lived Next Original homegrown, upbeat, electro acoustic indie band Fie Fie Fie Supported by Leeds based band Silverlode unleashing there Folksome indie rock on the Delius.

Divina De Campo Live At The Sun! 8.30pm, The Sun Hotel Outrageous Cabaret Every Saturday Night at The Sun from 8.30pm!

www.facebook.com/sunbradford/events/

Come and Sing Haydn’s Nelson Mass

1.30pm for 4.00pm performance, Bradford Cathedral Join the cathedral consort in a performance of this wonderful mass – open to all ages who enjoy singing together. £8 inc music: £4 audience only. www.bradfordcathedral.org

Black Orchid Empire

8pm till Late, The Underground Bradford As part of their UK tour to promote their album ARCHETYPE, Black Orchid Empire will be appearing at The Underground. free shuttle service to the University after the show for those wanting to attend Trap Door. FREE ENTRY www.theundergroundbradford.com

8pm, Al’s Dime Bar Delta Blues bad boys return, expect drinking and shenanigans.

Send us your event listings...

If you have an event you would like to feature in our listings please email events@thebradfordreview.co.uk. All listings are free of charge and are administered on a first come first serve basis. What’s On? 45


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A Quick Chat with

Jean McEwan Jean McEwan is a visual artist and founder of Wur Bradford art space in Kirkgate Market.

Favourite place to eat in Bradford? Mama Mia - lovely Italian food, great service.

Favourite place to relax in Bradford? Wur Bradford and The Sparrow.

Local event you could not live without? The Wild Woods After Dark Adventures in the old Marks and Spencers going on currently and put on by The Brickbox are completely unmissable.

Local business you admire? All of the lovely market traders in Kirkgate Market - because they always take time to talk to people.

Local person you admire (past or present)? So many, especially women. One of them is Samayya Afzal who as Women’s and Campaigns Officer at University of Bradford Union of Students did brilliant campaigning work on combating street harassment in our city

Name a guilty pleasure... I really love Wham!


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The Bradford Review | Issue 21 | November 2016  

A monthly events and culture magazine covering Bradford

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