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Special Feature Investment Opportunities in the Mexican Space Industry

The Lifestyle Feature Five Essential Exemplars of Mexican Folk Art

Negocios para exportadores

MEXICAN Aerospace:

An Industry on the rise

V - 2013


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Guest Opinion

Mexico in the World

Business Tips

Figures

Mexico: A Competitive Platform for Clean Energy Projects

The French Aerospace Connection

Mexico Gains Altitude

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COVER FEATURE Mexican Aerospace:

an industry on the rise

Mexico’s Partner 26 Safran 28 Volare Engineering 30 Soisa 32 Radiall

aem

34 Tecnum photo

36 Frisa

8 From ProMéxico

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40 Especialistas en Turbopartes 42 Pinnacle 44 O3b

Special Feature Investment Opportunities in the Mexican Space Industry

38 Hyrsa

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Briefs

46 Hughes Network Systems

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archive

Table of Contents May 2013


The Lifestyle

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archive

The Lifestyle Briefs

52 Underneath the Pitaya

Thorny Exterior, a Nutritious Interior

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ana carmen foschini

The Complete Guide to the Mexican Way of Life

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Two Silver Droplets Impossible to Tell Apart

Five Essential Exemplars of Mexican Folk Art

62 DDI, Acting Out Design Fantasies

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courtesy of ddi

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archive

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Mexican Architects without Borders

courtesy of consejo nacional del deporte

omar bรกrcenas

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Para exportadores

ProMéxico Karla Mawcinitt Bueno Image and Communications General Coordinator Sebastián Escalante Director of Publications and Content sebastian.escalante@promexico.gob.mx Advertising negocios@promexico.gob.mx Natalia Herrero Copy Editing

Download the PDF version and read the interactive edition of Negocios ProMéxico at: negocios.promexico.gob.mx This publication is not for sale. Its sale and commercial distribution are forbidden.

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ProMéxico

ilustración oldemar

y la cooperación económica internacional

70 De ProMéxico

Oportunidades de diversificación comercial

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Certificación de empresas

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y comercio exterior en México

fotos

archivo

Asia:

México en el mundo El comercio internacional de México en cifras

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Negocios ProMéxico es una publicación mensual editada en inglés por ProMéxico, Camino a Santa Teresa número 1679, colonia Jardines del Pedregal, Delegación Álvaro Obregón, C.P. 01900, México, D.F. Teléfono: (52) 55 54477000. Página Web: www.promexico.gob.mx. Correo electrónico: negocios@promexico.gob.mx Editor responsable: Gabriel Sebastián Escalante Bañuelos. Reserva de derechos al uso exclusivo No. 04-2009012714564800-102. Licitud de título: 14459. Licitud de contenido: 12032, ambos otorgados por la Comisión Calificadora de Publicaciones y Revistas Ilustradas de la Secretaría de Gobernación. ISSN: 2007-1795. Negocios ProMéxico año 6, número V, mayo 2013, se terminó de imprimir el 21 de mayo de 2013, con un tiraje de 14,000 ejemplares. Impresa por Cía. Impresora El Universal, S.A. de C.V. Las opiniones expresadas por los autores no reflejan necesariamente la postura del editor de la publicación. Queda estrictamente prohibida la reproducción total o parcial de los contenidos e imágenes de la publicación, sin previa autorización de ProMéxico. Publicación Gratuita. Prohibida su venta y distribución comercial. ProMéxico is not responsible for inaccurate information or omissions that might exist in the information provided by the participant companies nor of their economic solvency. The institution might or might not agree with an author’s statements; therefore the responsibility of each text falls on the writers, not on the institution, except when it states otherwise. Although this magazine verifies all the information printed on its pages, it will not accept responsibility derived from any omissions, inaccuracies or mistakes. May 2013.


BRIEFS

LOGISTICS

Reinforcing Mexico’s Ports

From proméxico.

Hutchison Port Holdings (HPH), part of Hong Kong-based conglomerate Hutchison Whampoa, is investing over 15 million usd in three mobile harbor cranes to reinforce ports on Mexico’s Pacific coast. HPH’s Lázaro Cárdenas Multipurpose Terminal will receive two cranes, each with a capacity of over 100 tons, while the third crane will operate at the Manzanillo International Terminal. In September 2012, HPH Mexico invested 15 million usd to upgrade the infrastructure at Manzanillo with eight rubber-tyred gantry cranes with a capacity of up to 40 tons each. www.hph.com

The Mexican aerospace industry is booming. Mexico offers, unlike other nations in the globe, countless advantages and favorable conditions for the sector’s development, many of which have attracted the attention –and investment– of global industry giants. Mexico’s competitive production costs; its network of trade agreements that facilitates the import of raw materials and the export of advanced manufacturing to the world’s leading markets; a supply chain that is consolidating quickly and strongly; world-class logistics infrastructure; a clear promotion policy that encourages productive investment; and what is acclaimed by most aerospace companies, its specialized and highly qualified personnel. In short, Mexico boasts a business environment that

has enabled the safe landing of leading aerospace companies in the country. Furthermore, the sector’s rapid development and short and medium-term growth expectations have led Mexican companies with long track records and experience in specialized manufacturing and design for sectors such as the automotive, to explore opportunities in the aerospace industry’s supply chain. Mexico’s aerospace industry is rapidly gaining altitude, driven by three main engines: investments from large global companies in the sector, the development of Mexican suppliers and the ability and talent of the Mexican workforce. And as if that were not enough, a smooth flight is forecast for the industry thanks to the synergy that has been created between the public, private and academic sector to boost its development and secure its growth.

Welcome to Negocios!

RENEWABLE ENERGY

Latin America’s Biggest Solar Plant Will be located in Mexico Gauss Energía, a Mexican business development firm specialized in the energy sector, will begin operations in its 100 million usd-30 megawatt (mw) Aura Solar I photovoltaic plant in August 2013. The company closed financing on the project after signing deals with Nafin,

the Mexican development bank, and the International Finance Corporation (IFC) for about 75% of the cost. Mexican investment fund and project owner Corporación Aura Solar will fund the remainder. Aura Solar I is expected to be the largest

photovoltaic plant in Latin America. The plant is located on a 100-hectare site in La Paz, Baja California Sur –a region where average daily global horizontal radiation tops 5.7 kilowatt-hour per square meter, one of the most suitable for solar energy generation in Mexico. It

will consist of 131,800 polycrystalline modules with single-axis trackers, to produce an estimated 82 gigawatt-hour per year –enough to supply energy to 164,000 people, roughly 64% of the population of La Paz. gauss.com.mx


BRIEFS

photos

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CHEMICAL

Airs of Expansion French industrial gas producer Air Liquide plans up to 100 million usd worth of investment to expand Mexico operations in 2013. Air Liquide recently inaugurated a new air separation plant in the northern state of Coahuila. www.airliquide.com

LOGISTICS

ELECTRIC

The DHL Mexican Family Grows

Engineered Success

German courier company DHL Express inaugurated a new operations center in Mexico City built at a cost 7.3 million usd. The center is part of a larger ongoing 160 million usd investment to upgrade and modernize the company’s infrastructure and equipment in Mexico.

French electrical engineering multinational Schneider Electric will invest 80 million usd in Mexico in 2013. Projects include completion of a research center in Monterrey as well as work on plants and clean energy projects for state-owned oil monopoly Petróleos Mexicanos (Pemex).

www.dhl.com www.schneider-electric.com

AUTOMOTIVE

Indian Investment Gets strong in Mexico Indian auto part manufacturer Samvardhana Motherson Group has opened a new plant in Puebla, Mexico joining the burgeoning list of Indian investors including Bajaj Auto and JK Tyres. The company will manufacture automotive products to cater to large auto assemblers operating in Mexico, such as Volkswagen and Audi. Investment for the new facility reached 30 million usd and, according to the company, is likely to go up to 70 million usd in the near future. www.motherson.com


BRIEFS

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BRIEFS

archive

MEDIA & ENTERTAINMENT FOOD & BEVERAGE

Cinépolis’ All-Time Box Office

Sweet Achievement Chocolate Ibarra was granted the FSSC 22000 (Food Safety System Certification) from the Food Safety Management System (FSMS), which guarantees that every product manufactured by the company is free of physical, chemical and biological contamination.

Cinépolis, the largest movie broadcaster in Mexico and Latin America has officially launched Cinépolis Klic, its new online streaming service, which arrives to compete against other VOD providers such as Netflix, AxtelTV, Clarovideo, Totalmovie and Vudu. With 3,100-plus screens, Cinépolis ranks among the world’s leading exhibitors. With Cinépolis Klic, the company will be able to buy broadcasting rights to movies, shortening the time between online and theatre premiere dates. In addition, the company is planning to expand the online services to the 11 countries where it operates.

chocoibarra.com.mx

www.cinepolis.com

MEDICAL

Bet on Biotechnology

CONSTRUCTION

Dupont HIRES ICA Fluor ICA Fluor, the industrial construction joint venture of Empresas ICA and Fluor Corporation, has been awarded a 130 million usd contract for the construction of a new titanium dioxide train to be built in DuPont’s complex located in Altamira, Tamaulipas, on the Gulf of Mexico.

ICA Fluor will be responsible for the construction, construction management and material management services for the production facility that is scheduled for completion in 2015. www.fluor.com www.ica.com.mx

IT

redIT’s New DataPark in Mexico redIT, the emerging leader in secure, customizable cloud computing and data center services, has opened a DataPark in Tultitlán, Estado de México. The first of its kind in the country, the Tultitlán complex will house eight PODs (Performance Optimized Data Centers), totaling 95,000 square feet, to service a wide range of companies and government institutions. The redIT DataPark employs a cooling system that leverages Tultitlán’s mild weather conditions to increase its energy efficiency by 45%. The complex’s proximity to a substation of the Federal Electricity Commission (CFE) also ensures a highly reliable energy supply, which will provide up to 9 MW to the redIT DataPark when in full operation. The redIT DataPark PODs are also certified ISO 27001, ISO 9001, ISAE3402 and ICREA Tier IV certified. us.redit.com

US-based Scantibodies Laboratory initiated construction on the company’s second laboratory in Mexico. The 16 million usd facility is planned to produce antibody products and will include a cancer treatment center. scantibodies.com

AUTOMOTIVE

Success is Where Clients Are Furukawa Electric plans to break ground on a new auto parts manufacturing plant in Mexico to supply Japanese automakers operating in the country. Furukawa, which supplies products to the automotive, construction, electronics, energy, materials and telecom industries, expects the 12.2 million usd plant to be finished in January 2014. The company currently has two auto parts plants in Mexico. The new plant will

initially employ 300 people but, according to the company, the payroll could climb to about 1,000 within a few years. Wires and cables produced at the new plant will be sold in Mexico and exported to Latin America and Europe. Furukawa also plans to manufacture parts for vehicle air bag systems and battery sensors at the new plant. www.furukawa.co.jp


Negocios ProMéxico | Guest Opinion

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Mexico: A Competitive Platform for Clean Energy Projects Mexico’s commitments towards reducing emmisions and using cleaner energy sources represent an important business niche.

systems. On the supply side, Latin America has important manufacturing clusters that could incorporate technologies which are common in industrialized countries but non-existent in the region, mainly due to a lack of information about their benefits, technical knowledge and commercial efforts. In the international arena, Mexico has made commitments to reduce emissions and use cleaner energy sources, setting goals to those ends. Companies with high energy consumption or large CO2 emissions are searching for proven technology options that enable them to reduce both their energy consumption and the risks associated with greenhouse gas emission regulations. The evermore obvious opportunities include the integration of renewable energies, co-generation, energy assessment of waste and a new approach to processes that increase energy efficiency.

archive

Guest Opinion | Negocios ProMéxico

396 MW in wind power, and a value of 961 million usd. For its part, Gamesa has installed more than 74MW with an investment of close to 160 million usd. Finally, by the end of 2012, the framework for small-scale renewable energy tender offers (<30MW) was created to promote investments by allowing installations to contribute to the power grid through the use of technologies such as solar photovoltaic and thermal, co-generation and small hydro. Mexico is committed to generating 35% of its electricity through renewable sources by 2024 (currently at 12%). In order to do so, several laws and regulations have been passed, above all to facilitate interconnection to the power grid. Wind power potential is estimated to reach a capacity of 12 GW by 2020, while in thermal solar energy, more than 1.66 million square meters have been installed with a potential for a further 23.5 million square meters by 2020.

by enrique rebolledo*

The rapid growth of emerging countries has caused an increase in the energy demands of their population, a demand that has already surpassed the current supply of energy generation and use. That imbalance has created a window of opportunity around energyefficient systems worldwide. Cities are significant energy consumer nodes. They are suitable for potential microgeneration and use of energy efficient devices on the side of demand. In urban areas, the services, building and industrial sectors have crucial opportunities in solar thermal power generation and utilization, while the public services sector can also leverage water pumping, public lighting, water and waste treatment and massive public transportation

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Resulting from the approval of the General Climate Change Law (2012) in Mexico, an internal emission trading system is planned, possibly linked to other international initiatives, as a tool for the country to achieve its goal of reducing carbon dioxide (CO2eq) emissions by 30% in 2020 and by 50% in 2050. According to Ernst & Young’s Renewable Energy Country Attractiveness Index for 2012, Mexico has the highest rates for solar power (18th globally) and the second (25th globally) for wind power in Latin America, only after Brazil. In 2012, installed wind capacity came to 1GW, with investment growth estimates in the industry at 20 billion usd for the next decade. Mareña Renovables has launched the most ambitious project in Latin America, with more than

Since 2011, every new house built with Esta es tu casa government housing grants must incorporate ecological criteria, such as solar water heaters, efficient lighting, thermal isolation and low-consumption appliances, based on the climate and region in which they are built or remodeled. Furthermore, and resulting from the approval of the General Climate Change Law (2012) in Mexico, an internal emission trading system is planned, possibly linked to

May 2013

other international initiatives, as a tool for the country to achieve its goal of reducing carbon dioxide (CO2eq) emissions by 30% in 2020 and by 50% in 2050. That system would define a method to distribute emission rights at facility level, defining a cap for regulated sectors and promoting trade between installations that show different cost structures to improve their energy and environmental performance. Trade arises from the options offered by regulated entities, either by assessing costs of an onsite reduction, or through the acquisition of reduction certificates in the market as a more convenient option. Entities with lower emissions than those assigned will be able to sell their excess certificates to other entities that find purchasing certificates more profitable

May 2013

than reducing emissions on an internal level. Exchange would be made through a mechanism similar to the stock exchange. In addition, that market could be linked to the Californian market through the Climate Action Reserve (an experienced, trusted and efficient offset registry to serve the carbon market), and to the North America 2050 (NA2050) partnership in the long term (a group of US states and Canadian provinces committed to policies that move their jurisdictions toward a low-carbon economy), creating an important opportunity for technology transfer and investment in the Mexican industry. Within that context, the Mexican energy sector accounts for close to 67% of greenhouse gas emissions (CO2eq) and energy consumption is expected to

increase by 3.3% annually until 2030. In other words, this market could reach a value of 2.295 billion usd by 2020 (equal to 153 million of tCO2eq) associated to the energy sector alone, based on prices of emission reduction certificates observed in California during the first tender of 2012. Even more interesting is the possibility of approaching international markets in other sectors that require investment –such as agriculture and transport– which could improve its financial and environmental performance through sustainability practices. In short, the closeness and availability of supply chains related to trade with North America and the Asian Pacific Corridor make Mexico a potential partner to leverage knowledge, manufacturing and export in the energy efficiency

and renewable energies market. Between 2005 and 2011, more than 4.77 trillion usd were invested in clean energies in Mexico (92% in wind power). Mexico is a competitive destination for strategic alliances with American companies. The country’s growth potential also demands technical skills and specialized training which, combined with potential energy and tax reforms, natural growth in consumption and technological advances, make Mexico a place of operations and growth. But most importantly, this landscape illustrates an important niche in the area of renewable energies and energy efficiency management that hasn’t been tapped into as yet. N * CEO of Bajo en Carbono. www.bajoencarbono.com

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Negocios ProMéxico | Mexico in the World

The French Aerospace Connection The French aviation industry has Mexico as a strategic partner due to the country’s advantages, such as free trade agreements, competitive production costs and highly skilled workforce.

Mexico in the World | Negocios ProMéxico

photos archive

by guillermo garza garcía*

When talking about the global aviation sector, one cannot help but think about France as one of the industry leaders. Firms such as Airbus, Eurocopter, Dassault, Thales, Safran and Zodiac Aerospace are just a few of the world-class players that have positioned France’s aerospace industry among the global elite. The sector’s economic activity accounts for 77% of France’s total exports and created 162,000 jobs in 2011. Meanwhile, Mexico’s aviation sector, although young, shows great promise. In just one decade, the country has built an industrial platform of 270 companies and supporting entities that employ 31,000

people with an annual growth rate of almost 20% (since 2004). That has made it the favorite destination of the global aviation industry, with more Foreign Direct Investment (FDI) received than any other nation in the last decade. Mexico has some major advantages for international markets, such as free trade agreements with 44 countries, competitive production costs, a highly skilled workforce and a geostrategic location due to its closeness to the US. These conditions have been essential for the French aviation industry to see a strategic partner in Mexico. The first approach took place in 1991 with the arrival of Safran group’s Labinal in the state of Chihuahua. Two decades later,

said group has become the main aerospace employer in Mexico, with 4,000 positions. Other French companies followed, such as Eurocopter, Zodiac Aerospace, Daher, Radiall, Latecoere, Manoir Aerospace, Hutchinson and Axon cable, among many others, strengthening the local aerospace segment. Currently, Mexico’s aerospace industry has a sustained growth strategy based on three pillars. The first is the creation of an integral supply chain that will lead to shorter integration times and significantly lower logistics costs. The second pillar is the construction of a stronger industrial fabric that will result in the foundation of globally competitive local companies. In order to achieve that, attracting foreign companies is crucial, alongside the manufacture of local products. The third pillar is the regional consolidation of capacities. For that, France developed a remarkable

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concept called “competitiveness poles” which is based on the triple helix model (government, academia and companies). The cities of Paris, Toulouse and Marseille are currently the prototypes of the French aerospace industry. At the same time, it is necessary to work with an industrial strategy based on high added value that strengthens aerospace production and research while encouraging a shift from “Made in Mexico,” to “Designed in Mexico.” Honeywell’s successful engineering and research centers in Baja California, General Electric’s (GE) in Querétaro, Labinal’s in Chihuahua and Bombardier’s in Querétaro, are great examples of that strategy, where Mexican talent designs, develops and reinvents today’s aviation sector. It is clear that France and Mexico have a mythical past, a dynamic present and a promising future in the aerospace

Mexico’s aerospace industry has a sustained growth strategy based on three pillars: the creation of an integral supply chain, the construction of a stronger industrial fabric and the regional consolidation of capacities. industry. However, it is Mexico who has more recently shown the elements and tools required to go even further on the global aviation scene. The country has already taken off and is quickly gaining altitude. As economist Philip Kotler duly says: “the future is already here.” N *Trade Commissioner at ProMexico’s Trade & Investment Office in Paris, France.

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Negocios ProMéxico | Business Tips

Mexico Gains Altitude

and development hub of great strategic value for the aerospace industry. Any efforts related to the Mexican aerospace industry cannot be understood without referring to the strategy that was outlined in Mexico’s aerospace flight plan (back in 2009) when ProMéxico made a sector-wide consultation and undertook a project to analyze said industry. The first edition of Mexico’s aerospace industry road map was then launched and it has been updated annually ever since, marking the latest trends and impacts on the national aerospace industry and providing a matrix of capabilities useful to understand the evolution of the sector. Mexico’s challenge now is to ramp up the supply chain and, when possible, develop national suppliers to consolidate its position as a destination that serves the complete aircraft cycle (from design to the

Mexico has become a strategic option for the global aerospace industry. With a solid and fast paced development in the industry, the country offers high added value and is regarded as a very cost-efficient and innovative solution to the sector’s strict manufacturing demands. by luis eduardo archundia*

Mexico is becoming a major supplier of the global aerospace industry. In 2012, it was the sixth provider of aerospace components and services to the US, considered the world’s largest market. The country is also becoming increasingly relevant due to its combined offer of specialized engineering services, talent and legal certainty. Currently, there are 270 aerospace companies and supporting entities in Mexico, most of which manufacture high-technology components, avionics and electronics, as well as harnesses and cables, heat exchangers, engines, flight control systems and wings, among many other products. The aerospace sector has become one of the main economic activities in the country due to its interrelation with other industries. In 2012 alone, Mexican exports in said industry reached 5.04 billion usd. Mexico has become a strategic option for the global aerospace industry operating in a fragile economic environment (caused by the financial crises in Europe and the US), coupled with the rise of unpredictable commercial and defense scenarios. This global economic turbulence has exerted unprecedented pressure on the sector’s closed circle of strategic production partners worldwide to deliver with an equation of cost efficiency and innovation, which only a few countries are able to provide. Mexico is up to the challenge. According to a study by KPMG, Mexico is the most competitive country in the Americas in terms of aerospace manufacturing costs. Also, the nation’s macro-economic stability, its solid reputation as a competitive destination, as well as several local and federal government incentives, academia and business strategies have all come together

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Business Tips | Negocios ProMéxico

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to foster the creation of highly competitive hubs across Mexican territory –mainly in the states of Baja California, Chihuahua, Nuevo León, Querétaro and Sonora– which operate within a world class, certified ecosystem. Mexico emerges as a safer and more attractive aerospace investment market. With a solid and fast paced development in this industry, the country offers high added value to the global aerospace industry and, now more than ever, is being regarded as a very cost efficient and innovative solution to the sector’s strict manufacturing demands. Industry leaders such as Honeywell, B.A.E. Systems, Bombardier, Eaton, GKN, UTC Aerospace Systems, Hawker Beechcraft, Labinal, Meggit, Volare and Zodiac, among many others, operate in Mexico. The country’s credentials speak volumes. It is a nation that has progressed leaps and bounds in terms of skilled labor and international treaties to guarantee quality production standards. It has a world renowned reliability as a member of the Bilateral Aviation Safety Agreement (BASA) signed with the US and also as part of the Wassenaar Arrangement –presently composed of 41 countries– which was signed last year in record time. The Wassenaar Arrangement has been established in order to contribute to regional and international security and stability by promoting transparency and

manufacturing of parts and structures and their assembly, aircraft maintenance, recycling and/or conversion). These are some of the reasons why Mexico has captured the spotlight at important events such as the 2012 Farnborough International Air Show, where exhibitors attracted further interest in aerospace and defense manufacturing in the country. The same positive impact is expected to be achieved this summer at Le Bourget Air Show in France, which will undoubtedly present a convincing showcase of expanding capabilities in the industry for the next 10 to 20 years. By 2020, it is expected that 12 billion usd of aerospace exports will come from Mexican aerospace design, engineering, Maintenance, Repair and Overhaul (MRO) and manufacturing facilities. Mexico has sophisticated technology and well known foreign providers which are

doing an excellent job of complementing the supply chain. The country’s natural advantages are also attracting other players from the US, France and Canada with high technology platforms. In short, Mexico’s aerospace industry is here for the long run. The nation’s entrepreneurs have come to understand that fact by looking at the country’s trade potential and its capability to integrate cost efficiency and innovation results in the aerospace area. The national industry is well on its way to bringing a complete plant to Mexico and creating the whole aerospace solution in the country. Mexico has taken off and is flying higher than ever, making a difference in the aerospace world. N *Industry analyst, Business Intelligence Unit (UIN), ProMéxico.

greater responsibility in transfers or exports of sensitive technologies. Participating states seek to ensure that transfers of these items do not contribute to the development or enhancement of military capabilities. Export controls are implemented by each participating state, although the scope of export controls in every member country varies from nation to nation in accordance with domestic procedures. Mexico’s participation in both legal mechanisms is proof of the trust that the international community has put on the country, viewing it as an optimal destination for the manufacture of sensitive technologies for the aerospace industry. Several US and European companies, especially those with government contracts, are looking for competitive locations to settle their operations and to generate more cost efficient products also to boost innovation in the industry. Only a handful of countries are in a position to do that. Mexico has an extensive pool of talented engineers, over 31,000 skilled professionals registered with the Performance Review Institute from the National Aerospace and Defense Contractors Accreditation Program (NADCAP) and also with the Aerospace Standard 91000 (AS9100) certification. Both standards, coupled with an effective legal framework for the protection of industrial property, have placed Mexico as a manufacturing, engineering

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May 2013

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Negocios ProMéxico | Cover Feature

mexican aerospace: an industry on the rise Mexico is beginning to reap the benefits of the joint commitment of government, businesses and universities to bring the aerospace industry to the highest levels of competitiveness with a single strategic program. by jesús estrada cortés

The Mexican aerospace industry is on cloud nine, soaring with sustained dynamism in terms of production, exports, investment attraction and job creation, its course firmly set to follow the 2010-2020 Strategic Program that was designed by the industry and government and which also receives support from the academic sector. With an average 20% annual growth rate since 2004, Mexico has become a global leader in the aerospace sector, boasting 270 companies and supporting entities, most of which are internationally certified with NADCAP and AS9100. In 2012, exports from Mexico’s aerospace

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Cover Feature | Negocios ProMéxico

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industry reached 5.040 billion usd, a 16.3% increase compared to 2011. Meanwhile, Foreign Direct Investment (FDI) exceeded 1.3 billion usd, according to data from the Ministry of Economy (SE). During 2012, the aerospace sector created 32,000 jobs and Mexico was ranked 14th largest industry supplier worldwide, according to information from the Mexican Federation of the Aerospace Industry (FEMIA). The industry is flying high thanks to a combination of competitive advantages, such as Mexico’s vocation as a manufacturing, engineering and development cen-

ter with high strategic value. That is due to the degree of technological sophistication of the country’s exports, its engineering talent –Mexico has the largest number of graduates in the Americas, with more than 100,000 new professionals every year– and the quality and competitiveness of its workforce. Moreover, Mexico holds strong as the most competitive country in the hemisphere in terms of aerospace manufacturing costs and it guarantees the optimal use of produced and exported goods thanks to a legal framework that efficiently protects industrial property.

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Vladimiro de la Mora, president of FEMIA, underlines other advantages that Mexico offers the aerospace industry, such as its geostrategic location. “We are next door to the world’s largest economy, the US. And our costs are extremely competitive,” he points out. Aerospace companies can produce in Mexico at costs that are 30% lower than in the US, 40% than in Europe and 50% than in Japan. Investment Landing The confidence shown by hundreds of companies in these competitive advantages has translated into more than 19.3 billion usd in accumulated foreign investment, which according to data by FEMIA, has been received by the aerospace industry in Mexico up to 2011. The increasing investment attraction has led to important projects. For instance, General Electric (GE), the global leader in airplane engine production, has its largest Research and Development Center (GEIQ) outside the US in the State of Querétaro. Also, its Advanced Engineering Center in the same state –GE Aviation’s largest global engineering complex– employs several engineers in charge of testing the GEnX turbine, which saves close to 15% in fuel and reduces its carbon footprint by 30%. The center achieved a significant expansion in 2011, hiring more than 240 engineers and designers and enabling the center to ramp up sales to 80 million usd for the year. Some of the areas of specialization include mechanical, electric, controls and software engineering. Other business operations in Mexico include Honeywell in the northern state of Chihuahua, which focuses on new large engines and their repairs; Churchill in the northwestern state of Sonora, which manufactures turbine blades for Rolls Royce and their application to new products; Snecma/ Safran with projects involving new mediumsized engines and their repairs and ITP which manufactures and repairs low-pressure turbines, both in the state of Querétaro. With regard to turbines, Honeywell has the Mexicali Aerospace and Technology Center, an engineering and technology complex that includes a design center, a system integration lab, test facilities and a business support team. At the center, the company does a full-scale simulation of an aircraft’s many systems, which allows for the testing of its inter-operability, control and technical maturity.

May 2013

As for the European Eurocopter within its Aerospace Aerocluster, it has a maintenance center to perform small and medium inspections equivalent to 150 to 600 flight hours, plus one or two years of use, for aircraft of the Ecureuil family –AS350, AS355 and EC130– and with the capacity to inspect six helicopters simultaneously. It also has an AS365N3 helicopter (Dauphin model). In terms of design, engineering and manufacturing, many companies have earned success in Mexico. Such is the case of the giant Bombardier, whose plant in Querétaro manufactures the fuselage, assembles the wings and horizontal and vertical stabilizers and manufactures and installs the electrical harnesses of the Learjet 85.

terials Research (IIM) of the Universidad Nacional Autónoma de México (UNAM), among others. That opens up opportunities to develop new latest generation materials by integrating into international innovation networks. For example, Helicópteros y Vehículos Aéreos Nacionales (HELIVAN) is developing graphene, a carbon fiber that is 200 times more resistant than steel and that is used in the defense aerospace industry, according to information by ProMéxico. Joint Work An essential element of the buoyancy shown by the Mexican aerospace sector is the design and implementation of the 2010-2020 Strategic Program for the Aerospace Industry, also known as Pro-

An essential element of the buoyancy shown by the Mexican aerospace sector is the design and implementation of the 2010-2020 Strategic Program for the Aerospace Industry, also known as Pro-Aéreo, whose core was created by the authorities and industry working together to define what we expect from the industry in the near future. In addition to manufacturing, engineering and design activities, aerospace companies in Mexico are strengthened by the work of many research centers and labs that specialize in new materials and nanocomposites, such as the Mexican Corporation of Materials Research (COMIMSA), the Advanced Materials Research Center (CIMAV) and the Institute of Ma-

Aéreo, whose core “was created by the authorities and industry working together to define what we expect from the industry in the near future. The plan establishes the creation of over 110,000 jobs, exports in excess of 12 billion usd and Mexico’s ranking among the top 10 suppliers for the global industry, in addition to placing national content close to 50%,” explains de la Mora.

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Negocios ProMéxico | Cover Feature

Cover Feature | Negocios ProMéxico

National and Regional Flight The national strategy has set its sights on turning Mexico into a destination that serves an aircraft’s complete cycle: design and engineering, parts manufacturing, maintenance, airplane assembly and recycling and reconversion. Added to national plans are the regional strategies of the country’s main clusters, which are based on their production vocations. According to ProMéxico, the country’s main clusters are Baja California, Chihuahua, Sonora, Querétaro and Nuevo León. Close to 60 companies operate in Baja California and have recorded close to 1.4 billion usd in annual exports, close to 28% of national exports. Their main destinations are the US, Canada, the United Kingdom, France and Germany, among other countries. Through the strategy developed between industry, academia and government, Baja California will focus its innovation capacities on knowledge process outsourcing (KPO) for the aerospace and defense

(A+D) industry and stimulate its potential to develop fuselage systems and power plants. In addition, more than 24,000 young people are enrolled in engineering and technology programs in the state. There are 28 aerospace companies operating in the state of Chihuahua, including four original equipment manufacturers (OEM): Cessna, Textron International Mexico, Beechcraft and Honeywell. In 2012, the state’s exports reached 568 million usd. Currently, Chihuahua has over 8,300 employees related to the aerospace industry. Honeywell’s Aerospace Chihuahua Manufacturing Operation (HCMO) consists of a highly complex machining manufacturing facility. The facility hosts a warehouse, labs and Quality Control Operations as well as Engineering. The HCMO is one of the most advanced machining operations in the aerospace industry. It features a state-ofthe-art blade manufacturing cell as well as numerous highly advanced aerospace machining cells. The site manufactures engine assembly ducts, gears and shafts, blade manu-

In terms of supply, the goal is to increase the development of local suppliers to take them to Tier 2 and Tier 3. To achieve that, the program includes support from the SE to help companies obtain the necessary certification. “Another strategy is how we help these companies obtain the funds they need to become suppliers,” explains de la Mora, adding that several automotive and electronics firms –two sectors in which Mexico is highly competitive– have already experienced success by migrating to the aerospace sector. Within the framework of Pro-Aéreo, businesses and government together define support for the aerospace industry. “An ex-

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facturing, impellers, nozzles, disks, stators, seals and nozzle segments, among others. Sonora has one of the most important and integrated machined aviation parts clusters in the country. With casting, machining and special processes, Sonora has become a center for excellence in the manufacture of blades and components for airplane turbines and engines. More than 48 companies operate in the state, exporting close to 174 million usd, and supported by more than 29,000 students enrolled in engineering and technology programs. The Sonora Institute for Advanced and Aerospace Manufacturing was recently created in the state capital, Hermosillo. In Querétaro, the joint work of government and industry has triggered important projects such as the Universidad Aeronáutica en Querétaro (UNAQ), which offers four education levels –basic technician, advanced technician, engineering and graduate programs– with more than 2,800 graduates since 2006. The Aviation Technologies and Test Laboratory

ample is the lab that the President [Enrique Peña Nieto] announced recently to Eurocopter. A new test center will be opened in Querétaro to support the aerospace sector with government investment –50 million pesos initially. Once again, we were invited as an industry to define what the complex should have: we are involved in the process,” adds the president of FEMIA. As part of the actions within ProAéreo, “We have identified critical areas on which we need to work, such as staff development. We have to collaborate with universities to develop the future talent required by the industry, not only in engineering and masters’ programs but with technicians,” he explains.

(LABTA) is a unique project in Latin America, comprising three research centers that join their specialties to present a comprehensive range of laboratory tests and services that will strengthen the development of the supply chain. In addition, the Querétaro Aerocluster is constituted by 30 manufacturing companies and suppliers of structures, parts and components; three MROs, five design and engineering centers; three innovation and development facilities; five service companies; three education institutions and one innovation and research network. The state’s aerospace exports total 673 million usd a year. Meanwhile, the state of Nuevo León is one of the leading industrial bastions of Mexico. Twenty-eight aviation companies operate in the state and export their products mainly to the North American Free Trade Agreement (NAFTA) market. The sector exports 555 million usd a year. The Nuevo León aerospace cluster was established in 2008.

High Specialization Mexico has been training aviation technicians and engineers since 1937. According to information from ProMéxico, there are currently 21 education institutions that offer 52 aerospace programs, which range from basic courses, high school and technical programs to advanced technical degree programs, professional licenses, undergraduate programs in engineering and some Masters’ programs. Baja California is perhaps the state with the most notable range of aerospacerelated courses, not only because of the large number of companies established there but also due to the joint work of the private, public and academic sectors to

May 2013

contribute to train professionals and technicians that will populate the industry and are the main driver behind the sector. “This is all handled with the triple helix model: government, academia and industry. As a university, we must contribute with continuous training for the people who comprise the sector and to do so we are constantly looking at what’s new, what does the industry need, what new projects will they bring, to learn what type of professionals they will require when the time comes. In that way, classrooms feed manufacturing facilities with the staff they need,” explains Omar Mata, professor and researcher at the Universidad Autónoma de Baja California (UABC). The UABC’s faculty of engineering offers education to close to 50,000 students and aerospace engineering is one of the newest programs, with 150 registered students, 15 of whom make up the first generation, who graduated in May 2013. “In the coming years we will be graduating between 15 and 20 young people each semester. It is an upward trend and the idea is to supply the complete Mexicali-Tijuana-Ensenada corridor to satisfy its require-

May 2013

ment for professionals,” says Juan de Dios Ocampo, coordinator of the Aerospace Engineering program at UABC. After pointing out that from 2014 onwards the UABC will begin to offer a Master’s Degree in aerospace engineering, de Dios Ocampo explains that creating a program such as this one required the industry’s participation. “These are flexible models that enable us to modify courses and content depending on the rhythm of the industry,” he says. Baja California’s successful model is a reflection of the joint effort of companies, governments and universities in Mexico and that partnership is what drives the aerospace industry to cruising speed. “We know for certain that the new government will follow up on this program; Pro-Aéreo is not stopping,” concludes de la Mora. N Part of the statements and data published in this text were taken from the National Flight Plan (version 4, 2013), which includes several industry, academia and government contributions. This strategic line of the aerospace sector will be launched shortly.

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Negocios ProMéxico | Special Report

Investment Opportunities in the Mexican Space Industry The study and development of the Mexican space industry is a key factor in boosting telecommunications, expanding the connectivity and inclusion of marginalized communities in remote areas of the country, in addition to the proven use of low orbit satellite observation to alert the population and mitigate the impact of nature-related disasters or monitor atmospheric phenomena, among other benefits.

servants and business owners expressed their prospective vision of the sector, established five strategic goals:

by jorge sánchez gómez*

The accelerated entry into the space economy has created a new challenge for Mexico. It implies the exploration, use and exploitation of outer space for scientific research; technology development and application; design, manufacture and operation of telecommunication systems; as well as satellitebased navigation, GPS, and earth and cosmic observation via vehicles launched and placed in space. The Law that created the Mexican Space Agency (Agencia Espacial Mexicana or AEM) –on July 30, 2010– and the initiatives gathered in several public forums produced the General Guidelines of Mexico’s Space Policy –published on July 13, 2011– and AEM’s National Space Activity Program (Programa Nacional de Actividades Espaciales or PNAE), stating the national strategy for the promotion of space exploration, use and exploitation. The 20122015 PNAE is based on five strategic axes: 1. Human capital training and development in the area of space. 2. Space scientific research and technology development. 3. Industrial, commercial and competitiveness development in the space sector. 4. International affairs, regulations and safety in space matters. 5. Funding, organization and information technologies in space matters. Each axis has well defined goals, strategies and lines of action. The first year of operations involved the organizational structure of the AEM and its five general coordinating offices –one for each strategic axis. That year also marked the beginning of works related to creating synergies between the various players. The industrial-commercial and competitiveness development coordinating office adopted the roadmap methodology, which establishes a mechanism to integrate and document the current situation of the space industry while defining the path to follow and criteria needed to achieve this goal. Strategic Milestones of Mexico’s Space Sector The Orbit Plan: Roadmap for the Mexican Space Industry 2012, in which a multidisciplinary group of academics, public

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Special Report | Negocios ProMéxico

photo aem

May 2013

1. For Mexico to have a world-class, high-technology validation and standardization center for the space industry with the capacity to provide services on an international level [five years]. 2. To establish a company that operates in Mexico with the technological capacity to design and manage space projects with the Public-Private Partership (PPP) model, which will be the nucleus and interface with those involved in space projects [two years]. 3. To integrate a low orbit multifunctional satellite platform with 50% of critical technologies developed in Mexico [five years]. 4. To create a PPP institution to coordinate the triple helix (government, industry and academia) for innovation in advanced materials for aerospace applications [five years]. 5. For Mexico to have a 1% (1 billion usd) share in the space industry [five years]. To achieve this, there must be public policies and production coordination models that acknowledge the scope of the sector, align its players, stimulate innovation and integrate new forms of commercial partnership. Technical-commercial alliances are essential for seeking partners capable of contributing with human capital, technologies and proposals to develop solutions and leverage the opportunities offered by the global space market (in 2011 sales were estimated at 289.77 billion usd). To create a comprehensive vision and comply with the recommendations of the Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development (OECD), Mexico must create a space infrastructure, that is, the set of tangible and intangible goods that are required for the study, access, exploration, use and exploitation of space: • Tangible assets include rocket engines, launching platforms and systems, sub-orbital vehicles, satellites and other spacecraft, their instru-

May 2013

Mexico is committed to the development of the space sector; there is a clear view of the space innovation ecosystem with collaboration spaces, merging synergies of the various stakeholders, and attracting investment and talent to position the country in the global space economy.

ments, payloads, master stations, teleports, receiving antennas, user terminals, observatories and other liaison and control devices. • Intangible assets include orbital positions and their related frequencies, laws, regulations, technologies, patents, licenses, concessions, brands and know-how. The Importance of Space Infrastructure Space infrastructure is the backbone that holds and links satellite space systems and national security applications; as well as connectivity, social coverage, environmental sustainability and scientific and technological research. It is constituted by projects that focus on national needs, such as the Early Alert System and the replacement of the MEXSAT System satellites at the end of their useful lifecycle (estimated at 15-18 years) within an innovation ecosystem that favors and encourages joint work. The development of space infrastructure requires funding and PPP similar to those established in road and port development. Specialization is indispensable for the space and aviation industries; it ensures quality and competitiveness of the technological areas in which Mexico can be attractive. Five technology areas have been initially selected, encompassing 113

technologies to be developed and applied, based on their technology-readiness level, their individual roadmaps and feasibility analyses to incorporate them into the Mexican space infrastructure and business plans that promote investment opportunities in this sector. Mexico is committed to the development of the space sector; there is a clear view of the space innovation ecosystem with collaboration spaces, merging synergies of the various stakeholders, and attracting investment and talent to position the country in the global space economy. The flow of foreign and domestic investment will enable the development of high added-value jobs and technology-based companies, well-paid specialized employees, and accelerate value chain integrations, with impacts in other economic sectors. According to the AEM’s estimates, the Mexican space industry could reach 1 billion usd in the next five years. Mexico is slated to become an attractive pole of space development, internationally renowned for its capacity to coordinate and carry out high-impact work with state-ofthe-art quality and innovation. N www.aem.gob.mx * Deputy Director, Industrial and Commercial Development, Mexican Space Agency (AEM)

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Negocios ProMéxico | Mexico’s Partner

Mexico’s Partner | Negocios ProMéxico

photos courtesy of safran

Aerospace Giant Hails Mexico “Engine” Just over 20 years after opening for business in Mexico, French aerospace giant Safran is now the country’s largest aeronautics company with 5,000 employees expected by the end of 2013. Not content to rest on its laurels, Safran has plans for even further expansion.

Safran is today the top French investor in Mexico. “The key figure for us is 25%. In the past year we grew 25% in production and in the number of our Mexican employees,” Piepsz says.

by graeme stewart

Mexico is for Safran the main engine for its aerospace activities in Latin America and second of the Americas, only behind the US, according to the senior Vice President of one of the world’s leading aeronautics companies who adds that he expects Mexico to continue to be a leader in global aeronautics. Olivier Piepsz, senior VP for Latin America of the French aerospace firm Safran Group, told Negocios that the performance of the aerospace sector in Mexico has been so impressive that Safran is now considering developing more activities in the country. Speaking at Safran’s headquarters in Paris, France, the VP confirms: “So far, we are studying this possibility and the idea, of course, is to create synergies between the companies of the Group and to also consolidate our footprint in Mexico”. Piepsz enthuses about Safran’s Mexico operations and continues: “We have two principal markets in Latin America, Mexico and Brazil; 80% of the Group’s number of employees in the region are in Mexico. Of what we produce in said area, 60% is in Mexico. For Safran, Mexico is the continent’s engine and we are very proud to be the most important aerospace company in the country. This year we have 4,400 people in employment with us in Mex-

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ico and we plan to increase that to 5,000 by the end of the year.” Safran is today the top French investor in Mexico. “The key figure for us is 25%. In the past year we grew 25% in production and in the number of our Mexican employees” Piepsz continues. When asked about Safran’s goals in Mexico, he answers: “We have three main objectives in Mexico: education and training, innovation and supply chain. That mirrors the very objectives of the Mexican government.” Adding, “we invest heavily in Mexico but we gain a lot of confidence from the country’s authorities. We meet on a regular basis with representatives of the federal and state governments, as well as with heads from small and medium enterprises to find solutions to any problems and to plan common strategies.” In addition to the close relation between private and public sectors towards the industry’s development, Mexico has some other advantages. “Mexico has a fantastic pool of talent. It has more than 100,000 engineers graduating every year, which is fantastic for the country and for Latin America. They are highly qualified, well motivated and incredibly enthusiastic to get into the aeronautics industry, which is a great bonus for us because in the US, for

Safran Group’s Presence in Mexico The Safran Group has operated in Mexico for more than 20 years. Today, it is the first aerospace employer in Mexico with over 4,400 workers in 10 companies and is also active in the defense and security sectors. Several of the Group’s companies have subsidiaries or affiliates in Mexico: J Labinal in Chihuahua. J Snecma, Messier-Bugatti-Dowty, Messier-BugattiDowty Services and Snecma America Engine Services in Querétaro. J Globe Motors in Tamaulipas. J Morpho in Estado de México. J Safran Mexico, Turbomeca and Morpho in Mexico City.

example, graduates are more interested in getting into the computer industry or into finance. In Mexico, there is no shortage of engineers wanting to get into the factory to begin work. That is a great advantage for us,” explains the VP. As for Safran’s plans in Mexico, Piepsz says: “We want to expand our industrial footprint in Mexico and to that end we opened an extension of our plant in Chihuahua, last month, reaching a total of 3,000 employees in this state. It is the largest wire-making factory in the world and shows our commitment to Mexico. Safran is

May 2013

also deepening its industrial presence in Mexico through its activities in security. Morpho, one of the world leaders in security solutions through smart cards, biometry, and detection, is highly active in the country.” Indeed the Group has great expectations in this field in Mexico thanks to its industrial presence and considers the country as a key base to address the regional market in Central America. Additionally, the Safran Group is heavily involved in sustainable development projects and training programs. For instance, it is leading the creation of a French-Mexican “Aeronautical Campus” in Querétaro, to develop a highly-skilled and trained workforce in aviation and MRO jobs. Furthermore, the Group welcomes a number of interns and participates in professional training programs. It has also been a leader in the foundation of an aeronautical cluster in Querétaro. The Group also works with Mexican industry on various sustainable development initiatives to provide “greener” solutions; more

May 2013

specifically it has been working with the airline Interjet on a green flight project of an A320 powered by a CFM56 engine using biofuel. A sector in which, once again, Mexico shows great potential. “We want to expand our industrial footprint in the country in many areas. We want it all in Mexico,” Piepsz concludes. N

SAFRAN MEXICO FACTS: J Number one player in Mexico’s aeronautical industry. J 4,400 employees. J A growth rate of 25% per year in Mexico (production & employees) over the last two years. J Largest French investor over the last years in Mexico. J Nine plants and three main hubs (Chihuahua, Querétaro and Mexico City). J 10 inaugurations/extensions since 2007.

www.safran-group.com

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Negocios ProMéxico | Mexico’s Partner

Mexico’s Partner | Negocios ProMéxico

photos archive

Volare: More Projection, Less Weight

Congress on March 1, 2013, has resulted in hundreds of cancelled flights, thousands of delays and the future reduction of air traffic volume due to the closing of control towers. But these are good signs for Volare because they represent opportunities for its sector: passenger railways will experience a spike in demand for tickets that will result in an increased need to buy light compartments for train cars. According to Corral, Volare had already become involved in the redesign of the Amtrak wagons that travel from Boston to Philadelphia and New York. “The train’s interiors will be very similar to first class [in an aircraft],” he explains.

Currently the profit margin from the company’s activities in the aerospace and train sectors is 75% and 25%, respectively. After a year of uncertainty and frozen projects, Corral says that the firm will see many doors open and important plans resume their course in 2013. “In the last two years we have practically doubled our income and it’s very likely that we’ll match it again this year, as we did in 2011,” says this entrepreneur who also chairs the small and medium-sized businesses (SMB) commission of the Mexican Federation of the Aerospace Industry (FEMIA). “Suddenly everything fell into place and this has been an extraordinary year; our projec-

tions for April are very similar to those of 2011, when we doubled our income compared to 2010,” he adds. An Unstoppable Flight Among countless others, Volare Engineering partners with Driessen Aircraft, an affiliate of the multinational Zodiac Aerospace, that specializes in aircraft interior and galley equipment. In addition, Corral explains that the Mexican corporation is undergoing consolidation with another partner in San Diego, California, that will result in a more extensive catalog and broader participation in the industry with the integration of engineering and electronics solutions. “When we receive a project, we take the model, improve it and make material recommendations,” he says of the activities of a company that offers engineering, design, testing, manufacturing and assembly solutions, backed up by the work of 20 permanent collaborators and a temporary pool of 20. Volare Engineering has ISO:9000 2008 and AS9100 certifications and is preparing to obtain the Six Sigma certification for cost reduction and innovation in its projects and processes. An article by the National University of La Jolla, California, recently highlighted the experience of Volare Engineering’s managers in global aerospace companies such as Airbus, McDonnell Douglas, Fokker and Boeing, particularly Corral, who is an expert in continuous improvement processes. With the eventual acceleration that the firm would experience from its new commitments, “we will incorporate more efficiency mechanisms to increase our productivity,” explains Corral.

Three Mexicans, the founders of the aircraft and train interior company, Volare Engineering, have managed to foresee market movements and visualize the opportunities that could arise from adjustments. They have also succeeded in satisfying two different sectors with one product and one goal. by omar magaña

Company specialization is of the utmost value in the aerospace industry. The key to success is focusing on one goal. Volare Engineering’s comes down to reducing weight in transportation. The firm that Sergio Segura founded in Mexicali, in the state of Baja California, and that he now manages with Roberto Corral, sales and marketing director, and Edgar Paz, head of special projects, moves in one direction and without any distractions, strengthening its core business: the design and manufacture of furniture for passenger aircraft and train galleys and cabins. Partnerships and trade relations are welcomed. Only recently, the partners visited the Aircraft

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Interiors Expo in Hamburg, Germany, from April 9 to 11, 2013, and returned with the confidence that they would soon close deals with companies to produce furniture for low-cost European airlines, who must lighten the weight of increasingly smaller aircraft. Screens, dividing walls, storage furniture and luggage compartments made with lightweight composites are just a few of the products that carry the Volare brand. “This is the chance to complement the new generation of products in the aerospace industry, not only in terms of design but also in terms of weight,” says Roberto Corral. On the other hand, the secuester approved by the US

May 2013

May 2013

Volare foresees a future filled with opportunities. According to Corral’s projections, China will experience new increases in labor costs

(UABC), are now creating projects to boost the production of materials with special rigidity, resistance, performance, durability and weight.

An article by the National University of La Jolla, California, recently highlighted the experience of Volare Engineering’s managers in global aerospace companies such as Airbus, McDonnell Douglas, Fokker and Boeing, particularly Corral, who is an expert in continuous improvement processes. due to pressure from unions, which will lead to a situation that will continue to divert investments to Mexico. Another piece of good news for companies like Volare, which currently import a large portion of their raw materials, is that the businesses located on the border aerospace cluster and universities in the area, particularly the Universidad Autónoma de Baja California

Everything indicates that new materials will appear shortly. Meanwhile, Volare’s three partners remain active both in Mexico and abroad, establishing agreements and looking for new customers. So fasten your seatbelts, and put your seats and tray tables in their upright positions, because Volare is taking off! N www.volare-eng.com

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Negocios ProMéxico | Mexico’s Partner

Mexico’s Partner | Negocios ProMéxico

photos courtesy of soisa

modifies and manufactures over 450 different products for the aerospace industry. Jesús and Javier Mesta of Soisa, remember: “We began in the aerospace sector because that was the area of opportunity in Mexico. After several analyses and studies we decided to go from manufacturing to crafting.” Located in the northern state of Chihuahua, Soisa’s tradition spans decades. It was born in 1949 as a manufacturing business and, over the years, has consolidated relations with companies in the US and Europe. Currently, after taking the leap to becoming an aerospace product manufacturer, Soisa now exports to various Asian and European countries, as well as the US. As Jesús Mesta indicates, “We engineer, design and manufacture airplane seats for more than 70 international airlines.” He adds that Soisa has two chief markets; one of them is

Soisa, Like Sitting on a Cloud 20% of all new airplane seats in the world are manufactured by the Mexican Soisa.

“The company performs a series of tests with software, we send off our designs, the customer approves them and then we deliver a sample; 90% of what we do is aimed at these two markets, seats for new airplanes and seat replacement for existing aircraft,” says Mesta. A key element in Soisa’s success is that it uses the concept “low volume high mix” unlike countries with high maquila volumes, such as China, which reduces costs for airlines. “The average purchase order is for approximately 15 pieces; imagine changing your production lines for 15 pieces for one airplane and then for another aircraft. This gives us a huge competitive advantage over other countries such as China or the US, which do not offer low volumes due to the high cost of these changes,” explains Mesta. Soisa’s geographic location is another added value

passengers who need to travel around the world and the need to replace old airplanes with new ones,” he says. Soisa’s CEO adds that manufacturing costs are lower in Chihuahua than in the US and Europe, and that there is highly-skilled human talent in the state. “Workers in Chihuahua believe that the product has to come out with perfect quality and on time. That is

a great advantage because we don’t have to teach that to people, it is already ingrained in their culture. There are also various technical schools and universities with huge capacity,” he explains. Soisa also works with the Tecnológico de Monterrey’s aerospace research center, where together with the firm’s designers, engineers and creators, university students innovate, design and

manufacture new seat prototypes and other products. AS9100 certified (the standard for the aerospace industry), Soisa intends to conquer 35% of the global market in the coming years. According to Jesús Mesta, the company wants to be recognized not only for its production volume, but for its innovation, design and patents. He adds that a few months ago an airline launched a call

for tenders to replace seats in 100 commercial passenger airplanes. While it took Soisa just ten days to send in its bid, the competition took three months. “We will experience more growth in design, patent registration and new product innovation. We are constantly working to improve airplanes and make them lighter,” he concludes. N www.soisaaerospace.com

AS9100 certified (the standard for the aerospace industry), Soisa intends to conquer 35% of the global market in the coming years. According to Jesús Mesta, the company wants to be recognized not only for its production volume, but for its innovation, design and patents.

by antonio vázquez

Two out of every 10 new seats in airplanes that fly around the world bear the stamp of Soisa, a Mexican company that is currently the trusted supplier of quality products to 70 international airlines. In 2006, the firm began manufacturing airplane seat covers. Seven years later, with more than 190 employees, Soisa engineers, designs,

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supplying seat covers for airlines and OEM’s such as Boeing and Airbus. “We produce seat covers for newly manufactured airplanes. I can safely state that we have 20% of the global seat market,” affirms Mesta. Soisa’s other strong market is redesign. The company helps airlines reinvent the image of their airplane seats, from design to cushion and cover manufacturing.

for the company. Some 250 miles from El Paso, Texas, the state of Chihuahua is a development center where deals can be closed with American and European companies. “Mexico’s great advantage is that it is one of the countries with the largest investment in the aerospace sector. The global aerospace market grows at an annual rate of 5.5%, boosted by two areas: the increase in the number of

May 2013

May 2013

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Negocios ProMéxico | Mexico’s Partner

Mexico’s Partner | Negocios ProMéxico

photos courtesy of radiall

Radiall, Connecting Airplanes in the Air This company located in the state of Sonora exports close to 70% of its production to the US; aviation giants such as Boeing and Airbus are among its main customers.

Radiall is the main supplier of several families of connectors for large companies and has a number of patents in this area. Its main customers include top aerospace firms like Boeing, Airbus, Embraer and Safran Group’s Labinal. Leyva explains that Radiall’s connectors can be placed in any part of an aircraft; invisible to the human eye, they are installed in the body, windows and throughout the airplane’s structure, helping it to function. Radiall began operating in 1999 in Nogales, another city in the state of Sonora. The company’s goal was to increase its production capacity and quality in Mexico to offer its main aerospace customers greater logistics and cost advantages. At that time, Radiall had a workforce of 90 employees. Since then it has grown exponentially; so much so that in 2007 it moved to Ciudad Obregón, where it currently has 560 employees and hopes

to grow to 600 by the end of 2013. Ildefonso Leyva is an optimist and a visionary. He believes that the aerospace industry is primed for huge growth in the near future and that this is a unique opportunity for Mexican businesses. “Boeing and Airbus have sales scheduled for five to ten years. This industry has a stable future and this reassures us to continue working. The Boeing 787 alone, our main project, has sold 1,040 airplanes, of which 50 are already flying. We are not the only suppliers, but this is a demanding sector that requires cutting-edge technology, and that is a huge commitment for us which helps us stay at the forefront,” he says. One of the advantages of closing a deal with Radiall is that it commits to reducing costs for its customers and proposes new ideas. “Going back to the case of the Boeing 787, it has forced us to innovate to make a lighter and more fuel-efficient airplane. A significant number of the technology components that we manufacture are lighter; we use plastic instead of aluminum, and that represents cost savings for the customer,” explains Leyva. Radiall’s geographical location gives it an advantage over companies in other countries. The Mexican firm can serve its customers in the US in less time -mainly Boeing in Seattle-, reducing transportation costs and delivery times. But “the main advantage of operating in Mexico is its people, their ability to learn the processes, how quickly they become efficient and effective and, most of all, their great loyalty towards the company and willingness

by antonio vázquez

When you are onboard a commercial Boeing or Airbus flight, chances are that the pilot’s orders are travelling through wires and connectors manufactured by the Mexicanbranch of Radiall. Radiall is a French company that manufactures and assembles electrical connectors, coaxial cables, optical fiber and communication antennas for the aerospace industry. It has several expertise centers and manufacturing locations on three continents and 13 countries. In Mexico, it is currently located in Ciudad Obregón, in the state of Sonora. The company is part of Collectron International Management Inc.,

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a pioneer of Sonora’s Shelter Plan with over 45 years of experience. It offers administrative and legal support for Radiall’s operations in Mexico. The company exports close to 70% of its annual production to the US, and another portion to its affiliates in France, which, in turn, distribute to other parts of Europe. “Radiall in Ciudad Obregón serves mainly the US aerospace industry, both civil and military. A percentage goes to the European market; through our affiliates in France, these become end products for customers in the region,” says Ildefonso Leyva, Radiall’s plant manager in Sonora.

May 2013

May 2013

to face new challenges,” says Leyva. Leyva states that professionally, Ciudad Obregón has a large number of universities and technical schools that enable Radiall to develop employees with a high degree of technical knowledge on a par with any other part of the world. One of Radiall’s goals is to design the first aerospace product made completely in Mexico in its Ciudad Obregón plant over the next two years. Meanwhile, the company focuses on satisfying the demand that the industry will have in the coming years, gradually reducing costs for its customers and innovating in the use of materials. N

Radiall is the main supplier of several families of connectors for large companies and has a number of patents in this area. Its main customers include top aerospace firms like Boeing, Airbus, Embraer and Safran Group’s Labinal.

www.radiall.com

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Negocios ProMéxico | Mexico’s Partner

Mexico’s Partner | Negocios ProMéxico

photos courtesy of tecnum

Tecnum: The Importance of Visibility Tecnum, like other companies who have started to explore the aerospace sector propelled by government bodies or academic institutions, understands that the road is long and risky. However, the firm wants to power through by facing the challenges ahead and increasing its presence on a global scale. by omar magaña

The time has come for Mexican small and medium-sized businesses (SMEs) from the aerospace sector to gain visibility with Original Equipment Manufacturers (OEMs) and Tier 1’s to ensure their involvement in the future activities of an ever-changing industry. “There is a great appetite in the aerospace sector and a remarkable trend for reductions in the supply base; OEMs want to deal with less suppliers and possibly one stop shops” says Guillermo Bonilla, CEO of Tecnum Service, a subcontract machining shop specialized in the manufacturing of prismatic components in hard materials located in Querétaro, Mexico. The visibility of Mexican SMEs seeking to lock into the sector, says Bonilla, will come from their ability to position themselves as high-technology manufacturers based in innovation, not only relying on the low labor costs which won’t last long. Partnerships with bigger international players could lead to a faster and more intensive growth resulting in more solid, productive and qualified companies. The task is to persuade large international players to invest in Mexico to gain market and increase their global competitiveness taking ad-

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vantage of a solid, young and certified workforce including well educated engineers. Tecnum Service has just about the right attributes to earn a spot in this race. It is a business that has made a name for itself in the automotive sector by supplying OEMs –such as TRW, Case New Holland, Cummins and GM– with products ranging from prototypes up to medium volume production parts. Through the experience gathered during many years machining cast iron and steel parts for a demanding sector such as the automotive, Tecnum has acquired an expertise that allows it to face the challenge of entering the aerospace market, leveraging its know-how to comply with the high demanding requirements of that industry. Bonilla believes that consolidating Tecnum as a high-ranked supplier –which satisfies the strict productivity and quality standards of the automotive industry, adding a premium to the mainly quality-focused but less productive aerospace sector– is no utopia but a real possibility. “According to our roadmap we will move from the automotive and commercial sectors in which we have worked so far, gradually integrating aerospace products,

Tecnum service’s conversion to an aerospace supplier has involved changes within the company, where the most significant are those related to retraining its human capital.

supported by Querétaro’s Secretariat of Sustainable Development (SEDESU); the participation in trade shows and benchmark studies carried out by the company itself have been key elements to identify niche markets and opportunities in the aerospace industry. However, Bonilla states: “the transition from our traditional market to one on the rise has had its key challenges.” What does this change imply? Tecnum service’s conversion to an aerospace supplier has involved changes within the company, where the most significant are those related to retraining its human capital. Like other up-and-coming SMEs in the sector, Tecnum intends to put its 36 collaborators in sync with the new organizational culture inspired by continuous improvements through constant training.

so to have a good balance of both” explains Bonilla. Tecnum has the right equipment: robust and flexible manufacturing cells to machine complex parts and a team of engineers with the competences required to produce prototypes and small batches typical of the aerospace industry. This has given the company the confidence to become a supplier of relatively large components out of hard materials such as titanium for OEMs that specialize in products such as landing gears, flats and slats assemblies, among other. The introduction to the aerospace industry programs

May 2013

May 2013

On the other hand “We have been forced to adapt and complement much of our equipment. We have made some very heavy investments,” explains Bonilla. “[Integrating into the sector] is very expensive, as we have to undergo certification processes and adapt our equipment to meet the standards” he adds, but it’s the only way to meet the objectives established by the company in light of the changes: being competitive, staying within the niche that other companies with Mexican equity have not explored: going from Tier 3 to Tier 2 and increasing profits from aerospace products, exceeding what has been Tecnum’s production axis so far. Bonilla believes he belongs to the group of Mexican entrepreneurs who want to transform the profile of Mexican manufacturing; who want to escalate to more value added processes that integrate better trained human capital. “We have to focus more on innovation and technology. Our medium-term goal is to create better-paid and higherquality job positions,” he says. According to his plans, Tecnum Service will be a more integrated company in the same niche by mid or end 2014, after an internal restructuring and collaborations with Tier 1 and Tier 2 businesses seeking partnerships in Mexico. In addition, Bonilla believes, a closer and more collaborative participation between the private sector and research institutions such as the National Council of Science and Technology (Conacyt). The actions of these bodies must contribute to the certification processes and match the efforts in favor of innovation stimulated by entrepreneurs. N www.tecnum.com.mx

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Negocios ProMéxico | Mexico’s Partner

Mexico’s Partner | Negocios ProMéxico

photos courtesy of frisa

press, roll, heat treat, machine (pre-machining and semifinal machining), analyze and test. The company has developed its own logistics –by ground, sea or air– for a worldwide delivery of large and small parts. New Opportunities With the launching of Boeing and Airbus’s new large projects, Frisa sees another promising window of opportunity and with it a new challenge: to increase the size of their workshops and machinery. The firm is in the middle of a growth project that involves boosting alliances with machining companies in Nuevo León to develop in the terminal or more complex phases of machining, an area they haven’t fully explored. Ramírez explains that, with regard to the aerospace sector, Frisa delivers semi-fin-

Frisa: A Perfect Fit Frisa is an integral piece of the soul that puts aircraft in the air. Its hi-temp seamless rolled rings and high-tech products meet the needs of some of the world’s top aircraft engine manufacturers. by omar magaña

Frisa is the perfect match for aircraft engine manufacturers. The Mexican company has the experience needed to forge metals with special properties, supported by a highly-skilled workforce which has made a career out of it, an unbeatable

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geographic location (some 200 kilometers from the MexicoUS border) and the best production technology in its field. Since 2003, Frisa has supplied seamless roll formed rings made from nickel and titanium alloys to Original

Equipment Manufacturers (OEMs) such as Rolls-Royce, General Electric (GE) and Pratt & Whitney, for the outer shells of turbines and inner areas such as combustion, transmission and exhaust chambers. Frisa is growing in a market it entered somewhat recently, after a decision taken to diversify its export locations. Its products, rolled rings, contour rings and open die forgings are now supplied to the aerospace, oil, wind, energy, construction, mining and general machinery markets. Oswaldo Ramírez, manager

of Frisa’s aerospace unit mentioned that the aerospace sector accounts around 15% of the firm’s annual turnover. “I remember that when we began operations in this new plant, our knowledge of the [aerospace] industry in Mexico was very limited,” he points out. “When we decided to venture into this industry, we knew of the tremendous challenges ahead of us” he adds. Founded in 1971, the company has three plants in the state of Nuevo León: Santa Catarina, García and Superalloys. It has the technology to cut the raw material and heat,

May 2013

May 2013

ished components, rings that the customer will finalize and assemble in the engines. He adds that “until now, we have found a dimensional difficulty to subcontract machining for parts the size of ours.” Frisa’s strength comes from the expertise it has gained through four decades of treating raw materials like carbon, low-alloy, stainless steels and, recently, titanium and hi-temp alloys also known as superalloys. Its manufacturing processes, quality standards (ISO 9000, ISO 14001 and AS9100) and engineering development are designed to match customer needs to the specifications established by the industry it serves. The company works with pressure, heat and wear-resistant metals for the engine market. “If you open an engine and analyze what the metallic components

are made of, you’d realize that approximately 70% are nickel-based alloys, 20% titanium-based and 10% aluminum-based and special steels,” explains Ramírez. If Frisa’s aerospace competitors, which are all located in the US and Great Britain, are noted for a long history in the sector, the Mexican corporation’s advantage, says Ramírez, is the region’s experience in metallurgy. The company’s process controls are supported by the latest information technology and the customer service expertise has been developed thanks to a wide portfolio of consumers from diverse sectors for which they have worked. Furthermore, while large sums of capital are required to participate in the aerospace sector, the investment needed to build production plants in Mexico is relatively lower than in countries where most of Frisa’s competitors are located. “We have a great deal of space available in Mexico and construction costs are lower compared to other countries,” says Ramírez. Moreover, companies such as Frisa have benefited from the education and training efforts that Mexican universities have

made specifically for the rapidly growing aerospace industry. Frisa’s aerospace unit has some 200 employees, including engineers who work alongside customers to analyze the geometries and specifications of the components to be developed, and structure the best processes in terms of costs and quality. Ramírez recognizes that the aerospace industry is “designed to remain unchanged,” where the margins to innovate and propose new designs are somewhat reduced given the years of research that go into every prototype. It is a strict industry that demands products that comply with previously validated and approved standards. Innovating in this industry means constantly seeking for new ways to benefit customer production processes; something Frisa does only too well. This enables it to visualize an optimistic future within the aerospace sector. “The next decade will bring about a period of higher growth. What is certain is that Frisa’s potential is engineered to last at least for the next two decades,” concludes Ramírez. N www.frisa.com

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Negocios ProMéxico | Mexico’s Partner

Hyrsa: A Mexican Aerospace Innovator As foreign investment increases in Mexico’s aerospace industry, companies with Mexican equity seek their niche to integrate and participate in the sector’s huge supply chain. This is Hyrsa’s case. by omar magaña

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Mexico’s Partner | Negocios ProMéxico

photos courtesy of hyrsa

The executives of Hyrsa American Steel Crowners & Aerospace will be part of a delegation from the Mexican aerospace industry that will visit the International Paris Air Show - Le Bourget in June 2013. Roberto Sánchez, CEO of the firm, acknowledges that the partnerships he seeks in forums such as this one, will pave the way for Mexican small and medium-sized businesses (SMBs) to integrate and climb in a sector characterized by the strict quality and reliability of even the smallest parts. “Several people have shown an interest in producing in Mexico and have provided us with information to begin quoting and establishing contacts,” he explains. Hyrsa is located in Querétaro, one of the Mexican states with the highest recorded development in the aerospace industry in recent years. It produces 11 different parts for the rigid metallic pipes that Industria de Tuberías Aeronáuticas (ITA), an affiliate of the multinational group ITP, produces in the same state. This Mexican capital company has focused on manufacturing assembly parts with the quality and precision finish required by ITA for titanium, steel, nickel and aluminum alloy pipes that are subsequently integrated to fuel-feeding, refrigeration and lubrication systems in aircraft. Meanwhile, ITA supplies the raw materials to Hyrsa’s aerospace division. Hyrsa leverages the extensive know-how it has developed through five decades of supplying high-precision parts machined in Computer Numerical Control (CNC) equipment from polymers and metals –stainless steel, aluminum, bronze and high-temperature alloys– to the food, automotive, medical and household appliance sectors.

Clearly, the aviation sector has its own attributes and standards, and Hyrsa has undergone a process of immersion, knowledge and analysis that enabled Roberto Sánchez to identify the niche where his business could fit into the industry’s wide and diverse value chain. “I found it interesting because [parts for the aerospace sector] have attributes that are very similar to what I am currently producing for the food industry,” says Sánchez. For instance, some of them use non-magnetic 300 and 400 series stainless steel that Hyrsa uses for mandates from the food industry. In addition, Sánchez discovered that in the aerospace industry, parts are delivered in limited size lots, never very large, as they are in the food sector. So, by the end of the last decade, everything pointed towards the possible penetration of the metal working SMB into the aircraft revolution in Querétaro. An Opportunity Not to be Missed “When we established in Querétaro, 35 years ago, we had no idea there would be a boom in the aerospace market,” says Sánchez. The company began in Mexico City and kept its metal working profile after moving to Querétaro. Its involvement in the aerospace industry is much more recent; it began with the sector’s exponential growth in the state, the arrival of transnationals such as Safran, AE-Petsche, Eurocopter and Bombardier and the enthusiasm shown by local universities. In 2007, the Tecnológico de Monterrey campus Querétaro launched the program “Aviation for Beginners,” with the goal of giving students the foundation to learn the basics of aeronautics and the industry.

May 2013

Roberto Sánchez participated in the program and then began to identify windows of opportunity for his firm; furthermore, he met a professional who has been key in Hyrsa’s recent history, José Eduardo Galicia Trejo, an aerospace engineer who teaches at the Tecnológico de Monterrey and is currently the company’s project and engineering manager. In mid-2010, Sánchez approached the purchasing department of then ITR and learned more about the processes and needs of his potential customers. Aircraft engine spare parts manufacturing was the first opportunity in the sector. That was when Sánchez realized that “it’s a very long road.” However, he has now consolidated a commercial company that focuses solely on the sector’s requirements and, in a very short time, has found the need to restructure Hyrsa to climb from Tier 3, where it is a manufacturer, to become a firm with high added-value products. “There are people who, like me, are interested in developing specialized manufacturing looking for a wide added-value margin for products,” he says. He accepts that Hyrsa will have to approach state funding and look for partnerships to accelerate the process and reach its goal by the end of 2013. Now, Hyrsa satisfies customers’ needs down to the last detail and manufactures assemblies with the materials, dimensions and shapes that they request. The new direction that Sánchez proposes for this small company, which has 15 employees, seven of whom work in the aviation division, involves increasing the quality of its processes through AS certifications, the “keys” for companies to open their doors to new suppliers; increasing productivity; introducing innovation with the help of engineers; and clos-

May 2013

ing deals with new customers. Meanwhile, Hyrsa has been negotiating with the German group Diehl Aerosystems. “We will start to rely on young people from the Universidad Nacional Aeronáutica en Querétaro (UNAQ), because ultimately you need employees with a specific mindset of productivity and care in manufacturing,” he explains. On the other hand, Hyrsa still caters to the markets that have been its customer base both before and during its ventures into the aviation sector. Sánchez’s strategy, then, involves reinforcing the company’s expertise, updating its machinery to improve the quality of its processes and getting certified; seeking out customers and partners; and committing to quality human capital. This is the roadmap for Hyrsa Aerospace today. N

Hyrsa leverages the extensive know-how it has developed through five decades of supplying high-precision parts machined in Computer Numerical Control (CNC) equipment from polymers and metals – stainless steel, aluminum, bronze and hightemperature alloys– to the food, automotive, medical and household appliance sectors.

www.hyrsa.mx

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Negocios ProMéxico | Mexico’s Partner

Especialistas en Turbopartes Flies Onboard Boeing and Airbus Aircraft Almost two decades ago, this Mexican company penetrated the energy market. In 2011 it began exploring other sectors and today manufactures technology parts for international commercial aircraft. by antonio vázquez

Mexico’s geographic location, infrastructure, human talent and even time zones, are helping it soar towards becoming a strategic leader in the aerospace industry, says Jatziri Barrios Porras, aviation Program Manager for Especialistas en Turbopartes, a Mexican company whose products are part of the landing gear of the Boeing 777 and 767, as well as the Boeing 737. “There’s a great demand and exponential growth in Mexico’s aviation market due

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Mexico’s Partner | Negocios ProMéxico

photos courtesy of especialistas en turbopartes

to new commercial routes to other countries, to other emerging markets. Mexico’s location –close to the US and flexible time zone with regard to Europe– have made it a geographic reference for investors,” she explains. She adds that in addition to Mexico’s position on the global map, it is a breeding ground for talent, young engineering graduates from local universities, who increasingly contribute their knowledge to a relatively new market in the

country, barely more than a decade old. “Furthermore, we have infrastructure. And the environment is also favorable; the environmental processes and issues for aerospace production in Mexico are not as difficult as in other latitudes, because the climate is not extreme. All this, added to our geographic location, convinces many businesspeople to invest in Mexico,” explains Barrios. And the executive knows what she’s talking about. Especialistas en Turbopartes began operations in 1991 as a turbo machinery firm in the state of Querétaro. That business division still remains and produces equipment for power generation and the supply of rotors and turbines of the state-owned Petróleos Mexicanos (Pemex) throughout the country. Over the years, the firm has decided to invest in research and explore other production sectors. Company officials intended to penetrate the aerospace market and by

parts for the landing gear of the Boeing 767, a commercial aircraft that was exported to Canada when it was launched. According to Barrios, being part of that project meant an opportunity for the company to specialize in a particular family of landing gear parts. “In 2013, we are manufacturing the FAI and first batches for the Boeing 737, one of the highest volume projects in the aviation division, with annual volumes of 1,200 manufactured parts, one of the largest in the industry; and we are looking forward to be involved with the Boeing 747,” continues Barrios. The parts that Especialistas en Turbopartes manufactures –and exports mainly to Canada– are called bearing carriers. The production, innovation and design of each part is owned by the firm, which means it is the only one in Mexico that manufactures this type of technology, making it nothing short of a craft.

2008, thanks to an invitation from TechBA Montreal (a program that helps to internationalize Mexican small and medium-sized enterprises (SMEs) that bring innovation and quality to markets), Especialistas en Turbopartes knew it had what it needed to achieve its goal. All that remained was the final leap. The company acquired every kind of tool, from financial to certification (it is now AS9100 certified, the quality standard for the aerospace industry) and finally, in 2010, it opened the division. One year later, Especialistas en Turbopartes was already manufacturing components for Goodrich Landing Gear through Noranco, two international aerospace technology manufacturers. Jatziri Barrios explains that since February 2011, the Mexican firm has continued to increase its presence in the aviation market. Currently, Especialistas en Turbopartes manufactures

May 2013

May 2013

The parts that Especialistas en Turbopartes manufactures –and exports mainly to Canada– are called bearing carriers. The production, innovation and design of each part is owned by the firm, which means it is the only one in Mexico that manufactures this type of technology, making it nothing short of a craft.

“We are delivering a volume of approximately 100 pieces per part number. We are currently developing five part numbers, some 350 pieces. Aviation handles small volumes when compared to the automotive sector; however, for instance, the 767 landing gear requires four pieces with delivery times of up to two months,” says Barrios. Added to that process is the customer’s validation of the product, which can take from three to six months. Especialistas en Turbopartes has a plant that manufactures exclusively for the aviation division with a dozen employees, and its goals are to grow in the future: it plans to have an annual increase of 30% by 2014. “We have already established contact with potential customers; we want to strengthen our landing gear manufacturing division and penetrate the area of propulsion engines,” concludes Barrios. N especialistasenturbopartes.com.mx

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Negocios ProMéxico | Mexico’s Partner

Education: The Key to Achieving Your Pinnacle When aerospace software engineering company Pinnacle was looking for a suitable site in Mexico, it was the high student population in Ciudad Obregón and elsewhere in the state of Sonora that convinced the firm to establish its facility there.

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Mexico’s Partner | Negocios ProMéxico

photos archive

by graeme stewart

Education, education, education is the popular mantra. And it is precisely this form of learning that has led to the success in Mexico of a US company specializing in embedded software product solutions for the aerospace industry. Pinnacle Aerospace, headquartered in Phoenix, Arizona, set up its primary design center in Ciudad Obregón in

the northern state of Sonora in 2009. Today it employs 38 people and, in the words of company President and CEO, Mike Morgan, it is in Mexico for the long run, thanks to national and local government assistance, a “fabulous” workforce, the country’s close proximity to the US and its special relationship with universities and colleges in Sonora.

May 2013

For Pinnacle has an arrangement with the college authorities that sees the firm recruit the cream of the crop of graduating students interested in an aerospace career. Indeed, Morgan states that Pinnacle chose Ciudad Obregón as the location for its facility: “Because of its high student population. There are 10 colleges in Sonora and we recruit from all of them. We have close links with all of the colleges and that has been a great advantage to us. The state graduates approximately 600 software engineers and Computer Science professionals annually. Pinnacle has relationships with all of the state’s major universities providing us preferred access to the most talented English speaking engineers. We are well integrated within the local education community and teach courses on embedded systems design.” And by providing meaningful employment opportunities to pregraduate students, Pinnacle can influence the curriculum of the software degree programs and further improve the depth and applicability of the talent pipeline. “This has worked very well for us. I don’t think we have had a single regret about any recruitment. We have made very few hiring mistakes. To be honest, the Mexican workforce is fabulous. They are keen, highly skilled, responsible and determined to show that they are as good as any counterpart in the world. I have no complaints whatsoever about our Mexican employees,” Morgan says. What kind of work do the student recruits have to look forward to?

May 2013

As the company says on its website, Pinnacle Aerospace is dedicated to being the aerospace community partner of choice for high quality, cost effective embedded software and product solutions delivered as promised. It offers top quality, and low cost, near-shore engineering solutions using experienced employees from its primary design center in Ciudad Obregón. Its motto is simple: “Deliver high value solutions using low cost, near-shore resources.” According to Morgan, recruits will help to deliver high value solutions using low cost, near-shore resources and, more specifically, will help develop project plans that fit a company’s needs and budget. They will be working on development plans required by the client including software aspects of certification, software development, software verification and a Software Quality Assurance Plan (SQAP). Morgan adds: “We pride ourselves on systems design and requirements development as we have extensive knowledge in navigation and flight management systems, flight controls, displays, aircraft maintenance systems and data link systems and a background in avionics integration and aircraft simulation. We also have great experience in most major system development and requirements and management tools including DOORs (Dynamic Object Oriented Requirements Management) and Matlab (Matrix Laboratory). Pinnacle can also help organize existing require-

ments into a database, write new ones and analyze system requirements for completeness and testability.” Morgan says Pinnacle is well aware of the documentation requirements of safety critical applications, which is why it helps its clients develop the required design documents including Software Requirements Document (SRD) and Software Design Description (SDD). “Pinnacle understands the requirements for certification of projects and can assist with compliance to the required national and international standards,” he assures. Pinnacle’s care in these matters has paid off as the success of its Primary Design Center at Ciudad Obregón has managed to recall work originally sent to India and China and relocate it to North America. Morgan enthuses: “Relocating the work from Asia to closer to home speaks volumes for the success of the Ciudad Obregón Center. As for the future, I can’t see us going anywhere else other than Mexico in the years to come. We have integrated into the Ciudad Obregón community, our workforce is outstanding and we are only a two hour flight away from Phoenix, we have fantastic cooperation with the national and state governments and we couldn’t be more pleased with how everything has gone in this city.” That’s certainly good news both for Pinnacle and for Mexican students from the state of Sonora. N

“Relocating the work from Asia to closer to home speaks volumes for the success of the Ciudad Obregón Center. As for the future, I can’t see us going anywhere else other than Mexico in the years to come.” ­—Mike Morgan, President and CEO of Pinnacle Aerospace.

www.pinnacleaerospace.com

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Negocios ProMéxico | Mexico’s Partner

03b: Connecting Half the World to Cyberspace O3b, a satellite broadband system, will launch operations from Mexico to the rest of Latin America in 2014. O3b will also have offices in Brazil and Colombia and will bring high speed Internet connectivity to parts of Latin America that have never been connected before. The company estimates up to 4 million usd in sales in Mexico and Central America during its first year of activities.

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Mexico’s Partner | Negocios ProMéxico

photos courtesy of 03b

by antonio vázquez

O3b is the story of how a simple idea turned into a successful company that not only generates profit, but is set to bring Internet access to 3 billion people -almost half the world’s population. In 2007, during one of his many trips around the world, Greg Wyler wondered why he could not access the Internet from wherever he was, even with all the mobile technology at his disposal.

From that thought, the visionary set out to create a system to enable anyone in the world to chat, visit a blog or write on Facebook, regardless of the geographical conditions. Thus O3b (Other 3 Billion) was born, a satellite services provider that is currently weaving a network of next generation satellites for telecommunications operators, Internet providers, busi-

May 2013

ness customers and governments in emerging markets. O3b’s system will allow billions of users from more than 180 countries to benefit from the high speed and low costs of Internet on mobile devices. “We really aren’t inventing the wheel; we are simply taking a satellite orbit and being creative with its use. We

it can operate in the rest of Latin America, due to the country’s significant influence on other countries in the Americas. O3b underwent a full conception and creation process for the service it will offer globally, with close to 1.3 billion usd in funding obtained from a successful campaign between 2009 and 2010.

and interactive games almost five times faster. With a fleet of eight newgeneration middle orbit satellites that will circle the Earth four times a day starting in June 2013 and will be located some 8,000 kilometers above the planet, O3b will offer a faster connection than traditional satellites, which are at an altitude of over 35,000 kilometers.

will give coverage to areas of the planet that are not connected, from satellites that are traveling around the Earth,” explains Mauricio Iván Morales, sales director of O3b for Mexico, Central America and the Caribbean. He adds: “There are hundreds of cities in Latin America that lack Internet access and what we are doing is contributing to closing the digital gap.” Morales explains that the firm has decided to open offices in Mexico, from where

SES, Google, Liberty Global, HSBC Principal Investments, Northbridge Venture Partners, Allen & Company, Development Bank of Southern Africa, Sofina, Satya Capital and Luxempart, are the investors that contributed with their equity to materialize Wyler’s idea. What differentiates O3b from other satellite Internet suppliers? Mauricio Morales explains that the company he represents has decided to place its satellites at a lower orbit, making web page loads

The firm –the first in Latin America to provide true satellite broadband connection– will enable connection speeds that range from 10 megabytes per second (Mbps) to 1 gigabyte per second (Gbps). “Due to the way we handle our technology, our total operating costs are lower than the rest of regular satellite technologies. We offer prices that are much lower than what operators pay with traditional satellite technology. We provide high-quality

May 2013

satellite communications with high capacity and competitive costs,” says Morales. However, he explains that O3b’s goal is not to displace companies that offer optic fiber Internet. “We do not intend to have terminals in Mexico City, Guadalajara, Monterrey; our target markets are those with communication needs, where companies cannot install 50 kilometers of optic fiber because they are in the middle of the jungle or due to other geographical conditions,” he says. So, starting in November 2013, O3b will offer commercial services with a global coverage 45 degrees north and south of the Equator. For Latin America, that means satellite Internet services practically from the central US to Patagonia, in Argentina. To date, O3b has customers in Brazil, Colombia, Guyana and the Caribbean, and has approached the governments of Mexico, Costa Rica, Brazil, Colombia and others, to bring its technology across these countries’ territories. Morales reveals that O3b’s first operational customer is from the Cook Islands, a small archipelago located in the southern part of the Pacific Ocean, between Hawaii and New Zealand. He adds that O3b’s first generation of eight satellites will be joined by a second generation of four additional satellites in 2014. The idea, he says, is for the company to have up to 120 satellites operating in the future. “This is new technology, so we are going through something that resembles evangelism, but once customers get to know our product, they will never stop asking for it,” concludes Morales. N www.o3bnetworks.com

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Negocios ProMéxico | Mexico’s Partner

Mexico Working Hand In Hand with Hughes A world-leading US broadband satellite network and service provider has developed a special relationship with various Mexican government agencies over the years to mutual benefit. by graeme stewart

Ask any company and they will tell you that government contracts are much sought after and cherished because of their “locked in” guarantee of financial security. Of course, it is a two-way street and countries benefit from the expertise of the favored corporation. One US firm with a presence in Mexico City that has had many years of experience with government contracts in Mexico is Hughes Network Systems, a wholly owned subsidiary of EchoStar Cor-

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Mexico’s Partner | Negocios ProMéxico

photos courtesy of hughes network systems

poration, and a world-leading broadband satellite network and service provider. Hughes is working hand-in-hand with the Mexican government to deliver a 24 million-usd new networks program to connect schools, hospitals, government locations, community centers and public calling offices in the country’s 32 federal entities. Headquartered in Maryland, Hughes was chosen last year through a bidding selection process that included ma-

jor international and Mexican broadband satellite equipment providers. The Mexican network is operated by Telecomunicaciones de México (Telecomm Telégrafos), a decentralized government office in charge of telecommunications in the country. Hughes was also selected by Boeing, the world’s largest defense, space and security business, to provide the Ground Communications Network for the MEXSAT Satellite Based Network to offer secure communications for Mexico’s national security needs, as well as enhanced coverage for the country’s civil telecommunications. Both projects are well under way, providing Internet access to previously unattended regions throughout Mexico and contributing to the nation’s security. Speaking at the launch of the nationwide network pro-

Hughes Network Systems is working hand in hand with the Mexican government to deliver a 24 million-usd new networks program to connect schools, hospitals, government locations, community centers and public calling offices in the country’s 32 federal entities.

gram, in 2012, Mónica Aspe Bernal, coordinator of the Knowledge and Information Agency of the Mexican Ministry of Communications and Transportation (SCT) said: “Hughes has been providing products and services to SCT for 25 years and has proven it is a reliable supplier to the Mexican government. On a project of this scope and importance, an open public competitive bidding process is mandatory. Other major broadband satellite equipment providers participated in the bid and Hughes’ proposal came out on top.” Hughes supplies every component of the network, from its advanced HN System Network Operations Center and 11,000 broadband terminals to the fiber optic/Internet interconnection equipment, data compression/optimization technology, IP phones and wireless access systems to serve remote locations. Almost 1,100 solar power systems have been

May 2013

May 2013

supplied to support equipment off the power grid. “We are proud that Hughes was the winner of this important tender for this significant opportunity,” says Nick Marzella, Hughes Vice President for Latin America. “As we’ve done in the past, we will strive to retain SCT’s trust and confidence in our ability to create one of the world’s largest broadband networks in such a short time window –with enormous potential in social and economic value.” Hughes is well under way providing services to the MEXSAT project and is supplying system design and development engineering, fabrication, and development of gateways, factory integration, and test of all subsystems, as well as site installation and final delivery into service. On the MEXSAT project, Marzella says: “Hughes is also enormously proud to have been selected by Boeing to develop this essential sys-

tem and core technologies for the MEXSAT program. Our experience developing mobile satellite systems and terminals for operators around the world has uniquely qualified us for this project and we’re employing our well-proven GMR1-3G satellite air interface in the design. That technology will be embedded in a range of reference user terminals we will deliver for maritime, aeronautical and

high-speed vehicular applications, including tracking.” The government of Mexico awarded the contract to Boeing to deliver the end-toend satellite communications system, which will consist of three satellites, two gateway sites, associated network operations systems, and reference user terminals. Marzella, who is happy to call Mexico his second home, speaks with great satisfaction about Hughes’ Sales and Operations office in Mexico City. “It started out primarily as a sales office 20 years ago and in the last 10 years we have done a lot of business in Mexico with Telmex and the Mexican government, particularly the SCT. Mexico has been good for us. It is the second largest market in Latin America and is a key market for the company. We thought it was important for us to have a local office in Mexico City because clients like to be addressed in their native language,” he says. “As for the future, we are looking forward to further expansion in Mexico and continuing to work with the Mexican government,” Marzella concludes. N www.hughes.com

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Negocios ProMéxico | Figures

infographic oldemar

The Complete Guide to the Mexican Way of Life

MEXICO IS GAINING

ALTITUDE Mexico’s aerospace industry has recorded almost 20% annual growth in the last seven years.

Currently, there are 270 companies and support entities in the country, most of which are NADCAP and AS9100 certified.

They are located mainly in six states and employ more than 31,000 high level professionals.

By 2012, exports from the Mexican aerospace industry reached a value of 5.040 billion .

Foreign and national investment in the sector exceeded 1 billion  in 2010 and 3 billion  in the last three years.

(Ministry of Economy -SE-, General Directorate of Heavy and HighTechnology Industries -DGIPAT-, 2011)

(Strategic Program for the Aerospace Industry 2010-2020, SE; Mexican Federation of the Aerospace Industry -FEMIA-)

The Lifestyle

5,040

MEXICO’S AEROSPACE INDUSTRY EXPORTS*

4,377 3,082

Million USD

3,266

2,728 2,522

2,042 1,684 1,267

1,343 1,306

2002

2003

2004

2005

2006

2007

2008

2009

2010

MORE PLAYERS ON THE FIELD Aerospace companies operating in Mexico*

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Five Essential Exemplars of Mexican Folk Art

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No collection of Mexican folk art can claim to be complete without having at least a few samples of black clay figurines, Talavera pottery, silk rebozos, Huichol tapestries and silver jewelry. 64

2008

According to estimates from the Strategic Program for the Aerospace Industry 2010-2020, coordinated by the Ministry of Economy (SE), the industry is expected to export 12.26 billion dollars in 2020, with a 14% average annual growth rate.

2012

Mexico is the 6th largest supplier of aeronautical products to the US.

Mexico has the 4th largest private jet fleet in the world.

(US Department of Commerce; US Census Bureau, 2012)

(Aviation Week, 2013)

Every two minutes, a plane with Mexican technology takes off.

2013** General Electric the world’s leading producer of aircraft engines, has its largest Center for Research and Design outside the US in Querétaro, Mexico.

(ProMéxico, 2012) **Updated to May

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*Source: FEMIA

2010

angélica portales

2006

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The Lifestyle Briefs

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Underneath the Pitaya Thorny Exterior, a Nutritious Interior

Two Silver Droplets Impossible to Tell Apart

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Mexican Architects without Borders

DDI Acting Out Design Fantasies


The Lifestyle Briefs

The Lifestyle Briefs

CINEMA

DESIGN

Three Mexican Films at Cannes

Life-changing Design

courtesy of premios quórum

This year, the watchword of Mexico’s prestigious Quórum Año Uno design awards was “Connecting”. For the second year running, dozens of designers specializing in graphic, industrial, fashion and digital design, as well as animation and illustration, competed with professionals from other fields –education, culture, economy, quality of life, government and social responsibility– that have used design to improve the living conditions of Mexicans. Founded in 1992, the purpose of Quórum is to single out talent, acknowledge best practices and promote the six main branches of design on a professional level. Winning projects will be announced on September 30, 2013, at an award ceremony at Mexico City’s Palace of Fine Arts. Complementary activities will include the publication of a commemorative book, an exhibition at the Franz Mayer Museum and round tables to promote the strategic goals of Quórum, in accordance with the opportunities available in Mexico and the country’s needs.

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courtesy of festival de cannes

A total of three Mexican films will be participating this year at Cannes, one of the world’s most respected film festivals. Amat Escalante’s Heli will be competing with 18 other films by directors of the stature of Roman Polanski, the Cohen brothers and Steven Soderbergh for the coveted Palme d’Or, the top prize awarded to the director of the best feature film. In 2005, Escalante won the Critic’s Award in the Un Certain Regard category of Cannes for his film Sangre. This year, La jaula de oro by Mexico’s Diego Quemada-Díez will be screened in the same section. Contrafábula de una niña disecada by Alejandro Iglesias Mendizábal will also be traveling to France this year under the auspices of the CinéFondation program. The director’s thesis project is one of 14 fictional and four animated films selected from 1,550 entries submitted by 277 film schools worldwide. www.festival-cannes.fr mexican director amat escalante will be competing for the palm d’or.

www.quorum.org.mx

ARCHITECTURE

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May 2013

May 2013

demics, professionals and focus group members. The BASF edifice competed in the Architecture, Building and Structure Design category, where it received a Golden A –an honor bestowed on only 3% of participating projects. Standing on Insurgentes Avenue, one of Mexico City’s main thoroughfares, the BASF building boasts 5,000 square meters of private and open-plan office spaces spread over a ground floor and six levels. The structure’s lighting is designed to save energy, while the principles of sustainability are evident throughout, right down to the basement, which features a bicycle rack and showers. The good news is that Space has other sustainable projects

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Who said going to work was a drag? Not if you work at BASF. Fresh, authentic and environmentally friendly is how the jury of Italy’s A’ Design Award described this corporate building, designed by the Mexican architecture studio Space. The firm’s founding partner, Juan Carlos Baumgartner, traveled to Lake Como in the Lombardy region of Italy to receive the award on April 15, 2013. A’ Design Award is an international competition that recognizes the best of international architecture and design in 80 categories ranging from furniture and sports equipment to lighting and the design of government buildings. Projects are evaluated by a panel of aca-

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BASF, Voted One of the Best Buildings on the Planet

in the pipeline and that BASF will soon be leasing out some of its private cubicles. www.adesignaward.com www.spacemex.com

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Negocios ProMéxico | The Lifestyle

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The Lifestyle | Negocios ProMéxico

Underneath the Pitaya Thorny Exterior, a Nutritious Interior Bittersweet to the palate, there’s nothing equivocal about the health benefits of this exotic fruit. And spring is the season when it comes into its own. by ignacio pérez vega

The pitaya grows in Vietnam, Colombia and the Caribbean. The Japanese eat it too. But it is in Mexico where this colorful exotic fruit takes on the subtle flavors of the land and has a loyal following. Rich in fiber, antioxidants and vitamin C, pitaya can be eaten fresh or can sometimes be found in punch, pastries and infusions. It is also used to make jellies and juices. Unlike its cactus-fruit cousin, the prickly pear, which has 50% fiber content, pitaya are 90% pulp. It has small seeds and a thin skin and takes from 55 to 60 days to mature. Once picked, it lasts five days at most, or up to 12 if refrigerated. In April, May and June, trucks laden down with pitaya fill the district of Nueve Esquinas in Guadalajara, turning its colonial streets into an explosion of color. On the sidewalks, large baskets called chiquihuites brim with between 200 and 300 pitaya of all shapes and sizes. Originally from Techaluta, Amacueca, Zacoalco and Sayula in Southern Jalisco, and arid parts of Oaxaca and Puebla in Central Mexico, the word pitaya is of Caribbean origin and means “thorny fruit”. The Spaniards documented it and brought it to Mexico during the Conquest, although there is evidence to suggest it has always grown here. Legend has it the Aztec emperors ate fresh

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A Super Fruit Pitaya and xoconostle can help people with Diabetes mellitus control their blood sugar levels. Since 1998, Miguel Ángel Armella, an academic at the Department of Biology at the Iztapalapa campus of the Autonomous Metropolitan University (UAM), has been researching dragon fruit, sweet xoconostle and jiotilla.

“All three are cactus fruit varieties and share similar properties. In the case of dragon fruit, we have found that it absorbs glucose derivatives. It doesn’t reduce glucose levels per se but it does prevent it entering the blood stream. That is because it adheres to the films of glucose in the digestive tract, making it harder for the human body to absorb them. So even though dragon fruit doesn’t contain any molecule

pitaya, ferried to Teotihuacán from Puebla and Western Mexico by messengers who made the 500-kilometer journey on foot. There are many types of cactus plants that produce pitayas, some 19 edible species in all, according to the Internet site dragonfruitpitaya.org. “I never dreamed that the world of fruits could produce something as wonderful as the dragon fruit. Its pulp has the color and appearance of rolled up rose petals and its juicy flesh tastes of a passionate lover’s kiss. Never before had I held in my hands a piece of red earth,” said French poet André Breton on tasting a Mexican pitaya for the first time. Unfortunately, this tasty exotic fruit isn’t keen on traveling. To taste it, you’ll have to visit Mexico, where it can be found chiefly in major cities like Mexico City, Guadalajara and Puebla. However, cactus experts like Eulogio Pimienta Barrios and Pedro Puente Ovalle, who work as researchers at the University of Guadalajara (UdeG), believe the pitaya can broaden its horizons, provided it is kept refrigerated. N

or element that directly reacts with glucose, it does have a positive effect,” says Armella. The red color of dragon fruit and jiotilla is due to the presence of betalains, a powerful class of antioxidants that are beneficial to the human organism. All three fruits have as much vitamin C as citrus fruit, which also makes them useful allies in warding off respiratory diseases.

May 2013

May 2013

The pitaya in eight bites: J J J J J J

Average weight: 100 - 120 grams. Fruit maturity period: 55 - 60 days. Picking season: April, May and June. Pitahaya is a Caribbean word meaning “thorny fruit”. Grown commercially on a small scale. Easily identifiable by its distinctive red, purple or white skin. J Produced in the Central Mexican states of Hidalgo, Morelos, Guerrero, Puebla, Oaxaca and Jalisco. J Major producer states: Oaxaca, Puebla and Jalisco.

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Negocios ProMéxico | The Lifestyle

The Lifestyle | Negocios ProMéxico

Mexican Architects without Borders Stadiums, gardens, office blocks, presidential residences; many of the buildings designed by Mexicans have broken ground in the history of architecture, setting the bar for those to come in their wake. Barragán, Ramírez, González de León, Legorreta, Norten and Kalach are just a few of the great architects Mexico has produced and whose creations have been shaping the face of our world since the 20th century, with creativity and a keen eye for space, materials and forms that harmonize with the natural environment.

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omar bárcenas

by antonio vázquez

Luis Barragán, Geometrician

The architecture of Pedro Ramírez Vázquez (Mexico City, 19192013) is nothing short of a chronicle of late 20th century Mexico. Chairman of the organizing committee for the 1968 Olympic Games in Mexico, and Secretary of State during the administration of President José López Portillo, Ramírez Vázquez’ works recount each phase in the country’s transition to modernity. The Modern Art Museum (MAM), the National Museum of Anthropology (MNA), the Azteca Stadium, the Basilica of Guada-

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lupe, the San Lázaro legislative building, the Templo Mayor Museum and the markets of Tepito, Coyoacán and La Lagunilla are just some of the landmarks this architect bequeathed Mexico City and that form part of the daily lives of the thousands who work and play in them. Overseas, Pedro Ramírez left his mark on buildings like the headquarters of the International Olympics Committee in Switzerland, the Chapel of Our Lady of Guadalupe at St. Peter’s Basilica in the Vatican, the Presidential Palace of Costa Rica and the Museum of Black Civilizations in Senegal.

May 2013

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Pedro Ramírez Vázquez, Chronicler

omar bárcenas

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omar bárcenas

Thick walls, bright colors, contrasting textures, peepholes, gardens and water are all recurring elements in the works of Luis Barragán (Guadalajara, Jalisco, 1902-1988), the only Mexican to have won the Pritzker Prize, architecture’s most sought-after accolade. Barragán’s vision meshed in the 1920s during a trip to France, Spain and Italy. The Mediterranean landscapes he encountered on his travels were to have a lasting influence on his architectural style. In 1947, he designed and built his own residence in the Tacubaya district of Mexico City and in 2004, the house –Casa Barragán– was declared a World Heritage Site, the only private residence in Latin America to make it on to the prestigious list of the United Nations Educational, Scientific and Cultural Organization (UNESCO).

May 2013

Anyone who claims to be interested in architecture simply must visit Casa Barragán. The building –a mixture of color balanced out with sobriety and geometrical volumes– houses what was once the architect’s studio, library, living quarters, terraces and gardens. Among Barragán’s countless contributions to Mexico’s cityscape are the residential district of Jardines del Pedregal de San Ángel, the restoration of the Capuchin Convent and the monumental Torres Satélite sculpture in Mexico City. The Architecture of Luis Barragán, an exhibition shown at the New York Museum of Modern Art (MoMA) in 1976, consolidated the architect as an international name. That same year, he was awarded the National Prize for Sciences and the Arts in his native Mexico.

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Modern, abstract and majestic are the adjectives that best describe the architecture of Teodoro González de León (Mexico City, 1926). Some of his better known works include the National Auditorium, the Colegio de México (COLMEX), the Rufino Tamayo Museum in Mexico City and the buildings that house the Mexican embassies in Germany and Guatemala. A graduate of the National School of Architecture at the National Autonomous University of Mexico (UNAM), González de León was awarded a scholarship by the French government to work for over a year as a resident at the Unité d’Habitation in Marseille. Back in Mexico, he worked closely with famed architect Abraham Zabludowsky, who had a hand in most of his projects for decades. Aside from his modernist, abstract aesthetic, the distinguishing features of González de León’s works are their colossal size and the repeated use of concrete carved into minimalist blocks that allude, perhaps unwittingly, to the huge pre-Columbian sculptures uncovered at archaeological sites throughout Mexico like Teotihuacán.

Ricardo Legorreta (Mexico City, 1931-2011) garnered international fame for his striking use of color, texture and light, combined with a gift for balancing spaces in terms of proportion and designing on a monumental scale. A student at the Architecture Faculty of the UNAM, for almost half a century Legorreta dominated the architecture scene in Mexico, where he built several hotels for the Camino Real chain in Mexico City, Cancun and Ixtapa, the Televisa offices and the Papalote Children’s Museum, both in Mexico City, and the Museum of Contemporary Art (MARCO) in Monterrey. He also renovated Chapultepec Zoo and restored what was once the Palace of Iturbide in Mexico City’s historic center. Legorreta’s legacy lives on today beyond Mexico’s borders in buildings like the San Antonio Public Library in Texas, the Metropolitan Cathedral of Managua, Nicaragua, the Discovery Museum in California and the Sheraton Hotel in Bilbao, Spain.

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robert loncher photo

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May 2013

martha silva

Ricardo Legorreta, Big Thinker

aurelio asiain

Teodoro González de León, Modernist

daniel lobo

The Lifestyle | Negocios ProMéxico

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Negocios ProMéxico | The Lifestyle

May 2013

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Negocios ProMéxico | The Lifestyle

The Lifestyle | Negocios ProMéxico

Enrique Norten, Perfectionist

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omar bárcenas

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“After Luis Barragán, Enrique Norten,” New York gallery owner and architecture expert Max Protech has been quoted as saying on more than one occasion. In the mid 1980s, Norten (Mexico City, 1954), who had just turned 30, founded TEN, a firm that is now synonymous with excellence in architecture’s upper echelons. The National Theater School, the National Arts Center (CNA) and the refurbishing of the Condesa district in Mexico City all form part of his impressive portfolio. Norten is an architect who knows no boundaries, as evidenced by buildings like the Brooklyn Public Library for the Visual and Performing Arts in New York. These and other similar works have earned him recognition from prestigious organizations such as the Society of American Registered Architects (SARA) and the Municipal Art Society (MAS) of New York. Enrique Norten holds the Miller Chair at the University of Pennsylvania, the O’Neil Ford Chair in Architecture at the University of Texas at Austin and the Lorch Professor of Architecture Chair at the University of Michigan.

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May 2013

May 2013

omar bárcenas

Alberto Kalach (Mexico City, 1960) defines architecture as a discipline that helps solve spatial and construction problems. True to his own definition, he has focused his talent on lighting and ventilation projects, with floor plans that make the best possible use of available space, while achieving a sense of harmony with the natural environment. Town planning is Kalach’s specialty and one of the pet projects of his Mexico: Ciudad Futura collective is Ciudad Lacustre, which aims to replenish the lakes and canals that once surrounded Tenochtitlán, seat of the Aztec Empire, where Mexico City was founded five centuries ago. Kalach designed the José Vasconcelos Public Library, the New Natural History Museum and the kurimanzutto Gallery in Mexico City and the Juan José Arreola Library at the University of Guadalajara (UdeG).

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Alberto Kalach, Problem Solver

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Negocios ProMéxico | The Lifestyle

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courtesy of consejo nacional del deporte

Two Silver Droplets Impossible To Tell Apart Like mirror images of each other when they dive from the 10 meter platform, these Olympic medalists have their sights set on Rio 2016.

by patricia peña

What were you doing when you were 18? Iván Alejandro García Navarro and Germán Saúl Sánchez Sánchez will tell you that their passage from puberty to adulthood was spent 10 meters above the ground, doing what they do best. These Mexican divers will also tell you that their dedication and passion for the sport won them the Olympic medals they’d dreamed of as boys. “Nothing is impossible. It doesn’t cost anything to dream”. These phrases may sound like clichés but they are the mantra that has got Iván and Germán this far. After winning a silver Medal at the 2012 Olympic Games in London in the synchronized

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diving 10 meter platform event, they could easily have retired from the sport, gracefully and with no regrets. But they have that headstrongness that comes with youth, while their aspirations keep them on their toes, dreaming of Olympic gold, a World Series medal and seeing their names inscribed in the annals of Mexican history as the best divers of all times. Different, But the Same Germán Sánchez is 20. Born in the city of Guadalajara in West Mexico, he loves wrestling and sees himself traveling the world, executing extreme dives for a series organized by an energy drink brand. He wants to live in the country in a regular house; his only requirement is that it has a pool.

Iván García, aka “El Pollo” is also a native of Guadalajara and has just turned 19. He wants to get married, have a family, drive a flashy sports car and work in public relations. Out of their swimming trunks –Germán in sweatpants and Iván in designer brands, as per usual– they seem at odds, worlds apart even. Yet the minute they open their mouths the gap narrows, only to disappear completely when they start telling anecdotes. Maybe it’s because they’ve spent half of their short lives together, training for up to 10 hours a day, juggling their free time between the gym and the sports doctor. Excellent divers as individuals, as partners they are so incredibly in synch that they were chosen to represent

Mexico at the 2012 Olympic Games. Their goal is to emulate two drops of water falling from the platform as if they were mirror images of one another. A 10 meter mirror that reflects a sequence of triple twists and somersaults that have earned them record scores and medals at the Pan-American Games, the Diving World Cup and the Olympic Games. Precision Coaching Coach Iván Bautista has played a key role in the fine tuning of the piece of precision apparatus Iván and Germán have become. He has also helped his Siamese diving twins overcome professional envy. Although he joined the team several years later, Germán Sánchez worked hard to catch up with the rest of its members to the point where he surpassed them and went on to compete in the 2008 Olympic Games in Beijing when he was just 15. In China, he made it past the first round and into the semifinals, coming in 17th place in the Water Cube. One year later, in 2009, he would be executing his first synchronized dives with Iván García. On the springboard to success, Iván García had to confront his own fears. One of these consisted of ironing out a bad habit he had acquired –a painful one that frequently caused him to land on his back in the water. “El Pollo” might have retired had his coach not come to the rescue. “We stuck sheets of fluorescent cardboard on each platform. The idea was that, with each twist, the colored card would help Iván get his bearings. And that’s how we eliminated the problem,” recalls Bautista. The trick worked and “El Pollo” not only perfected his take offs and entries but also

May 2013

The Lifestyle | Negocios ProMéxico

his precision improved so much that a year later he represented Mexico at the Singapore 2010 Youth Olympic Games, where he won a bronze medal. It was that accolade that motivated him to start out on a path that culminated in victory at London in 2012. Like Ducks to Water Winning an Olympic medal brought Iván and Germán money, fame, less time and a mandatory break of almost two months to wrap their heads around their achievement. It was only when they came back down to earth that they began suffering the consequences of injuries that called their return into question. Doctors are keeping a close eye on Iván’s left ankle,

May 2013

which is giving him trouble, while Germán underwent surgery in late 2012 to correct a right shoulder injury. But any doubts as to their comeback were dissipated at the Diving World Series, held in Edinburgh, Scotland, on April 19–20, a mere stepping stone on a journey with stopovers at the Guadalajara leg of the World Series this May, the 2014 Central American Games in Veracruz, the 2015 Pan-American Games in Toronto and the World Swimming Championships, hopefully ending at the 2016 Olympic Games in Rio. “The medals don’t imply a sacrifice because we love what we do and train with dedication,” says Iván, who admits that “all athletes dream of

Winning an Olympic medal brought Iván and Germán money, fame, less time and a mandatory break of almost two months to wrap their heads around their achievement.

Olympic gold”. In his case, it’s a dream that could soon become reality. Germán is in synch with his partner’s winning mentality. He’s learned to listen to his body so he doesn’t get injured again. Although sometimes his mind is so focused on competing that he blocks out the pain. He is determined to stand on that Olympic podium with a gold medal around his neck. “We can win. It’s just a matter of putting in the work and the time. I’m going to look after myself so I make it to the next Olympic cycle,” he says categorically, confirming that Mexico is well on its way to becoming a sporting power, thanks to the determination of young athletes like Iván and Germán. N

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Negocios ProMéxico | The Lifestyle

The Lifestyle | Negocios ProMéxico

“Each design project represents a new challenge, because each seeks to meet different needs. This enriches the projects we undertake, conferring each a sense of individuality,” says Compeán. In the case of the Cineteca Nacional Siglo XXI –guardian of the country’s celluloid history–, DDI joined forces with Taller de Arquitectura Rocha + Carrillo, the firm commissioned to renovate the original space. Based on the architects’ core concept, DDI designed furniture for the video library, the store, the toy library and the museum reception area. Each space demanded specific ideas. “For example, the digital video library has booths measuring 2 x 2.5 meters that can accommodate two or three users. We made them out of tough, visually appealing birch triply, while the challenge at the toy library was to design durable, ergonomic furniture for the hundreds of kids who play there.” The renovation of a young director’s office in the Lomas Altas district of Mexico City called for a different set of tools. Here, the

DDI, Acting Out Design Fantasies Despacho de Diseño Integral (DDI) has left its signature on everything from museums and offices to living rooms with concepts that fuse form and function.

by sandra roblágui

Offices you actually want to work in. Multifunctional furniture that doesn’t skimp on comfort or style. Spaces that adapt to the needs of its users. Interior landscapes. Form and function. This is how the Mexico City-based design studio Despacho de Diseño Integral (DDI) defines its concepts and products. Marcela Compeán, who specializes in the design of spaces and products, heads a threeman team of Mexicans who spend their days wrapping their heads around design conundrums. A graduate of the Créapole design school in Paris, France, Compeán founded DDI in 2010 at the tender age of 30. Initially, the idea was to develop contemporary design projects, but in 2013 she decided it was time to rethink the nature, identity and image of her studio. Today, DDI is a company that takes a more comprehensive approach to design, integrating related disciplines like architecture and graphic design with a view to offering the customer a wider range of industrial, furniture and interior design services. Designing objects and interiors isn’t a question of good taste, says Compeán. “DDI works closely with its customers to come up with customized concepts that reflect their personality

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and calls on several disciplines as part of an integral design process based on observation, research and experimentation.” Together with industrial designers Raúl López de la Cerda and Oscar Miranda, Compeán attacks each design challenge with a battery of methodologies and creative processes, although the overriding goal is always to meet the customer’s expectations. To achieve this, the firm teams up with graphic designers and architects to seek out innovative solutions for its customers. Or sometimes DDI is invited on board the projects of firms working in these fields. DDI has only been around for three years, but in this short time it has developed commercial projects for customers as diverse as the José Cuervo tequila brand, Masisa, which manufactures and sells particleboard, Glocal Design Magazine, Grupo Bimbo, Iusa, which manufactures electrical and plumbing products, Grupo Editorial Expansión, Compusoluciones, the Bulgari luxury goods company, the Cineteca Nacional, home to the country’s film archives, and the Estrella Roja bus company, as well as coming up with interior design solutions for residential projects.

May 2013

May 2013

DDI has only been around for three years, but in this short time it has developed commercial projects for customers as diverse as the José Cuervo, Masisa, Glocal Design Magazine, Grupo Bimbo, Iusa, Grupo Editorial Expansión, Compusoluciones, Bulgari, the Cineteca Nacional and the Estrella Roja bus company.

central feature is a ribbed, laser-cut steel bookcase that transforms into a desk and a meeting table, teamed with shelves and white oak modules. The decoration was complemented with pieces by Herman Miller, Pirwi, the DDI collection and one-of-a-kind vintage objects. For Cuervo, the mission was to design stands to display the company’s tequilas at high-end department stores. DDI opted for simple, but highly original displays made out of laser-cut birch triply. “One of the hardest challenges we face is transforming ideas into quality concepts. Execution is always a complicated process that requires the same attention to detail as the design itself, considering that an economical product must meet very high aesthetic standards,” says Compeán. DDI has ambitious plans for 2013, including the launch of its own line of furniture and interior design products, chiefly ceramic pottery. Given the studio’s flight path so far, it’ll be a launch not to be missed! N

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Negocios ProMéxico | The Lifestyle

The Lifestyle | Negocios ProMéxico

by the Hands of Tradition

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In Náhuatl, the language of the Aztecs, Coyotepec means “coyote mountain”. But this town, 10 kilometers south of the capital of Oaxaca, is famous for more than its coyotes –it produces a type of black clay that has been used since Pre-Columbian times to make pitchers, pots, whistles, flutes and figurines. What makes this black clay so special is that it can only be found in Coyotepec and its environs, making this a mandatory point of call for visitors to Oaxaca, especially those in search of collector’s pieces. Creating a piece of black clay pottery is a painstaking

process that takes more than 10 days. The sculpted artifact is left to dry in the sun for four days, then sanded and left in the sun for another two days. Next it is polished and set in the sun for four more days before being fired. The next day, the piece is washed and dried and ready to be displayed. In the mid-20th century, a woman by the name of Rosa developed the processes that lend black clay pottery its different tones. Today, Rosa’s pottery in Coyotepec is synonymous with this particular genre of Mexican folk art.

VISIT: Alfarería Doña Rosa Calle Benito Juárez 24 San Bartolo Coyotepec, Oaxaca

May 2013

May 2013

Talavera pottery can take the form of anything from a simple pitcher to a tile on a church wall. The designs have been updated and more modern processes have allowed for the incorporation of a wider variety of colors –typically blue, white, yellow, orange, green, black and purple– but essentially the technique used to make Talavera has remained unchanged for five centuries. Since the late 1990s, when the Mexican government granted Talavera an Appellation of Origin to protect it from foreign imitations, only pieces made in the city of Puebla, specifically Atlixco, Cholula and Tecali de Herrera, are considered authentic. One of the most famous potteries is Talavera de la Reyna, where the pieces are handcrafted and painted by artisans.

raúl pacheco vega

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1. Black Clay, Modern Art Molded

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2. Talavera Pottery, An Appellation of Origin

by antonio vázquez

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drew leavy

No collection of Mexican folk art can claim to be complete without having at least a few samples of black clay figurines, Talavera pottery, silk rebozos, Huichol tapestries and silver jewelry. Crafted from materials found often only in Mexico, these works of art epitomize the union of fire and earth, needle and thread, simplicity and the baroque in the skilled hands of artisans who carry on ancestral traditions.

raúl pacheco vega

Five Essential Exemplars of Mexican Folk Art

VISIT: Talavera Museum Talavera de la Reyna Exhibition Hall Lateral Sur Recta a Cholula 3510 Cholula, Puebla www.talaveradelareyna.com.mx

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4. Nierika, Tapestries

PURCHASE ONLINE AT: Galería Nierika www.nierika.com.mx

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glenda alexandra suárez

with a World View

The Huichol are one of the few indigenous groups that successfully outlived the Conquest and whose age-old traditions have remained intact. That is reflected in their unique artwork, which depicts the numerous / countless deities they worship. In the states of Jalisco, Nayarit, Durango and Zacatecas, Huichol communities continue to make bead figurines, wooden instruments and colorful paintings with psychedelic designs that illustrate how they perceive the world and their relationship with Mother Earth. The magical, surreal universe of the Huichol people, populated by fire, deer and serpents, is perhaps best exemplified by their tapestry-like paintings known as nierikas. Color, creativity, originality and patience are the raw materials of these intricate works of art, some of which are worth thousands of dollars. Using wax, the artists trace divine figures and symbols on a wooden board and fill them in from the edge inwards using thread. On the back, one will generally find the artisan’s signature and a brief explanation of the imagery employed.

arturo ávila

The Lifestyle | Negocios ProMéxico

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Negocios ProMéxico | The Lifestyle

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pablo arredondo

luz maría nieto photo

Worn as a shawl, dress or top, the rebozo is a long strip of silk fabric that adds a touch of sophistication to every outfit and that can be used on virtually any occasion. In the late 16th century, during the Colonial period, the rebozo was popular among women of all social classes. Aristocratic women would wear it at home or to cover their heads before entering church, while the lower classes would use it as a shawl, a baby sling or shroud.

Woven out of silk produced by Franciscan monks, Santa María del Río, a town in the northwest state of San Luis Potosí, became famous for its rebozos in 1764. There are many myths surrounding the rebozo. For example, the women of Santa María del Río are said to have dipped the tip of theirs in a fountain when remembering their suitors. Santa María del Río has an atelier school where one can see how a rebozo is made, a process that can take up to 60 days from beginning to end. Such is the work that goes into this garment that people might feel inclined to hang it on the wall instead of wearing it.

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3. The Rebozo, Color Woven into Fabric

VISIT: The Rebozo School Jardín Hidalgo 5 Santa María del Río, San Luis Potosí www.elrebozo.gob.mx

May 2013

May 2013

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Negocios ProMéxico | The Lifestyle

Negocios ProMéxico

the Sun and Moon

VISIT: Gabriela Sánchez López Mateos 897 Guadalajara, Jalisco www.gabrielasanchez.com

photo archive

The artisans of West and South Mexico were skilled at transforming silver into decorative artifacts long before the Spaniards arrived. In fact, some historians claim the first gift the Aztec Emperor Moctezuma gave the conquistador Hernán Cortés was two pieces of silver engraved with images of the sun and moon. Earrings, necklaces, bracelets, pendants and rings were commonly worn by the upper class in colonial times to denote their power and status.

There are numerous silver-producing towns in Mexico but Taxco, in the state of Guerrero, is perhaps the most famous for its jewelry. Mexican designers are known the world over for their way with silver. Designers like Jalisco-born Gabriela Sánchez, who hails from a jewelry-making family and who takes dreams, laughter, spontaneity, childhood and tradition and cuts and buffs them into striking, modern pieces with a sense of humor. Mexico’s former Miss Universe Ximena Navarrete and previous First Lady Margarita Zavala have been seen wearing Gabriela Sánchez’ designs on more than one occasion.

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5. Silver, Jewelry that Reflects

jason latting

Para Exportadores

ProMéxico ha impulsado la participación del país en distintos foros y mecanismos de cooperación internacional, con el fin de contar con más y mejores herramientas para apoyar la internacionalización de las empresas mexicanas.

ProMéxico

y la cooperación económica internacional 78

Oportunidades de Diversificación Comercial

Certificación de empresas

méxico en el mundo:

y Comercio Exterior en México

el comercio internacional de méxico en cifras

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76

photo archive

Asia:

6

May 2013


Negocios ProMéxico | Para Exportadores

Para Exportadores | Negocios ProMéxico

de proméxico. Congruente con la política de apertura comercial que México ha mantenido durante las últimas décadas, y como parte de su labor para atraer inversión extranjera al país e impulsar la internacionalización de las empresas, ProMéxico ha realizado importantes esfuerzos en materia de cooperación internacional que hoy se traducen en apoyos e incentivos concretos para que empresas mexicanas, especialmente pequeñas y medianas, incursionen con éxito en el comercio global. En esta edición de Negocios Para Exportadores presentamos una mirada rápida a algunos de las acciones de cooperación internacional que la Unidad de Promoción de Exportaciones ha emprendido para di-

70

versificar y consolidar la oferta de apoyos e incentivos a los que las empresas mexicanas tienen acceso a través de ProMéxico. En todas las oficinas de ProMéxico en el país, asesores especializados pueden proporcionar más información sobre cómo aprovechar estos programas y tener acceso a sus beneficios. ProMéxico tiene el compromiso de ser el mejor aliado de las empresas mexicanas para que su participación en la economía internacional traiga consigo nuevas oportunidades de crecimiento y contribuya al desarrollo de las regiones del país en las que operan. Somos los mejores asesores para la internacionalización de las empresas mexicanas. ¡Bienvenidos a Negocios ProMéxico!

Mayo 2013

Mayo 2013

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Negocios ProMéxico | Para Exportadores

Asia: Oportunidades de diversificación comercial México tiene que impulsar su vínculo comercial Asia para diversificar sus relaciones comerciales y reposicionarse en el escenario internacional. por adolfo laborde*

La Administración del presidente Enrique Peña Nieto ha sido muy enfática en la importancia de diversificar las relaciones comerciales de México, al reforzar la presencia y el activismo del país en el extranjero. Este replanteamiento de la política comercial del país en favor de una mayor diversificación es una línea fundamental para el reposicionamiento de México en el escenario internacional. En esa estrategia, Asia representa una oportunidad inigualable. Aunque países como China, Japón y Corea del Sur son socios comerciales importantes de México, las oportunidades de intercambio y cooperación de nuestro país con aquella región son enormes y deben maximizarse.

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Para Exportadores | Negocios ProMéxico

fotos archivo

En 2012, China fue el segundo socio comercial de México a escala mundial (segundo como abastecedor y cuarto como comprador). Sin embargo, aún no tenemos un tratado de libre comercio (TLC) que refuerce el intercambio con ese país. Según datos del Banco de México, la relación comercial entre México y China creció 804% entre 2002 y 2012, al pasar de 6 mil 928 millones de dólares en 2002 a 62 mil 657 millones en 2012, lo que representó una tasa media anual de crecimiento de 25%. Según análisis de ProMéxico, México podría afianzar el flujo de inversiones de ese país en el sector automotriz, por lo que podrían impulsarse alianzas estratégicas con las armadoras, tal y como ha ocurrido

con empresas chinas en otras latitudes. La exportación de cárnicos (en especial carne de cerdo) y productos agropecuarios tampoco es menor, por lo que deben facilitarse las certificaciones y permisos correspondientes. Asimismo, a pesar de que tanto México como China son productores y exportadores clave en productos electrónicos y de electrodomésticos, podrían generarse sinergias entre ambos países. Japón, por su parte, fue el cuarto socio comercial de México a escala mundial (tercero como abastecedor y noveno como comprador) en 2012, y el segundo en Asia, después de China. Aunque México y Japón suscribieron un Acuerdo de Asociación Económica (AAE) en 2004 (mismo que entró en vigor el 1 de abril de 2005), todavía hay muchas áreas de oportunidad en la relación comercial entre ambos países. De acuerdo con datos de ProMéxico, a partir de la entrada en vigor del AAE entre México y Japón, el intercambio comercial entre ambas naciones creció 39%, al pasar de 14 mil 548 millones de dólares en 2005 a 20 mil 268 millones en 2012. Durante 2012, 63% de las exportaciones mexicanas hacia Japón fueron manufacturas como teléfonos celulares, automóviles y autopartes. Los productos alimenticios guardan un lugar preponderante en el intercambio bilateral entre ambos países (29% de las exportaciones totales). Los principales productos alimentarios que se exportan a Japón son sal, carne de cerdo, aguacate, pescado congelado, bebidas alcohólicas, jugos de frutas y café. Las oportunidades con este país en este rubro específico son impresionantes. Según información de ProMéxico, durante 2011, Japón fue el tercer país que importó más alimentos en el mundo, con un valor de casi 82 mil millones de dólares. Sin embargo, a pesar de que Japón es el segundo destino para las exportaciones mexicanas de alimentos, México ocupa el vigésimo primer lugar como proveedor de alimentos a dicho país.. En tanto, Corea fue el sexto socio comercial de México a escala mundial en 2012 (16 como comprador y quinto como abastecedor), y el tercero en Asia. Según

Mayo 2013

cifras del Banco de México, el intercambio comercial entre México y Corea creció 265% entre 2002 y 2012, al pasar de 4 mil 129 millones de dólares en 2002 a 15 mil 078 millones en 2012. Cabe destacar que Corea es un país importador de materias primas y productos de consumo. Su economía está concentrada en el sector industrial y de tecnología, y se abastece del exterior de productos primarios. De acuerdo con ProMéxico, Corea es el quinto productor mundial de automóviles (con 4.7 millones de unidades producidas en 2011) e importa alrededor de 4 mil millones de dólares anuales en autopartes. En este sentido, hay enormes oportunidades tanto comerciales (exportación de autopartes y componentes), como de inversión (promover el establecimiento de plantas armadoras coreanas en México).

Corea es un país líder en el sector de electrónica. Ese país es el tercer productor de aparatos electrónicos (detrás de China y los Estados Unidos), por lo que también puede explorarse la posibilidad de establecer más empresas coreanas en México. Talento e inmersión cultural: componentes clave para los negocios La diversificación comercial no es una tarea sencilla. Va más allá de una simple declaración o de concretar mecanismos para agilizar el comercio (a la fecha, México tiene 12 tratados de libre comercio con 44 países). ¿Qué tendríamos qué hacer para que nuestro comercio con los mercados chino, japonés y coreano fuese superavitario? Buena pregunta. Cada caso representa un escenario diferente; cada uno de esos paí-

ses tiene su propia cultura de los negocios y la estrategia comercial que se despliegue en la región debe ser específica para cada caso. No es lo mismo hacer negocios en China que en Japón o Corea. Aunado a ello, los actores interesados en expandir las relaciones económicas en esos países (iniciativa privada y gobierno) deben priorizar políticas de largo plazo para formar recursos humanos, o bien, especialistas económicos en cada país. Es cierto que el inglés es el idioma de los negocios, pero no todos los chinos, japoneses y coreanos lo hablan. Los japoneses (y cada vez más los chinos y coreanos) envían a su personal a los países donde fungirán como comisionados. a recibir un entrenamiento de por lo menos dos años. Esta preparación consiste en una total inmersión en la cultura; los ejecutivos de las empresas aprenden el idioma del país extranjero, sus tradiciones, así como su cultura y el comportamiento de su sociedad. Gracias a ello, a la hora de los negocios es más fácil ganar terreno no solo en el idioma, sino en la capacidad de reacción de la contraparte. En este sentido, es importante incidir en el desarrollo de recursos humanos para enfrentar los retos de las relaciones económicas internacionales de México en Asia. Si queremos ser exitosos, es imprescindible empezar a crear y ejecutar una política económica exterior en la que el capital humano tenga un papel preponderante. Es muy importante dotar a los empresarios mexicanos de mecanismos que impulsen el comercio, y motivarlos para que el capital humano del país tenga las herramientas adecuadas para incursionar en otras regiones. De esta manera, el escenario comercial de México podrá ser aún más prometedor. N *Director de la Licenciatura en Relaciones Internacionales y del Bachelor in International Affairs del Instituto Tecnológico y de Estudios Superiores de Monterrey (ITESM), Campus Santa Fe. Miembro del Sistema Nacional de Investigadores (SNI), Nivel 1 del Consejo Nacional de Ciencia y Tecnología (CONACYT).

Mayo 2013

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Negocios ProMéxico | Para Exportadores

Para Exportadores | Negocios ProMéxico

fotos archivo

La Organización Mundial de Aduanas (OMA) se encarga de difundir las bases para la creación de la figura de OEAU, y dicta lineamientos clave para las aduanas en el mundo, con lo cual impulsa el comercio ágil y seguro a través de cadenas de suministro adecuadas. Un OEAU está certificado para participar en la cadena de comercio internacional, mientras su actividad profesional se sujete a la normativa aduanera (importadores, exportadores, fabricantes, representantes ante la aduana, transportistas y operadores de terminal, entre otros). Estos operadores deben cumplir con el perfil de riesgo, rigurosas políticas de control,

Es importante mencionar que aunque el registro en estos esquemas es voluntario, el impulso que las certificaciones generan en la operación representa múltiples ventajas para las empresas. Es recomendable para cualquier operador en comercio exterior, sin importar su tamaño o alcances, obtener su registro y conocer los beneficios inherentes a esta operación. En particular, cuando los socios extranjeros, e incluso nacionales, empiecen a exigir el registro a estos programas para mantener su negocio en el país. En conclusión, estos programas son un factor clave para el crecimiento comercial. Es necesario que México esté a la van-

Es recomendable para cualquier operador en comercio exterior, sin importar su tamaño o alcances, obtener su registro y conocer los beneficios inherentes a esta operación. En particular, cuando los socios extranjeros, e incluso nacionales, empiecen a exigir el registro a estos programas para mantener su negocio en el país. instalaciones y auditorías internas en la cadena de suministros, entre otros requisitos. También deben someter una solicitud de registro para su dictamen ante la Administración Central de Asuntos Internacionales de la Administración General de Aduanas (AGA) y, si es favorable la opinión, continuar con el trámite ante la Administración Central de Regulación Aduanera de la AGA. Toda esta gestión debe realizarse durante un máximo de 140 días hábiles.

guardia del intercambio comercial y adecúe ciertos mecanismos globales en su operación. La confiabilidad de estos procesos es, sin duda alguna, fundamental para acelerar los procesos de negociación, así como para incidir en nuevos mercados y atraer más inversiones productivas, las más importantes para el país. N *Director General de Narro y Asociados, S.C.

Certificación de empresas y comercio exterior en México Con la puesta en marcha del programa de Operador Económico Autorizado, avalado por el Servicio de Administración Tributaria de México y la Agencia de Protección de Aduanas de Estados Unidos, se generan nuevas ventajas para las empresas con actividades de exportación e importación en México. por josé f. narro garcía*

A principios de 2013, México y Estados Unidos firmaron un plan de acción para facilitar la adhesión de las compañías de ambos países al Nuevo Esquema de Empresas Certificadas (NEEC), así como a programas de seguridad de las aduanas (como el Customs-Trade Partnership Against Terrorism o CTPAT). Estos mecanismos de participación voluntaria buscan garantizar la cadena de suministros de comercio exterior a partir de la certificación de empresas manufactureras, productoras, maquiladoras y comercializadoras, tanto de importación como de exportación.

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El NEEC alude a estándares mínimos de seguridad que han sido reconocidos por distintos países. En el caso de México, el programa Operador Económico Autorizado (OEAU) está por iniciar su oficialización con el apoyo del Servicio de Administración Tributaria (SAT) y la Agencia de Protección de Aduanas de Estados Unidos (US Customs and Border Protection). Este último ha firmado programas de reconocimiento mutuo con Nueva Zelandia, Canadá, Jordania y Corea del Sur, mismos que también se han gestionado por los países miembros de la Unión Europea, Suiza, Noruega y Japón, por mencionar algunos.

Mayo 2013

Mayo 2013

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Negocios ProMéxico | Para Exportadores

Para Exportadores | Negocios ProMéxico

infografía oldemar

Exportaciones

MÉXICO EN EL MUNDO

Millones de dólares Rubro

Manufacturera 26,065

Marzo ‘13

El comercio internacional de México en cifras

CANADÁ $2,550 | 2.9%

Petroleras 4,200

Agropecuarias 1,121

Extractivas 447

Variación ’12

2.0%

-19.8%

-3.0%

4.1%

Ene-Mar ‘13

71,184

12,908

75,325

1,054

Variación ’12

0.6%

-10.6%

0.1%

-15.7%

ESPAÑA $1,929 | 2.2%

ALEMANIA $1,128 | 1.3%

INDIA $758 | 0.9%

CHINA $1,482 | 1.7%

JAPÓN $515 | 0.6%

88,233 millones de dólares entre enero y marzo de 2013 (una disminución de 1.6% con respecto al mismo periodo en 2012).

#2 #5

ESTADOS UNIDOS

Principales socios comerciales de México $ Exportaciones acumuladas de enero a marzo de 2013

68,906

millones de dólares (78.1% del total) en ventas a Estados Unidos en el primer trimestre de 2013.

#

#3

1

#9 #4

#8

Millones de dólares

COLOMBIA $1,097 | 1.2%

% Participación de las exportaciones mexicanas totales

BRASIL $1,086 | 1.2%

#6

#7

Enero a marzo de 2013

CHILE $493 | 0.6%

Por sector

#10

Fuente: Banco de México 76

Mayo 2013

Enero-febrero 2013

Variación

Millones de dólares

Mismo periodo en 2012

Automotriz

Electrónico

Eléctrico

Químico

Equipo médico

Farmacéutico

12,242

7,496

3,905

1,971

961

380

4.5%

-10.6%

2.5%

5%

2.4%

5.5%

Mayo 2013

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Negocios ProMéxico | Para Exportadores

Para Exportadores | Negocios ProMéxico

photos archive

ProMéxico y la Cooperación Económica Internacional

textil y del calzado, agropecuario, aeroespacial, automotriz, de tecnologías de la información y de dispositivos médicos, entre otros. El valor de los primeros siete proyectos financiados por el PROCEI, firmados en 2012, es de 200 millones de pesos y su ejecución beneficiará a 850 pymes distribuidas en 16 entidades federativas del país, con impacto en 13 sectores industriales. En 2013 se apoyará por lo menos a cuatro nuevos proyectos por un valor de cerca de 30 millones de pesos.

En su búsqueda por apoyar la internacionalización de las empresas mexicanas y mejorar la posición de México en la economía global, ProMéxico ha impulsado la participación del país en distintos foros y mecanismos de cooperación internacional. Gracias a ello, hoy se cuenta con diversos programas de apoyo para que negocios mexicanos, especialmente pequeñas y medianas empresas, incursionen en los mercados internacionales. por claudia esteves cano*

Atraer inversión extranjera al país y fortalecer la participación de México en la economía global son objetivos cruciales para ProMéxico, por lo que la institución ha participado en diversos programas y proyectos bilaterales y multilaterales, y ha dedicado esfuerzos a establecer, fortalecer y preservar relaciones con organismos internacionales como el Banco Mundial (BM), la Corporación Financiera Internacional (CFI), el Banco Interamericano de Desarrollo (BID), y la Organización para la Cooperación y el Desarrollo Económicos (OCDE), así como con cámaras binacionales y agencias de promoción económica en otros países. En la estructura de ProMéxico, dentro de la Unidad de Promoción de Exportaciones (UPE), existe un área dedicada a proyectos de cooperación internacional, con el fin de apoyar a las pequeñas y medianas empresas (pymes) mexicanas para mejorar su competitividad, de forma que desarrollen la capacidad, tecnología e innovación necesarias para expandirse a mercados internacionales. La participación de ProMéxico en el escenario internacional, ha permitido la puesta en operación de diversos programas en los que las empresas mexicanas, especialmente PYMES,

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conjunto de 18 millones de euros, financiado a partes iguales por México y la Unión Europea, gestionado por ProMéxico a través de un fideicomiso. Con una duración de 54 meses, el fondo financia proyectos en tres líneas específicas: 1) fortalecimiento de los procesos de innovación y transferencia de tecnología, 2) apoyo a los procesos de certificación para exportar al mercado europeo y 3) fortalecimiento de los mercados mediante la creación de un sistema de inteligencia comercial y de negocios, aprovechando los sistemas de información comercial existentes. El objetivo específico del PROCEI es proporcionar a las pymes mexicanas asesoría y asistencia especializada en nuevas tecnologías e innovación de procesos productivos. El programa brinda apoyos para proyectos de innovación, transferencia de tecnología, certificaciones y estrategia de comerico, con el fin de apoyar a las empresas mexicanas para ingresar en el mercado europeo. A través de este programa, México tiene acceso al mercado de 27 estados miembros de la Unión Europea, mediante proyectos ubicados en diferentes partes del país alusivos a sectores de alto valor agregado como son los sectores

pueden solicitar apoyos para desarrollar y fortalecer su proceso de internacionalización. Los programas de cooperación internacional de ProMéxico buscan incrementar la competitividad de las pymes mexicanas a través de la incorporación de tecnologías, de la asistencia técnica y de la proveduría de conocimientos necesarios para facilitar su acceso a los mercados internacionales. Dichos programas están diseñados para que las pymes obtengan resultados concretos como: • Integración de acciones de innovación y transferencia de tecnología con el negocio. • Establecimiento de relaciones sostenibles entre empresas mexicanas y extranjeras mediante coinversiones, transferencia de tecnología u otros medios. • Desarrollo de sistemas de gestión de la calidad mediante la obtención de certificaciones aptas para los mercados internacionales. Programa de Competitividad e Innovación México – Unión Europea (PROCEI) El Programa de Competitividad e Innovación México-Unión Europea (PROCEI) es un fondo

Mayo 2013

Mayo 2013

Nodo de México en la Red Europea de Empresas (EEN) Esta red, creada en 2008 por la Comisión Europea, agrupa a casi 600 organismos miembros en 51 países alrededor del mundo. Para postular su candidatura como miembro, ProMéxico sumó esfuerzos con el Tecnológico de Monterrey (ITESM) y el Consejo Nacional de Ciencia y Tecnología (CONACYT). Después de dos años de negociaciones, en noviembre de 2011 se presentó de manera oficial el nodo México de la EEN, mismo que se constituyó como el segundo en Latinoamérica, después de Chile. Gracias a la participación de México en la EEN, empresas mexicanas tienen acceso a oportunidades de negocios y pueden recibir servicios de información y contactos en cualquiera de los países miembros. A través de la EEN, ProMéxico ha apoyado a 54 empresas en ocho ferias europeas, logrando su participación en encuentros empresariales profesionales; además, se han impartido cuatro talleres beneficiando a 76 pymes en temas como envase y embalaje, diseño estratégico de marca, industrias creativas y trazabilidad industrial. Asimismo, se han firmado 11 acuerdos de colaboración entre empresas y hay cuatro acuerdos más de este tipo en proceso. Fondo Conjunto de Cooperación México - Chile En agosto de 2011, ProMéxico postuló un proyecto para el Fondo Conjunto de Cooperación México-Chile, con el fin de ampliar la oferta exportable y el intercambio comercial entre ambos países. Actualmente se trabaja con más de 20 franquicias mexicanas que serán introducidas en el mercado chileno. México y Japón, sobre ruedas Como fruto de la colaboración entre México y Japón, se creó el proyecto de cooperación para el desarrollo de la industria de proveeduría au-

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Negocios ProMéxico | Para Exportadores

4

tomotriz en México, el cual contribuirá a hacer más eficientes a las pymes mexicanas proveedoras de las armadoras japonesas en el país, mejorará el control y la calidad de los productos nacionales, creará una base de datos para los involucrados y promoverá el conocimiento y entendimiento entre ambas naciones para disminuir las diferencias culturales. Junto con la Agencia de Cooperación Internacional de Japón (JICA), ProMéxico funge como coordinador del proyecto que tiene un valor aproximado de 7.8 millones de dólares. En una primera etapa se beneficiará a 30 empresas Tier 2 en los estados de Guanajuato, Nuevo León y Querétaro. Además, la iniciativa busca construir una base de datos de capacidades de proveedores de la industria en los tres estados mencionados estados para facilitar dicha herramienta a las empresas japonesas interesadas en México.

senta un mercado de 201 millones de habitantes (36% de la población de Latinoamérica), 50% del comercio en la región y una tercera parte del Producto Interno Bruto (PIB) regional. Se espera que Costa Rica y Panamá, que participan en la actualidad como países observadores, sean próximamente miembros plenos de la Alianza del Pacífico. ProMéxico participó en la Primera Reunión de Agencias de Promoción de la Alianza del Pacífico, el 7 de febrero de 2012. Como resultado de la reunión se establecieron siete acuerdos: intercambio comercial entre los países miembros, mayor presencia en los mercados internacionales, encuentro empresarial entre los países miembros, apertura de oficinas conjuntas en el exterior, participación conjunta en ferias internacionales, intercambio de información y realización de un seminario de oportunidades de inversión en China. N

México y la Alianza del Pacífico La Alianza del Pacífico se creó el 28 de abril de 2011, cuando los presidentes de Colombia, Chile, México y Perú firmaron una declaración para conformar dicho bloque, que repre-

* Directora de Proyectos Multilaterales y Regionales, Unidad de Promoción de Exportaciones.

Mayo 2013


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