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JANUARY 2015

A FFI L I AT ES L E T T E R The official newsletter for FEMS Affiliates

Investing in science flowchart: follow the money Also in this issue: Publications Page Developments Letters Society Feature Grants Corner Deadlines FEMS-Sponsored Meetings Microbiology TidBits

‘Follow the money’ and you will find out what drives people and organisations. We are a not-for-profit organisation and UK charity, publishing five journals on microbiology. The income from the journals is returned back to the scientific community via various activities. Each year FEMS supports hundreds of grantees facilitating and supporting the training of early career scientists in research. You can apply for research grants, meeting grants, meeting attendance grants and congress grants, but there’s more, as you can see in the flowchart below. Our publishing partner, OUP also reinvests into science. The FEMS grants have made a huge difference to

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many early career scientists, supporting their research activities and setting up invaluable networks for the future. Our belief is that microbiology is made stronger through collaboration. FEMS links 52 microbiology member societies in 36 European countries, and represents around 30,000 microbiologists.


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FEMS MICROBIOLOGY REVIEWS

FEMS MICROBIOLOGY LETTERS

REVIEW ARTICLE

MINI REVIEW

SOS, the formidable strategy of bacteria against aggressions

Bacterial differentiation, development, and disease: mechanisms for survival There is increasing evidence that many bacteria respond to stressful environments through transient changes in morphology that, in turn, provide protection against the stressors encountered in those environments. Justice et al. DOI: 10.1111/1574-6968.12602

Beyond being a repair process, SOS induction leads to a very strong but transient response to genotoxic stress, which potentiates bacterial survival and adaptation to changing environments. Zeynep Baharoglu, Didier Mazel DOI: 10.1111/1574-6976.12077

Did you know: • At FEMS 2015, FEMS Journals will be present at the special events • One of the special events will be about ‘how to publish a paper’?

FEMS Microbiology Letters new Editor-in-Chief: Rich Boden Rich Boden is lecturer in Environmental Microbiology & Biotechnology at the University of Plymouth. His research programme spans physiology, ecology, biochemistry, taxonomy and environmental processes, including soil and freshwater geochemistry. FEMS Microbiology Letters new sections Two sections of importance to the field of microbiology are added. We are now accepting papers on Virology and Professional Development. You can read more about the development of Letters in Rich Boden’s latest editorial.

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PATHOGENS AND DISEASE

FEMS YEAST RESEARCH

RESEARCH ARTICLE

MINI REVIEW

Cellular Responses: Imaging and pathogens

According to the Center for Disease Control (CDC) in 2012, there were 34 million people infected with HIV, 8.7 million new cases of tuberculosis, 500 million cases of hepatitis, and 50–100 million people infected with dengue. Despite this high incidence, several pathogens do not have reliable clinical detection methods. This article summarises new or improved protocols that may enhance detection of pathogens and reduction or elimination of the devastating consequences of infectious diseases.

Role of asymmetric cell division in lifespan control in S. cerevisiae

Asymmetric inheritance of aging determinants in budding yeast results in age rejuvenation of daughter cells and continued aging of mother cells. This article describes the key quality control mechanisms in budding yeast that contribute to asymmetric cell division of aging determinants. Higuchi-Sanabria et al. DOI: 10.1111/1567-1364.12216

Rella et al. DOI: 10.1111/2049-632X.12199 FEMS MICROBIOLOGY ECOLOGY RESEARCH ARTICLE Spatial variations in the human foot microbiome and the production of odorous volatiles The human foot provides an ideal environment for the colonization and growth of bacteria and subsequently is a body site associated with the liberation of odour. This study aimed to enumerate and spatially map bacterial populations resident across the foot to understand any association with odour production. Stevens et al. DOI: 10.1093/femsec/fiu018 P U B L I C AT I O N S PA G E

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The Danish Microbiological Society

Promoting Danish Microbiology nationally and internationally

The Danish Microbiological Society (DMS) was founded in 1958. It has two scientific divisions: The Society for Mycopathology and the Danish Microbiological Society and is a full member of the Federation of European Microbiological Societies. The DMS also represents Danish microbiologists in the International Union of Microbiological Societies (IUMS). The present President and FEMS delegate is Professor Lars Bogø Jensen (picture below). On the national level, DMS’ primary function is as a contact point for national microbiological activities. The society has a vote at the IUMS and FEMS meetings. Thus, the Society’s most essential activities are to represent Denmark internationally and to maintain genuine national influence in matters that are determined internationally. Supporting student members Everybody who is in interested in microbiology can join DMS. As a member of DMS, students are informed of topics of interest to microbiologists including where Everybody who is interested to meet microbiin microbiology can join DMS ologists engaged in the microbiological field as the student are interested in and potential job opportunities. In addition to free membership, student members can apply for a DMS Travelling Grant. Research and public engagement The Danish Microbiological Society is concerned with all fields of microbiology. It initiates scientific meetings in microbiology and related fields and informs the members about microbiological events in Denmark as well as in other countries.

S O C I E T Y F E AT U R E

Congress In recent years the Danish Microbiological Society has put on a large, one-day congress in November each year. Last year a record number of participants decided to visit the congress, which added to the atmosphere. The congress focuses on six to eight specific areas of microbiology. Danish Microbiological Society Symposium on MRSA

Another recent event is a symposium to which leading experts in MRSA risk assessment and handling as well as involved political and interest organisations were invited to participate. The day consisted of presentations and. a panel discussion. Activities in cooperation with Dansk Magisterforening The Danish Microbiological Society co-operates with Dansk Magisterforening, the Danish Association of Masters and PhDs, a traditional trade union as well as a professional association for people with a university degree. The co-operation concerns both administrative tasks and dissemination of academic knowledge. Further information: DMS

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Call for applications FEMS Meeting Grants

Application checklist

FEMS Meeting Grants application deadline 1 March 2015

FEMS Meeting Grants regulations apply to all applications; the requirements for the applicant consist of but are not limited to the following:

The call is directed to scientific conferences, laboratory workshops, and training courses in the European area planned for 2016.

• You are a meeting organizer • The meeting that you are planning is microbiology-related

The maximum amount of a Meeting Grant is EUR 15 000. The Meeting Grant may only be used to support the attendance of:

• This microbiology-related meeting is either a scientific conference, laboratory workshop and/or training course

• Early Career Scientists (minimum of 60% and a maximum of 80% of the total grant value)

• This meeting will be held in Europe

• Invited Speakers (minimum of 20% and a maximum of 40% of total grant value) On special request by the organizers and upon approval by the FEMS Grants Secretary, the total grant amount may be used to the sole support of early career scientists. The regulations and application form are available electronically. Please read them carefully and check the list at the right before contacting the FEMS Central Office. A list of events that have been granted a FEMS Meeting Grant is maintained online.

• The grant that you will receive will be used to support Young Scientist/s and Invited Speaker/s • You have read the regulations and fulfil all the requirements • You provide general and budgetary information • You provide the full programme with list of speakers • You have received endorsement by the FEMS Delegate of your FEMS Member Society • You have completed and signed the application form • You send the complete application to grants@fems-microbiology.org before the deadline of 1 March 2015

GR ANTS CO RN ER

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DEADLINES (APPLICATIONS FOR) GRANTS 1 March 2015 FEMS Meeting Grants (for meetings to be held in 2016) (NOMINATIONS FOR) AWARDS 10 January 2015 FEMS-Lwoff Award (NOMINATIONS FOR) POSITIONS 17 April 2015 Vice-President (2016–2019) M-a-L Meetings Board (2016-2019) 31 July 2015 Delegate representatives

FEMS-Sponsored Meetings, February - March 2014 16 F e b r u a r y 2 015 Modern vectorology: new concepts and approaches for gene therapy FRANCE 15 M a r c h 2 015 Meeting on Bacterial Respira tor y Chains PORTUGAL 18 M a r c h 2 015 8th Conference on Recombinant Protein Production - A comparative view on host physiology S PA I N

The FEMS Affiliates Letter is a production of FEMS Central Office

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MICROBIOLOGY TIDBITS Novel antibiotic in dark matter? Many of the most successful antibiotics were found in the mid-twentieth century by scientists who trawled microbial communities for bacteria capable of killing their brethren. But the researchers missed many potential candidates — known collectively as microbial ‘dark matter’ — because of their reluctance to adapt to life on a petri dish. Researchers discovered E. terrae’s potential with a device that expands the amount of microbes in a soil sample that are able to grow in the lab from 1% to 50%. Source: Nature Biological safety lock for genetically modified organisms Scientists have genetically recoded a strain of E. coli to depend on a synthetic amino acid so the bacteria can’t survive outside the lab. The E. coli were also made resistant to two viruses. Two studies are the first to use synthetic nutrient dependency as a biocontainment strategy, and suggest that it might be making genetically modified organisms safer in an open environment. Church: “This is the most radically altered genome to date in terms of genome function. We have not only a new code, but also a new amino acid, and the organism is totally dependent on it.” Source: Science Daily New bacterial ‘language’ detected A new research demonstrates that P. asymbiotica communicates via dialkylresorcinols (DARs) and cyclohexanediones (CHDs), novel and widespread signaling molecules. Source: Science Daily Did you know: • Kim Lewis will be one of the speakers at FEMS 2015 • You can hear Kim Lewis talk about the antibiotic his team discovered online

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FEMS Affiliates Letter January 2015  
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