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SARASOTA

JEWELS

for the home from

BALDI

La beauté de l’art

Fashion Forward with High Tech Dazzling Digital Art A New Frontier Refined Russia A Tale of Two Cities


941.921.1900 | rugsasart.com | 6650 S. Tamiami Trail, Sarasota, FL Widely known as one of the nation’s most prestigious and award-winning area rug stores, Rugs As Art carries products from more than 90 vendors covering over 40 rug-producing countries. Voted Best Rug Store in America numerous times, Rugs As Art promises the best selection at the lowest prices, backed by unparalleled customer service. u

What to look for when purchasing an

Oriental rug

The better educated you are about Oriental rugs, the more you will appreciate their beauty, artistry, and craftsmanship. Here are some factors to consider beyond the design when evaluating rugs.

Jonathan Collection Hand knotted of 100% wool. Available in rectangle, runner, round, and square sizes.

Length of pile

Longer pile does not necessarily amount to higher quality. Rather, shorter pile rugs allow for a more defined pattern and design, tend to be more durable, and are also easier to care for.


u Quality of materials

Although silk may be highly prized, wool really is the best for durability and everyday wear. Hand-spun wool is preferable and the overall quality and price of a rug can be contingent on the grade of wool used (i.e. New Zealand, semi-worsted, worsted, Gazni, etc.).

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Symmetry

Symmetry can be important with regard to image, size, and knotting. Remember, however, that this is a handmade/handknotted product and individuality from the weaver is most adored by true rug enthusiasts.

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Dying materials

Today, there are natural, vegetable and synthetic dyes. The most desired are natural and vegetable dyes due to their aesthetically pleasing colors. The best natural dying processes and formulas are well kept secrets passed down from generation to generation.

u Knot count

Oriental rugs are made using various knot styles (usually determined by country of origin). Knot count per square inch (KPI) is just one of the many criteria used to help determine quality, value, and durability. Although not always true, higher knot counts can represent higher value as they take longer to weave (a 9’ x 12’ can take four weavers upwards of 12 months to complete).


JIMMY CHOO

In 10022-SHOE, Sarasota’s most well-heeled ZIP code. 120 UNIVERSITY TOWN CENTER DR. 941.364.5300


SPRING/SUMMER 2016

FEMME ROUGE beauty

fashion

food & wellness

11 H UMA N G ROW T H FAC TO R the next big breakthrough for your skin

18 YAN IN A CO U TU R E exquisite designs dance from ballet to runway

14 P RE C I O U S P I C KS Be Natural Organics

26 DE SIG N E R SP OTL IG HT Ashi Studio Couture

42 O N THE TAB L E deliciosa fare from Spain 48 A G O O D E G G the forgotten superfood

34 E THAN K luxury handbags with a story

51 LO C AL E ATS where to get them organic and homegrown 54 M E E T YO U R V ITAM IN S keeping up with the omegas

36 TE CHN O CO U TU R E the fascinating fusion of fashion and technology

58 YO U DE CIDE the risks and rewards of raw

ON THE COVER

Spectacular statement decor from Baldi Home Jewels, page 98. Image: © FLAIRE STUDIO © LUCA VISENTINI ©ALESSIO BALLERI ©DEVIN BLAIR Dance the night away at Sarasota’s best ballroom venues, page 74. Listen and relax at one of the area’s outstanding piano bars, page 78.

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36 FASHION | TECH

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ON THE TABLE

Simply Spanish

simplified them for everyone to cook and enjoy.

1 Gazpacho

TECHNOCOUTURE F U T U R I S T I C FA S H I O N From making the materials to creating the design, technology has been stretching our concept of couture.

From Russia with love, the passionate and creative designs of Yanina Couture dance off the pages of fairy tales like something out of the Bolshoi Theatre.

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YANINA COUTURE

British designer Hussein Chalayan has been drawing gasps on the runways for over 15 years. Each season crowds gather at his fashion shows like art connoisseurs to Art Basel, just to glimpse what the innovator will come up with next. From his early work that turned living room furniture into dresses and skirts, to a collection of stiff designs that the models subsequently shattered with hammers, every show holds a spectacle that takes the audience to an unexpected place. And like any talented artist, Chalayan has something to express through his wearable works of performance art.

We no longer have to just “get dressed”—now we can

Silk voile drapes lightly over a structured tutu underskirt in this ethereal dress. Hand-embroidered beads shimmer along the delicate black branch motif. The headband is hand-embroidered with stones and beads.

wear highly engineered and exceptionally beautiful ensembles that evolve with our bodies, our emotions, and even those with whom we interact.

opposite: This stunning velvet dress with bold sheer illusion panel at the bust features hand-embroidered ballerinas on the sleeves, which are crafted out of multi-tiered silk voile.

S E E C H A L AYA N ’ S D E S I G N S U P C LO S E at the Metropolitan Museum of Art in New York as part of the “Manus x Machina: Fashion in the Age of Technology” this May.

8 ripe organic tomatoes 1 small red onion 1 organic English cucumber 1 small organic green pepper 1 small organic red pepper ¼ teaspoon crushed garlic (or to taste) 2 tablespoons organic unfiltered apple cider vinegar Cold water Sea salt Organic extra virgin olive oil Parsley leaves for garnish Diced tomato and cucumber for garnish

For his 2016 Spring/Summer Collection, the designer drew inspiration from a trip to Cuba, where he was fascinated by the locals’ live-in-the-moment attitude. To capture this spirit of impermanence, he created crisp white shirtdresses out of paper and placed two models under a shower onstage. The dissolving outer garments reveal Swarovskiencrusted gowns with appliqué petals and contrasting black embroidery. Of his impetus for melding the worlds of fashion, art, and technology, Chalayan calls himself a “weaver of different worlds,” always ahead of his colleagues in fashion who seem to be stuck in a cycle of repeating the past. “If you don’t take risks in the world, nothing happens, you just stay static.” And static is one word that will never be used in connection with this next-generation artist.

H O W T O P E E L A T O M AT O Don’t lose half of your tomatoes by going at them with a knife. Just follow these simple steps:

◗ Bring a large saucepan of water to boil. ◗ Place tomatoes in boiling water for 20 seconds or until the skins crack. ◗ Remove and rinse under cold water. ◗ The skin will peel right off in your hands!

Serves 4-6

PREP

◗ Blanch and peel tomatoes, remove seeds ◗ Peel and deseed cucumber ◗ Deseed green and red peppers ◗ Roughly chop onion, tomatoes, cucumber, and peppers STEP ONE: BLEND & CHILL Process the chopped vegetables and garlic with a cup of water in a food processor or a blender until smooth. Add vinegar and salt, and then process quickly until well incorporated—but not over-blended so it starts foaming. Depending on the consistency you prefer, you can add more water. Refrigerate for an hour before serving in bowls or glasses garnished with a drizzle of olive oil, fresh parsley, and diced tomato and cucumber.

Note: Be your own chef! In our recipes the measurements are approximate, substitutions are encouraged, and you'll get the best results from trusting your tastebuds, like we do.

Watch Chalayan’s incredible dissolving dresses in this video:

Raw oysters, those tasty little mollusks thought to be an aphrodisiac, may be giving you more than a boosted libido—they are sometimes served with a side of a little bug called Vibrio vulnificus— with the unappetizing symptoms of nausea, vomiting, abdominal pain, diarrhea, fever, chills, and even blistering skin lesions.

has a love of delightfully stylish food. We chose some of the most popular dishes from the region’s specialties and

first course that really wakes up the taste buds.

the weaver of different worlds

CUCUMBERS Made up of almost 95% water, these hydrating fruits are botanical relatives of squash and melon. Cultivated for thousands of years in India and parts of Asia, cucumbers are some of the oldest produce known to mankind.

Health Benefits

◗ REDUCES RISK OF CANCER Cucumbers contain polyphenols called lignans, which have been known to lower the risk of breast, uterine, ovarian, and prostate cancers.

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OTHER OPTIONS TO MINIMIZE ILLNESS INCLUDE:

◗ BRAIN PROTECTION Containing the anti-inflammatory flavonol fisetin, cucumbers play a crucial role in brain health. Fisetin improves your memory, protecting nerve cells from agerelated decline.

FEMME ROUGE

dairy Raw milk, derived from happy, grass-grazing cows, has higher levels of fat-soluble vitamins, linoleic acid (CLA), essential fatty acids, and contains all eight essential amino acids. But getting a glass of unpasteurized milk isn’t easy. That’s because interstate shipment of raw milk is banned in the U.S., although more than half of the states allow onor off-farm raw milk sales. Soft cheeses made from raw milk are prohibited in some states, and must be aged at least 60 days to qualify for interstate shipping. Why is the government so concerned with pasteurization? Because without it, dairy products can contain Campylobacter jejuni (C. jejuni, the most frequent form of foodborne illness in the U.S.) and listeria, bacteria that cause intestinal distress. In fact, the risk of becoming ill from drinking raw milk is about nine times greater than it is from drinking pasteurized milk.

CHEW ON THIS

Raw Deal?

The benefits of eating raw vegetables are undisputed—but what about uncooked (or unpasteurized) animal products? Are there risks to going raw?

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these favorite foods, you may be rolling the dice with disease. Here’s the breakdown.

meats & fish Foodies swear by the superior “mouth feel” and flavor of raw meat. Additionally, it is higher in vitamin B6 and eliminates concerns of potential carcinogens— advanced glycation end-products (AGEs), heterocyclic amines, and polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons—that grilling and searing may create.

A 2011 study at the University of Utah revealed that more energy is derived from meats that are cooked than those eaten raw. The thinking is that cooking unwinds proteins in meat and loosens the protein fiber connections, making it easier to chew and digest.

◗ FRESH BREATH Placing a slice of cucumber on the roof of your mouth can help get rid of odor causing bacteria. Eating cucumbers may also help release excess heat in your stomach that is said to be the root cause of unpleasant breath.

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Do you love your carpaccio, ceviche, sushi, and steak tartare? By indulging in some of

On the flip side, consuming raw meat and fish can cause problems, from bacteria (E. coli, listeria, and salmonella) to parasites (trichinella worms and Toxoplasma). Finding a butcher or fishmonger you trust may reduce the risk, as will buying the meat whole (as opposed to ground) and the fish as fresh as possible. But the only way to prevent these little critters from hitchhiking into your GI tract with certainty is to cook them.

Top Nutrients

Vitamin K, Pantothenic Acid, Potassium

Scan here to watch the video or visit femme-rouge.tv

FEMME ROUGE

FOOD | HEALTH

SHELLFISH SHELL GAME

From creative tapas to modern molecular gastronomy, Spain

Refreshingly light and served cold, this soup is an appetizing ➤

“If you don’t take risks in the world, nothing happens, you just stay static” – Hussein Chalayan

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◗ Freeze for two weeks before consuming. This will kill parasites and most bacteria. Be sure to defrost safely in the refrigerator (never at room temperature). WHO SHOULD AV O I D R AW ANIMAL PRODUCTS?

◗ infants and children ◗ pregnant women ◗ the elderly ◗ those with weakened immune systems

◗ Dehydrate at a low temperature, preventing the growth of pathogens. ◗ Marinate in an acid-based liquid —the chemical reaction of the marinade will “cook” the meat or fish (case in point, ceviche).

eggs The incredible, edible egg may not be so incredible after all...IF you’re eating it raw. Especially if it’s unpasteurized. One out of every 30,000 eggs poses the possibility of salmonella contamination. So before you put unpasteurized raw eggs in your smoothie or pour on that homemade Caesar salad dressing, consider the risks.

F O O D B O R N E FA C T S

P R A C T I C A L PA I R I N G S

Wasabi contains allyl isothiocyanate, an aid in battling foodborne bugs, while pickled ginger is considered a “gastric antiseptic,” helping kill germs in the digestive tract. This explains why, for centuries, the two have been served with sushi in the Japanese culture. Horseradish also has antibacterial properties, thus its pairing with raw oysters.

The Centers for Disease Control estimates that approximately 48 million people become ill, 128,000 are hospitalized, and 3,000 die of foodborne diseases each year (from both raw and cooked foods).

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William J. Lahners, M.D., F.A.C.S. LASIK, Cataract & Lens Replacement Surgeon Named “Top Doctor” by Castle Connolly Medical, Ltd.


SPRING/SUMMER 2016

FEMME ROUGE VIDEO GALLERY See your favorite articles come to life in our educational, inspiring, and entertaining videos!

PAGE 37 F R | FASH IO N

A fashion statement that dissolves before your eyes

PAGE 38 F R | FASH IO N

Voice-activated couture is futuristic chic

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Fisherman’s Paella

life style 62

WHAT ’S U P SAR ASOTA?

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PASSIO N AT THE HE L M David Verinder, Sarasota Memorial Hospital’s CEO, shares what’s next

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THE B ROAD MUSEUM LA’s contemporary new jewel

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L IT TL E MARK E T making a big social impact

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O U T AN D AB O U T FEMME ROUGE in the community

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RU SSIAN ROMANCE two cities, infinite possibilities

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A CLO SE R LO O K at the Ringling College of Art and Design

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B E JE WE L YOUR HOME with decor from Baldi

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MAY I HAV E THIS DAN CE? where to get your groove on in Sarasota

108 L IAN RO KMAN sophisticated splendor for the modern bride

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G E T CR E ATIV E artsy outings around town

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DIG ITAL DE SIG N S the future of contemporary art?

SC AN QR CODES

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Supporting talented craftswomen the world over

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LIFE STYLE | ART

MODERN ART

Throughout human history, art has been a means to make sense of the world around us. From paintings on cave walls to

D I G I TA L D E TA I L

oil on canvas, the media are constantly changing, but one thing remains the same: our art reflects our reality. So naturally,

The vector drawings are created using CorelDraw and cut on a ULS CNC laser.

art of the 21st-century reflects a technological reality, both in content and in form.

BROAD MUSEUM

“When I’m drawing, I think of the negative space in its absence, creating physical space as they’re stacked on top of each other.” – Eric Standley

THE FUTURE OF CONTEMPOR ARY ART

(pronounced brode) Museum is going to transport your thinking beyond the glitter of Hollywood. Since opening its doors in September 2015, this shiny new jewel in the City of Angels has been a serious player in the contemporary art world.

laser focus

This innovative system gives us a glimpse of what would normally be hidden away in storage—that portion of the collection not currently on display. As patrons enter and exit the museum, the vault is in constant sight, with its heavy sculptural underside

The intricate stained glass windows, inspired by Gothic and Islamic architectural ornamentation, are created entirely of paper—each sheet of the sometimes more than 200 layers individually cut with the aid of a laser. His pieces—he refers to them facetiously as “folk math”—can be viewed at the Marta Hewitt Gallery in Cincinnati and are featured the book Mandala Masterworks by Paul Heussenstamm.

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LIFE STYLE | BRIDAL

When you think of Los Angeles, film is probably the predominant art form that comes to mind. The Broad

THE ARCHITECTURE Designed by world-renowned architectural firm Diller Scofidio + Renfro (they conceived New York’s High Line) in collaboration with Gensler, the $140 million, 120,000 square foot building is a work of art in and of itself. With two floors and over 50,000 square feet of gallery space, the museum—located downtown on Grand Avenue across the street from the Museum of Contemporary Art (MOCA) and next door to Walt Disney Concert Hall—houses Eli and Edythe ("Edye") Broad’s vast collection utilizing a unique “veil-and-vault” design.

The Masters of old couldn’t have dreamed of the cutting-edge technology—quite literally— employed by Eric Standley. The artist is an Associate Professor of Studio Art at Virginia Tech and comes from a family of engineers. That shouldn’t surprise anyone, as his complex creations make use of his knowledge of geometry and involve months of planning, sketching, and assembly.

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visible from the lobby—the top of the vault is actually the floor of the exhibition space. Viewing windows are built into the structure, permitting a peek inside the holding space, which is crowned by an “airy, honeycomblike structure”—the veil— allowing natural light to filter in and illuminate the artwork. The exterior of the threestory building, already an architectural landmark in its pop art-like glory, is comprised of the veil. Constructed of fiberglass-reinforced concrete, its exoskeleton enrobes the structure from roof to ground level. Its bone-white veneer is raised up at the front corners, revealing glass walls and drawing you in. The design has received mixed reviews, however, with the Los Angeles Times architecture critic Christopher Hawthorne proclaiming the facade “surprisingly punchless.”

ABOUT THE BROADS Entrepreneur and philanthropist Eli Broad made his fortune— Forbes estimates his net worth at $7.4 billion—building two Fortune 500 companies, KB Home (suburban tract homes) and SunAmerica (insurance). He and his wife Edye began collecting art with the acquisition of a drawing by Van Gogh. Their interests shifted to more contemporary works with “social or political meaning,” and thus began what is now a comprehensive collection amassed over almost 50 years.

LIAN ROKMAN “We want this to be a gift to the city of Los Angeles. We wanted to share [the art] with the broadest possible public. And that’s why we have free admission.” – Eli Broad

Broad’s goal was to make Los Angeles a “cultural capital of the world,” and has contributed more than $800 million to local art institutions toward that end. He and his wife financed the construction of the museum bearing their name and housing their collection of more than 2,000 works, considered to be among the most prominent of postwar and contemporary art in the world. That collection continues to grow by an average of one piece per week.

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BALDI HOME JEWELS

Cindy Sherman: Imitation of Life June 11 – October 2, 2016

THE INSTALLATION The Broad’s inaugural installation is a chronological selection of more than 250 masterworks, including paintings, sculptures, and photographs by approximately 60 artists. This trip through time begins on the third floor, with works of prominent artists from the 50s

(Jasper Johns, Robert Rauschenberg, and Cy Twombly) , 60s (Roy Lichtenstein, Ed Ruscha, and Andy Warhol), progressing through the 80s (Jean-Michel Basquiat, Keith Haring, Barbara Kruger, and Jeff Koons). The first floor (the second floor is comprised of the vault and office space) brings us to more recent works, including Takashi Murakami’s 82-foot mural In the Land of the Dead, Stepping

eli and edye FEMME ROUGE

AMADEUS COLLEC TION 2016

OLD WORLD OPULENCE

C O M I N G AT T R A C T I O N S SPECIAL EXHIBITION

on the Tail of a Rainbow, inspired by Japan’s 2011 earthquake and tsunami, and covering most of two walls. In addition, The Visitors, a performance art piece by Icelandic artist Ragnar Kjartansson is displayed on nine video screens, and features musicians playing a bit of Abbainfluenced tunes. But perhaps the most dazzling display on the first level is Yayoi Kusama’s Infinity Mirrored Room—The Souls of Millions of Light Years Away, a reflective chamber with acrylic balls and a spectacular twinkling LED light display. Described as “LA’s most Instagrammable room,” it was the background for singer Adele’s latest video for the song “When We Were Young,” and can be viewed through September 2016.

Beauty and harmony are the principles that have guided Baldi Home Jewels since its founding in 1867 Florence. Renowned for luxurious designs using precious materials— hand-cut crystals, lapis lazuli, malachite, tiger eye, and amethyst, to name a few—its collections include bathtubs, vases, bowls, and lamps created by skilled artisans.

The Broad’s first special exhibition will feature a collection of the work of Cindy Sherman. Nearly 120 photographs of the artist, a favorite of the Broads, will fill the museum’s first floor. “Cindy Sherman’s work has been a touchstone for the Broad collection since Eli and Edye Broad first encountered it in 1982, and Cindy is the only artist in the collection whose work we’ve acquired so deeply and regularly, for more than 30 years,” said Joanne Heyler, founding director of The Broad.

The centuries-old craftsmanship from the Florentine Renaissance is reflected in every piece. Using the same techniques as jewelers—wax casting, gilding, and crystal blowing, right down to hand-chiseling the 24-karat plated bronze—Baldi’s traditional artistry and attention to detail is evident. Its timeless creations for the home are the perfect expression of the Old World Italian lifestyle. WHERE TO FIND IT baldihomejewels.com

F E AT U R E D O N T H E T H I R D F L O O R

Galleries devoted to single artists: Warhol’s series of Campbell’s Soup Cans included in a collection of 11 paintings in a small gallery; Lichtenstein in a larger room of 10 paintings; Twombly’s collection including seven paintings and three sculptures; Koons with eight sculptures on display.

Photos: © Flaire Studio © Luca Visentini ©Alessio Balleri ©Devin Blair

The phrase “like mother, like daughter “ could have been coined for German bridal designer, Lian Rokman. Rokman’s mother, a designer and pattern maker, was her role model and inspiration, instilling in her a love for fashion. The younger Rokman began sewing as a child, and by the time she was a teenager, she was creating clothes for her friends.

UFIZZI COLUMN WITH KATE CANDELABRA Made from mouth-blown amber crystal, each piece is cut by hand and gilded with gold-plated bronze. TABLE The resplendent Richelieu table is handcrafted from Brazilian stone and rests atop a wax-casted base that glitters in 24k goldplated brass.

At the age of 20, Rokman designed her first bridal collection. She expanded on her artistry, studying professional makeup and hairstyling, so that she could offer full bridal services. And that business has blossomed over the past 10 years to bring her to the forefront of bridal design.

CHANDELIER The Riccoli chandelier delivers drama to any room with its mouth-blown, hand-cut crystal and goldplated brass details.

Cindy Sherman, Untitled #92, 1981 108

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Rokman’s breathtaking gowns combine the romantic with the sensuous, with each design created to reflect the bride’s personal vision. Embellished with the finest laces and embroidery from around the world, Rokman spares no attention to detail, resulting in a sophisticated splendor for what is one of the most memorable days in a woman’s life. WHERE TO FIND IT

Contact the designer and mention you’re a FR reader.

info@lianrokman.com

PHOENIX A winged sheer back and delicate train adorn this exquisite gown composed of multiple fine laces.

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FROM THE PUBLISHER "Good art enters the soul, appeals to the heart, and makes new ideas plausible." —Unknown Art has the power to transform us. When we stand in front of ancient ruins we are transported to another time. It makes us question how they accomplished such grand feats, and gives us a window into the lives of the people who built and used them. Every sculpture, mosaic, piece of pottery is a surviving record of a civilization’s story. The connection art makes between the observer and the artist is undeniable. On a recent trip to St. Petersburg, Russia, I was fortunate to visit the Hermitage Museum, which is a work of art, from the palatial architecture outside to the vast collection of artworks inside. Gazing at the poignant sculptures of Michelangelo I could see the incredible sensitivity of the artist and felt somehow as if I had an encounter with the Renaissance master himself. Through each medium, artists speak to us in different ways. We learn more than just a story from the theatre—we gain insight into the culture of the playwright and even his innermost thoughts while penning the play. Revolutionary advances in technology allow designers to create performance art from fashion, conveying significant statements beyond style. Listening to a favorite composer allows us to disconnect from our present concerns and escape into the enveloping world of chords and notes. The artist has a great responsibility to reach out to potentially millions of people and, through her art, to change the world.

THANK YOU to our readers from the FEMME ROUGE team!

OUR MISSION With a desire to empower and enlighten women of all ages, FEMME ROUGE is committed to providing artfully expressed, female-focused content that both moves and motivates. All subject matter is carefully selected, based on merit, and reviewed by field experts including physicians, psychologists, and educational organizations to ensure that we bring our readers only the best.

➤ CONTAC T Join us to meet, learn, share, and bond (941) 870-7220 femme-rouge.com info@femme-rouge.com 1234 2nd Street, Sarasota, Florida 34236

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Yara Shoemaker: Publisher, Editor-in-Chief Brittany Worth: Managing Editor Beth Knopik: Director of Development Jeanette Bakowski: Creative Director Susan McGrath: Copy Chief Vanessa Houston: Associate Editor Doris Berkey: Sales Manager Maddie Crotts: Office Manager Sarah Fulton: Distribution Manager Gabbie Amontree: Social Media Specialist Kimberly Cole: Graphic Designer Michelle Martin: Contributing Writer Robbie Vogel: Contributing Writer Marie McGrath: Contributing Writer Videographer: Josh Webb

Disclaimer: The information in FEMME ROUGE has not been evaluated by the FDA, and is not intended to diagnose, treat, cure or prevent any disease. It is not medical advice, nor is it a substitute for medical advice or for consultation with a qualified physician; if you have medical concerns or symptoms, or are considering use of herbs or supplements, please seek advice from a qualified physician. This publication makes no actual recommendations or claims whatsoever as to the use of herbs, nor makes any guarantees whatsoever as to either the efficacy of such products nor as to the accuracy of any claims made about them. This publication and its contents are provided for general information, reportage, background research and entertainment purposes only. The publisher specifically disclaims responsibility for any consequences of using this publication and its contents. 06

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WITH WITH GRATITUDE GRATITUDE TO O U RTO C UO S TO U RMCEURSSTO M E R S who trust us who with trust their usmost with important their most place important — home. place — home.

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Our philosophy of aesthetics is simple, natural, and authentic. By testing and researching trending products, as well as consulting the experts, we bring you the freshest recommendations to let your beauty shine through.

beauty

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N E X T GENER ATION SK INC ARE HUMAN GROW TH FAC TOR

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NATUR AL BEAUT Y FROM BE NATUR AL ORGANICS

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Photo Credit: Katelyn Prisco Photography

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BEAUTY | SKIN ➤

in the beginning Stem cells are found everywhere in the body. They are the foundation upon which other more specialized cells are formed. These building blocks can do two things: reproduce more stem cells and differentiate (develop to perform a specific function). Where do these multi-tasking cells come from? Three to five days after conception, a mass— called a blastocyst—forms that

is no bigger than the dot above the letter i on this page. Inside this blastocyst are embryonic stem cells, which develop into every cell type in our fully formed bodies. While they are useful for applications such as disease research and drug testing (rather than testing on a human, pharmaceutical companies try out their new products on human cells), they can only be harvested through in vitro fertilization (IVF), which is anything but a renewable resource. The adult body also contains many stem cells, which are more suitable to direct medical applications on a patient, as well as less controversial because they are taken from tissues such as fat. But how do they work on the skin?

The Beauty of Technology STEM CELL SKINCARE

It seems every year a new potion is concocted that has everyone talking about the fountain of youth. Many times it disappears as hocus pocus, but sometimes a rare advancement can actually improve our skin and our lives. Could stem cells be next?

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BEAUTY | SKIN W H AT A B O U T PLANT STEM CELLS? Although plant stem cells provide some modest improvements in the skin, they must be combined with other, non-botanical active ingredients because they do not make growth factors or activate cellular renewal the way human stem cells do.

the perks of HGF Topical applications of HGF show significant results in:

◗ Anti-aging on the face, neck, eye area, and hands ◗ Pigment correction ◗ Healing after cosmetic procedures ◗ Preparation of the scalp for hair restoration ◗ Lash, brow, and hair growth ➤

got you under my skin In the case of aging skin, many varieties of growth factors come into play. Some communicate with collagen-producing cells to ramp up production on par with younger cells. Others cause cells in the epidermis to rejuvenate, essentially resurfacing the lines and wrinkles on our faces. Still others can have a brightening effect to improve skin tone and hyperpigmentation from age or sun damage.

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Increasingly, dermatologists and cosmetic surgeons are turning to HGF skincare products for their patients. The consistent daily application of a product with high quality growth factors in high concentrations can produce some pretty convincing results (we’ve seen them firsthand!). In addition, if you and your physician are considering a cosmetic procedure, such as a chemical peel, laser, or face lift, the use of an HGF product for posttreatment care can significantly improve downtime and enhance the outcome of the treatment. So, whether for maintenance or major transformation, it seems growth factors are here to stay.

getting to the growth factors In highly advanced procedures, laboratory scientists safely cultivate these stem cells to produce messenger molecules called human growth factors (HGF). This is the part of the stem cell that communicates with other cells around it to modify their behavior. Though the stem cells are more often in the limelight, it is the growth factors that have a transformative effect on the body.

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how to benefit

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too good to be true? As with every innovation, trust takes time and proof. Although the commercial market for HGF skincare is very new, the use of growth factors to revitalize other tissues in the body has been happening since the 1990’s. After researchers realized the potential for the technology that was regenerating blood vessels in heart patients and skin in burn victims to be harnessed for cosmetic purposes, they went about proving its efficacy. Just some of the studied effects of HGF include:

◗ Wound healing (Experimental Cellular Research, 2010) ◗ Collagen production (Archives of Dermatology, 2008) ◗ Hair growth and follicle health (American Journal for Scientific Development, 2012)

LC Cell Anti-Aging Kit This day serum and night cream set has the luxurious texture one expects of a high-end product, with the skin rejuvenating benefits of HGF and other cutting-edge active ingredients. Dermatologistrecommended for reversing signs of aging, like wrinkles, expression lines, uneven tone and texture, and sagging due to collagen loss. Contact LC Cell and mention you’re a FR reader for exclusive pricing: info@ lccell.com


PRECIOUS PICKS

BE NATURAL ORGANICS Be Natural Organics is a skincare line whose name says it all. In fact, it recently received the lowest toxicity rating from the Campaign for Safe Cosmetics—a U.S. health and environmental agency with a mission to protect the health of consumers. Its products are paraben-, glycol-, and sulfate-free, and contain no additives, artificial preservatives, chemicals, or ingredients that are petroleum-derived, or synthetic. Committed to high-performing yet healthy beauty, it offers the best in fresh botanicals, produced in small batches to preserve bio-active properties and ensure optimal results. GENTLE FOAMING

BIO-AC TIVE

FA C I A L C L E A N S E R Gentle, yet powerful, this cleanser is enriched with botanical actives to provide nourishment and protection. A great cleanser choice for truly sensitive skin, it contains no irritating ingredients.

C L E A N S I N G T R E AT M E N T This anti-aging cleanser uses a proprietary blend of all natural glycolic, lactic, tannic, and alpha hydroxy acids to brighten and even out skin tone while maintaining moisture.

Top Ingredients: olive oil, rosehip

Top Ingredients: green tea leaf,

seed oil, sea kelp extract

bilberry extract, sugar cane extract, sweet orange fruit extract, lemon extract Our Review: We thought this cleanser made our skin look and feel more radiant. However, those with sensitive skin experienced some drying and redness.

Our Review: This had a pleasant

scent, was gentle enough for a baby, but not tough enough for acne-prone skin.

COQ10 EYE PROTEC TION CREAM CoQ10 combines with all natural ingredients to revitalize and protect the delicate skin around your eyes. Top Ingredients: avocado fruit

oil, camellia sinensis seed oil, shea butter, pumpkin seedcake extract, oat kernel flour, turmeric powder Our Review: We found this to be a heavy eye cream that helped lighten dark undereye circles the next morning. It was a bit greasy, but we liked the rich, thick texture. Applied before bed, it left our skin feeling nourished.

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S E A K E L P D A I LY MOISTURIZER This anti-aging cream repairs, nourishes, and protects the skin, restoring a natural glow. The sea kelp extract protects against environmental toxins, while the wax-free formula allows for deep absorption of its beneficial ingredients. Top Ingredients: grapeseed oil, red raspberry seed oil, panthenol, hyaluronic acid, allantoin, sea kelp extract, bilberry extract, sugar cane extract, sweet orange fruit extract Our Review: This moisturizer has a refreshing scent, and has helped our skin tremendously. Great for oily, acne–prone skin as well. One staffer has already reordered and calls this her “one and only.”


BEAUTY | PRODUCTS

BEHIND

D A I LY B O TA N I C A L

E Y E R E PA I R

NIACIN COMPLEX

ENZYME PEEL By helping to loosen dead cells from the skin's surface, this peel exposes fresher cells for optimal absorption of serums and moisturizers.

NIGHT SERUM Applied at bedtime, this serum repairs, nourishes, and hydrates the delicate tissue around the eyes while improving the skin’s texture.

Top Ingredients: lactic acid (vegetable-based), D-panthenol (pro-vitamin B5), niacinamide (vitamin B3), ginger extract, calendula officinalis flower extract Our Review: This started off with a slight stinging sensation and left us with a bit of dry, flaky skin. Once our skin adjusted to it, we noticed a reduction in occasional breakouts and fine lines, and a better overall appearance. Definitely a bit strong for sensitive skin, so use sparingly.

Top Ingredients: rose hip fruit oil,

BALANCING MIST This spray combines alpha lipoic acid, DMAE, and botanical extracts to tighten, nourish, and protect the skin while balancing pH levels for complete nutritional absorption—specifically formulated to combat the signs of aging.

vitamin E, evening primrose oil, moringa oil, jojoba seed oil, argan oil Our Review: This product seemed to plump up fine lines and tighten pores, although it didn’t help with dark circles and bags.

the brand

Founder Joanne O’Donnell has been a skincare professional and owner of Bloomfield Esthetics Day Spa in Michigan for over 30 years. She witnessed firsthand the damage that toxins in skincare products can cause. What began as a side business formulating natural products for friends, family, and clients grew into what is now one of the largest companies in the botanically-active retail market.

Top Ingredients: sage extract,

aloe vera leaf juice, cucumber extract, aspen bark extract, papaya extract Our Review: We noticed a slight tingling/stinging sensation when it was first spritzed on, and a reduction in occasional breakouts. An overall improvement in our skin’s appearance earned this a thumbs up.

P O M E G R A N AT E FA C I A L S C R U B The jojoba beads in this scrub gently remove surface buildup, while sweet almond oil provides essential fatty acids and antioxidants, leaving behind a smooth texture and a radiant glow. Gentle enough to be used daily or as a once a week treat. Top Ingredients: sweet almond oil, hydrogenated jojoba oil, kaolin clay Our Review: This scrub smells divine—definitely a treat for the senses! It pulled the dirt and grime

from the skin without causing any irritation, leaving our faces feeling clean, soft, and refreshed. FEMME ROUGE

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Fashion is an art. We embrace all its forms—from classic to modern, established to up-and-coming—and focus on the designers making a difference in the way we see ourselves with their fine artistry.

fashion

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YULIA YANINA’S ROMANTIC RU SSIAN DESIGNS

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FEMININE AND DR AMATIC GOW NS BY ASHI STUDIO COUTURE

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E THAN K’S COLORFUL LU XURY HANDBAGS

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From Russia with love, the passionate and creative designs of Yanina Couture dance off the pages of fairy tales like something out of the Bolshoi Theatre.

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YANINA COUTURE


Silk voile drapes lightly over a structured tutu underskirt in this ethereal dress. Hand-embroidered beads shimmer along the delicate black branch motif. The headband is hand-embroidered with stones and beads. opposite: This stunning velvet dress with bold sheer illusion panel at the bust features hand-embroidered ballerinas on the sleeves, which are crafted out of multi-tiered silk voile.

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This pastel pink taffeta dress uses a tutu underskirt to shape the top layer of silk mesh. The circles of lavender silk thread embroidery are finished with beads.

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FASHION | YANINA

Several colors of silk voile converge into a fan-shaped gown. The silk belt defines the waist and leads to the pleated sheer floor-length skirt.

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This silk voile dress with exposed seams and plunging neckline is hand-embroidered with silk braids that tell the stories of classic Russian poet Alexander Pushkin.

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FASHION | YANINA

Inspired by the white swan, this sheer illusion dress is hand-embroidered with beads, feathers, stones, and a bright ruby at the waist.

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This sheer silk voile dress is hand-decorated with dark lavender floral appliquĂŠ. A skirt of feathers adds flirtatious texture to the sensual design.

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FASHION | YANINA

YULIA YANINA

Yulia Yanina founded the fashion house bearing her name over 20 years ago in the small Russian town of Saratov. In 1993, Yanina and her family moved to Moscow, where she held the first public premiere of Yanina Couture Collection. Now located in a mansion near Red Square, Yanina Couture is considered one of the most elegant and successful designers in Russia, with celebrities like Kate Hudson, Gwen Stefani, Paris Hilton, and Juliette Binoche walking the red carpet in her designs. In her latest collection, Yanina has captured the sophistication, elegance, and grace of the Russian tradition using luxurious fabrics of silk taffeta, voile, tulle, velvet, and lace. Inspired by famed ballerina Anna Pavlova, Princess Irina Yusupova, and dancer Ida Rubinstein, her ethereal designs evoke images of Vrubel’s The Swan Princess. The fairy-tale bird, princesses, and flowers spring to life in her creations. In the designer’s words, “The collection means luxury, magic, and dreams come true.” And who doesn’t love a happy ending? WHERE TO FIND IT

Contact the designer and mention you’re a FR reader: yaninafashion@mtu-net.ru

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DESIGNER SPOTLIGHT

Mohammed Ashi, known simply as Ashi, was born in Saudi Arabia in 1980. Fascinated with fashion from an early age, he eventually left home for France, to attend the prestigious École supérieure des arts et techniques de la mode (ESMOD). There he obtained his degree in design, finishing in just three years. After graduation, Ashi landed a dream job in Elie Saab’s atelier. The Lebanese master took Ashi under his wing, helping him hone his natural talent. With Saab’s supervision, Ashi assisted in the design of the 2006 Spring/ Summer Collection—while also working as Head of Design for Saab Accessories. He went on later that year to enter and win the popular Lebanese reality show Project Fashion, giving him the recognition he needed to start his own label.

2016 spring/summer collection

ASHI STUDIO COUTURE Launched in 2007, Studio Ashi has garnered praise from the likes of Franca Sozzani, Editor-in-Chief of Vogue Italia, for the timeless, modern elegance of his designs. As an avid movie buff, Ashi finds inspiration in films, often telling a tale through embroidery, feathers, and fringe. We can’t help but be spellbound by his masterful storytelling, expressed in each exquisite gown. 26

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the -Warrior Princess With Ashi’s latest collection, he transports us to the fairy-tale world of lace and flowers, with the century-old story of a princess who transforms into a warrior while waiting for her knight. She is expressed with the femininity of floral garlands and intricate embroideries juxtaposed with the strength of structured corsets, sleek sheaths, and curvaceous cuts. We think you’ll be captivated. WHERE TO FIND IT

Contact Ashi Studio and mention you’re a FR reader: info@ashistudio.com

The chic pairing of elaborate crepe and gazar ruffles with a sleek jumpsuit is beautifully unique. Hand-embroidered details shimmer across the sheer neckline, bust, and v-back. FEMME ROUGE

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FASHION | SPOTLIGHT

This eye-catching gown is equally stunning from the feminine curve of the embroidered sleeves to the cascade of ruffles that make up the high-low skirt.

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FASHION | SPOTLIGHT

The dramatic winged sleeves of this black gazar wrap dress lead to an asymmetrical full skirt replete with downy feathers.

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FASHION | SPOTLIGHT

The high neck and long sleeves of this sheer illusion bodice are exquisitely hand-embroidered. A silk, tulle, and gazar skirt provides bell-like structure to the gown.

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Ethan K

DESIGNER BAGS WITH A STORY TO TELL

Ethan Koh strolled into the Saks Fifth Avenue lounge in Sarasota with a bright smile and a cheerful, leaf-colored blazer to match his oversized, emerald green tote. After remarking on the jacket, we find out that both items are of his own design. And both, we suspect, were specifically worn today to reflect his soft spot for the Sunshine State, whose nature and lushness he says continually inspire him.

We sat down with the Singaporeborn handbag designer whose eponymous line—Ethan K— was the main attraction at an invitation-only brunch at Sophie’s that afternoon. The debut of the Spring 2016 collection was to be followed by clients' exclusive, one-on-one consultations with the artist himself.

What sets you apart from everyone else out there? I think there are two things. First of all, our personal approach, and also the nature of our product. We have a very unique customer approach because we are not like any traditional luxury brand. I started the company about six years ago. It was a hobby and it became a business. I really felt that as things are getting more mass-produced and globalized, there was this group of customers around the world who wanted something special. I’m very fascinated by creating an experience. I see that Ethan K is just a medium for me to communicate my creativity to people. The bags are a medium and also the clasps, but I think that in a way ten years ago it might have been different—it was all about buying a product. It was all about showing someone 34

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that you had taste. But today, I think even more so that luxury is for oneself. And of course a unique selling point is that we have a lot of beautiful colors. What makes us really different is that we actually use a lot of semi-precious stones for the animal clasps of the bags.

How did you come to intern at Hermès in Paris? I went to Central St. Martins to study, and I was an apprentice to an artisan as well during summer school in Tuscany. I grew up in Asia, but I was always intrigued by Europe because I think that luxury and a unique experience came from there. Europe has a long history of arts, and when I went there I was very interested in the story of Thierry Hermès because he was a saddle maker. Having interned there, I really learned how to make a bag and I discovered how heritage is so important. And through that education I felt there was a little similarity to my story because I grew up with a tannery in the back of my home, so that’s how everything started.

Ethan Koh For us, luxury is not about a status symbol. The bags I have created are a result of the cultural dialogue with our customers.


FASHION | ETHAN K

Your handbags are so whimsical, with their details of bejeweled animals like hedgehogs and turtles. They are clearly inspired by the fairy tales you loved as a child…do you have a favorite story among them?

clasp in tiger’s eye stone. So the conversation is ongoing.

Symbolism is very important. My bags and the colors are inspired by the tropical nature of my birthplace. And the animals are inspired by the childhood fairy tales of Hans Christian Andersen. I love Rapunzel—a featured accent on one bag is a small golden image of the story’s heroine—and I think what I really wanted to do is to bring a bit of playfulness to the luxury product, because now I feel like everything has become a little too serious. I also wanted to incorporate beautiful colors into my creations. Like the green is inspired by the palm trees I saw when I was traveling around Florida last year.

I think that first of all, when we deal with the special order service, most of the time it’s customers who have already acquired pieces in our collection and understand our ethos. And then we meet them, and it’s a very casual conversation and sometimes they say, “Oh Ethan, last year I ordered all these shiny crocodile bags and they were too hard—I need something soft this year.” So what makes me different is that I understand that functionality is so important to a woman. After all, a handbag is virtually her second home.

Do you design with a certain individual in mind? I design with the customer in mind. For example, I designed one particular clutch for this mysterious person I met in New York. She invited me to her closet, and she had a beautiful picture there of her with her horses. And through that I was inspired to design a clutch bag with a horse

E YE C A N DY

Ethan K’s unique handbags come in an array of dazzling colors. All are carefully crafted of exotic skins and include lovingly thought-out details such as fanciful closures, interior pockets, and trap-door access.

Take us through the bespoke process…someone contacts you and tells you s/he wants a special bag…what happens next?

You’ve said that the vibrant tones you use are also reminiscent of your grandparents’ business in the fruits and spices trade. What is the best way to wear them? To appreciate and be able to wear an Ethan K piece, it definitely needs to be someone with personality. But also we appeal to a group of collectors, and they are non-conformists. So it’s not like they see their friends have something and they want it, too.

It’s more like a self-expression. Of course we have the casual pieces, the soft and matte pieces, the reversible tote, and very soft leather. And then we also have the very dressy evening bags, which are the showpieces of the brand.

What trends are coming? What is the future of handbags in terms of new styles? The whole luxury industry in the last few years has become too mass-market. And of course there has been a growth of handbags— everybody started talking about them. I think that this year will be one of consolidation. Companies are forced to reeducate their clientele about what a beautiful handbag is. I think today’s clients need to be stimulated. They really need to see a point of difference in a product before buying it.

Ethan designs with a woman’s needs in mind. Over the years, conversations with his clients have led to the forging of true, lasting friendships. Ethan is a wonderful listener, and that quality and caring are boldly demonstrated in his work. shown clockwise: ADINDA Ethan’s inspiration for this dark and lovely bag was a very fashionable, on-the-go mom. The small gold hedgehog gracing the clasp is a symbol of adventure. MRS. BAKER’S CLUTCH This electric blue clutch includes a cross-body strap to easily transition from daytime to evening. The bag is beautifully accented with twin tropical mangosteens, known in Asia as “the Queen of Fruit.” ANGELICA The editor-in-chief of Vogue China inspired the creation of this classic handbag. The lovely tri-color design makes it a stunner from any angle.

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“If you don’t take risks in the world, nothing happens, you just stay static” – Hussein Chalayan

TECHNOCOUTURE F U T U R I S T I C FA S H I O N From making the materials to creating the design, technology has been stretching our concept of couture. We no longer have to just “get dressed”—now we can wear highly engineered and exceptionally beautiful ensembles that evolve with our bodies, our emotions, and even those with whom we interact.

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FASHION | TECH

the weaver of different worlds British designer Hussein Chalayan has been drawing gasps on the runways for over 15 years. Each season crowds gather at his fashion shows like art connoisseurs to Art Basel, just to glimpse what the innovator will come up with next. From his early work that turned living room furniture into dresses and skirts, to a collection of stiff designs that the models subsequently shattered with hammers, every show holds a spectacle that takes the audience to an unexpected place. And like any talented artist, Chalayan has something to express through his wearable works of performance art.

S E E C H A L AYA N ’ S D E S I G N S U P C LO S E at the Metropolitan Museum of Art in New York as part of the “Manus x Machina: Fashion in the Age of Technology” this May.

For his 2016 Spring/Summer Collection, the designer drew inspiration from a trip to Cuba, where he was fascinated by the locals’ live-in-the-moment attitude. To capture this spirit of impermanence, he created crisp white shirtdresses out of paper and placed two models under a shower onstage. The dissolving outer garments reveal Swarovskiencrusted gowns with appliqué petals and contrasting black embroidery. Of his impetus for melding the worlds of fashion, art, and technology, Chalayan calls himself a “weaver of different worlds,” always ahead of his colleagues in fashion who seem to be stuck in a cycle of repeating the past. “If you don’t take risks in the world, nothing happens, you just stay static.” And static is one word that will never be used in connection with this next-generation artist.

Watch Chalayan’s incredible dissolving dresses in this video:

Scan here to watch the video or visit femme-rouge.tv

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putting our emotions on our sleeves What do you get when you combine dressmaker pins, electronic devices, and highly durable engineered polymers? Why, haute couture of course! Canadian designer Ying Gao dares us to pin our hearts on our sleeves with two high-tech dresses in a mini-collection titled “Incertitude”—meaning a state of uncertainty or hesitation. Through a complex hidden electrical system, the outward facing pins on the clothing ➤ do you see me? react to sounds around them, Also by the talented Ying Gao, the undulating in a hypnotic wave collection of two vision-activated to audible stimuli such as music dresses called “(NO)WHERE and even the human voice. (NOW)HERE” cleverly combines eye-tracking technology with The interactive dresses were photoluminescent thread, shown at Montreal’s Centre de super organza, and electronics design de l’UQAM as works of into something both worn and fashion art and certainly made exhibited. When the viewer’s an impression. The designer’s gaze is directed at the dress it theme of a “hypermodern illuminates the fabric and causes individual…pressured by a logic the layers to shift. Look away and of urgency, and worried about the action stops. But who could the future,” is relatable in our look away from something so fast-paced society. Such sensitive fascinating? reactions to the world around us are most often hidden, but Gao’s Gao was inspired by an essay audacious endeavor brings them written by French cultural theorist right to the surface and demands Paul Virilio, who often wrote on we pay attention. the subject of technology and

Ying Gao

See the mesmerizing movement of Gao’s dresses in this video:

Scan here to watch the video or visit femme-rouge.tv

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the arts. In this collection, she captures the concept of presence and disappearance in a very personal way that connects the observer with the artwork itself.


FASHION | TECH

HEAD TO TOE TECH

In recent years electronics giant Philips has been getting its chic on. From a glowing dress to the current foray into biometric jewelry, the people at Philips are using their innovations to propel us into a new era of wearable tech that fits the fashion bill, too. Their Vibe Emotion Sensor is a cleverly designed biometric signal detector that shares emotional information with other wearers of the necklace via conductive ink and textile sensors. But don’t dare call it a mood necklace. The sensitive jewelry is the result of one of many “Design Probes”—short-term innovation projects that are brought directly to market for live testing and feedback, rather than spending years in development. Survey says: this is fashionable fun. If what you’re looking for is custom footwear, look no further than the Melania Shoe. The first-ever 3D printed couture shoe is the creation of fashion designer Naim Josefi and industrial designer Souzan Youssouf. By scanning your foot to measure angle, arch, and contours, a computer is able to design and print the perfect fit, layer by layer, in recyclable nylon. Josefi cites his background in microbiology as the inspiration behind the almost anatomical design that combines fashion, function, and ecology. Nominated for the prestigious Brit Insurance Award, the Melania Shoe is also a favorite of fashion pioneer Lady Gaga.

FEMME ROUGE on the runway Artist and educator Barbara Gerdeman crafted a beautiful gown out of pages from our magazine for the iConcept Art Couture Fashion Show at Saks Fifth Avenue in Sarasota, Florida. We asked Barbara about her vision, challenges in creating the dress, and views on fashion as an art form. “I chose to use FEMME ROUGE because the content helps women feel good about themselves—I tried to encapsulate that in the dress. I also incorporated pages from an article on my favorite designer, Alexander McQueen, and placed some of the words strategically to give meaning to the design. Because your papers are so high gloss, I achieved a special crackled effect by crumpling the pages multiple times to soften them. I had to be careful not to pull stitches too tightly, as the dress was sewn both by hand and by machine. I consider fashion design an art in itself, because the goal is self-expression, and—just like a painter will use a variety of paints and techniques—the designer selects materials and puts them together in a way that conveys a concept." Photo courtesy of Rich Schineller

See more about 3D printed fashion in our April 2015 edition.

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Nuevo Latino cuisine Innovative, intricately prepared dishes are plated and presented as works of art. Our cuisine has earned raves from all over the world, including the New York Times, which called us “possibly the best food in Sarasota.� 1345 Main St, Sarasota, FL 34236 (941) 362-4427

Pacific Rim Award-winning sushi Pacific Rim offers guests freshly prepared food, personalized service, and a warm contemporary ambiance that creates an exceptional, yet affordable dining experience. 1859 Hillview Street, Sarasota, Florida 34239 (941) 330-8071

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We believe that health starts on your plate, and are committed to educating our readers about food— making delicious cooking simple, fun, and nutritious. Our holistic approach to respecting our bodies includes useful information for a healthier daily life.

food | wellness

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EASY, E X TR AORDINARY SPANISH MEALS

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O M EGAS FROM FISH O IL AND BEYOND

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THE RISK S OF GOING R AW

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ON THE TABLE

Simply Spanish

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From creative tapas to modern molecular gastronomy, Spain has a love of delightfully stylish food. We chose some of the most popular dishes from the region’s specialties and simplified them for everyone to cook and enjoy.


1 Gazpacho

Serves 4-6

Refreshingly light and served cold, this soup is an appetizing first course that really wakes up the taste buds. 8 ripe organic tomatoes 1 small red onion 1 organic English cucumber 1 small organic green pepper 1 small organic red pepper ¼ teaspoon crushed garlic (or to taste) 2 tablespoons organic unfiltered apple cider vinegar Cold water Sea salt Organic extra virgin olive oil Parsley leaves for garnish Diced tomato and cucumber for garnish

H O W T O P E E L A T O M AT O Don’t lose half of your tomatoes by going at them with a knife. Just follow these simple steps:

◗ Bring a large saucepan of water to boil. ◗ Place tomatoes in boiling water for 20 seconds or until the skins crack. ◗ Remove and rinse under cold water. ◗ The skin will peel right off in your hands!

PREP

◗ Blanch and peel tomatoes, remove seeds ◗ Peel and deseed cucumber ◗ Deseed green and red peppers ◗ Roughly chop onion, tomatoes, cucumber, and peppers STEP ONE: BLEND & CHILL Process the chopped vegetables and garlic with a cup of water in a food processor or a blender until smooth. Add vinegar and salt, and then process quickly until well incorporated—but not over-blended so it starts foaming. Depending on the consistency you prefer, you can add more water. Refrigerate for an hour before serving in bowls or glasses garnished with a drizzle of olive oil, fresh parsley, and diced tomato and cucumber.

Note: Be your own chef! In our recipes the measurements are approximate, substitutions are encouraged, and you'll get the best results from trusting your tastebuds, like we do.

CUCUMBERS Made up of almost 95% water, these hydrating fruits are botanical relatives of squash and melon. Cultivated for thousands of years in India and parts of Asia, cucumbers are some of the oldest produce known to mankind. Top Nutrients

Vitamin K, Pantothenic Acid, Potassium Health Benefits

◗ REDUCES RISK OF CANCER Cucumbers contain polyphenols called lignans, which have been known to lower the risk of breast, uterine, ovarian, and prostate cancers. ◗ FRESH BREATH Placing a slice of cucumber on the roof of your mouth can help get rid of odor causing bacteria. Eating cucumbers may also help release excess heat in your stomach that is said to be the root cause of unpleasant breath. ◗ BRAIN PROTECTION Containing the anti-inflammatory flavonol fisetin, cucumbers play a crucial role in brain health. Fisetin improves your memory, protecting nerve cells from agerelated decline.

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2 Paella de los Pescadores

Serves 4-6

Fisherman’s Paella is as versatile as the Spanish coastline—substitute local seafood when available, choose your favorite mollusks and crustaceans, or follow our suggestions for a superb yet simple main course.

3 tablespoons organic extra virgin olive oil 1 medium onion 2 garlic cloves 2 teaspoons smoked paprika (or to taste) 1 tablespoon (or a large pinch) saffron strands 2 small ripe organic tomatoes 2 tablespoons organic tomato paste 2 cups rice (we used Arborio; Basmati also works) 4 cups water or organic low-sodium stock (vegetable, seafood, or chicken) Sea salt 1 medium organic red pepper 1½ cup organic green peas 8-12 large raw peeled, deveined shrimp, prawns, or lobster meat 10-12 small clams, washed 15-20 mussels, cleaned

brands WE LOVE Rice Select Organic Arborio Rice Pride of Szeged Hungarian Style Hot Paprika Bella Famiglia Mediterranean Red Saffron PREP

◗ ◗ ◗ ◗ ◗ ◗

Dice onion Chop garlic Peel and chop tomatoes Chop pepper Rinse and drain rice Wash seafood (see tips at right)

STEP ONE: RICE In a shallow pot or a traditional paella pan (if you have one), sauté onion in olive oil until soft. Add garlic and cook 1 minute, stirring to prevent it from browning. Add paprika, saffron, tomato paste, and chopped tomatoes, stirring constantly for about 30 seconds over low heat until the spices become fragrant. Pour in rice and stir with spices to coat, about 1 minute. Add liquid and season with salt (adjust amount depending on your chosen liquid). Bring to a boil, cover, and reduce the heat. STEP TWO: TOPPINGS After rice is halfway cooked (time depends on your chosen rice, so check the packaging for instructions), add chopped pepper and peas to the pot, and stir gently with a fork. Adjust seasoning if necessary. STEP THREE: SEAFOOD Place the seafood artistically around the pan. Cover and continue cooking on low heat for 7-10 minutes, or until rice is done, shellfish is open, and shrimp is opaque, but not overcooked.

MUSSELS BUILD MUSCLE Mussels are every bit as proteinpacked as red meat, but without all the saturated fat and calories that come with a ribeye.

STEP FOUR: GARNISH Garnish with parsley before serving from the paella pan.

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HAIRY SITUATION All marine mussels use hair-like threads to attach themselves to rocks and other structures. This is called the beard. To "debeard" the mussels before cooking, simply pull the threads out and discard them. FRESH OR FISHY? Any shellfish that is open before cooking should be thrown out. Likewise, shellfish that doesn't open after cooking or has an unpleasant smell is also dead and inedible. Since you can't do this step yourself when eating out, make sure the restaurant is reputable and gets their seafood from reliable sources.

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WASH UP The best way to clean shellfish is to soak them in a large bowl of cold water with one tablespoon flour. Mix well and then allow the sediment to settle to the bottom of the bowl. Give the shells a rinse under fresh water.

FARMED VS. WILD Both clams and mussels can be harvested in the wild, or obtained through farming. Sustainable practices allow the shellfish to live in ocean waters to ensure proper nourishment and cleanliness in a protected area where they can be easily monitored and harvested with minimal impact to the environment.


FOOD | ON THE TABLE TOURIST TR AP

For most Spaniards, lunch is the main meal of the day; the evening meal is quite a bit lighter. As filling as paella can be, it’s typically not eaten after sundown by the locals. Order this delicious dish at a restaurante for dinner and you’ll be pegged as a tourist for sure.

SWEET TEA

Long, long ago in lands far away, saffron was a key ingredient in mixing up a number of magical potions. A cup of tea brewed with a bit of saffron was believed to have the power to make a man fall in love.

RED GOLD

Today, saffron is worth more by weight than gold. 90% of the bright red stigmas of the saffron crocus flower are produced in Iran, where they flavor much of the regional cuisine.

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S W E E T VA R I AT I O N S

Many cultures enjoy their own version of this silky dessert, including the French, English, Portuguese, and Spanish. THE FIRST CRÈME BRÛLÉE

ONE-THIRD THE C A LO R I E S

are consumed in a serving of Crema Catalana, as compared to a serving of Crème Brûlée.

reference was found in a French cookbook from 1691. "BURNT CREAM"

was made popular nearly 200 years later in Cambridge, England at Trinity College by burning the school's crest into sugar with a branding iron. NOT TO BE OUTDONE,

the Portuguese have two varieties: a baked custard called Tigelada (something akin to Crème Brûlée) and Leite Creme, which is prepared on the stovetop (similar to Crema Catalana). MARCH 19TH

marks Saint Joseph's Day, when Catalans celebrate their fathers with Crema Catalana.

Color. Culture. Cuisine.

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WELCOME TO BUSTLING BARCELONA! THIS IS A CITY WITH STYLE, CLASS, AND SOMETHING FOR EVERYONE, SO PACK YOUR MALETES (THAT’S CATALAN FOR "SUITCASES") AND LET’S GO! Fem m e R ou ge

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IN BARCELONA Next time you’re in Barça, stop by Escribà for an authentic crema catalana. The family bakery has been mastering traditional Spanish desserts for over 100 years in the Ramblas district (find more travel tips for Barcelona in our April 2015 edition). 46

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FOOD | ON THE TABLE

3 Crema Catalana

Serves 3

From the heart of Catalonia, this is a lighter version of the popular Crème Brûlée using milk, rather than heavy cream. Infused with aromatics and topped with a crunchy layer of burnt sugar, this smooth custard is just the thing to end your chic and simple Spanish meal. 2 cups organic whole milk Strip of organic lemon peel 1 stick cinnamon 3 large organic pastured egg yolks (use 4 if yours are small) 3 tablespoons organic cane sugar plus more for topping 2 tablespoons cornflour Sliced strawberries, mint leaves, and powdered sugar for garnish STEP ONE: ADD AROMATICS Gently heat milk in a small saucepan with lemon peel and cinnamon. Bring to a simmer, stirring often to avoid burning. Remove peel and cinnamon. STEP TWO: CAREFUL COMBINATION Meanwhile, whisk the egg yolks with the sugar and cornflour until smooth. Pour a few tablespoons of the hot milk into the eggs and whisk to temper them. Add a bit more milk and repeat, then transfer the

tempered egg mixture to the saucepan of milk and place over low heat. Whisk continuously for several minutes, until it begins to thicken and coats the back of a wooden spoon. Remove from the heat. If you tempered well and the mixture is smooth, pour directly into individual bowls or ramekins. If you have any clumps, pass the mixture through a sieve before filling into the ramekins. STEP THREE: CHILL, BURN, AND SERVE Chill in the refrigerator for at least 1 hour. Before serving, sprinkle a spoonful of sugar evenly over the surface of each serving and caramelize using a kitchen torch—we found that doing this under the broiler doesn’t work nearly as well. Garnish the cremas with sliced strawberries, fresh mint leaves, and powdered sugar. ➤

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A L L YO U R E G G S IN ONE BASKET

When a recipe calls for more than three eggs, it doesn’t hurt to sub in some egg whites for a few of the whole eggs—just to provide a balance in the overall fat content (a large egg contains about 4.5 grams of fat—all of which can be found in the yolk).

The Incredible Egg

A L L I T ' S C R AC K E D U P TO B E

Eggs—the breakfast of champions. Pancakes can be fun, and French toast is tasty, but a delicious Denver omelette or fresh frittata is hard to beat. Speaking of beat…how do you like your eggs? Scrambled, hard boiled, soft boiled, sunny side up, poached, deviled…it’s one of the most versatile foods there is. And not just at the breakfast table. Let’s hear it for “brinner!” So what’s stopping us from enjoying this many-faceted food on a more regular basis?

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the whole [egg] truth Over the years yolks have gotten a bad reputation­—it’s been drilled into us that whole eggs are unhealthy, causing high cholesterol levels and heart disease. We’ve been advised to toss the yolks and stick with an egg white omelette if we absolutely MUST indulge. But more and more studies have surfaced in the past decade that indicate this aversion to eggs is unfounded. Research shows that in healthy adults, eating eggs every day does not increase the level of “bad” cholesterol in the blood (International Journal of Cardiology, 2005). Saturated and trans fats (the usual suspects: fast food, fried goodies, and junk snacks) actually have a much greater effect on blood cholesterol. And of course, we also have to keep proper prep in mind— if you load up your skillet with butter and then pair your eggs with a pile of crumbled bacon and cheese, it’s true that your heart may not be too happy with you. But if you cook them up with a splash of olive oil, and a dash of salt and pepper, you’ve got a meal that’s not only delicious, but also nutritious in so many wonderful ways.


FOOD | HEALTH

brimming with nutrients In fact, it might surprise you to be told that eggs are a superfood—second only to mother’s milk for nutrition! They contain, in varying amounts, almost every essential vitamin and mineral necessary to humans. Besides packing a real protein punch, they also provide vitamin A, omega-3 fatty acids, iron, riboflavin, folic acid, calcium, vitamins B6 and B12, choline, phosphorus, and potassium. Some of the body benefits here include keeping your eyes healthy, promoting proper liver function, helping memory problems, and fighting off the free radicals that can cause tissue and cell damage (which fends off cancer). Sounds like the total package—all crammed inside that delicate little shell.

golden egg So now that you know your egg craving does not have to induce feelings of guilt, let’s go shopping. Depending on where you head, you may see an array of colors on display. The color of the shell (whether white, yellow, brown, blue, or greenish—a virtual rainbow of hues) does not affect the taste, provided the hens who laid them are all being fed the same diet and the eggs are all equally fresh. It’s actually genetics and the breed of the bird that determine color during a complex pigmentation process that occurs as the egg travels through a hen’s oviduct. NOW HEAR THIS Check out a chicken’s earlobes to predict the color of her eggs— typically those with white ear lobes produce white eggs.

L ABEL L ANGUAGE

What about the description on the egg carton? There is a wide range of terms that you’ll see in print, which may seem self-explanatory, but can actually be deceptive— here’s a breakdown of the specifics: FARM FRESH Doesn’t really mean a thing, but probably leads the buyer to believe she is making a healthy, all-natural choice. It’s a generic label solely used for marketing. While the egg did come from a farm, and presumably the carton’s contents aren’t from last Easter so they are technically “fresh,” don’t be fooled into thinking you are choosing an egg that is superior in any way. CAGE-FREE Basically indicates that the birds are not kept in the typical tiny battery cages used by the majority of egg farms. Instead, they have a henhouse in which to roam—though it’s likely to still be tight and overcrowded. FREE-RANGE Does not necessarily mean the animals are running free in a green, fresh-aired field. In this case, the birds are still housed in a barn or other structure, with limited access to the outside (probably a patch of dirt at best). ORGANIC This label is regulated by the U.S. Department of Agriculture, which stipulates that the eggs must come from chickens that are free-range, fed organic feed, and receive no hormones or antibiotics. PASTURED Probably most replicates the bird’s natural environment and way of life. These chickens have a fair amount of space in which to roam outdoors, plus access to a barn. Many also have a diet of insects and grass, along with corn feed.

What does all of this mean for the flavor of the eggs you take home? That remains a matter of opinion. Some claim there is no contest when it comes to comparing an organic, pastured egg to a factory farm egg—the former is far superior. As for nutrition, a study performed by Mother Earth News in 2007 came up with some impressive results. Information was collected from 14 farms across the United States, and determined that pasture-raised hens produced eggs that contained the following, as compared to official USDA nutrient data for commercial eggs:

1⁄3 less cholesterol 1⁄4 less saturated fat 2⁄3 more vitamin A 2 times more omega-3 fatty acids 3 times more vitamin E 7 times more beta carotene And it makes sense that a happier chicken will produce a better-quality egg, doesn’t it? A stressed out bird in cramped conditions will likely not be at her egg-producing best. We are all healthier and happier when we’re not cooped up, so it stands to reason that hens feel the same way.

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FOOD | HEALTH

down on the farm Now that you know what kind of eggs you want to find on your plate, where should you go to pick some up? Hit downtown on Saturday morning and head straight to the popular Grove Ladder Farm stand. But don't wait too late in the day...the early bird gets the eggs!

Grove Ladder Farm is a pasture-based, nonGMO, soy-free, sustainable livestock farm located right here in Sarasota. In October of 2014, owners Tim and Chelsea Clarkson began leasing farmland to expand their pastured poultry business. Today the farm is home to pasture-raised chickens for meat and eggs, heritage breed meat rabbits, and even turkeys. Tim and Chelsea’s egg layers are non-hybrid hens, such as Rhode Island Reds and Barred Rocks for their “pasture hardiness, aggressive foraging, meaty frame, and excellent egglaying abilities.”

› A L L I N T H E FA M I LY

Tim and Chelsea with daughters Celeste and Rosa Maeve.

In the months ahead they plan to invest in many more egg-layers, in order to meet the extremely high demand for local, pastureraised eggs. Tim says, “Once folks have tried our fresh, golden-yolked eggs, it’s hard to go back to a 90-day-old, flat, pale-yolked conventional grocery store egg.” You can find the Clarksons’ chicken broth and fresh eggs at the Sarasota Farmers Market on Saturdays from 7 AM to 1 PM. Learn more about them at groveladderfarm.com.

C H E E P P O S TA G E The farm gets its chicks via mail order. When they are one day old, the little peepers are shipped in well-ventilated cardboard boxes to the local post office. Chelsea and Tim are contacted as soon as they arrive so they can pick them up and introduce them to their new home at Grove Ladder Farm.

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FOOD | LOCAL

Finding Local Flavors

O R G A N I C , H O M E T O W N F O O D I N S A R A S O TA

THIS IS A UNIQUE PLACE.

Though lined with white-sand beaches, it’s never developed the feel of a campy tourist town. Rather, the influence of philanthropists and the art community has given Sarasota a modern vibe that has raised the cultural palate of the locals. We want access to what’s on trend—whether that’s technology, fashion, or food. And, for foodies, Sarasota delivers.

Discriminating diners have a wide range of choices. And while we’re fortunate to have restaurantepreneurs who are mindful of sourcing local organic foods, consumers may need to add some education to their expectations. “Local” doesn’t have a defined radius. Conversely, the term “organic” does have labeling guidelines, but meeting them can be expensive. Many small farms use sustainable, organic practices, though they’re legally constrained from making the “organic” claim. We did some digging to find over a dozen spots offering select menu items that are both organic and sourced in Florida. Whether you’re looking for a quick shot of wheatgrass, fine dining, or farm-fresh raw provisions, Sarasota satisfies locavores.

MOZAIC: Vegan couscous and artichokes, with garbanzo beans, olives, eggplant, and saffron raisin sauce

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FOOD | LOCAL C ALL AHEAD OR CHECK WEBSITES TO SEE W H AT ’ S B E I N G S E R V E D I N S E A S O N !

A restaurant may still source organic food, but won’t be able to find a local source year round.

Indigenous

Choose this restored cottage in Towles Court for food that is organic, locally sourced, a work of art and a culinary delight. In a word: exquisite. Make reservations. They’re open only 4.5 hours a day. 239 South Links Avenue; indigenoussarasota.com Pomona Bistro & Wine Bar

Local seafood and vegetable options are offered in an intimate, white-linen setting. Expect a wide variety of flavor and a menu that lists local farms that supplied the food. 481 North Orange Avenue; pomonabistroandwine.com MoZaic

The exotic menu at MoZaic is “season and market-driven,” with local produce from over 20 local suppliers including organic items from Lady Moon Farms and Papa Lynn’s Organics. 1377 Main Street; mozaicsarasota.com

Beauty of Sprouts

Check hours before going! Specializing in a raw-foods menu that is gluten-free and vegan. 1474 Fruitville Road; beautyofsprouts.net The Rosemary

This bistro offers natural, non-hormone meats (including brisket!) and locally sourced vegetables. Make reservations: the location makes this a hot spot for dinner before a show! 411 North Orange Avenue; therosemarysarasota.com Smell the Bread

Beyond salads, this cafe serves house-made black bean burgers, vegan meatballs, and, as the name suggests, bread! Meat lovers can choose humanely-raised chicken. 3482 Clark Road; smellthebreadcafe.com Green Zebra Cafe

Stop in for juices, smoothies, sandwiches, salads, raw food, vegan, gluten-free... and dessert! 476 John Ringling Boulevard; greenzebracafe.com Tide Tables

On the one hand, you can’t label wild-caught fish “organic.” On the other, it doesn’t get much more local and organic than catching fish off the dock and serving it to guests. 12507 Cortez Road West; facebook.com/tidetables Crop Juice

Glass-bottled and cold-pressed local, organic goodness. Visit one of their two local shops—on Gulf Gate Drive or Cattlemen Road. Read more about Crop Juice in our February 2015 issue. cropjuicesrq.com enRich: Shrimp 'n Grits, lightly blackened local gulf shrimp with smoked gouda bacon grits, Cortez bottarga sherry cream, and O'Brien Family Farms heirloom tomato salata

enRich

Owner and Executive Chef Rich Knowles brings an eclectic food experience to Bradenton. He describes it as “integrating global flavors with local ingredients in a refreshing atmosphere.” 5629 Manatee Avenue; enrichbistro.com Shore

Opt for Shore when you’re looking for late-night dinner with open-air seating and craft cocktails. Bonus: open until 10 p.m. 465 John Ringling Boulevard; dineshore.com Duval’s Fresh. Local. Seafood.

Fresh local seafood is prepared in tacos and po’ boys or served at dinner in gourmet menu options.1453 Main Street; duvalsfreshlocalseafood.com 52

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Simon’s Coffee House

Casual dining with indoor and outdoor seating, Simon’s offers a wide range of choices, with juice, coffee, and raw, vegan, and vegetarian options. Read more about Simon’s in our January 2015 issue. 5900 South Tamiami Trail; simonstogo.com Ionie

Casual dining with a focus on vegan, gluten-free, and raw food. If you can’t make it in by 3 p.m., call to have a dish prepared for take out! Read more about Ionie in our January 2016 issue. 1241 Fruitville Road; ionie.com Cafe Evergreen

If you’re lucky, you’ll be there when the wheatgrass on the countertop is ready for juicing, but if you miss it, you can’t go wrong with anything on the menu. Read more about Cafe Evergreen in our February 2015 issue. 801 South Tamiami Trail, Nokomis; cafeevergreen.net

FA R M T O YO U R TA B L E

When you’re looking for organic veggies at home, go right to the source. Visit the farm directly or stop by one of our local markets. AT T H E FA R M

Jessica’s Farm jessicasorganicfarm.com Sweetgrass Farms sweetgrassfarms.com Read more about Sweetgrass Farms in our Summer 2015 issue. Grove Ladder Farm groveladderfarm.com Read more about Grove Ladder Farm on page 52 of this issue. AT T H E M A R K E T

Sarasota Farmers Market Worden Farm My Mother’s Garden Simply Organix Peter Burkard SaraJuice Read more about SaraJuice in our February 2015 issue Phillippi Creek Farmhouse Market Aloe Organics Geraldson Community Farm Gamble Creek Farms Homestead Hydro Farm Go to eatwild.com to find local, organic protein, including beef, pork, lamb, turkey, chicken, and eggs.

MORE TO MENTION? If you have a favorite restaurant that serves local, organic food, let us know! FEMME ROUGE Magazine @femmerougemagazine @FemmeRougeMag


Join community leaders like Violeta Huesman for the 2016 “I Support Goodwill� Campaign and tell us why you support Goodwill! Use #IsupportGoodwill on Facebook and visit our website to learn how you can help change lives through the power of work.

safety zone

THE GOODWILL 2015 IMPACT With your support in 2015, Goodwill helped 22,739 individuals, placed 961 in jobs in our community, helped 358 veterans and diverted 41 million pounds from local landfills!

ExperienceGoodwill.org Facebook.com/GoodwillManasota


MEET YOUR VITAMINS

Omegas 36 &

When choosing what to put on our plate, we should invariably steer clear of fat, right? Au contraire, femmes...not all fat is evil. It is important in our diets and necessary for our bodies. So how can you tell the difference between the good and the bad? We humans need omega-3 and omega-6 fatty acids, obtained mainly through our diet—file them under “the good kind of fats.” We’ve got the dish on both so you can be sure you’re getting exactly the right amount in your dish(es). 54

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Omega-3 what it is There are three kinds of omega-3 fats: eicosapentaenoic acid (EPA), docosahexaenoic acid (DHA), and alpha-linolenic acid (ALA). Those first two (EPA and DHA) are often called marine omega-3s because they come primarily from fish. ALA is usually converted into energy (better than coffee!) and is the most common of the three in Western diets, as it is frequently found in nuts and seeds. Our bodies can make most of the fats we need from scratch, but not all of them. That’s where omegas come in. We can produce EPA and DHA from ALA, but only in small quantities. In other words, a huge amount of ALA will not result in a huge amount of EPA/DHA, so it remains very important that we get enough of all three kinds of omega-3s from the foods we eat.

what it does Omega-3s are multitaskers. In addition to creating energy, they also help make hormones that regulate inflammation, blood clotting, and contraction/relaxation of artery walls. They are essential to cell membranes all over the body, as well as genetic function (Harvard School of Public Health). Omega-3s work toward prevention of some of America’s biggest killers: heart disease, stroke, and cancer. To promote cardiovascular health, they regulate heart rhythms and lower blood pressure and heart rate. An Italian study (GISSI Prevention Trial) showed that people who had heart attacks in the past were less likely to have a repeat heart attack or stroke if they took a capsule of fish oil daily for three years. Not a


WELLNESS | NUTRITION bad stat, but that’s not all omega-3s are good for. They also may help manage arthritis, depression, lupus, ADHD, eczema, and aid in maintaining memory (although definitive results are still pending). However, all omega-3 fats might not be created equal. Marine omega-3s have been shown in some studies (American Journal of Clinical Nutrition, 2004) to lessen the likelihood of prostate cancer in men, while in another study (Cancer Causes Control, 2006), ALA omega-3s (of which we Americans consume much more) were shown to increase those odds. Again, current research has shown inconsistent results. Marine omega-3s are especially important for women who are pregnant, trying, or nursing, and for young children. A developing child (third trimester through age two) needs DHA specifically for the proper formation of their brain and nervous system. We know that many expectant mothers try to stay away from fish because of mercury, but the likelihood of complications due to a lack of omega-3 is much higher than that of mercury from the fish you eat. Stay away from swordfish, tilefish, albacore tuna, and king mackerel, as well as fish oil supplements that contain them—but don’t just take our word for it. It’s important for moms-to-be to talk to your doctors and make sure you are getting enough of this essential fat in a way that is safe for your little one.

how much/munch what? For EPA and DHA omega-3s, it’s really all about the swimmers. We’re talking salmon, tuna, sea bass, and halibut, as well as some other sea critters like krill and algae. The World Health Organization recommends a daily EPA and DHA intake of 0.3 to 0.5 grams and a daily ALA intake of 0.8 to 1.1 grams. For EPA and DHA, focus on dark, fatty fish for the highest concentration of these good fats. You should make an effort to eat one serving of omega-3 rich seafood once or twice a week. For ALA, chow down on nuts, seeds, and tofu, and try flaxseed oil (use cold to avoid damaging the ALA).

balance it out As always, try to find the happy medium. Too much omega-3 can increase your risk for bleeding and “bad” cholesterol, as well as decrease your blood sugar control and alter immune function. It can also make you smell fishy—literally. If you have heart disease, consult your doctor before beginning the use of a supplement or amping up your fish game in a big way. Oregon State University associate professor Norman Hord, co-author of a recent review on the subject, says that more research is needed to establish an upper limit for consumption.

deFISHencies Eating less omega-3 fats than recommended can be a serious problem. Not only will you lose all the aforementioned benefits, but you may also experience fatigue, poor memory, heart problems, depression, a decrease in circulation, or dry skin, to name a few. Remember that omega3s are essential to every organ in the body, so getting enough is imperative. If you feel that you may be deficient, take a closer look at your diet, and chat with your physician about the best way for you to introduce more omega-3s.

FISHY FEELING Not into fish (or animals in general)? Chill your gills. Here are five omega-3-filled foods for your fix*:

◗ Edamame ◗ Ground flaxseeds or flaxseed oil ◗ Dark leafy greens...You know the ones. Spinach, kale, those guys. 1 cup of them gets you 56% of your DRV. ◗ Pecans, hazelnuts, and walnuts ◗ Enriched eggs *remember, these are ALA omega-3s, not DHA or EPA. Veggies or vegans should talk to a doc about whether or not to introduce a fish oil supplement.

PREVENT HEART DISEASE STROKE CANCER

OMEGAS AROUND THE WORLD

We know we’ve touted the Mediterranean diet more than once (check out our January 2016 edition for more specifics and recipes). It is modeled specifically after the people of Greece and Southern Italy in the 1960s, because those countries reported the highest adult life expectancy in the world. Interested? A Mediterranean diet focuses on foods rich in omega-3s, whereas the American counterpart includes mostly omega-6 foods. Another nation you might look to for food inspiration is Japan, where the death rate from coronary heart disease has always been quite low ( Journal of the American College of Cardiology,

2008). As if you needed another reason to order the salmon teriyaki. Effects of fish oil on cardiovascular health became the subject of studies once it came to light that Inuit people, specifically those of Greenland, had lower instances of heart disease, despite the fact that they had a high-fat diet of mostly fish.

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WELLNESS | NUTRITION ➤

Omega-6 what it is Omega-6 is a type of polyunsaturated fatty acid (PUFA). Like omega-3, omega-6 is a good kind of fat—it cannot be made in the body, but must be obtained through diet, and it plays a crucial role in normal growth, development, and brain function. Also like omega-3, there are several kinds of omega-6 fats. They are: linoleic acid (LA), gammalinolenic acid (GLA) and arachidonic acid (AA). They exist in a sort of chain. LA is ingested in food, such as vegetable oils, and once in the body, is converted to GLA. GLA can then be broken down further into AA. GLA has been shown to reduce inflammation. Omega-6 also is important for healthy skin and hair growth, bone health, and regulation of metabolism and the reproductive system.

what it does The potential benefits of omega-6 in fighting various illnesses and conditions are vast, but many of them are not set in stone just yet*. Still, it is worth noting that omega-6 may very well be beneficial in combatting: ›

BREAST CANCER There are definitely some mixed reviews here, but one study (Nutrition and Cancer, 1995) showed that GLA can slow breast tumor growth. Another (International Journal of Cancer, 2000) showed that women fighting estrogensensitive breast cancer responded better to tamoxifen when they also took GLA supplements. However, some different research (European Journal of Cancer, 2001) suggests that an omega-6-heavy diet may increase the development of breast cancer. ATTENTION DEFICIT HYPERACTIVE DISORDER (ADHD) Children with ADHD have been shown to have lower levels of both omega-3s and omega-6s, which is important to normal brain function. Some studies have shown that taking fish oil can reduce ADHD symptoms (Journal of Clinical Psychiatry, 2011), but more research is needed. ALLERGIES Women who are prone to allergies have a lower level of GLA in their blood and breast milk, so it follows that supplementary GLA may reduce allergy symptoms. However, more study is needed to verify this connection. *Consult your physician before testing out any of these options for your medical condition.

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DIDN’T I HEAR SOMETHING ABOUT OMEGA-9? Yes, you did! Omega-9 is another fatty acid found in vegetable oil and animal fat, but unlike omega-3 and omega-6 it is non-essential. This is because it can be created by the body from unsaturated fat and, while beneficial when obtained through food, it isn't something you need to actively supplement.

how much/munch what? According to the American Heart Association, at least 5 to 10% of our caloric intake should come from omega-6 fatty acids. So, if you’re working from the average of 2,000 calories per day (for women; men need 2,500), that’s between 100 and 200 daily.

Many foods contain omega-6 fats, but those richest in omega-6 are the following: vegetable oil, sunflower seeds, butter, chicken, pork, and beef.

deficiencies Omega-6 deficiencies were once prevalent worldwide, but these days are relatively rare. In fact, most people suffer from too much omega-6—but more on that later. People who may be at risk for an omega-6 deficiency are those whose diets emphasize grains and beans with very little fat or meat. If this is the case for you, as little as a teaspoon of vegetable oil in your cooking will get you back to where you need to be.

weighing it out Omega-3 and omega-6 fats are good for you, but it is extremely important to strike the right balance between the two. The ratio between omega-3 and omega-6 shouldn’t be exactly equal, but a typical American diet has between 14 to 25 times more omega-6 fatty acids than omega-3s. This can cause huge health risks. Studies show that, while a high omega-3 to omega-6 ratio (i.e.: more omega-3) has many benefits (detailed above), a high omega-6 to omega-3 ratio has negative effects including heart disease, cancer, depression, increased inflammation, autoimmune disease, and a higher risk of death among certain patient groups (Biomedicine & Pharmacotherapy, 2002). Thankfully, the remedy for this problem is simple. Take some of the omega-6-rich foods you eat and replace them with omega-3s. This will begin to get your ratio back down to where it should be.


We raise our hands to change lives. —Mindy & Wayne Rollins, coMMunity suppoRteRs

When you raise your hand for children First, you provide families with the guidance and tools they need to escape poverty and build better lives. Won’t you join us by raising your hand today?

childrenfirst.net/raiseyourhand 941.953.3877 ext.115


YOU DECIDE SHELLFISH SHELL GAME

Raw oysters, those tasty little mollusks thought to be an aphrodisiac, may be giving you more than a boosted libido—they are sometimes served with a side of a little bug called Vibrio vulnificus— with the unappetizing symptoms of nausea, vomiting, abdominal pain, diarrhea, fever, chills, and even blistering skin lesions.

Raw Deal?

The benefits of eating raw vegetables are undisputed—but what about uncooked (or unpasteurized) animal products? Are there risks to going raw?

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WHO SHOULD AV O I D R AW ANIMAL PRODUCTS?

◗ infants and children ◗ pregnant women ◗ the elderly ◗ those with weakened immune systems


FOOD | HEALTH

Do you love your carpaccio, ceviche, sushi, and steak tartare? By indulging in some of these favorite foods, you may be rolling the dice with disease. Here’s the breakdown. ➤

meats & fish

Foodies swear by the superior “mouth feel” and flavor of raw meat. Additionally, it is higher in vitamin B6 and eliminates concerns of potential carcinogens— advanced glycation end-products (AGEs), heterocyclic amines, and polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons—that grilling and searing may create. (But of course, poultry and pork must always be cooked through.)

dairy Raw milk, derived from happy, grass-grazing cows, has higher levels of fat-soluble vitamins, linoleic acid (CLA), essential fatty acids, and contains all eight essential amino acids. But getting a glass of unpasteurized milk isn’t easy. That’s because interstate shipment of raw milk is banned in the U.S., although more than half of the states allow onor off-farm raw milk sales. Soft cheeses made from raw milk are prohibited in some states, and must be aged at least 60 days to qualify for interstate shipping.

On the flip side, consuming raw meat and fish can cause problems, from bacteria (E. coli, listeria, and salmonella) to parasites (trichinella worms and toxoplasma). Finding a butcher or fishmonger you trust may reduce the risk, as will buying the meat whole (as opposed to ground) and the fish as fresh as possible. But the only way to prevent these little critters from hitchhiking into your GI tract with certainty is to cook them.

Why is the government so concerned with pasteurization? Because without it, dairy products can contain Campylobacter jejuni (C. jejuni, the most frequent form of foodborne illness in the U.S.) and listeria, bacteria that cause intestinal distress. In fact, the risk of becoming ill from drinking raw milk is about nine times greater than it is from drinking pasteurized milk.

CHEW ON THIS

A 2011 study at the University of Utah revealed that more energy is derived from meats that are cooked than those eaten raw. The thinking is that cooking unwinds proteins in meat and loosens the protein fiber connections, making it easier to chew and digest. OTHER OPTIONS TO MINIMIZE ILLNESS INCLUDE: ◗ Freeze for two weeks before consuming to kill parasites and most bacteria. Be sure to defrost safely in the fridge (never at room temperature).

◗ Dehydrate at a low temperature, preventing the growth of pathogens. ◗ Marinate in an acid-based liquid. The chemical reaction of the marinade will “cook” the meat or fish (case in point, ceviche). ◗ Talk to the restaurant owner about freshness and sources, and observe the establishment's overall cleanliness.

eggs The incredible, edible egg may not be so incredible after all...IF you’re eating it raw. Especially if it’s unpasteurized. One out of every 30,000 eggs poses the possibility of salmonella contamination. So before you put unpasteurized raw eggs in your smoothie or pour on that homemade Caesar salad dressing, consider the risks. Also be sure to use very fresh eggs when eating them raw; they may have taken weeks to get from the farm to your fridge.

P R A C T I C A L PA I R I N G S

Wasabi contains allyl isothiocyanate, an aid in battling foodborne bugs, while pickled ginger is considered a “gastric antiseptic,” helping kill germs in the digestive tract. This explains why, for centuries, the two have been served with sushi in the Japanese culture. Horseradish also has antibacterial properties, thus its pairing with raw oysters.

F O O D B O R N E FA C T S The Centers for Disease Control estimates that approximately 48 million people become ill, 128,000 are hospitalized, and 3,000 die of foodborne diseases each year (from both raw and cooked foods).

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Look no further for inspiring stories, dazzling decor, stunning bridal, and travel that expands your worldview, including hand-selected personal recommendations from our experiences— each edition holds new surprises to enhance your every day.

life | style

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U P CLOSE W ITH R INGLING COLLEGE O F ART AND DESIGN

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L A’S NE W CONTEMPOR ARY ART SPACE THE BROAD MUSEUM

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THE LIT TLE MARK E T WITH THE BIG HEART

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THE ROMANCE OF RUSSIA

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WHAT'S UP SARASOTA There’s so much to see, do, and try around town this spring. Let FEMME

events

ROUGE fill you in on a few highlights to make sure you don’t miss out!

MARCH 30-APRIL 24

Disgraced CycleBar® has arrived in Sarasota. Enjoy their luxury amenities, personal performance tracking, mind-blowing playlists, and invigorating rides. With energizing workouts tailored to all fitness and experience levels, this indoor cycling boutique will inspire, motivate, and invigorate you to face your day. Head in for a free intro ride and see what it's all about. sarasotautc.cyclebar.com The wildly colorful artwork of Dasha Reich is always on display at the State of the Arts Gallery, but there is a special feature of her new work through July. Exploding with pure pigments and layers of epoxy resins, Reich’s pieces are a feast for the eye. Check out the dazzling display at 1525 State Street or visit sarasotafineart.com for more information. Celebrate Earth Day in a big way! Hosted by the Sarasota Native American Indian Festival community, the first ever Sarasota Multicultural Earth Festival taking place from April 15-17 will feature dance, music, food, and culture from all parts of the globe. Dance to the rhythm with the Nahui Ollin Aztec Dancers, The Hungarian Folk Dance Ensemble, and the Drake School of Irish Dance. sarasotamulticulturalearthfestival.com Tucked above Caragiulos you’ll find Rue boutique, a treasure trove of unique items brought together with the purpose of introducing something special into a shopper’s wardrobe. The store showcases designer clothing, jewelry, handbags, and accessories that owner Natalie Rue Morgan has hand selected to introduce into Sarasota’s ever-growing fashion scene. ruesrq.com.

A signature event for the Lighthouse of Manasota is the Art in the Dark Benefit, taking place on April 16 at Michael’s on East. The benefit will address the impact of the programs offered in rehabilitation training for the blind and visually impaired. The importance of The Ringling’s accessibility tours, for example, will be demonstrated. During these tours, clients get to touch and feel artwork such as sculpture, accompanied by the passionate narration of a docent. This allows them to enjoy the arts the way the sighted community can. lighthouseofmanasota.org/art-in-a-whole-new-light/ The Clever Cup brings you the best in treats of all varieties—from locally roasted coffees to jewelry, sculpture, and paintings. And don’t forget the cookies, scones, and pie! This unique collection of goodies for both the eye and the tummy can be found near Stickney Point Road. theclevercup.com Bruce Crissy has gathered together a huge collection of 18th to 20th century antiques for your Saturday afternoon shopping pleasure. Browse among unique porcelains, classic furniture, cut glass, paintings, Tiffany and Pairpoint lamps, bronzes, estate jewelry, and more at Crissy Galleries’ main showroom and vault collection. crissy.com 62

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Historic Asolo Theater asolorep.org/shows/ disgraced/2015-2016 APRIL 1-10

18th Annual Sarasota Film Festival Regal Hollywood 20 Theater (1993 Main Street) sarasotafilmfestival.com APRIL 9

3rd Annual Bradenton Dragon Boat Festival Riverwalk in Bradenton 9 AM-3 PM panamdragonboat.com APRIL 4-13

La Musica Festival Sarasota Opera House lamusicafestival.org APRIL 22

Designing Daughters Fashionable Gala: Hot Havana Nights Servandos on 4th 8 PM designingdaughterssarasota.com/ hot-havana-nights/ MAY 7

44th Annual Siesta Sand Sculpture Contest Siesta Key Beach Judging commences 1 PM escape-to-sarasota.com/siestasand-sculpture-contest.html JUNE 5

The Devyn Wedding Expo 2016 The Devyn Event Venue (7113 South Tamiami Trail) 12:00 PM eventbrite.com/e/the-devynwedding-expo-2016-tickets21069007970?ref=ecal

IN THE KNOW Email info@femme-rouge.com with info about a new service, event, or business you'd like to share.


IN HIS ELEMENT In the lobby of Sarasota Memorial Hospital, where David has successfully implemented significant financial and operational improvements during his tenure. 64

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LIFE STYLE | INTERVIEW

David Verinder HEALING THROUGH LEADERSHIP We caught up with David Verinder, president and CEO of Sarasota Memorial Health Care System, to find out how the only public hospital on the Suncoast consistently ranks among the top 100 hospitals in the nation, and #1 in Southwest Florida for overall quality and care. MAKING A DIFFERENCE

You’ve been with Sarasota Memorial for a decade now, first as CFO, then COO, and in 2014 you were appointed CEO. What changes and advancements have you witnessed at the hospital over the years? The past ten years have been transformative and I feel fortunate to have been a part of it. When I first arrived, Gwen Mackenzie [David’s predecessor] and I set a goal to build a distributive model. At that time, probably 85% of Sarasota Memorial’s business was on this campus right here. But we said we wanted to take our high quality healthcare out to the public, to be where people live and work, and to really deliver those services at a lower cost closer to our patients, across our community. Over the next ten years, we built urgent care centers as far north as Manatee County and all the way south into Venice. We put a freestanding ER down in North Port, and diagnostic centers and First Physician Group offices throughout the region. So if you fast forward to today, we now deliver probably 50% of our services on this campus and 50% in more convenient outpatient settings in our community. I think that’s been the most transformational thing

that’s happened. We’ve done many other things along the way, from trauma centers to cardiac programs. But I think when you step back and look at things on a macrolevel, that’s what you see transformation-wise.

bringing in new robotic surgeons, like Dr. Kenneth Meredith. He has performed more robotic esophagectomies than anyone else in the world. Only your top hospitals offer that kind of breadth and depth.

What is new at the hospital in terms of equipment, technology, and services, etc.?

What have you learned as your position with the hospital advanced? How did you adjust to each role and the hospital’s expectations of you?

The biggest project in recent years has been the construction of the Courtyard Tower. It was a $250 million project that we took on during a huge recession, when there was no other construction going on. I remember we had two huge cranes out here at Sarasota Memorial, and those were the only two in the city—and now you have probably a dozen across the skyline. So it was a huge step for us to do that. It changed the face of the organization and improved it, because we demolished buildings from the 1950s and put in brand new facilities that are state of the art. Also, ten years ago we didn’t have a da Vinci surgical robot at this hospital. Now we have three— and that’s probably a number that you would find at very few facilities throughout the country. And more than two dozen robotic surgeons are trained to do robotic assisted minimally invasive procedures. We keep

I’m still adjusting! As with anything in life, it’s a journey. In every role I found new priorities and issues. So I would say that at any given point, I’m growing; I learn every day. For instance, just this morning I sat with a cardiologist for about an hour and a half trying to understand some different things going on in the Cardiology Department and where we’re going in the future. That was an impromptu discussion in which I ended up learning a lot. But that’s every day. There are so many skilled people here—we have around 5,000 employees. We had only 3,500 about a year and a half ago. Today we have 900 physicians and hundreds of volunteers. And each one of them is equally important—we couldn’t do it without them.

This past November marked Sarasota Memorial’s 90th anniversary. It is one of the largest acute-care public hospitals in the nation, and among the largest employers in the region.

What is your top priority right now? That’s a tough question—there are so many priorities. I think at the top of the list is working on how we can respond to the community’s needs, and how we can continue to provide high quality healthcare each and every day. It all goes back to what benefits our community, what needs they have today, what needs they will have in ten years, and how we can forecast that. How do we anticipate those needs and set plans in place to get there? I’d say that’s my overarching goal. Then you get into other issues. I want to get the graduate medical education program up to speed and off the ground, and have new physicians in this community be a part of that education process. Also, we’re seeking state approval to open a new hospital in Venice, so we are focused on that. Our trauma program is less than a year old but has already cared for more than 1,300 patients. The list FEMME ROUGE

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LOYAL SERVICE At the 90th anniversary celebration in November 2015, David recognized SMH's longest serving employee, Dessie Peterson. She has been with the hospital since 1969.

We are growing at a rapid rate right now, when the national average is showing about a 2% decline in hospital admissions year over year. We are very different from that national trend.

of priorities is endless. Our cardiac surgery volumes have increased 30-40% in the past couple of years—how do we continue growing? And then there’s the Institute for Cancer Care, which is occupying a lot of my brainpower these days. We want to have a first class cancer center—one that is on the leading edge of treatment and research ten years from now. So, we are envisioning the future now, and setting ourselves up to succeed at that.

We look around and see Sarasota growing before our eyes—how does the hospital plan to keep up with and accommodate that growth? We know there’s a part of our population that lives here because of Sarasota Memorial. They could live in other parts of Florida but they choose Sarasota because we’re here. We truly recognize the responsibility that goes along with that and try to be mindful 66

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of it each and every day. We are growing at a rapid rate right now—a time when the national average is showing probably a 2% decline in hospital admissions year over year. So, these days, we also are focused on capacity, and there are three components to that: real estate—meaning hospital rooms and beds. Then there’s efficiency—making sure we can discharge someone who’s ready to go home by 11 am instead of making them wait until 3 pm. And last but not least, people—attracting and retaining a talented staff. It’s not just that we want nurses with an RN license. We want the right nurses, the right environmental services attendant, and the right physicians. So we are always trying to attract talent at every level of the organization, which can be a challenge given the nation’s nursing and physician shortage.

Why do you think we’re seeing that difference in growth, between here and other places across the country? Well, Sarasota is a beautiful city! Also, I think people recognize the value of a public hospital that operates at the level that we do. Every nickel that comes into this place goes right back into the community, so whenever we have a surplus, all of that goes back into building a new cancer center, or the new urgent care facility at St. Armands, or bringing in a new surgeon or robot. That’s what our mission is: to put our resources back into the community.

Tell us about the new medical residency program that has been launched with Florida State University. Florida State has a medical school in Sarasota whose third- and fourth-year students train here at the hospital, and have been doing so for the past ten years.

But the plan going forward is for these students and others to be able to train in an Internal Medicine residency program here once they graduate from medical school—and participate in rotations that range from orthopedic surgery to pediatrics. Whatever specialty they want to go into. Research and data show that where someone trains for their residency is where they want to stay, because at that point they usually have families and have put down roots in the community. The goal is for them to stay and establish practices in the community. We have a huge shortage of primary care physicians, so this should give us a steady stream of quality doctors year after year.

You moved here to Sarasota in 2006 from Texas—what was that transition like for you and your family? Well, it’s always a big transition whenever you move. My wife Monica and I have always lived in the southeast part of the country, so to one extent it wasn’t a big change. We actually had a timeshare out on Longboat so we were familiar with the area from vacationing here one week a year. So when I got a call telling me that Sarasota was looking for a CFO, we jumped at the opportunity. I have two daughters who were both in school at the time, so not only did I have to


LIFE STYLE | INTERVIEW

learn a new job, but they had to come and make new friends, go to a new school. It’s never easy, but it was worth it. We couldn’t be happier here.

Your father was a NASA engineer and worked with IBM. How has he helped shape your work ethic and drive? My dad always influenced me by being such a hard worker. He graduated from the University of Texas and went to work for NASA back in the mid 60s; he was an engineer on the Saturn 5 rocket project. Then he left and went to work for IBM, where he spent the rest of his career until he retired. My dad was a very big family man, always very dedicated to us growing up, and with a strong work ethic.

FAMILY MAN David and his girls, from left to right: Hayden, wife Monica, and Haley.

younger daughter is a sophomore at Cardinal Mooney. She’s doing great. Both of them were involved in high school lacrosse, and my younger is in soccer too right now at Mooney. You really just have to try to set time aside to make sure you’re part of their lives. Sometimes that’s just juggling

with your wife on the phone— ok, who can make the awards banquet tonight? My wife’s a realtor so she’s constantly on the go, too. But we always make sure somebody’s there at a game or a school event. Just like work, family life is a journey—we’re always learning.

GROWTH AND CHANGE Among other projects such as an urgent care center on St. Armands and an adult internal medicine practice in Newtown, a new rehabilitation facility (rendering below) is currently underway on campus, with an expected completion date of late 2016.

How do you manage to balance work and spending quality time with your two teenage daughters? We lead a very busy life. We are usually going 16 hours a day between work and the kids. My older daughter is a freshman in college now—at Auburn University in Alabama, where I went for my B.A. She’s having to adjust to being eight hours away, and I have to adjust to that change, and most definitely her mother had to adjust to letting her go. I’ve been up to Auburn maybe three times since she started in the fall. Her mom maybe a few times more. My FEMME ROUGE

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OUT AND ABOUT Check out what’s been happening in and around town. FEMME ROUGE Magazine is proud to have been a part of these incredible events that make our community a better place.

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The American Cancer Society’s Big Top Gala on February 27 was a one-of-akind evening, with great food, soul music and dancing, a spectacular auction, and much more. The event was a huge success, raising $250,000 that will help save lives by funding research and the ongoing fight against cancer.

3 Make-A-Wish Central and Northern Florida, Sarasota Region held its 6th Annual Cooking for Wishes Interactive Luncheon. Guests prepared a delicious four-course meal with the guidance of talented Michael’s on East executive chef, Jamil Piñeda. The lunch was once again a sold out event, and raised $150,000—an amazing stride in making the wishes of children with life-threatening medical conditions come true.

American Cancer Society’s Big Top Gala 1. Bonnie and Kenneth Feld (co-chairs) 2. Guests enjoyed the circus theme Images: Wendy Dewhurst Cooking for Wishes Interactive Luncheon 3. Melissa Lerner, Sherry Koski, Terri Klauber

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If you stayed up past your bedtime for the After Party following the Asolo Repertory Theatre’s Annual Gala, you participated in one of the biggest events of the season! The gala’s jazzy theme was Cabaret at the Tropicana, and the After Party kept the fun flowing with drinks, light bites, and music late into the night. All gala proceeds support the artists in Asolo Rep’s 201516 season, as well as their award-winning education & outreach programs.

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The Women’s Resource Center of Sarasota County’s Renaissance Luncheon featured an afternoon of shopping, raffle prizes, and a fabulous lunch followed by guest speaker Gayle Tzemach Lemmon. She is the author of Ashley’s War, the gripping story of a team of elite women soldiers selected to assist Special Operations forces during the Afghanistan War. The Resource Center creates growth opportunities for women and provides strategies for living that strengthen them, their families, and their communities. Asolo Repertory Theatre’s Annual Gala After Party 4. Sally Schule, Beth Knopik, Veronica Brady, Michelle LaDuke Senglaub 5. Keeping the party pumping Women’s Resource Center of Sarasota County’s Renaissance Luncheon 6. Victoria Finley, Gayle Tzemach Lemmon (author of Ashley's War), Caitlin Bardenhagen, Bethany Beachy FEMME ROUGE

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A CLOSER LOOK

Stepping Into The Spotlight R I N G L I N G C O N T I N U E S T O M A K E L O C A L A N D N AT I O N A L H E A D L I N E S We had the opportunity to hear from two faculty members at the Ringling College of Art and Design who are integral parts of the amazing growth, change, and influence of Sarasota’s very own artist incubator institution.

➤ Even if you didn’t see the film, you probably at least heard that Pixar's "Inside Out" was awarded the Oscar for Best Animated Feature Film this year. The exciting news for Sarasota is that the crew who created the film included 13 Ringling graduates. No surprise there. We talked with Jim McCampbell, the department head of the Computer Animation program at Ringling to get a behind-thescenes peek into what makes his students so special.

Specifically what contributions did Ringling graduates make to the award-winning film “Inside Out?” The graduates performed in a number of roles in this film. Some built the 3D geometry that made up the characters and the objects in their world, some supplied the animated performances, others did the lighting and texturing that gave the film its final look.

Having been introduced in 2001, the Best Animated Feature category is a fairly recent addition to the Academy Award lineup. Why do you think it took so long for animation to earn this recognition? Until the late 90s there just wasn't a lot of competition in the area of animated feature films. Disney dominated it, so year after year there would have been very few possible nominees and the winner would almost always have been Disney. The release of “Toy Story” and the subsequent ravenous appetite for 3D animated feature films gave rise to more and more films being produced and thus made this a viable and exciting category. By the way, since the inception of the category, Ringling College alumni have worked on all but two of the Oscar winners...13 out of 15 of the Oscar winners were touched by Ringling hands and minds. 70

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Jim McCampbell What is unique about the Ringling curriculum that manages to keep churning out such amazing talent? There are several unique aspects to the curriculum. First, we use a highly collaborative teaching model. All of the faculty teaching in the Computer Animation major are full-time faculty here. We frequently do critiques as a group, so students don't hear just one voice for influence on their work. We also collaborate on the design of the curriculum overall. This allows us to "cross-thread" learning objectives across multiple courses in the same semester. That strengthens the learning and understanding of all course concepts and how they relate to each other. Another benefit of learning at Ringling College is that it is about 75% residential. That means that around 3/4 of the students live and work on campus. It makes a vibrant community of artists and affords an opportunity for learning from other students regardless of their major or year. We also have a large amount of support from big studios. They regularly send us visiting artists for days at a time to give feedback on student work.


LIFE STYLE | INTERVIEW “Watching someone laugh uncontrollably at something you created is every bit as golden as an Oscar.” – Jim McCampbell

IN THE STUDIO A Ringling student hard at work on a Computer Animation project

How different is the classroom experience from the real-world experience students will encounter at a big animation studio? We go to great lengths to simulate the professional environment. We have matched the hardware and software used at the major studios, designed a space that emulates their workplaces, and most importantly we hold the students to a professional standard with regard to the quality expectations of their work as well as their personal work ethic. Professionalism is actually a part of the grading component in every course. The result is a graduate that is talented, articulate, and ready to be productive from day one. To them (adrenaline rush aside), going from school to the working environment is just a change of seat.

How else does Ringling prepare them for the real world? We have a very robust student life program that does wonders for opening their eyes to a global perspective. We also have a Career Services office that manages the herd of recruiters that come to campus. Most of them visit in the spring semester as students are finishing up their work and preparing to graduate. But some arrive earlier in the year as well, so we have a steady stream. Some of them even come twice per year…once to present and generate excitement, and again to recruit and reap the benefits of that. Many of the recruiters are looking for summer interns and having them visit here goes a long way towards putting our students into those places. Being able to meet them in person is a real game changer for most. Personality is a huge hiring consideration, and you can feel the professionalism and passion when speaking with the students face to face.

When you watch a film some of your former students have made, can you see evidence of their particular style or technique in the finished product? Yes, sometimes. I can think of a couple of students who had developed a signature facial expression or two and I can detect that. It's fun for faculty here to think that in a way, part of all we do here finds its way into animated films that touch so many lives.

What advice can you give to aspiring animation artists who hope to one day walk the red carpet on Oscar night? Observe the world around you. Watch people and their behavior and think about how you would caricature it. Draw. Now draw some more. Keep drawing. Be ready to work incredibly hard to realize your dreams. Be passionate about what you do. Read. Yes, actually read. Watch a LOT of movies without doing anything else simultaneously. Become a lifelong learner. You will have to reinvent and retool yourself many times during your career. And perhaps most of all, cherish the ability you have to positively influence the lives of others, and use it wisely. Watching someone laugh uncontrollably at something you created is every bit as golden as an Oscar.

Current and incoming Ringling students have some very big shoes to fill—what new talents and fresh ideas are you seeing from them? I'm constantly amazed at how fast they learn and how dedicated they are. I've been teaching here for 21 years and overall I see students becoming more driven than ever to realize their dreams, and yet strangely enough they seem more relaxed at the same time. They know the shoes are big. But they are determined to try them on! FEMME ROUGE

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➤ In January of this year, Jeff Schwartz was appointed

Associate Vice President for Academic Affairs and Dean of Undergraduate Studies. Jeff began teaching at Ringling in 1998 and became the department head for the Illustration program in 2012. We sat down with Jeff to explore how Ringling keeps its edge, holding its place as one of the top art schools in the world.

In your new role at Ringling, which departments will require most of your focus? Part of my job is to really manage and work with all the programs and the new offerings. Some programs are very established and running really smoothly in terms of creating enrollment—like our Computer Animation, Game Art, and Illustration programs. And for a variety of reasons, things like Fine Arts, Photography, Advertising, and Graphic Design are areas where we are seeking to expand and grow their success. So part of my job is to look at what’s going on within the college, see what’s out there at other schools and in the industry, and figure out how alignments can be reorganized to be more competitive. I also support the new programs we’re offering, like the two being launched this fall— Creative Writing and Visual Studies. If you use the benchmarks of Illustration and Computer Animation, we want every program to have that same kind of interest and robust enrollment. [Computer Animation receives over 600 applications each year, and only 90 are chosen.]

How does Academic Affairs collaborate with college president Larry Thompson in attracting young talent to Ringling? Larry's vision is to elevate the role of art and design in contemporary culture and in today's marketplace. I think one of the great qualities of Larry’s leadership style is giving different people the responsibility to do their jobs. So, though I may not work directly with him to determine curriculum, I work with the departments and admissions and communications to determine the language we need to get students out there interested in what we do. The reality is that it costs something to come here. And there’s a certain kind of quality you’re going to get when you come to Ringling. The thing we have found is that if students visit the school, they always want to come here. Getting them here to see the facilities and the student work and the faculty is the key. You don’t have to say anything—they want to come. Higher education has become very expensive and competitive, and it’s a very complex game to play to make sure you’re always managing the variables that are there. 72

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Jeff Schwartz You mentioned that Computer Animation and Illustration are some of the most popular programs offered by the school. Why the difference in interest between those and say, Fine Arts or Graphic Design? Animation is a huge industry—there’s a lot of opportunity out there. It’s very visible, so that makes it very easy for people to understand why they want to go into that field. There’s a direct career translation. I think the reality is, things like Fine Arts and Visual Studies require a lot of skills that are applicable to many different places, but it’s not linear, like doing A, then B, then C—the entire alphabet is up to you. It’s a tough sell if people are looking for a linear way to find success. When you’re paying money for higher education, you want to know what you’re investing in. It’s tough if you say, “anything is possible.” Students want to know exactly what’s possible; they want us to nail it down and show them. Part of our strategy is to identify some of these things that we know are opportunities—that’s part of the challenge. Our Ringling College "Collaboratory" is one such way that enables us to bring real clients to the college to work with students and gives them the chance to do things they never even thought were possible in their field of study. For example, we don’t have an automotive design program here. But General Motors was looking to engage with creatives with a fresh perspective—no preconceived notions on what cars should look like—and with expertise in using the ZBrush 3D modeling program. They came to Ringling with their "Speed Form" project to access Ringling students' perspective and expertise—and


LIFE STYLE | INTERVIEW were so pleased with the results they offered all the graduating seniors in the Collaboratory program job interviews, hired two full-time positions, and are coming back again this spring with an expanded program to work with even more students. So there are these skill seekers who come to us to find the things they need. There are a lot of things happening here, and they plug into us in these interesting ways. Also, as our graduates go out in the workplace, they come back to us to hire students because they know what the experience here was like, and the quality of our students. Hallmark and Moonbot Studios are great examples. They come here, do workshops, and bring students back as employees once they graduate. Even Hasbro has become a regular hire for our students. We don’t teach toy design, but we give students the skills that employers are seeking. So that’s pretty exciting.

Ringling is already so well known and respected, what is your vision for the future—what’s the next step? Of course, we have the new buildings coming on line, which allow us to realign some of our programs—like the Fine Arts studio groups with the new Visual Arts Center. So you’re bringing in new material practices that we haven’t been

able to offer. That doesn’t just happen because you build it—you have to promote it, talk about it, and bring in experts who can help students be engaged with it. Another very exciting upcoming development is the Sarasota Museum of Art. With this new opportunity, the possibilities are limitless.

Do you think the new museum will help make the Sarasota community more involved with the school? Absolutely. The location, the scale and size of the building, the quality of the programming. The new executive director, Anne-Marie Russell, is fantastic. Her resources and knowledge and connections are international and of the highest caliber. There are all kinds of ways to promote and work our students into that equation that we haven’t been able to do before, because we haven’t had the opportunity. It’ll be another beacon in the community that will be recognized as part of the college. The thing that always surprises me is the people in the community who have lived here for years and still don’t know we are here. Or are unaware that we have some beautiful galleries on campus that are open to the public. But this new museum is in a visible spot—people know about it. That creates a connection that will help us expand that awareness. And that’s exciting for me.

THE ARTIST BEHIND T H E A D M I N I S T R AT O R Jeff is trained as a studio artist, with a BFA from The School of the Art Institute of Chicago, and an MFA from American University. “Some things start as a class project that I do with my students, and I end up building a whole body of work around it. I couldn’t really separate my teaching from my practice—there was no time. They had to work together. So my practice became more efficient. When I go to the studio, I am on task. It’s like working. And I never know what’s going to happen. If I come out of my studio and I’m surprised, I’ve been successful. When is a line a line, and when does it become a piece of language you can read? There’s a very specific point at which it changes from just squiggles to actually saying something and communicating to you. That balance is what I’m always trying to delicately play with.”

LOOKING AHEAD The Richard and Barbara Basch Visual Arts Center, currently underway

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ONE TWO THREE ...ONE TWO THREE S T E P I N T O T H E FA S C I N AT I N G W O R L D O F B A L L R O O M D A N C I N G No matter how limited your exposure to ballroom dancing, there’s no denying that it makes quite an impression. Simply put, it’s a spectacle—the costumes, the makeup, the hair, the formality of it all. It truly is an art form. And then there’s the music. We dare your hips not to wiggle when some rowdy rumba music starts playing!

When you think of ballroom, your mind may go the traditional route to the waltz, foxtrot, and samba. Or if you are among the millions who tune in to one of the medium’s showcases like Dancing With the Stars, your brain may also venture into Argentine tango, quickstep, and pasodoble. Not only are they fun to do, they’re fun to say. Cha cha cha.

for the body,... We are always touting the health benefits of exercise, and with dance, you get to combine recreation with cardio. Physically, dance aids in coordination and of course, builds muscle tone. If you watch the way couples spin one another around the floor, there’s no denying that for both dancers and spectators alike, it gets the heart racing.

H AV E A B A L L The word “ball,” as in a large formal gathering, is derived from the Latin word ballare, meaning “to dance.”

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Of course, it doesn’t have to be so fast paced. Tailor the energy level in your hops and pivots to your own personal capabilities. Admit it—even tapping a toe to the beat is enough to put a smile on your face. So really, minimal effort is required to benefit from all that music and dance have to offer.


LIFE STYLE | LOCAL

STEPPING UP

The specific term “DanceSport” was coined in the early 1980s to acknowledge the physical challenges involved, and the fact that dancers are real athletes. Dance is a sport activity, and with that in mind, DanceSport submitted a request in 2002 to be considered for admission to the Olympics. The struggle for that recognition continues. Hopes are high that it may be included in the 2020 Tokyo games.

for the mind... Mentally, dance is a terrific stress reliever and can be extremely rewarding. In kids, not only does it teach them to set goals (and reach them), it has also been shown to enhance cognitive learning (that’s where the “one two three…one two three” comes into play). In Europe, dancers are introduced to ballroom at an early age—many start as young as first grade. Formal dance engenders confidence, kind manners, excellent posture, and smoother social skills (see our article on the Cotillion Club in the March 2016 issue). Even though most of these young dancers do not pursue further instruction beyond middle school, the lessons learned on the dance floor stay with them for a lifetime.

and for the soul Dance is a wonderful way to reconnect with your partner. Working as a team as you swivel and sway will bring you closer together—in more ways than one. And if ballroom is something you’ve always wanted to try, don’t feel like you have to miss out if you want to venture into it on your own. Classes at most studios accommodate both singles and couples. Pick up the steps, and you’ll be surprised how quickly you’ll pick up a partner once you’re out on the floor.

passion and glory In the world of ballroom dancing there is also fierce competition, as well as quite a bit of judging drama. Couples are rated on a variety of criteria including poise, posture, musicality and expression, timing, body alignment and shape, foot and leg action, and presentation. Since each of these elements can be rather subjective, depending upon the perspective of a judge’s gaze at any given point in the performance, controversy often swirls around the rulings. If you are interested in experiencing some of the high drama firsthand, you can check out one of the local competitions that take place right here in our own backyard.

COMPE TITIONS

THE 8TH ANNUAL DANCESPORT SARASOTA CHALLENGE recently took place at the Hyatt Regency, March 19-20 Not only does the competition bring together high-caliber performers from all parts of the world, the Sarasota Challenge also aims to make the world a better place. The organization asserts that through dance, it is able to connect with the community in order to provide monetary donations to those in need. This year, it was proud to support The Homeless Coalition. Keep an eye on next year’s calendar so you don’t miss this incredible event that is open to the public. Attend competitions, seminars, exhibitions, and more. sarasotachallenge.com

THE FLORIDA STATE DANCESPORT CHAMPIONSHIPS will be held at the Sarasota Ritz-Carlton, August 2-7 This is the 44th anniversary of the event, which draws incredible international talent. It is the final “jewel” in a series of four week-long competitive ballroom dancing conventions, also known as the Triple Crown. Seating is reserved on a first-come, first-served basis, with package holders receiving priority, so reserve your tickets early. flstatedance.com

W H E R E C A N YO U L E A R N T O G E T YO U R GROOVE ON?

EMPIRE BALLROOM STUDIOS Adults can be trained by dance professionals at this wellrespected school founded by Sid Pocius, a world class, professional champion ballroom dancer. Sid is also the organizer of the annual Dancesport Sarasota Challenge. empireballroomstudios.com DYNASTY DANCE CLUBS This studio hosts weekly parties and a monthly night on the town so dancers-in-training can step out, get down, and practice their moves. dynastydanceclubs.com SOUL STUDIOS Kids of all ages are invited to come and learn—whether they are interested just for fun or with a professional goal in mind. There are classes for ages two to eight, eight and up, and adults as well. Contact them about their summer dance camp program for youth. soulstudiosdance.com ARTHUR MURRAY DANCE STUDIOS This renowned dance school has a local studio offering one-on-one, couples, or group classes in both modern and traditional dance styles. arthurmurraysarasota.net FRED ASTAIRE Named for the most famous smooth mover ever, this studio offers to teach the basic elements on which all dance patterns are based in the very first lesson. fredastaire.com

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PLAY OUTSIDE THE BOX WITH THESE 5 FUN OUTINGS try a painting class Recruit your usual partner in crime, pick up a bottle of wine, and head over to the Sip n’ Create studio for a unique experience. Don’t be intimidated if you’re not experienced—99% of the guests who attend have never touched paintbrush to canvas before. It’s a learn-as-you-go process, with an instructor at the head of the class guiding you every step of the way. The classes are suitable for a girls’ night out, birthday party, reunion, and more. There are even new and exciting things to try—like silk scarf and wineglass painting. You might unlock some artistic potential you didn’t even know you had. Located in the Parkway Collection shopping center at University Parkway and North Lockwood Ridge Road. sipncreate.com

➤ Thought you’d sampled all

that Sarasota has to offer? Think again. Just because Valentine’s Day has come and gone, that’s no reason to set aside romantic notions of spending quality time with your favorite person. And Mother’s Day is right around the corner, so it’s not too soon to start planning a special activity for the one person who is always “doing” for everyone else.

dine in the water What is more relaxing and enjoyable here in lovely Florida than waterfront dining? Take things to a completely new level and plan a picnic for two on a powdery white sandbar off of Siesta Key. Chef Christian Hershman will prepare an intimate meal to be shared in a way you’ve maybe never thought possible— like something out of a Bond film. Make plans by contacting christian.hershman@icloud.com. Then charter a boat with Yacht Solutions to ferry you out to your own private little island! Call (813) 690-4481 or visit yachtsolutions.us for more details.

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take in a film Now that the Academy has made you aware of all the great films out there you might’ve missed, it’s time to go out and see some new movies for yourself, before they become old news. And why not watch them in style and comfort? We’ve been anxiously awaiting its arrival at the Westfield Southgate Mall, and since the big debut in February, CinéBistro has been causing quite a stir. Not only can you sip a cocktail at the stylish lounge before the show, but you can also choose a gourmet item from the extensive menu (no nachos or hot dogs here—although popcorn and Twizzlers are available!) to nibble on during the movie. Kick back and enjoy the film while reclining in comfy, luxurious leather. cinebistro.com


We Buy & Sell Antiques & Estate Jewelry Oscar Heyman platinum, natural sapphire (29.35 ctw) and diamond (10.36 ctw) bracelet.

19th century K.P.M. jewel casket. The perfect repository for your jewels.

Art Deco platinum ruby and diamond link bracelet.

Tiffany & Co. 18-K made in France diamond and sapphire ribbon bracelet.

Bruce Crissy, gallery owner, offers free verbal appraisals of your antiques, jewelry and collectables.

Established 1965

640 S. Washington Blvd. Sarasota, FL 34236 941-957-1110

ART & ANTIQUE CENTER S A R A S O T A

Monday - Saturday, 10am - 5pm

www.crissy.com subject to prior sale


LIFE STYLE | LOCAL

if you're in the mood for a melody... THE TERRACE AT S U R F S H A C K

head to a piano bar Sing-alongs are a terrific way to relieve stress and unwind after a busy day at the office. You know how great it feels when you know all the words to a tune on the radio as you’re cruising around with your windows rolled down. So grab a pal, grab a drink, and then grab a seat at one of these lively music joints around town (see right). You might even be moved to belt out a few tunes on your own (outside the safety of your own car!), and probably make a few new friends by the end of the evening.

Enjoy live music nightly at the piano bar while enjoying a beautiful rooftop view of St. Armands Circle. terraceatsurfshack.com MARINA JACK

The talented Rock Lee performs at the piano of Marina Jack’s scenic, casual Deep Six Lounge from Tuesday through Sunday starting at 6 PM. marinajacks.com M AT T I S O N ’ S FORTY-ONE

learn to dance Surprise your honey with a ballroom dancing class at one of the local, professional studios mentioned on page 75. Or if you already have the steps down, head out to show those moves off. Try 15 South Ristorante. Accessed from an upstairs entrance that is separate from the restaurant (and piano bar), the lively nightclub features live entertainment several nights a week. A Latin band spices things up on Fridays, Saturdays, and Sundays so you can salsa or merengue the night away (or at least until 2 AM). 15southristorante.com

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The piano bar at Chef Paul Mattison’s South Sarasota location offers up entertainment seven nights a week starting at 6 PM. mattisons.com M I C H A E L’ S O N E A S T

Go for a cocktail at happy hour and then stick around for the musical stylings of Joe Micals at the piano in the Lounge beginning at 7 PM, Tuesday through Saturday. bestfood.com


Broadway-Bound

World Premiere APRIL 27–MAY 29

Book by ELLEN WESTEN and MARK HAMPTON Music by STEPHEN DORFF Lyrics by JOHN BETTIS From an original story by Kenneth Waissman Based on the book Remembering Josephine by Stephen Papich Directed and choreographed by JOEY MCKNEELY

ASOLOREP.ORG 941.351.8000

Deborah Cox as Josephine Baker. Photo by Mike Ruiz. © Deco Recording Group, LLC.

PARIS 1936. ONE WOMAN MESMERIZED THE WORLD.

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THE

TECHNOLOGICAL TWISTS OF

MODERN ART

Throughout human history, art has been a means to make sense of the world around us. From paintings on cave walls to oil on canvas, the media are constantly changing, but one thing remains the same: our art reflects our reality. So naturally, art of the 21st-century reflects a technological reality, both in content and in form.

laser focus The Masters of old couldn’t have dreamed of the cutting-edge technology—quite literally— employed by Eric Standley. The artist is an Associate Professor of Studio Art at Virginia Tech and comes from a family of engineers. That shouldn’t surprise anyone, as his complex creations make use of his knowledge of geometry and involve months of planning, sketching, and assembly. The intricate stained glass windows, inspired by Gothic and Islamic architectural ornamentation, are created entirely of paper—each sheet of the sometimes more than 200 layers individually cut with the aid of a laser. His pieces—he refers to them facetiously as “folk math”—can be viewed at the Marta Hewitt Gallery in Cincinnati and are featured the book Mandala Masterworks by Paul Heussenstamm.

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D I G I TA L D E TA I L The vector drawings are created using CorelDraw and cut on a ULS CNC laser.

“When I’m drawing, I think of the negative space in its absence, creating physical space as they’re stacked on top of each other.” – Eric Standley

The artworks shown here were made specifically for Standley’s solo exhibit “Thus You Shall Go to the Stars” at the 18th Islamic Arts Festival in Sharjah, UAE in January 2016. left: Either/Or Zeta Orionis; detail of Either/Or Delta Orionis above: Either /Or Epsilon Orionis

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digital revolution

searching for art

High tech and pop art collide in the exhibition aptly titled Digital Revolution.

You might not expect the search engine giant to also be big

Exploring the impact of technology through time, the show—which premiered at London’s Barbican Centre in 2014 and is now at the Zorlu Centre in Istanbul (February 16 – June 12, 2016)—appeals to young and old alike.

pops up might just be … well, Google. DevArt, a project to

With collaborations between contemporary artists and entertainers, the culmination is a dazzling laser exhibit from Umbrellium, including works of Japanese designer Yuri Suzuki and Black Eyed Peas front man will.i.am, and innovative, interactive installations from the DevArt project.

in the art world, but if you Google digital art, the result that encourage and support artwork made with computer coding, was launched as a collaboration between London’s Barbican Centre and Google. DevArt’s mission is to “use technology as the canvas and code as the raw materials” in their undeniably engaging digital art works, like Wishing Wall, featured here. right: Wishing Wall by Vavara + Mar connects the magic of making a wish with the visualization of digital butterflies. Described as “the metamorphosis of a wish” simply whisper your wish and a fluttering cloud appears. The enchanting exhibit is part of Google’s DevArt.

The Treachery of Sanctuary by Chris Milk uses Kinect cameras and 3D graphics in an interactive triptych, allowing the viewer to be an active character in the piece. This modern take on shadow play explores the spiritual journey of birth, death, and transfiguration, and in the end, enables the viewer/participant to see an expanse of wings on their silhouette. 82

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© Matthew G. Lloyd_Getty Images


THE

BROAD MUSEUM THE FUTURE OF CONTEMPOR ARY ART

When you think of Los Angeles, film is probably the predominant art form that comes to mind. The Broad (pronounced brode) Museum is going to transport your thinking beyond the glitter of Hollywood. Since opening its doors in September 2015, this shiny new jewel in the City of Angels has been a serious player in the contemporary art world.

THE ARCHITECTURE Designed by world-renowned architectural firm Diller Scofidio + Renfro (they conceived New York’s High Line) in collaboration with Gensler, the $140 million, 120,000 square foot building is a work of art in and of itself. With two floors and over 50,000 square feet of gallery space, the museum—located downtown on Grand Avenue across the street from the Museum of Contemporary Art (MOCA) and next door to Walt Disney Concert Hall—houses Eli and Edythe ("Edye") Broad’s vast collection utilizing a unique “veil-and-vault” design. This innovative system gives us a glimpse of what would normally be hidden away in storage—that portion of the collection not currently on display. As patrons enter and exit the museum, the vault is in constant sight, with its heavy sculptural underside

visible from the lobby—the top of the vault is actually the floor of the exhibition space. Viewing windows are built into the structure, permitting a peek inside the holding space, which is crowned by an “airy, honeycomblike structure”—the veil— allowing natural light to filter in and illuminate the artwork. The exterior of the threestory building, already an architectural landmark in its pop art-like glory, is comprised of the veil. Constructed of fiberglass-reinforced concrete, its exoskeleton enrobes the structure from roof to ground level. Its bone-white veneer is raised up at the front corners, revealing glass walls and drawing you in. The design has received mixed reviews, however, with the Los Angeles Times architecture critic Christopher Hawthorne proclaiming the facade “surprisingly punchless.”

ABOUT THE BROADS Entrepreneur and philanthropist Eli Broad made his fortune— Forbes estimates his net worth at $7.4 billion—building two Fortune 500 companies, KB Home (suburban tract homes) and SunAmerica (insurance). He and his wife Edye began collecting art with the acquisition of a drawing by Van Gogh. Their interests shifted to more contemporary works with “social or political meaning,” and thus began what is now a comprehensive collection amassed over almost 50 years.

“We want this to be a gift to the city of Los Angeles. We wanted to share [the art] with the broadest possible public. And that’s why we have free admission.” – Eli Broad

Broad’s goal was to make Los Angeles a “cultural capital of the world,” and has contributed more than $800 million to local art institutions toward that end. He and his wife financed the construction of the museum bearing their name and housing their collection of more than 2,000 works, considered to be among the most prominent of postwar and contemporary art in the world. That collection continues to grow by an average of one piece per week.

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C O M I N G AT T R A C T I O N S SPECIAL EXHIBITION

Cindy Sherman: Imitation of Life June 11 – October 2, 2016

THE INSTALLATION The Broad’s inaugural installation is a chronological selection of more than 250 masterworks, including paintings, sculptures, and photographs by approximately 60 artists. This trip through time begins on the third floor, with works of prominent artists from the 50s

(Jasper Johns, Robert Rauschenberg, and Cy Twombly) , 60s (Roy Lichtenstein, Ed Ruscha, and Andy Warhol), progressing through the 80s (Jean-Michel Basquiat, Keith Haring, Barbara Kruger, and Jeff Koons). The first floor (the second floor is comprised of the vault and office space) brings us to more recent works, including Takashi Murakami’s 82-foot mural In the Land of the Dead, Stepping

on the Tail of a Rainbow, inspired by Japan’s 2011 earthquake and tsunami, and covering most of two walls. In addition, The Visitors, a performance art piece by Icelandic artist Ragnar Kjartansson is displayed on nine video screens, and features musicians playing a bit of Abbainfluenced tunes. But perhaps the most dazzling display on the first level is Yayoi Kusama’s Infinity Mirrored Room—The Souls of Millions of Light Years Away, a reflective chamber with acrylic balls and a spectacular twinkling LED light display. Described as “LA’s most Instagrammable room,” it was the background for singer Adele’s latest video for the song “When We Were Young,” and can be viewed through September 2016.

The Broad’s first special exhibition will feature a collection of the work of Cindy Sherman. Nearly 120 photographs of the artist, a favorite of the Broads, will fill the museum’s first floor. “Cindy Sherman’s work has been a touchstone for the Broad collection since Eli and Edye Broad first encountered it in 1982, and Cindy is the only artist in the collection whose work we’ve acquired so deeply and regularly, for more than 30 years,” said Joanne Heyler, founding director of The Broad.

F E AT U R E D O N T H E T H I R D F L O O R

Galleries devoted to single artists: Warhol’s series of Campbell’s Soup Cans included in a collection of 11 paintings in a small gallery; Lichtenstein in a larger room of 10 paintings; Twombly’s collection including seven paintings and three sculptures; Koons with eight sculptures on display.

Cindy Sherman, Untitled #92, 1981

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THE LITTLE

MARKET ...BIG IMPACT

➤ Imagine having the one-

of-a-kind wares of fanciful markets, street vendors, and open-air souks found in remote corners of the Earth right at your fingertips. Handicrafts from far-off places like Tanzania, Bolivia, Thailand, Ethiopia, Nepal, and Mexico are just a click away, rather than a plane ride away. Welcome to The Little Market.

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The website that makes all of this possible is a labor of love by Lauren Conrad and Hannah Skvarla, friends and once fellow students at the Fashion Institute of Design & Merchandising. Having traveled the world together and witnessing firsthand both the talent and the hardships of artisans across the globe, the pair committed themselves to bringing the beautiful items handmade by these individuals to a larger audience.

VARIETY GALORE The online marketplace they have carefully constructed—made up of 26 different groups representing 16 countries (and growing!)—is filled with charming, one-of-akind products in a wide range of categories. Browse the gorgeously hued web pages for a gift for that special someone—especially if that someone is yourself! We found accessories ranging from bracelets to luggage tags, plus soy blend candles in delicious scents, unique bottle stoppers, adorable stuffed animals, and bags and totes in every shape, size, and color.

PRETTY WITH A PURPOSE The artists are predominately women from disadvantaged communities. Some have disabilities, while others are living in extreme poverty. The focus of the marketplace is to empower these artisans and give them a way to actively support their families. All products are sourced ethically using fair trade principles—no child labor, fair wages, safe working conditions, and a commitment to gender equality. IT’S ALL IN THE DETAILS As you’re shopping, you’ll notice that in addition to a description that lists basic info like the dimensions and composition of the product, there are also details regarding the name of the item’s artisan group, its provenance, the process by which it was made, how proceeds from the item’s sale benefits the people who produced it, and in some cases, an actual photo of the individual responsible for making it. With The Little Market, the joy and excitement we get from purchasing a work of art at our


LIFE STYLE | ART E A R T H - F R I E N D LY FRENCH BLUE TALL GLASS PITCHER Crafted of recycled glass and hand-etched in a traditional Mexican flower and leaf design. $68

The artisans in The Little Market circle are encouraged to create products that are crafted from all-natural fibers and recycled material.

MOSAIC SERVING BOWL Freehand painted in an elegant design of rich tones by Tunisian artisans. $20 NEWPORT OVERNIGHT BAG Hand woven and thoughtfully designed, hailing from the highlands of Guatemala. $240 RAINBOW STRIPE KNITTING BASKET Employs the coil style of basket weaving, incorporating the thick local grasses of Senegal and strips of brightly colored recycled plastic. $54

local craft festival—where we met the artist, talked to her, discussed her inspiration and process— advances to a completely different level. Not only are we told the story behind the blanket, glassware, apron, but we now also know the impact that our purchase makes on the life of the woman gazing back at us from the computer screen, along with many just like her. The organizations with whom they work offer adult literacy classes, micro loan programs, and family healthcare.

HOME IS WHERE THE HEART IS One knitting group, Pebble , started as a tiny non-profit operating out of a single room in Bangladesh. The fanciful baby rattles they create are crafted in the women’s own rural communities, so they do not have to migrate in search of employment. Keeping families together makes them stronger and happier. The Little Market is allowing these women to stay home—or in some cases, very close to home—so they can raise and nurture their children while at the same time earning the means to support them.

A member of the Handmade Expressions artisan group in India, which produces some of the lovely table linens offered by The Little Market, like the YELLOW FLORAL NAPKIN with a striking pattern block-printed on cotton. $8

Scan here to watch the video or visit femme-rouge.tv

SOY TO THE WORLD The delectable offerings of the Prosperity Candle group based in the U.S. come in scents such as clementine, rosemary, grapefruit, honeysuckle, chai tea, and many more. Each 8-ounce candle is hand-poured using fragrances created with natural essential oils. The wax is a clean-burning mixture of GMO-free, Kosher-certified, American-grown soy and U.S. food-grade paraffin. The candles are vegan with no dyes or enhancers, and no ingredients are ever tested on animals. FEMME ROUGE

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friends and co-founders We wanted to talk to Lauren and Hannah about their wonderful website so we could learn a bit more about how it came to fruition, what they have accomplished since its inception, and what they see for the future.

lauren and hannah Travel is what led you both to start The Little Market project—how did that happen, and what criteria did you use to select your initial eight artisan organizations? We were inspired to start The Little Market after visiting different markets around the world and seeing the beautiful products that local artisans were making. Many people still produce handmade goods using the same techniques that have been passed down in their culture for generations. However, most of these artisans were only selling to a limited local market, because they lack the resources to expand their scope. With The Little Market, we hope to change that. We specifically wanted to focus on female artisans, because women around the world are still less educated, less healthy, and experiencing more violence than their male counterparts. By helping these talented women earn a fair wage, we hope that they can break the cycle of poverty, support themselves and their families, and improve their lives. We chose our initial eight artisan organizations because of the fair trade practices that they were using. We felt strongly that

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those groups had an interest in creating a mutually beneficial relationship that would support their artisans. Each group does more than just help its artisans sell products; they provide business management training, skills workshops, educational resources, and more.

Do you have input regarding which products the artisans create, or do you seek them out specifically for what they are already producing? We seek out artisans specifically for the techniques they have mastered. We are drawn to each artisan group by the beautiful products that they are producing. After establishing a partnership, we often work with the artisan group to choose the colors and designs that we believe fit best with The Little Market. On occasion, we help develop new products that we think our customers might be interested in.

How do you communicate with them—particularly those in remote locations? Most of our artisans are organized into groups or cooperatives that help them coordinate products, design, inventory, and sales. If possible, we like to meet with the artisan group in person when we first develop a partnership. That

way, we can get to know them, see the products firsthand, and develop a relationship with the artisans beyond just a virtual one. Once we begin working together, we usually communicate via email, Skype, and telephone.

How do the women learn their skills? Every artisan group is different, but typically the artisans use indigenous techniques. In many cases, skills are passed from mother to daughter at a very young age. Many of them have been perfected over centuries, making them nearly impossible to replicate using modern techniques.

How has The Little Market affected its artisans’ communities? How has it improved their lives? One group in particular, Prosperity Candle, works with female refugees who have relocated here to the United States from Burma. The group helps women learn the skills of candle-making and gives them opportunity for advancement and an ownership stake in the company. Many of the women are mothers, and their children may be the first in their families to finish school. Prosperity Candle is about much more than just providing employment—it is a social enterprise with the power to break the cycle of poverty for female refugees and their families.

Your website asks shoppers for input to source new talent. What do you see for the future? We are always looking to grow and add more artisan partners, especially from countries and communities where we don’t yet have a presence. And we really love hearing about new artisans and products from our shoppers! There are a lot of talented groups out there who share our fair trade principles—it’s impossible to find them all on our own. The artisans we’re looking to connect with often live in rural areas, don’t have a website, and don’t have regular access to internet. So we’ve been lucky to have received many connections through our shoppers. It speaks to the power of social media, as many suggestions come from our followers all over the world who know of amazing artisans in their countries. We’re also in development on some really exciting products right now that will be released later this year. With handmade products, the wait is sometimes long—but well worth it! You can always check our website for the newest additions. Visit us at thelittlemarket.com.


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St. Petersburg & Moscow R U S S I A' S D U A L J E W E L S

Russia is a country filled with contradictions: historical yet contemporary, proud yet wounded, romantic yet gruff. It is home to soaring mountains, verdant plains, and gorgeous coastlines, as well as some of the most beautiful and historically significant cities in the world. Come along with us as we explore two of the jewels in Russia's crown.

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LIFE STYLE | TRAVEL

SHADES OF AMBER Peter is the best place on earth to pick up some uniquely beautiful amber jewelry—some of it quite rare. While the colors range from milky white to fiery orange, the most valuable specimens are actually those with fossilized insects inside. Oh, and don’t forget to bargain with the vendors—it’s culturally expected.

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St. Petersburg The former Russian capital is a glamorous city filled with rich history and cosmopolitan culture that permeates architecture, leisure, and society.

WEST MEETS EAST We eased our way into the Russian way of life with a stay in its most Westernized city: St. Petersburg. Since its founding in 1703 by Tsar Peter the Great, this enchantingly beautiful city has been known by many names: Petrograd, Leningrad, Petersburg, and, in casual conversation among the locals, simply Peter. It was the capital of Russia from 1713 to 1918, with one brief four-year interlude, and its location on the Baltic Sea (where it sits on 44

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islands) made it Russia’s window on the West. We got an up close and personal look at this gem, and left with a good idea of why it’s called the “Venice of the North.” IMMERSE YOURSELF We were spoiled for choice when it came to spending time in St. Petersburg and found the most difficult part of sightseeing was simply choosing what to see first. Feel free to follow our suggestions, but be mindful that you can have just as wonderful

a time wandering, sans itinerary, from one historic landmark to the next. You won’t have to go far to find the history here—it fairly drips from the Petrine Baroque buildings (a sub-style of architecture only found in St. Petersburg). To get ourselves properly steeped in the aura of Peter, we first hit the major spots: Palace Square, the sprawling plaza surrounded by gorgeous Neoclassical buildings and containing the Alexander

Column (erected after Russia’s defeat of Napoleon); St. Isaac’s Cathedral, the fourth largest cathedral in the world; and Peter and Paul Fortress, the original citadel of the city which was incorporated by Peter the Great in 1703 and now houses the State Museum of St. Petersburg History. It’s like walking through a 3D, hi-def history textbook, but exchange the musty smell of old binding for the sharp tang of salt air and the calls of hundreds of street vendors.


LIFE STYLE | TRAVEL

ART AND WAR At the top of our must-see list was one of the most expansive and oldest museums in the world—the Hermitage Museum . Housed in six historic buildings along the flat side of the Palace Square, including the Winter Palace (former home of the Russian tsars), the Hermitage contains the largest single collection of paintings in the world. And it sure felt like it, as we could have spent days lost among its halls and passages, wandering from a da Vinci to a Michelangelo to a Rembrandt. But the collections don’t stop there, as the museum is home to some three million items (though they can’t display all of them at once), and includes everything from ancient Mesopotamian artifacts to 15th century European suits of armor. The museum, like the city as a whole, left us awed in a way we couldn’t have predicted. That suit of armor must have spoken to us, as our next stop was the businesslike facade of the Central Naval Museum. We didn’t have to go far—the museum sits just across a bridge over the Neva River from the Hermitage. It’s clear that nothing in here is designed with aesthetics in mind, save for maybe the ominous marine paintings by famed artists such as Ivan Aivazovsky. Nevertheless, we had a fascinating time admiring the scale-model warships (of which the museum has over 2,000); priceless loot gathered by Russian soldiers in war; and Peter the Great’s Botik, the pint-sized warship that served as his first boat and a symbol of his rule. From the very old to the very new—the best lunch spot on Vasilyevsky Island (where the Naval Museum is located) is the trendy Abajour. The small dining area is reminiscent of the living room of an Ikea employee, and although we only peeked through the window on our stroll, the quality of the food was evident. We’ve heard it’s a steak-lover’s dream, so try any of their cuts of beef.

THE SIGHTS

clockwise from opposite page: St. Isaac's Cathedral Palace Square Hermitage Museum Central Naval Museum

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HOUSES OF THE HOLY Though relatively young by European standards, St. Petersburg has no shortage of historic (and beautiful) churches. St. Isaac’s (mentioned earlier) should absolutely not be missed—it took 40 years to construct, which in and of itself demands appreciation. While exploring this Empire-style monolith, we also paused to admire the imposing Bronze Horseman statue a few hundred feet away. The statue depicts (who else?) Peter the Great rearing astride a gigantic warhorse, but don’t overlook the piece’s base. It’s called the Thunder Stone, and it’s claimed to be the largest single stone ever moved by humans without the aid of animal or machine. We stayed on the south side of the Neva for our final two church excursions: Kazan Cathedral and (morbidly named, even for Russia) The Church of the Savior on the Spilled Blood. No matter what your taste, one of these churches will appeal to your aesthetic sensibilities. Kazan is a monstrous half circle modeled after Rome’s St. Peter’s Basilica, complete with dozens of columns both inside and out, a massive palatial interior, and art and sculptures by some of Russia’s finest artists. As for the Church of the Savior on the Spilled Blood, it looks like Russia. There’s no other way to put it. When we first walked into the semicircular plaza surrounding it, the soaring onion-shaped domes and bright pinwheel stripes gave us our first true “welcome to Russia” moment. The church is built on the spot where Tsar Alexander II was fatally wounded by a grenade in 1881, and the royal family spared no expense in commemorating him: the gilt-covered and colorful exterior are no match for the inside of the church, where every square inch of wall and ceiling are covered in intricately detailed mosaics.

WHAT’S FOR DINNER? A truly cosmopolitan city, St. Petersburg has a wealth of great dinner options from which to choose. We couldn’t get enough of the city’s stunning architecture and decided to kill two birds with one stone by stepping aboard the good ship Dunaevsky. Dinner and a river cruise is on the docket here, as the Volga restaurant has commandeered the motor cruiser and turned it into a five-star experience. Yes, it’s a bit pricey, but the views more than make up for it. A chilled vodka and a fresh baked crab julienne while seeing the domes and columns of St. Petersburg illuminated by the setting sun is something we won’t soon forget. If you’re like we are, you won’t rest until you’ve found the best Italian restaurant in every city. In Peter, it’s tough. You’ve got Percorso, the house restaurant of the glitzy Four Seasons hotel, which scores high on just about everything—food, wine, decor, location, service, and the list goes on. But for our money, the pick is Mansarda. It’s harder to find, located on the 6th floor of the Gazprom building in downtown Peter. But once you find it, you’ll fall in love like we did. The panoramic views made us literally gasp with awe as St. Isaac’s massive dome filled our windows. Add in the sumptuous veal and the divine gelato, and it was hard to leave.

STAY IN STYLE But leave we had to, for bed was calling. And this wasn’t just any old bed—it was a Four Seasons bed. The hotel occupies the LobanovRostovsky Palace, which was built in 1820 by Auguste de Monferrand, who also designed neighboring St. Isaac’s Cathedral. It’s set so dead center in the heart of the city that you’d be hard-pressed to find any major landmark you can’t walk to. We’ve already mentioned its incredible in-house restaurant, and the decor and service are what you’d expect from the Four Seasons, which is to say—top notch. Of course, just like restaurants, St. Petersburg has its fair share of stunning hotels as well. Another great choice is the Belmond Grand Hotel Europe, set directly on the famed Nevsky Prospekt. The Belmond has been entertaining guests for over 140 years and features Russia’s oldest functioning restaurant, as well as its own shopping center and a fitness center with sauna and pool. And for hotels with a little more local flair? Art buffs should try the State Hermitage Museum Official Hotel, an exquisitely opulent property which is (somewhat confusingly) set about 10 minutes away from its namesake museum. But don’t worry—there’s a complimentary shuttle each way.

O T H E R C A N ’ T - M I S S S T. P E T E R S B U R G S T O P S

Nevsky Prospekt Famed main shopping street Peterhof Peter the Great’s Versailles-like megamansion on the coast of the Baltic Sea (45-minute drive from Peter) Admiralty Naval HQ sitting at concurrence of three main streets— conspicuous by its warship weathervane 94

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LIFE STYLE | TRAVEL ➤

Moscow Russia's largest city and capital is known for its iconic architecture, but Moscow is so much more than historic buildings. It is the distilled essence of the people, which has been shaped by both privilege and hardship.

CAPITAL GAINS After our sojourn through St. Petersburg, it was time to tackle true Russia: the city of Moscow. Remember how we described the Church of the Savior on the Spilled Blood as being our first “welcome to Russia” moment? Well, there were about 500 of those during our time in Moscow, but our first came before we even arrived. The flight from St. Petersburg is short—roughly an hour. But the drive can stretch to nearly ten, as you navigate Russia’s dubious highway system. We opted to compromise by taking the Sapsan—a high-speed direct train (named with the Russian word for “peregrine falcon”) that takes four hours to get from St. Petersburg to Moscow. Rather than deal with hectic terminals and cramped airline seats, we were able to spread out and enjoy gorgeous views of the Russian countryside before being deposited in the heart of Russia’s capital. RUSSIAN HOSPITALITY A 15-minute cab ride took us to Red Square, and two blocks further on took us to our hotel—the RitzCarlton Moscow. In a word, superb. After dropping our bags in the posh suite, we headed up to the 12th floor O2 Lounge to get our bearings. While sipping bespoke cocktails, we marveled at the scenes filling the panoramic windows—Red Square, St. Basil’s Cathedral, the Kremlin, and the rooftops and highrises of downtown Moscow. Another signature “welcome to Russia” moment.

If the Ritz isn’t your speed, a number of other hotels shine just as brightly in the center of Moscow. The St. Regis Hotel Nikolskaya sits several blocks east of Red Square along Lubyanka Square—the innermost of the many ring roads that cut concentric circles through the city—and directly across from the Metro station of the same name. The hotel is opulence itself, from the exquisite lobby with crystal chandeliers and a sweeping grand staircase to the luxuriously furnished guest suites. A lobby bar and cognac room will quench whatever thirst you might be carrying, and the house Italian restaurant rivals any in Rome (or Peter). A bit further from the city center, but still very much in the center of things, sit the Radisson Royal Hotel Moscow and the Lotte Hotel. Don’t let the former’s name fool you—once the forgotten child of the luxury hotel tier, Radisson has recommitted to providing excellence across the board, and the Royal Hotel Moscow (still often referred to by its traditional name, Hotel Ukraina) will convince you of that commitment. It’s a gorgeous property, perched on a bend of the Moskva River and housed inside one of the Seven Sisters—the elaborate Russian Baroque skyscrapers erected by Stalin throughout Moscow. The hotel has an astonishing nine restaurants, ranging from steak to Middle Eastern to Mediterranean, so you’re guaranteed to find something you like.

The Lotte is the newest of the four, opened in 2010 and situated right off one of Moscow’s main thoroughfares, Novinskiy Boulevard. It’s all here—marble bathrooms, indoor pool, rooftop terrace, Japanese restaurant… you name it, and the Lotte probably has it. We couldn’t stay in all four of these, but if we ever return, you can bet we’ll at least stop by for a drink at each of their bars. THE SIGHTS

Radisson Royal Hotel Moscow opposite page: Kazan Cathedral, The Church of the Savior on the Spilled Blood RED BY ANY OTHER NAME The Ritz’s location just steps from Red Square was too good, so we had to make that legendary triumvirate our first stop. Red Square, ironically, is neither red nor a square. It’s a massive cobblestone rectangle bookended at one end by the rotund spires of St. Basil’s Cathedral and at the other by the imposing facade of the Kremlin. You can easily spend a day here, passing among different vendors and food carts, people watching, and studying the magnificent art and architecture of the surrounding buildings. In fact, we did just that! Lenin’s Mausoleum lines one side of the square, where victorious Russian armies threw flags of the conquered Nazi army after World War II, and steps away from that sits the home of Vladimir Putin, itself partially a museum housing hundreds of Russian artifacts and regalia. You really don’t have to look beyond Red Square to find some of Russia’s most fascinating history, as our trip into the Kremlin Armory showed. It’s one of several museums housed in the Kremlin, and we wandered among collections ranging from 12th century Russian arms to antique 18th century horse-drawn carriages. However, our hearts were stolen by another museum within the Kremlin: the Diamond Fund. The Fund exhibits an astonishing array of jewelry, regalia, and gemstones, as well as several breathtaking raw diamonds, including the Orlov (190 carats) and Shah (89). Its main attractions are the Imperial Crown of Russia (made for Catherine II in 1762) and ten Imperial Fabergé eggs—the second largest collection of Fabergé eggs under one roof. After a long day of wandering Red Square, stop for a casual bite to eat at Bosco Cafe . It’s located in the GUM department store that skirts one edge of the square, and it’s the perfect place to recharge before returning to the bustling Russian capital. FEMME ROUGE

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above: The Kremlin; below: The Bolshoi Theatre; opposite page: Café Pushkin GET CULTURED Of course, Moscow’s not all style over substance. It’s the world’s most populous city not situated on an ocean, the most populous city that’s entirely in Europe (Istanbul, which is larger, straddles two continents), and boasts both the tallest freestanding structure and tallest skyscraper in Europe (the Ostankino and Federation Towers, respectively). And where millions of people live, work, and create massive structures, great culture usually follows. So it is with Moscow, which lays claim to a host of world-class museums and theaters. Though the Pushkin Museum of Fine

Art, Multimedia Art Museum, and Vakhtangov Theatre are all excellent, the picks of the litter are the Tretyakov Gallery and the Bolshoi Theater. 96

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The Tretyakov Gallery is actually split into two buildings—the Old and the New—both founded by Pavel Tretyakov, who donated his private art collection to the city of Moscow in 1892. It’s the largest collection of Russian fine art in the world, started by Tretyakov’s donation of roughly 2,000 paintings, sculptures, and drawings. It has expanded just a bit, as the museum now holds over 130,000 pieces, including Theotokos of Vladimir, the 12th century Byzantine painting of the Virgin and Child which is one of the most venerated icons in the Eastern Orthodox religion. As befits a museum of this stature, the building itself is gorgeous to behold—designed with a touch of fairytale style, it resembles the front of a massive cuckoo clock.

And speaking of gorgeous buildings, a trip to Moscow wouldn’t be complete without a stop at The Bolshoi Theatre. It doesn’t get more quintessentially Russian than this iconic neoclassical structure, whose facade is featured on Russia’s 100 ruble banknote. The theatre is home to the Bolshoi Ballet, which is the world’s largest ballet company, with more than 200 dancers. And these dancers have quite the hall in which to dance. The theatre’s impressive exterior is matched by its massive, multi-tiered heart, which would be at home in any Italian city. It’s all gold filigree and red velvet drapes and ornate ceiling detailing—you’d be forgiven for letting your eyes wander from the world-class performers.


LIFE STYLE | TRAVEL WINES AND DINES It’s easy to work up an appetite after hitting some of the best spots in Moscow, and our waistlines can attest to this. A highlight of our stay was Café Pushkin, which is simply one of the best restaurants in Moscow. It’s an absolutely stellar combination of incredible food, attentive service, and the kind of setting you might find in an old-school Russian gangster flick. It’s like crown moldings were invented to be installed here, to offset the sumptuous red upholstered chairs and wooden inlay along the walls. We ate in the sun lounge, with the summer sun streaming through the high windows, and felt like tsarinas for a day. It’s a one-of-a-kind experience, with a price tag to match. From one royal eatery to another—our next stop was at world-famous Turandot. We couldn’t get enough of the ornate Bolshoi Theatre, and this restaurant scratched that itch in a big way. The decor is what would happen if Michelangelo’s Russian doppelganger designed a restaurant—everything radiates glamor and elegance. There is barely an inch

of wall that remains unfiligreed, and gold, crystal, and candlelight greeted us at every turn. The interior decor alone is rumored to have cost more than two million dollars. The restaurant is based on Puccini’s famous Turandot opera, and opens its doors each night to the tale’s opening number. Interestingly, the theme doesn’t extend to the menu, which follows the whims of its creator, London restauranteur Alan Yau (founder of Wagamama). But the pan-Asian fare gave us just the spicy kick we had been craving, and seemed right at home among the splendorous decor. A step down in price, but little else, is La Maree —a seafood restaurant just a short ten-minute walk from the Bolshoi Theatre. Its unassuming facade belies an upscale interior, and the fish on offer is some of the freshest in the city. We know, because the shop window displays a host of treasures from the deep— everything from grouper and monkfish to crab and lobster, and an incredible 15 different varieties of oyster. While it may be surprising that this city in the middle of the continent can offer fresh-caught fish, one taste made us believers.

TO RUSSIA, WITH LOVE When we told friends and loved ones we were visiting Russia, there were a few raised eyebrows. It’s not a place like Italy, where the mention of a visit will generate universal acclaim. But the old saying “nothing ventured, nothing gained” is definitely in play here. Russia is one of the most beguiling nations on earth made up of people who welcomed and befriended us. And while its politics might not line up with ours, there are still a host of reasons to visit the great white North.

THE RUSSIAN BEAR

Largest nation on earth, covering one eighth of the world’s inhabited area Shares the record for most land borders (14) with China Spans 11 time zones Largest nation in both Europe and Asia At its height, the 18th century Russian Empire was the third largest empire in world history

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OLD WORLD OPULENCE BALDI HOME JEWELS

Beauty and harmony are the principles that have guided Baldi Home Jewels since its founding in 1867 Florence. Renowned for luxurious designs using precious materials— hand-cut crystals, lapis lazuli, malachite, tiger eye, and amethyst, to name a few—its collections include bathtubs, vases, bowls, and lamps created by skilled artisans.

The centuries-old craftsmanship from the Florentine Renaissance is reflected in every piece. Using the same techniques as jewelers—wax casting, gilding, and crystal blowing, right down to hand-chiseling the 24-karat plated bronze—Baldi’s traditional artistry and attention to detail is evident. Its timeless creations for the home are the perfect expression of the Old World Italian lifestyle. WHERE TO FIND IT baldihomejewels.com

Photos: © Flaire Studio © Luca Visentini ©Alessio Balleri ©Devin Blair 98

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UFIZZI COLUMN WITH KATE CANDELABRA Made from mouth-blown amber crystal, each piece is cut by hand and gilded with gold-plated bronze. TABLE The resplendent Richelieu table is handcrafted from Brazilian stone and rests atop a wax-casted base that glitters in 24k goldplated brass. CHANDELIER The Riccoli chandelier delivers drama to any room with its mouth-blown, hand-cut crystal and goldplated brass details.


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LIFE STYLE | DECOR MEDIA CABINET Inlaid in lapis lazuli mosaic and embellished with elements of 24k gold-plated bronze, this console is a work of art.

COFFEE TABLE Made of rock crystal, this stunning table is inlaid with yellow marble from Siena using the antique technique of "commesso fiorentino."

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DINING TABLE The grand table top (spanning three meters across) is veneered with lapis lazuli mosaic and yellow marble commesso fiorentino, and features an intricate gilded base.

DINING CHAIRS Upholstered chairs with gracefully curved backs are adorned with button tufting, and are elegantly framed with carved gold details.

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MONUMENTAL VASE Towering in splendor at two meters in height, the lapis lazuli mosaic vase is gilded with 24k gold-plated bronze and rests upon onyx columns. GRAND PIANO This Steinway restoration is veneered in lapis lazuli gemstone mosaic embellished with handmade details in 24k gold-plated bronze.

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ROCK CRYSTAL BATHTUB Nature and art intersect in this dramatic three-person bath. Sculpted from a single block of rock crystal found in the Amazonian rain forest, the stunning statement piece weighs in at approximately 22,000 pounds.

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LIFE STYLE | DECOR MONUMENTAL CLOCK Combining time-honored clockmaking techniques with the latest in technology, Baldi clocks are of the highest quality. This work of art is made entirely of crystal, gilded with 24k gold-plated bronze and stands just over eight feet tall.

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LIAN ROKMAN AMADEUS COLLEC TION 2016

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The phrase “like mother, like daughter “ could have been coined for German bridal designer, Lian Rokman. Rokman’s mother, a designer and pattern maker, was her role model and inspiration, instilling in her a love for fashion. The younger Rokman began sewing as a child, and by the time she was a teenager, she was creating clothes for her friends.

Rokman’s breathtaking gowns combine the romantic with the sensuous, with each design created to reflect the bride’s personal vision. Embellished with the finest laces and embroidery from around the world, Rokman spares no attention to detail, resulting in a sophisticated splendor for what is one of the most memorable days in a woman’s life.

At the age of 20, Rokman designed her first bridal collection. She expanded on her artistry, studying professional makeup and hairstyling, so that she could offer full bridal services. And that business has blossomed over the past 10 years to bring her to the forefront of bridal design.

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Contact the designer and mention you’re a FR reader.

info@lianrokman.com


LIFE STYLE | BRIDAL

PHOENIX A winged sheer back and delicate train adorn this exquisite gown composed of multiple fine laces. FEMME ROUGE

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GLAMOUR This sophisticated design is clean and elegant with figure-flattering raised seams , cutout sides, and a modern golden zipper down the back.

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LIFE STYLE | BRIDAL

GIGI A unique high collar and sheer illusion back are swirling with hand-sewn pearly beading. The mermaid silhouette has contemporary lingerie styling at the bust.

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LIFE STYLE | BRIDAL ROSE The barely there bodice of this lace-covered dress leads to a stunning layered skirt of lace and silk. The narrow belt ends in a soft bow at the back.

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HOMME BLEU SPRING/SUMMER 2016

The Smart Home

FUTURISTIC FEATURES FOR YOUR FORTRESS

Fitness Is Your Body Beach Ready? Gianluca Isaia Sophisticated Italian Style with an Unexpected Edge


ISAIA's unpredictable upscale Neapolitan style, page 38. Photo courtesy of ISAIA

Welcome to the SPRING/SUMMER edition of HOMME BLEU! Our mission is to be the premier resource for the modern man, elevating your lifestyle to the next level. Gentlemen, our cutting-edge men’s section was written with you in mind, bringing you all the latest in technology, style, luxury toys, and more with a masculine accent. Look no further than flipping over a copy of FEMME ROUGE for your quarterly must-read magazine. We’re glad to have you on board and look forward to keeping current content and innovative information in your hands.


SPRING/SUMMER 2016

HOMME BLEU 2 WHAT ’S YO U R HO M E’S IQ? the latest devices for the smart home

VIDEO GALLERY

8 21ST CE N TU RY SHAR IN G from cars and jets to vacation homes

See your favorite articles come to life in our educational, inspiring, and entertaining videos!

14 THE AR TISTIC G E N IU S O F CO N R AD SHAWCRO SS

22 T-IN G U P the lowdown on testosterone 26 CO N SIDE R ING CHOLESTEROL

16 A THO U SAN D WO R DS Conor MacNeill’s spectacular travel photography

20 AR E YO U READY FOR R E TIR E M ENT? 7 steps to get you there

30 U P P E R B O DY FITNESS baring it on the beach

PAGE 15 H B | AR T

36 IN THE CE LL AR organic wines you should know about

Behind the scenes with Conrad Shawcross

38 ST YL E the Italian elegance of ISAIA

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HB | LIFE STYLE

The Sharing Economy

I N T H E H I E R A R C H Y O F WAY S T H AT T H E I N T E R N E T HAS IMPROVED OUR LIVES,

your mind probably jumps immediately to things like communication, commerce, banking, and navigation. And it’s true that it’s become easier to stay (or get) in touch with people the world over, buy (and sell) almost anything, and find your way around pretty much anywhere using just your phone. But yet another way that the web has taken us out of the dark ages is in the concept of sharing. Your kindergarten teacher probably taught you that sharing was caring (and it could be fun). And in the past decade or so, through services like Airbnb, Uber, Lending Club, and others, the internet has allowed tech companies to expand this cup-of-sugar mentality into a variety of previously untapped marketplaces.

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transportation revolution The best place to start any discussion of this brave new world is with the transportation industry, as it’s by far the hottest. It seems like every week another app or service pops up to help you get from point A to point B faster than its competitors. Let’s take a look at some of the first movers and the innovators. FIRST ON THE ROAD The first major breakthrough in the concept of car sharing came from Zipcar, in Cambridge, MA. The idea for this car sharing service was based on the business model of German and Swiss companies which already offered it. Zipcar owns a fleet of vehicles which are scattered around major cities in designated locations, and members can reserve these cars for anywhere from an hour to seven days. Simply sign up, pick up a wallet-sized Zipcard at a local Zipcar office, then tap your card to the reserved car’s transponder to unlock it and start your adventure. It’s like having your own car, without needing to find parking. After catching on in Boston, Zipcar quickly spread to nearby cities such as Washington, D.C., New York, and Toronto. Today, the company counts about 10,000 vehicles in its fleet and nearly a million members across the globe.

THE UBER EFFECT Not just taxi fares are falling as a result of ride-sharing—drunk driving accidents have declined as well, with an estimated 60 fewer alcohol-fueled crashes each month since its inception. (MADD— Mothers Against Drunk Driving)

Uber started nine years ago in (where else?) Silicon Valley—the brainchild of two software entrepreneurs. It’s an objectively great idea, and as all of them are, it’s blindingly simple. Uber turns regular drivers into taxi drivers. Anyone who owns a car, has a clean driving history, and passes the company’s certification testing can become a part-time driver. Passengers need only open the Uber app on their phone, request a certain type of car (SUV, black, taxi, or regular sedan), and await their chariot. The first few times you jump into the back of a strange car with no taxi-like markings (save for the Uber decal on the window), it’s a bit odd. But you get used to it very quickly. NEW ON THE SCENE Of course, with great ideas come copycats. One of the most successful Zipcar impersonators is car2Go , a mainly European-based operation that offers oneway point-to-point car rentals and charges by time. There are already a few interesting wrinkles here to differentiate it from Zipcar. Users don’t have to return the cars to a designated location (car2Go’s mobile app allows users to find their cars wherever they’re parked), and the time aspect encourages short trips (though hourly and daily rates are also available). The other difference? car2Go only offers one type of car: the Smart Fortwo. Yes, those tiny things that look like someone chopped off the back half of a normal sedan. All of these distinctions make car2Go a great choice for city dwellers in need of quick wheels, and it shows: they’re the largest car sharing company in the world, with over a million members.

Dr. Michael Petchauer, DC, agrees. He has spent the last 35 years trying to dismantle the influence big pharma has on patients who receive their education through the media. “We’ve been told what foods are good and bad,” he says. “When we realize we still aren’t healthy, we consult a doctor, and often the solution is a drug aimed at forcing a ‘fix’ that stops symptoms rather than discovering the underlying cause.”

So Zipcar and car2Go own their cars, and Uber and Lyft drivers own theirs as well, but you don’t get to drive them. Do you see the hole that’s left here? Because a lot of companies have.

During football season, when many of us are plunked on the couch for three (or six, or nine) hours at a time,

Conor MacNeill is a fine art travel and destination photographer who specializes in landscape, cityscape, and astrophotography.

The overarching benefit with all of these car services is environmental. With fewer people driving alone (thanks to Uber and Lyft) and cleaner cars on the road (thanks to car2go), it’s a small step towards reducing our collective greenhouse gas emissions.

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Functional medicine is the science-based, natural way to become healthy.

don’t get blindsided “Cholesterol” has become a health buzzword. Most people know that there are two kinds—the “good” cholesterol (high-density lipoprotein, or HDL) and the bad (low-density lipoprotein: LDL). If you’re using margarine instead of butter, drinking low-fat milk instead of whole milk, or getting the disapproving eye from your wife as you dig into that crispy fried chicken, you’ve been influenced by the “diet/heart hypothesis.” So says Jennifer Elliott, dietitian and author of Baby Boomers, Bellies & Blood Sugars. You may think your decisions lower the risk of heart disease, but these choices have “never been proven to be beneficial,” says Elliot (Food and Nutrition Sciences, 2014).

Enter Getaround, Turo, and JustShareIt (among others). All of these services work the same way— they allow private car owners to rent out their cars to people who need a set of wheels. Owners using these services can set their own prices, and commissions vary (Getaround users earn 60% of the rental price, JustShareIt owners retain 80% commission). Turo (formerly RelayRides) targets longer term journeys of several days, Getaround allows users to rent by the hour, day, or week, and JustShareIt allows hourly and daily rates.

As well as aiming to visit and photograph every country in his lifetime, Conor leads photography expeditions and teaches workshops around the globe.

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I TA L I A N E L E G A N C E , N E A P O L I TA N I R R E V E R E N C E

Gianluca Isaia

WHERE TO FIND IT

Visit thefella.com for more information and to view more of Conor's photographs.

Left: Awe-inspiring Lofoten archipelago in the Norwegian Sea once tied for third on National Geographic’s list of the top-rated islands in the world for environmental sustainability. Despite the area’s picturesque little fishing villages, it has dodged excessive tourism partly because its chilly climate (thankfully) isn’t so appealing to beach-loving vacationers.

it can sometimes seem like we’re watching a string of

Above: If you look up the famed Arashiyama Bamboo Grove in Kyoto, Japan in The Lonely Planet, you’ll learn that strolling through the grove is like stepping into another world. You’ll also read that, “You’ll be unable to resist trying to take a few photos, but you might be disappointed with the results: photos just can’t capture the magic of this place.” Gazing at Conor’s image shown here, we beg to differ.

commercials interrupted by the occasional touchdown. Those ads fall into a few main categories: cars, insurance, beer, and—ahem—the little blue pill. These companies clearly know their audience. And there’s one other industry that makes a killing with this strategic placement: medications to lower cholesterol.

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The current medical view on cholesterol is that a high-fat diet increases plaque buildup, putting us at an increased risk of coronary vascular disease. Two studies in the 1940s and 1950s, the Framingham Heart Study and the Seven Countries Study, cemented the belief among doctors. In response, they began prescribing that familiar diet: low-fat, high-carb. When that alone didn’t make a difference, big pharma swooped in. Lipitor, Crestor, Zocor. Today sales of cholesterol drugs are in the tens of billions of dollars. Yet, heart disease still ranks as the leading cause of death in the United States (cdc.gov). Drugs don’t seem to be fixing the problem. Considering the possible side effects—muscle soreness, liver damage, links to neurological problems (including Alzheimer’s), and increased blood sugar levels—the “cure” could be doing more damage than good (mayoclinic.org).

GOOD

The point here is that people are increasingly realizing that they don’t need to own the item that helps them accomplish their goal—they just need to accomplish their goal. Hanging a picture? You don’t need a drill. You need a hole in the wall.

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T H E G O O D, T H E B A D, A N D T H E N O T - S O - U G LY T R U T H

The taxi replacements have come out in force, as well. Uber’s main competitor is Lyft, started in 2012 as a subsidiary of Zimride, a long-distance ride sharing platform for folks traveling between cities. Lyft soon took off on its own, as many consumers started to see it as a more affordable, more approachable version of Uber (Uber’s sleek app and spotless fleet was originally marketed as “Everyone’s private driver”). Lyft’s original calling card was the presence of a gaudy pink moustache affixed to the grill of every car, which they’ve since done away with. Still, the general consensus remains that a Lyft ride is a bit less expensive overall, though these results vary based on where you’re riding. The two companies operate virtually identical business models—the McDonald’s and Burger King of ride sharing services.

(HDL) HIGH-DENSITY LIPOPROTEIN

Considered the “good” protein, HDL is a heart plaque that transports fat around the body. This is not the plaque that causes heart attacks.

BAD

Zipcar’s benefits are obvious—namely, that you’re the pilot of your journey, rather than the passenger. But what if you’re in an unfamiliar city, have trouble navigating and driving at the same time, or are a bit— ahem—impaired for one reason or another? That’s where the ride-sharing services come in. And chief among them is the oldest and best-known: Uber.

sharing in the 21st century In the old days, if you needed a cup of milk or a handful of nails or something else quintessentially 1950s suburban America, you’d knock on your neighbor’s door. That was sharing. Now, thanks to enterprising entrepreneurs, we have an entire “sharing economy”—a network of services connecting the haves with the have-nots in an agreement that (generally) works out for all involved.

Cholesterol Concerns

CONOR MACNEILL

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(LDL) LO W - D E N S I T Y LIPOPROTEIN

Considered the “bad” protein because it forms a soft plaque on the arteries, LDL actually offers benefits to the body, including building healthy muscle. A recent study by the American College of Cardiology suggested low LDL levels influenced the development of cancer (ACC 61 st Annual Scientific Session; March 2012).

fumbling the facts “If your premise is wrong, your solution is going to be wrong,” says Dr. Petchauer. “By 1992, low LDL numbers and the low cholesterol diet was the dogma,” explains Dr. Petchauer. Nobody was educating the public on the importance of cholesterol. Without the correct levels, the body doesn’t function properly. In fact, though the liver eliminates excess cholesterol out of the body through bile, it will produce LDL cholesterol if the body doesn’t ingest sufficient amounts.

C R E S TO R C R E S T I N G Now that a generic form of Lipitor is available, Crestor is the most popular branded cholesterol drug. Yearly sales exceed $6 billion (fiercepharma.com).

The ISAIA brand holds true to its roots with inimitable style, plenty of class, and a touch of rebellious individuality that sets the wearer apart from the masses.

“So people are on a low-cholesterol diet and the liver begins producing cholesterol because it’s essential to our cells,” says Dr. Petchauer. “Doctors respond by prescribing a statin medication to block the enzyme that produces cholesterol. But it also blocks Coenzyme Q10, an enzyme that makes energy to grow and repair cells.” It’s a case of not seeing the forest for the trees. Or, perhaps more accurately, razing the entire forest because one species of tree has a disease.

With flagship stores in Milan, Capri, Beverly Hills, New York, and Japan as well as franchise shops in Russia, Azerbaijan, Ukraine, and China, ISAIA is a leading line of menswear. Combining hand-craftsmanship and fashionforward style with innovative, luxurious fabrics, the storied company creates sophisticated silhouettes to appeal to “The Modern Gentleman.”

huddle up From his office in Holland, Michigan, Dr. Petchauer educates patients on the benefits of chiropractic health, nutrition, and functional medicine. Functional medicine is the science-based, natural way to become healthy. Getting on his patient list isn’t as easy. Patients must fill out a 30-page questionnaire and complete two blood tests before even being granted a sit-down with the man himself. During the first meeting Dr. Petchauer’s goal is nothing less than to dramatically shift their paradigm on how they recognize and treat their health problems. “We are a medically minded society,” he explains. “It takes a lot of talking and explaining to break down what is essentially propaganda. Culturally, we believe the role of medicine is to treat visible symptoms. But to achieve health, we need to investigate why we have the symptoms.”

At the helm is Gianluca Isaia, who was raised in the business, learning his family trade from the ground up—literally— roaming the factory floors as a child in Napoli and working in London with one of the company’s top clients as a young man. Now as president and CEO of ISAIA, he has brought a style that is contemporary, yet playfully sensuous, resulting in a “Modern Sartorial” success with the ethos of “luxury with a meaning.”

S AY Y E S TO T H E YO L K The reign of the egg-white omelette is over…yolks are in again! See our feature on EGGS and their health benefits on page 50.

BENEFITS OF CHOLESTEROL

Helps the body process vitamin D

WHERE TO FIND IT

Allows the body to manufacture hormones

isaia.it

Repairs damaged cells

Beverly Hills ISAIA 9527 Brighton Way

Acts as an antioxidant

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Double breasted, peak lapel jacket. Wool/Delain silk. 100% cotton shirt.

Images courtesy ISAIA

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Home of the Future

THE HOUSING RE VOLUTION IS HERE…AND IT ’S SMART Well, we made it. We’re in the future. At least, the year 2016 certainly sounds like the future, and many science fiction stories (Back to the Future Pt. 2, 2001: A Space Odyssey, Escape from L.A.) were set in “futures” that have already come and gone. Yes, it’s the future, and several of our long-held fantasies are reality. We can watch sports on our phones, buy flying cameras, and control our home televisions from our work computers. It’s a brave new world.

IN THE FEBRUARY 1952 ISSUE OF GAL AX Y MAGA ZINE, Robert Heinlen, the “dean of science fiction,” offered up a series of predictions for the year 2000. He nailed the smartphone, and he was way off, sadly, on our ability to eliminate cancer. But one point of his is particularly interesting in light of the current state of technology: “In 15 years the housing shortage will be solved by a ‘breakthrough’ into new technologies which will make every house now standing as obsolete as privies.” Well, 15 years from Heinlein’s prediction deadline brings us to last year. And while every house now standing isn’t as obsolete as an outhouse with a crescent-moon door cutout, there are some extremely interesting breakthroughs in the home technology sector.

history of home automation

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As remote controls became the norm in more and more areas of life, the idea of a fully automated home gained steam. In 1984, the American Association of Housebuilders first used the term “smart house.” Then, with the explosion of the internet, the smart home industry really took off, to the tune of 1.8 million home automation systems installed in 2012 and an astonishing 12 million expected to be installed this year.

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World's Fair Smart House Exhibitions

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wife normally did around the house. To the chagrin of busy women nationwide, he never sold the idea to a manufacturer.

Before talking about the future, though, we have to know how we got here. And while it may seem like the automated home only came into vogue with the seminal 1999 Disney Channel original movie Smart House, the concept has been around a lot longer. Exhibitions at the World’s Fair in 1934 and then again in 1965 offered some glimpses of what was to come, and in 1966 an engineer for Westinghouse Electric, Jim Sutherland, created what was essentially a player piano for household chores. He named it the Electronic Computing Home Operator (or ECHO), and it was designed to take over the work that his

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World's Fair Smart House Exhibitions

Invention of the Electronic Computing Home Operator, later featured in Popular Mechanics

The term "smart house" came into use

Disney Channel movie 1.8 million home automation systems Smart House installed


HB | TECH

H O M E A U T O M AT I O N B LO WS U P The global home automation market may be as high as $36 million this year, up from $17 million in previous years. Experts believe a typical home could contain over 500 smart objects by 2022.

automation explained Lest you think that every home automation project needs to be on par with Bill Gates’ legendary home (where sensors adjust every room’s light, temperature, music, and artwork to your preference), think about this: you probably already have a few smart objects in your house. Most newer televisions can connect to the internet, intelligent thermostats are anticipating our arrival home from work, and that personal fitness tracker you wear counts the steps to the laundry room just as well as it does those on a treadmill. The technical term for intelligent home technology is “domotics” —a combination of the Latin word for home (domus) and current English terms like informatics and robotics. And while many houses these days contain only a few smart objects, there are some that go well beyond this threshold. Inside the Smart Home, compiled and edited by Richard Harper, proposes five classes of smart homes, ranging from those containing smart objects to socalled “attentive homes” which log the activity and location of people and objects related to the home in order to anticipate their needs.

savant

Taken the wrong way, it sounds kind of creepy. But once you see the possibilities—and the stats—you might want to think about smartening up your home.

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popular smart devices Many homes won’t be ready to go fully automated at this point (but if yours is, feel free to skip down to the next section). The barrier to entry in the smart home device market is pretty low, particularly if you want to intelligently heat and cool your home.

nest Another reliable and interesting option on the thermostat front is the Zen Thermostat. It’s not smart in the way the Nest is, in that it won’t learn your preferences and self-adjust to fit them. But this can be a blessing in disguise, as Nest’s learning algorithm may frustrate some users who want more control in their home’s temperature. If you don’t have a full home automation system, the Zen can be used just like a regular thermostat, and its lack of wiring (running on 4 included AA batteries) makes installation a snap. For those with home automation systems, Zen can connect to SwannOne and is OpenHome certified. zenthermostat.com, $199

Perhaps the most popular smart home device is the Nest Learning Thermostat, which was introduced in 2011 as one of the first of its kind. The Nest connects to your home’s Wi-Fi network and can be programmed to “learn” a variety of different settings for your home. Want the heat to turn on at 6:30 AM so your feet don’t get cold in the morning, and then shut off when you leave for work? The Nest has you covered. It can also turn itself down when it detects no one is home, and shows you a leaf icon when you’ve chosen a temperature that’s energy-efficient. It’s a sleek little device, too, mimicking the shape and look of a traditional home thermostat but with an upscale tech aesthetic. But that’s to be expected, as the company was formed by two former Apple engineers. The Nest is compatible with most home automation systems and is OpenHome certified, meaning it will connect with any other device or system bearing the same certification (which is most of them). store.nest.com, $249

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HB | TECH

quirky aros

HOME IS WHERE T H E WA L L E T I S Automated thermostats save homeowners an average of 15% on monthly energy costs. This works out to $16.50 per month, or nearly $200 per year.

Smart heating devices are all well and good, but what if you just want to chill? Fortunately, the Quirky Aros smart air conditioner has your back. Rather than blasting the A/C on freezing cold right when you get home (the least energy-efficient method), pull up Quirky’s mobile app and start the airflow whenever you want, at whatever temperature suits you… or let the unit learn your schedule and usage tendencies to keep your home perfectly cool whenever you’re there. quirky.com, $205

Of course, you can’t talk about smart home devices without mentioning security. Looking for locks? Try the Kwikset Smartcode 916. It allows you to use your old house keys if you want, but also presents a number pad above the keyhole which can be programmed with a password and connects through the communication protocol Zigbee (which the Zen thermostat also uses) to many automation systems. Two cool features here: the lock requires two random digits to be entered before your password, so potential bandits can’t guess your password from fingerprint smudges. And it has an alarm if someone does try to bust in. kwikset.com, $217 If you happen to be home while these wouldbe burglars are flummoxed by your lock, keep tabs on them (and the rest of your home) with Samsung SmartCam cameras. Sporting both an indoor and outdoor model, Samsung’s cameras offer several days of offline video storage through microSD cards, and are fully integratable with Samsung’s SmartThings home automation hub. samsungsmartcam.com, $190

smartcode 916

And finally, total home security instills peace of mind, and nothing says peace of mind like a smart, extremely sensitive smoke and carbon monoxide detector. The First Alert 2-in-1 Z-Wave Smoke and Carbon Monoxide Alarm has a long name but a short purpose: it will tell you when it detects smoke or CO, no matter where you are. It can also connect to other smart devices using Z-Wave, another home automation protocol that many devices follow, and can alert you when its battery begins to die. firstalert.com, $40

smartcam

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popular home automation systems

So, you’ve got the lowdown on devices. But how do you get them to play nice with one another? There are a variety of methods, but almost all start with buying a home automation hub. These hubs allow devices to connect to each other, whether they use Zigbee, Z-Wave, Bluetooth LE, or one of the many other communication protocols. A lot of companies that have already gained a foothold in your home are betting they can parlay that into a full automation job. Major cable providers like Comcast, Cox, and Time Warner Cable have rolled out home automation suites that include everything from security to video monitoring to lighting and thermostat control. These are an interesting option if you already receive TV, internet, and phone from a company and want to keep everything streamlined. Plus, you can usually get a good deal out of these guys by bundling a home automation suite with your already existing package. If you’re ready to move into the new world of home automation without the aid of Big Cable, there are myriad other options out there. A few of the best are below.

If you worship at the altar of Steve Jobs and your wardrobe contains nothing but black turtlenecks, we suggest Savant. An Apple-friendly automation system that offers the same features as many other suites, Savant separates itself by unapologetically preferring the Steve Jobs way to any other. Savant differs from Apple’s own automation hub, Apple HomeKit, by integrating with a much wider array of devices and communication protocols. The price isn’t for the faint of heart, and the company’s website fairly brags about its status as the “home automation brand of choice for the world’s most luxurious homes, castles, and yachts.” Castles. There’s a word you don’t see too often in your day-to-day internet shopping. Though you can integrate hundreds of disparate devices,

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For those unwilling to Apple-fy their homes, Samsung comes in with high marks in this category as well. Their Samsung SmartThings hub is compatible with a multitude of different communication protocols and can integrate with IFTTT, a capability that allows any connected device to be programmed with simple “if this, then that” statements. For example, if your smart thermostat is compatible with IFTTT (pronounced “ift”), then you can program operations like “If The Weather Channel app shows a temperature above 80, set the house temperature to 70.” You can control the whole thing from your mobile device (provided you’re connected to the internet), and it integrates with the Apple Watch and the Amazon Echo smart speaker. Pretty nifty. smartthings.com, $99 A higher-end option comes in the form of Control4, a complete home automation system that can connect hundreds of devices across your property. The Control4 boasts the highestperforming controller in its class, and allows users to effortlessly distribute entertainment throughout the home and control pretty much anything else, from window shades to door locks to security cameras. And did we mention you can do all this from anywhere in the world, provided you have your mobile device? Yeah, pretty sweet. All this power comes with a price, but we think the tag is worth it. control4.com, $600

savant

and the requisite app is available in the Android store, everything from Savant’s integration with Apple TV to its sleek, understated hub device reflects the California tech giant. And if we know Apple people, we’re betting that’s just fine with them. savant.com, $10,000

control4 In addition to connecting with your own mobile device, Control4 is introducing the 10” Control4 Tabletop Touch Screen with HD video intercom and bold, high-resolution graphics.


HB | TECH A N D M A N Y ( S O M E W H AT ) HAPPY CUSTOMERS A home automation system, or even one of those newfangled self-adjusting thermostats, isn’t something that most people buy on a whim. Word of mouth recommendations are the most trusted source a consumer considers when purchasing a product, and some of these systems and devices stand up to scrutiny better than others. Receiving high marks across the board is the Amazon Echo voiceactivated speaker. This slim cylinder is a lot more than a hub to blast the new Kanye album. It connects via Bluetooth to a host of other smart gadgets, devices, and systems, and you can ask Alexa, the speaker’s “personality,” to do just about anything: check the weather, set a timer, turn your lights off, play an audiobook…the list goes on. CNet and PC Mag gave the Echo four out of five stars, and perhaps most important was PC Mag’s bottom line: “Entirely fun to use.” amazon.com/echo, $180 For lighting your home, the consensus is to stick with the industry power of Phillips. The Phillips Hue family of smart lightbulbs gives consumers the option for color-changing lights or standard whites. The white bulbs retail for $30, while the color-changers go for double that. But whichever you choose, the technology behind them remains exceptional—IFTTT integration means you can program the lights to react to other goings-on in the house and environment, the control app works on all smart devices including many watches, and you can even select the light’s hue based on individual colors from images on your phone. Both

Wareable and PC Mag mark the Hue at the top of their lightbulb list. meethue.com, $30 One product that might not be up to snuff? Surprisingly, we return to Nest. This busy little device tries its hardest to make sure you never have to think about your home’s temperature, but some users are finding out there’s a limit to how far home automation should go. Consumer Reports mentions Nest’s habit of shutting down the heating system after receiving automatic software updates, with users returning to frozen homes. The tech review site called Darwin’s Den butters Nest up to start, using terms like “aesthetically pleasing” and “elegant,” and describes its physical interface as “like a piece of jewelry.” However, the other shoe drops as they mention Nest’s 60-minute interval minimum when using the device, making it actually use more energy to heat or cool your home than you might need. C AU S E F O R CO N C E R N With all of this technology, of course, comes the possibility of a data breach. Hackers can target a smart home (or device) just as easily as they can a home computer, and the results may be more than what you’d expect. For example, imagine a hacker breaks into your Nest thermostat, a feat which one presenter in a Black Hat learning session accomplished in 15 seconds. That person now has way more power than the ability to crank up your heating bill. He or she knows exactly when people in the house are home or away, and awake or asleep. Your daily schedule is completely

transparent, opening you up to potential break-ins. Another chilling thought is the potential for hackers to gain control of your smart security system. Rather than the traditional rock-throughthe-window method, imagine a hacker remotely unlocking your front door and strolling right in while your family is on vacation. Not good, right? In addition, hackers could lock you out of your smart TV, wreak havoc with your lighting and sound systems, and generally disrupt your life through many of the devices that are specially designed to simplify it. Want to avoid this? Of course you do. And there are a few steps you can take. First, invest in a wireless router with a good security track record, make sure you have a difficult-to-guess password, and keep the router fully updated. These last two points extend to any smart devices you may have as well— it’s important to make them as difficult to hack as possible, and that starts with passwords and software updates. Name your wireless network something obscure and impersonal—a string of letters and numbers would work, provided they’re random. Or get creative. Maybe hackers won’t come snooping around a network named “Carlo’s Pizza.” You

should also think about installing a firewall and/or UTM (Unified Threat Management) appliance, both of which will tighten up security or, at the very least, alert you when there’s a breach. THE FUTURE LO O K S S M A R T If we’ve piqued your interest with some of these devices or ideas, and you fire up your internetconnected device of choice to do some independent investigation, you’ll notice one commonality. In nearly every positive review of a smart device or system, the author will mention that they didn’t know they wanted this ability until they had it. In fact, some go so far as to say they couldn’t have imagined trying it, and now they can’t live without it. Of course, a glance at the other side of the coin reveals a few different arguments, the first being that we’re becoming lazier as a culture. Why do we need automated sprinklers and self-regulating thermostats? The world has gotten along fine without them, and they’re only turning us into couch potatoes. Or, conversely, what if the home becomes too technical, and your whole day is spent running from one device to the next, updating, securing, adjusting, and tinkering? Sometimes the simplest solution is the best.

However, it’s an undeniably inviting proposition: on a freezing cold day you return to a cozy home with your favorite song playing, the lights keyed to soothing colors, secure in the knowledge that your abode was locked, monitored, and warmed up in the most efficient way possible. After all, we are in the future—why not live like it? HOMME BLEU

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The Sharing Economy

O N E P E R S O N ' S S TA S H I S A N O T H E R ' S T R E A S U R E

sharing in the 21st century In the old days, if you needed a cup of milk or a handful of nails or something else quintessentially 1950s suburban America, you’d knock on your neighbor’s door. That was sharing. Now, thanks to enterprising entrepreneurs, we have an entire “sharing economy”—a network of services connecting the haves with the have-nots in an agreement that (generally) works out for all involved. The point here is that people are increasingly realizing that they don’t need to own the item that helps them accomplish their goal—they just need to accomplish their goal. Hanging a picture? You don’t need a drill. You need a hole in the wall.

I N T H E H I E R A R C H Y O F WAY S T H AT T H E I N T E R N E T HAS IMPROVED OUR LIVES,

your mind probably jumps immediately to things like communication, commerce, banking, and navigation. And it’s true that it’s become easier to stay (or get) in touch with people the world over, buy (and sell) almost anything, and find your way around pretty much anywhere using just your phone. But yet another way that the web has taken us out of the dark ages is in the concept of sharing. Your kindergarten teacher probably taught you that sharing was caring (and it could be fun). And in the past decade or so, through services like Airbnb, Uber, Lending Club, and others, the internet has allowed tech companies to expand this cup-of-sugar mentality into a variety of previously untapped marketplaces.

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transportation revolution The best place to start any discussion of this brave new world is with the transportation industry, as it’s by far the hottest. It seems like every week another app or service pops up to help you get from point A to point B faster than its competitors. Let’s take a look at some of the first movers and the innovators. FIRST ON THE ROAD The first major breakthrough in the concept of car sharing came from Zipcar, in Cambridge, MA. The idea for this car sharing service was based on the business model of German and Swiss companies which already offered it. Zipcar owns a fleet of vehicles which are scattered around major cities in designated locations, and members can reserve these cars for anywhere from an hour to seven days. Simply sign up, pick up a wallet-sized Zipcard at a local Zipcar office, then tap your card to the reserved car’s transponder to unlock it and start your adventure. It’s like having your own car, without needing to find parking. After catching on in Boston, Zipcar quickly spread to nearby cities such as Washington, D.C., New York, and Toronto. Today, the company counts about 10,000 vehicles in its fleet and nearly a million members across the globe.


HB | LIFE STYLE

Zipcar’s benefits are obvious—namely, that you’re the pilot of your journey, rather than the passenger. But what if you’re in an unfamiliar city, have trouble navigating and driving at the same time, or are a bit— ahem—impaired for one reason or another? That’s where the ride-sharing services come in. And chief among them is the oldest and best-known: Uber. THE UBER EFFECT Not just taxi fares are falling as a result of ride-sharing—drunk driving accidents have declined as well, with an estimated 60 fewer alcohol-fueled crashes each month since its inception. (MADD— Mothers Against Drunk Driving)

Uber started nine years ago in (where else?) Silicon Valley—the brainchild of two software entrepreneurs. It’s an objectively great idea, and as all of them are, it’s blindingly simple. Uber turns regular drivers into taxi drivers. Anyone who owns a car, has a clean driving history, and passes the company’s certification testing can become a part-time driver. Passengers need only open the Uber app on their phone, request a certain type of car (SUV, black, taxi, or regular sedan), and await their chariot. The first few times you jump into the back of a strange car with no taxi-like markings (save for the Uber decal on the window), it’s a bit odd. But you get used to it very quickly. NEW ON THE SCENE Of course, with great ideas come copycats. One of the most successful Zipcar impersonators is car2Go , a mainly European-based operation that offers oneway point-to-point car rentals and charges by time. There are already a few interesting wrinkles here to differentiate it from Zipcar. Users don’t have to return the cars to a designated location (car2Go’s mobile app allows users to find their cars wherever they’re parked), and the time aspect encourages short trips (though hourly and daily rates are also available). The other difference? car2Go only offers one type of car: the Smart Fortwo. Yes, those tiny things that look like someone chopped off the back half of a normal sedan. All of these distinctions make car2Go a great choice for city dwellers in need of quick wheels, and it shows: they’re the largest car sharing company in the world, with over a million members.

The taxi replacements have come out in force, as well. Uber’s main competitor is Lyft, started in 2012 as a subsidiary of Zimride, a long-distance ride sharing platform for folks traveling between cities. Lyft soon took off on its own, as many consumers started to see it as a more affordable, more approachable version of Uber (Uber’s sleek app and spotless fleet was originally marketed as “Everyone’s private driver”). Lyft’s original calling card was the presence of a gaudy pink moustache affixed to the grill of every car, which they’ve since done away with. Still, the general consensus remains that a Lyft ride is a bit less expensive overall, though these results vary based on where you’re riding. The two companies operate virtually identical business models—the McDonald’s and Burger King of ride sharing services. So Zipcar and car2Go own their cars, and Uber and Lyft drivers own theirs as well, but you don’t get to drive them. Do you see the hole that’s left here? Because a lot of companies have.

Enter Getaround, Turo, and JustShareIt (among others). All of these services work the same way— they allow private car owners to rent out their cars to people who need a set of wheels. Owners using these services can set their own prices, and commissions vary (Getaround users earn 60% of the rental price, JustShareIt owners retain 80% commission). Turo (formerly RelayRides) targets longer term journeys of several days, Getaround allows users to rent by the hour, day, or week, and JustShareIt allows hourly and daily rates. The overarching benefit with all of these car services is environmental. With fewer people driving alone (thanks to Uber and Lyft) and cleaner cars on the road (thanks to car2go), it’s a small step towards reducing our collective greenhouse gas emissions.

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more than just cars

NetJets owns the largest fleet of private jets in the world.

The sharing economy is reaching its tentacles into nearly every avenue of transportation. And speaking of tentacles, your best bet to see some (outside of a calamari plate) is probably to utilize one of several peer-to-peer boat rental companies that have popped up recently. There are a variety of services in this space: Boatbound, Boatsetter, GetMyBoat… you get the idea. The benefits for the renter here are fairly evident—you get all the perks of having a boat without, you know, having to actually own a boat. That means no taxes, no repairs, no mooring fees, no winterization, and the list goes on. Visitors to an exotic

locale who want to see it from the water will have that chance, and prospective boat owners can try a similar model before buying it. Scouring these rental sites will bring up an incredible array of options, from small pleasure boats to take out with a few friends to opulent luxury yachts to charter for a stunning anniversary celebration. And for the boat owners, the draw is obvious—you can’t be out on the water every day, so why not make some money while you’re landlocked? So far, everything we’ve discussed has been pretty local. Sure, you can rent a car through a sharing service and go on a bit of a road

trip. But if you want to go farther, faster, and higher, you need to take advantage of the coolest niche in the transportation sharing economy: private jets. Yes, the once inaccessible world of private airplane travel has gone generous, with services like NetJets and JetSmarter leading the pack. These two are slightly different, but both offer opportunities to a wider customer base than ever before. NetJets (which was actually started all the way back in 1964 as Executive Jet Aviation) owns the largest fleet of private jets in the world (over 650) and members pay a fee for “fractional ownership” of the jets. Then, depending on how much a member pays, they’re granted between 50 and 400 hours of flight time per year on the type of jet of their choice. It’s a bit like the ZipCar of the skies. JetSmarter is different: it allows members to hitch rides on charter jets in their area, and book trips through a mobile app. The idea here is that all private jets can’t be in service at all times, and folks looking for an upscale, private flight experience can take advantage of this downtime. In that way, it’s similar to the previously discussed boat-rental services.

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home away from home It’s almost unthinkable that we’ve gotten this far without discussing what’s perhaps the biggest new trend with the sharing economy: home rentals. Services like Airbnb,

Homeaway, Home to Go, and VRBO allow anyone to put their property on the market for rental. It’s a far cry from the ski lodges your parents used to rent for a weekend (although those are available, too). AIRBNB averages nearly 425,000 guests per night, 22% more than Hilton Worldwide

SHARING OPINIONS

44% of U.S. adults are familiar with the term “sharing economy” 19% of U.S. adults have engaged in a sharing economy transaction 86% of those familiar agree it makes life more affordable 83% agree it makes life more convenient and efficient 76% agree it’s better for the environment

A GROWING TREND

Airbnb’s valuation of $13B exceeds that of Hyatt and Wyndham Uber’s February 2015 valuation of $41.2B exceeds the market capitalization of Delta, United, and American Airlines Global investment in sharing start-ups was $300M in 2010 and $6B in 2014 The consumer peer-to-peer rental market as a whole is worth $26B

The clear leader here is Airbnb, which is ubiquitous around the world with over 1.5 million listings in 190 countries. You can rent everything from a three-bedroom flat in downtown Edinburgh to a one-room cottage in the woods in Maine—in fact, we’ve done both of those! The reservation system couldn’t be simpler, and the pros are obvious: no huge hotel bills, the freedom to choose the kind of place that suits your needs, a sense that you’re actually part of the community you’re staying in rather than an outsider, and that indefinable sense of home that a hotel just can’t match. Homeaway and VRBO work almost identically, though their reach isn’t quite as big. We did stay at a gorgeous apartment in suburban San Juan for a week through VRBO, and the experience was every bit as

“There are some things that are irreplaceable... things that are deeply human that people want to participate in. So I think this is the beginning of a golden age.” —Brian Chesky, Airbnb CEO

good as Airbnb’s—down to the host’s excellent local restaurant recommendations. These are the benefits of this home-sharing idea: since you’re staying where someone else lives (or at least vacations), the hosts are often eager to point you in the direction of their favorite local restaurants and haunts, which adds a wonderful sense of intimacy to any far-flung locale. Just be sure to check the property’s images and reviews thoroughly before booking, and try to keep an open line of communication with your host in order to eliminate any surprises when you arrive.

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Think that’s all? Boy, are you wrong. TaskRabbit allows people to connect and find immediate help with virtually anything they need— cleaning, plumbing, electrical, moving, delivery… you get the picture. Neighborgoods is the same thing, but for stuff. It’s the actual modern equivalent of borrowing a cup of sugar (although with NG, you’ll need to bring the item back). Spinlister allows users to rent bikes, surfboards, snowboards, and all manner of extreme sports equipment. And to top it all off, Poshmark is a service that literally allows you to sell someone the shirt off your back (although, you know, maybe have an undershirt on or something).

share and share alike Of course, those are only the big players in this new world of sharing. If you’ve got a good or a service, chances are there’s an app or website where you can share it. Here are a few of our favorites. If you need cash, but don’t want to deal with bankers, try Lending Club. Founded in 2006, it’s the largest peer-to-peer lending site in the world, and has serviced nearly $16 billion in loans. It works somewhat like the ABC show Shark Tank: prospective borrowers enter details about themselves and their loan requests (between $1,000 and $35,000), and investors can peruse the field and choose which loans to invest in. In theory, everybody wins: borrowers get

their loans, investors make money from interest, and Lending Club charges service and origination fees. Unfortunately, the service can’t help you spend your borrowed money wisely, so don’t come crying if that “can’t-miss” business deal turns out to be a ruse. Ever been in dire need of internet access but nowhere close to a WiFi signal? Well, FON is trying to make sure that never happens again. It’s a service that allows users to share WiFi bandwidths with each other. So if someone is near your apartment or mobile hotspot and needs some bandwidth, you can toss them a line. And when you’re in their shoes, you’ll know someone else has your back.

pay it forward If you’re an optimist, this sharing revolution is one of the best possible offshoots of our larger internet revolution. It reveals the innate goodness and generosity of most people and encourages the kind of face-to-face interaction that many people say has been lost in our screen-based culture. Heck, based on the services listed here, you could probably show up in a new city with only the clothes on your back, a smartphone, and a credit card, and have nothing to worry about. The worrywarts among us will cite isolated incidents of scams being run, car-sharing services being sued, and homes being trashed. And yes, with great rentals comes great responsibility. There have been a few horror stories of homeowners renting their house for a weekend and returning to a disaster—whether it’s simply a mess or something much worse (Don’t Google “Airbnb NYC nightmare”). However, every service has its pros and cons, and even the most highly recommended traditional hotel or car service has its own hiccups. So while your Uber driver’s pad thai might have been sitting in the car a bit too long, or your Airbnb’s bedroom is painted a relaxing shade of electric green, most users have consistently positive experiences, and it’s likely you will too.

And if you’re worried about a few bad apples ruining an entire orchard, the best thing to do might be to get proactive! Become a sharer—of homes, cars, planes, internet, whatever—and keep this goodwill going. The internet is fast transitioning from the information superhighway to the sharing revolution. 12

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The Sarasota Studio A DIVISION OF DIMMITT AUTOMOTIVE GROUP

AN IMPRESSIVE SELECTION OF PERFORMANCE, LUXURY AND EXOTIC VEHICLES

The Sarasota Studio 1518 State Street Downtown Sarasota

Call 941.444.3510 for more information

www.TheSarasotaStudio.com HOMME BLEU

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Conrad Shawcross A M O D E R N D AY D A V I N C I ?

the early years Born in 1977 in London, Shawcross is the son of writers Marina Warner and William Shawcross. But instead of a love for literature, the young Shawcross had a preoccupation with “building towers and structures in my room and taking them apart.” His mother would later marry painter Johnny Dewe Mathews, whom he credits with teaching him to draw. Shawcross' childhood was filled with visits to art galleries and theaters, pilgrimages to Pompeii, and trips to historic churches to view frescoes and altarpieces.

the art student As a student at the Ruskin School of Art in Oxford, Shawcross was fascinated with the workings of his car, perhaps foreshadowing his future mechanical pieces. Despite this preoccupation, he earned his B.A. in Fine Arts and went on to graduate with a Master of Fine Arts from Slade School of Fine Art in London, where he famously turned his Ford Capri into sculpture, putting chairs, fishing rods, and a kite on top and dubbing it Investigation Bureau into the Location of the Soul.

the works

Portrait of Conrad Shawcross in his studio, 2015, photograph by Carolina Mazzolari

G I V E YO U R C H I L D B L O C K S A N D T H E F R E E D O M T O C R E AT E ,

and who knows, they might just become the next Conrad Shawcross. Heralded by some as a modern day Leonardo da Vinci, Shawcross turned his boyhood play into lifetime passion and is taking the contemporary art world by storm. The works of Conrad Shawcross combine artistry and engineering, poetry and physics, music and mathematics. His career as a contemporary sculptor has experienced a meteoric rise, with awards and commissions increasing in scale and scope. opposite page, from top: Conrad Shawcross, Three Perpetual Chords, 2015, courtesy of the artist Conrad Shawcross, rendering of The Optic Cloak, 2015, courtesy of the artist Conrad Shawcross, Dappled Light of the Sun, 2015, courtesy of the artist 14

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Shawcross first gained acclaim in 2004 with his work The Nervous System, exhibited at the Saatchi Gallery in London. The mechanical sculpture, which is comprised of cogs and pulleys, spins and creaks to continuously churn out colorful cord. The woven rope spills forth from the machine into a Technicolor twisted pile of ever growing coils of double helix-like strands. With Timepiece (2013), another vast mechanical work, Shawcross explores the perception of time, transforming the Camden Roundhouse into a solar clock, with revolving steel arms to mark the minutes and hours in light and shadow. His work continues to evolve, moving away from the mechanical, and into more static, diverse use of materials. The mathematics of music, aided by the harmonograph, transforms the ratios within harmonic chords to three dimensions in his sculpture, Manifold (2015)—“a picture of a chord falling into silence.” The visualization of music and mathematics, this time in cast iron, reveals itself in Shawcross’ Three Perpetual Chords. Selected for a commission in


HB | ART

Dulwich Park meant to honor an original sculpture by Barbara Hepworth, which was stolen from the park, Shawcross became interested in the “idea of entering into the sculpture, complete immersion. Children used it [Hepworth’s sculpture] as an object of play.” Of his series of three structures which now draws visitors to the park, Shawcross quipped, “It’s been incredibly well received by people under the age of seven. So it’s become like a total climbing frame sensation. If you get kids running toward something, you know you’ve done something right.” Shawcross’ most recent project has been his most ambitious to date, The Dappled Light of the Sun , which was installed in the courtyard of Britain’s Royal Academy of Arts last summer—he is now the youngest member of the prestigious institution. The enveloping steel structure, perched atop a series of tripods, is a feat of engineering, seeming to float above, somewhat improbably, like the canopies of trees. The resulting shadows give the piece its name. “We live in the shadows and will never be able to see the real tree,” says the artist.

what’s next Shawcross’ next epic undertaking will be The Optic Cloak—an immense installation that will rise almost 170 feet high, and more than 60 feet across—in London’s Greenwich Peninsula, to be completed this summer. Commissioned by Knight Dragon, a commercial developer, the work will be constructed from aluminum cladding with perforated triangular panels. The panels will form intricate geometric patterns, folding across the surface of a tower, and utilizing an optical phenomenon known as the moiré effect. By overlaying the perforations on each panel at varying angles to each other, it results in a surface that appears to be in constant change. This fusion of science and nature that Shawcross manages to capture on a grand scale will most certainly cement his stature as the future of contemporary sculpture.

DAPPLED LIGHT OF THE S U N S TAT S :

30,000 triangles (over 20 miles stretched end to end) 8,000 tetrahedrons 25 tons of steel 10 men labored 4 months welding installation took 4 full days & nights

Scan here to watch the video or visit femme-rouge.tv

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CONOR MACNEILL

Conor MacNeill is a fine art travel and destination photographer who specializes in landscape, cityscape, and astrophotography. As well as aiming to visit and photograph every country in his lifetime, Conor leads photography expeditions and teaches workshops around the globe.

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WHERE TO FIND IT

Visit thefella.com for more information and to view more of Conor's photographs.


HB | ART

Left: Awe-inspiring Lofoten archipelago in the Norwegian Sea once tied for third on National Geographic’s list of the top-rated islands in the world for environmental sustainability. Despite the area’s picturesque little fishing villages, it has dodged excessive tourism partly because its chilly climate (thankfully) isn’t so appealing to beach-loving vacationers.

Above: If you look up the famed Arashiyama Bamboo Grove in Kyoto, Japan in The Lonely Planet, you’ll learn that strolling through the grove is like stepping into another world. You’ll also read that, “You’ll be unable to resist trying to take a few photos, but you might be disappointed with the results: photos just can’t capture the magic of this place.” Gazing at Conor’s image shown here, we beg to differ.

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Bagan is an ancient city in central Myanmar (formerly Burma) dating to the early second century B.C. While ghostly remnants of over 2,000 Buddhist temples, pagodas, and monasteries can still be found there, records indicate that more than 10,000 once stood on this 38 square mile plain. Today, only a few dozen of the remaining thousands are maintained on a regular basis.

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It appears that the best way to experience Petra, a historical and archaeological city in the southern Jordanian governorate of Ma'an, is with the moon and stars and hundreds of flickering candles lighting the way. “Petra by Night” is one of the region’s most popular tourist treks, truly showcasing the Rose City, as its known, thanks to the ruddy hue of the stone out of which it is carved.

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7 SMART STEPS TO

Retirement Planning Here are some thoughtful tips to help you build your retirement nest egg logically and methodically. And all without causing too much strain and stress along the way. The key is to start planning early, in order to save yourself anxiety later. You don’t want to get caught in your retirement years without the funds to live the life you always dreamed of having.

1 . ACT NOW Regarding retirement planning, don’t wait until the end of the year to set funds aside. Make a conscious effort to pay into your retirement plan monthly. What they say is true: it’s never too soon to start! Making smaller, monthly (or even quarterly) contributions also lessens the impact, rather than getting hit with one lump sum come December. 2 . GREAT BENEFIT Join in any existing retirement plans at your place of work, especially where there is employer participation. If the opportunity is available to you, it’s best to take it. The contributions can be made directly from your paycheck as a percentage of your weekly salary, or in some cases you can specify the exact dollar amount that should be deducted. 3 . MIND YOUR OWN BUSINESS Start a retirement account now if you are self-employed. Being your own boss is great, but you need to think ahead and look out for yourself. One of the best vehicles

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for this is an SEP (Simplified Employee Pension). At the very least, open up a traditional IRA if permitted. The sooner the money goes in, the sooner the earnings are tax deferred. If you are over 50 and are selfemployed with no employees, consider forming a defined benefit plan. In this case, pension

payments are calculated based on length of service and the salary you are earning at the point of retirement. This will allow for much more in deductible contributions than any other vehicle. 4 . LOW RISK Be conservative with retirement investments. It’s a delicate balance. You want your money to have high potential for growth over time—so the stock market seems like a smart

It may feel like a long road to retirement. What should you be doing NOW?


HB | FINANCIAL

RETIREMENT RANGE In 2015, the U.S. Census Bureau reported that the average retirement age among Americans is 62. That number has slowly increased over the years, as has the age at which younger folks expect to retire (from age 60 in 1995 to age 66 last year).

choice. But that can also be scary because the market is so volatile. On the other hand, you worry that socking funds away in the bank won’t help you feather that nest egg very much. High-quality bonds, like treasury bonds, are a solid choice in mitigating risk. Also, watch and monitor your assets at least six times a year. Remember, it is not a problem to harvest gains since there are no tax ramifications with a retirement account. 5 . YOUR HEIRS Check your designated beneficiaries with the institution investing your funds every couple of years. Beneficiaries change as life changes—new marriages, divorce, the birth of a grandchild. You want to be certain that your money lands in the hands of those intended. Institutions are loaded with paperwork, and it’s possible that yours gets lost in the shuffle…or does not get updated properly. Regularly monitoring this information is essential.

6 . SLOW AND STEADY If you receive a retirement account as part of an inheritance, it makes sense to leave the funds in the retirement account and take the option of minimum distributions over your lifetime. Having access to a steady stream of income is the wisest (though not the most tempting!) choice. 7 . ROLL OVER Consider a Roth conversion of existing accounts if possible. A major benefit here is that your money will grow tax-free indefinitely. As the owner of the IRA, you will not have to take required minimum distributions (RMDs) over the course of your lifetime. But you'll need to take into account a couple of issues. First, do you have the money to pay the tax, outside of your plan assets? Before making a Roth conversion, it is imperative that you calculate your tax liability. You’ll owe taxes on the original account’s earnings plus any pretax contributions. Also, consider your age and life expectancy. The younger you are, the more sense a Roth conversion makes.

the

terms

SIMPLIFIED EMPLOYEE PENSION (SEP) A variation of the IRA account, the plan provides business owners with a simplified method to contribute toward their employees’ retirement as well as their own retirement savings. Contributions are made to an Individual Retirement Account or Annuity (IRA) set up for each plan participant (a SEP-IRA). ROTH CONVERSION Converting your traditional IRA to a Roth IRA, which allows you to pay taxes on contributions now and then let money in the account grow tax-free. REQUIRED MINIMUM DISTRIBUTIONS (RMDS) The minimum amount you must withdraw from your retirement account each year. You generally have to start taking withdrawals from your IRA, SEP IRA, SIMPLE IRA, or retirement plan account when you reach age 70½. Roth IRAs do not require withdrawals until after the death of the owner.

Chairman of the Board of Suplee, Shea, Crammer & Rocklein, P.A., Ray Suplee is a graduate of Villanova University. He has been a practicing Certified Public Accountant since 1974. Mr. Suplee concentrates on individual and business taxation.

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UPS AND DOWNS In the shorter term, factors that affect testosterone levels tend to be more relationship-based:

T

The Truth About 'T' T H E R E A S O N YO U ' V E LO S T

T H AT S P R I N G I N YO U R S T E P 22

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Watching a sexually explicit film (Archives of Sexual Behavior, 1974) Having a conversation with a woman (Evolution & Human Behavior, 2003)

T Falling in love Becoming a father (Psychoneuroendocrinology, 2004 and The Mayo Clinic, 2001)


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Testosterone. It’s the best-known male hormone; the thing that ostensibly separates us hairy brutes from the lovely, lithe figures of the fairer sex. We hear about it from steroid allegations in sports to hormone replacement for men looking to extend their prime in a different arena. But how do you know if your levels are correct, and if not, how to best fix them?

staying level

testosterone: the basics The principal sex hormone in males, testosterone is technically a steroid — part of the androgen group released by the testes. It is crucial in almost all facets of male development, including healthy growth of reproductive organs and the prostate, as well as producing the traditional “masculine” characteristics like body hair, muscle, and bone mass (Endocrine Reviews, 1987). Of course, with those good characteristics come the ones you might want to forget about, like acne and vocal changes—a.k.a. puberty.

Everyone has a different ideal level of testosterone in their bodies. This should be fairly evident, as Dwayne “The Rock” Johnson has a much higher testosterone level than, say, Dave, your dentist. However, there is a sort of lower limit to a healthy testosterone level—a point below which you shouldn’t find yourself: 300 nanograms per deciliter (ng/ dL). Anything under this number (which can be determined via a simple blood test) qualifies as a low testosterone level. Everyone, from the biggest wrestlers to the most mild-mannered dentist, can fall victim to these sorts of fluctuations in T levels. And it can happen for a variety of reasons, over both the short and the long term.

30+ years

= FALLING TESTOSTERONE LEVELS

Testosterone decreases with age. After about age 30, the average level of testosterone begins to fall somewhat gradually.

As an adult, testosterone gets down to its more serious roles. The hormone is responsible for the normal maturation of sperm, controlling the response to stress and other strong emotions, and regulating both mental and physical energy.

Research indicates that this is not necessarily a consequence of age itself, but has more to do with behavior, such as smoking, and health issues, like obesity and depression. In a 2012 study by the National Health and Medical Research Council of Australia, nearly 1,400 men (with an average age of 54) had their hormone levels tested over a five year period. They found that the median testosterone levels decreased insignificantly—only 1% a year.

U N D E R T R E AT E D

However, the aforementioned factors—obesity, depression, and stopping smoking—resulted in more significant drops in hormone levels over the same period. Author of the study, Dr. Gary Wittert, cautions that "While stopping smoking may cause of a slight decrease in testosterone, the benefit of quitting smoking is huge."

It's estimated that hypogonadism affects two to six million men in the United States, but only 5% receive treatment.

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SLEEP WORK OUT WATCH YOUR WEIGHT DE-STRESS low T symptoms There are many different symptoms of low testosterone, most you might naturally associate with the aging process. Low sex drive, difficulty achieving erection, and low sperm count are all signs of low T, though patients exhibiting these symptoms strongly in their 30s and 40s should consider consulting a doctor, as other health problems may be to blame. In addition to the sexual effects, low testosterone can cause general fatigue or lack of energy—so if you find yourself even less motivated than usual to hit the gym, you might be suffering from low T.

treatments for low T The number of men undergoing testosterone therapy has quadrupled since 2000 (The Washington Post, 2014). There are a multitude of methods to increase testosterone, including everything from natural holistic treatments to hormone replacement therapy. Let’s break them down. T H E N AT U R A L Get enough sleep, stay active, maintain a healthy weight, and don’t stress out— all of these factors will ensure that your body is free to produce the correct amount of testosterone, according to Dr. Joel Fuhrman, board-certified family physician, New York Times best-selling author and nutritional researcher.  

Aside from that softening, gym-averse body that develops, men begin to lose their youthful glow as their testosterone decreases. Hair loss becomes an issue—though more often due to genes than T levels—as does a loss in bone and muscle mass, and body fat tends to increase. The tricky thing with diagnosing low testosterone is that most of these factors can also be attributed to other issues as well—obesity, infection, or disease, such as HIV or diabetes. If you begin to exhibit a few of these symptoms, you may want to discuss them with your doctor.

You can also include testosteroneboosting foods in your diet. Good fats like olive oil, avocados, peanut butter, red meat, dark chocolate, and cheese have all been shown to boost testosterone (Journal of Applied Physiology, 1997). In addition, natural supplements like zinc and vitamin A have been shown to be beneficial.

Working out boosts the body’s testosterone-building process, too, which can then lead to more energy and a desire to get in the gym. It’s a cyclical effect. The benefits of these natural remedies are pretty straightforward. They don’t come with a doctor’s note, so you’re free to experiment with the right mix of strategies of diet/exercise/ supplement levels until you feel right. You’ll feel good about taking back control of your hormones, which will also help your stress levels. If you still find yourself feeling testosteronedeficient, it’s probably time to schedule an appointment.

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TESTOSTERONE BOOSTERS Kickstart your T production with these superfoods

olive oil

almonds

avo ca dos

red meat

peanut butter all quality monounsaturated fats

coconut oil

eggs

dark chocolate

cheese all quality saturated fats

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e sp e c i al l y yol k s


HB | HEALTH

THE MEDICAL Don’t think it’s as easy as simply walking in, answering a few questions, and walking out with a testosterone prescription. As testosterone is a strong hormone which plays a massive role in many of the body’s systems, it takes a lot for a doctor to prescribe replacement therapy. The FDA approves this prescription only for men with low T due to certain medical conditions (testicular injury or cancer, chronic diseases, or hypogonadism resulting from diseases or neurological disorders) and whose lab tests have indicated low T. If your doctor believes hormone replacement therapy is the right way to go, there are myriad options. For men seeking to increase their fertility, the best choice may be testosterone injections, according to Dr. Jason Hedges, a urologist at the Oregon Health and Science University. Given every few weeks, these stimulate the healthy growth and motility of sperm. If fertility isn’t the issue, a doctor may prescribe either a patch or gel. These come in a variety of brand names and applications. These types of treatments are preferred to an oral testosterone supplement as they are absorbed directly into the bloodstream and have no adverse effects on the liver.

A SERIOUS ASIDE

side effects So...you head to the doc, grab some patches, stick ‘em on your arm, and feel the youth flow back into you, right? Not so fast. Oftentimes, a doctor will be hesitant to prescribe testosterone replacement therapy, and with good reason. In 2015, the FDA stated that there was no established benefit to testosterone replacement therapy in patients whose T levels were declining naturally due to aging (FDA, 2015). They also enacted legislation requiring all testosterone supplements to bear labels detailing side effects.

OFF

the shelf

The most popular names in prescription low-T treatments are:

Androderm a skin patch applied once a day to the upper body AndroGel, Axiron, and Fortesta come in bottles which dispense the prescribed amount of testosterone with every pump Natesto is a gel applied to the inside of the nose Striant is a twice-a-day tablet which is applied above the incisor and releases testosterone through your gums

Testosterone replacement therapy in all its forms comes with risks. Adverse reactions could include:

◗ ◗ ◗ ◗ ◗ ◗

Heart attack Stroke Acne/oily skin Fluid retention Increased risk of blood clots Mood irregularity

T and the big C The main question that everyone has about testosterone replacement, however, is a big one. Will it give me prostate cancer? Dr. Peter Boyle’s work for the International Prevention Research Institute has shown that there is no discernible link between testosterone replacement and prostate cancer development. In fact, some physicians are having success using hormone replacement to treat patients who have previously had prostate cancer (Journal of Urology, 2004) with no recurrence of the disease. These results were replicated in subsequent studies both at Case Western Reserve University School of Medicine and Baylor College of Medicine. It’s a constant refrain in those incessant drug commercials: “Talk to your doctor” about X, Y, or Z. And in this case, it’s really the best course of action. If you’re feeling unreasonably tired, unmotivated, or have lost your libido, check with your doctor and see if low T might be the reason.

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Cholesterol Concerns

T H E G O O D, T H E B A D, A N D T H E N O T - S O - U G LY T R U T H

don’t get blindsided “Cholesterol” has become a health buzzword. Most people know that there are two kinds—the “good” cholesterol (high-density lipoprotein, or HDL) and the bad (low-density lipoprotein: LDL). If you’re using margarine instead of butter, drinking low-fat milk instead of whole milk, or getting the disapproving eye from your wife as you dig into that crispy fried chicken, you’ve been influenced by the “diet/heart hypothesis.” So says Jennifer Elliott, dietitian and author of Baby Boomers, Bellies & Blood Sugars. You may think your decisions lower the risk of heart disease, but these choices have “never been proven to be beneficial,” says Elliot (Food and Nutrition Sciences, 2014). Dr. Michael Petchauer, DC, agrees. He has spent the last 35 years trying to dismantle the influence big pharma has on patients who receive their education through the media. “We’ve been told what foods are good and bad,” he says. “When we realize we still aren’t healthy, we consult a doctor, and often the solution is a drug aimed at forcing a ‘fix’ that stops symptoms rather than discovering the underlying cause.”

During football season, when many of us are plunked on the couch for three (or six, or nine) hours at a time, it can sometimes seem like we’re watching a string of commercials interrupted by the occasional touchdown. Those ads fall into a few main categories: cars, insurance, beer, and—ahem—the little blue pill. These companies clearly know their audience. And there’s one other industry that makes a killing with this strategic placement: medications to lower cholesterol.

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The current medical view on cholesterol is that a high-fat diet increases plaque buildup, putting us at an increased risk of coronary vascular disease. Two studies in the 1940s and 1950s, the Framingham Heart Study and the Seven Countries Study, cemented the belief among doctors. In response, they began prescribing that familiar diet: low-fat, high-carb. When that alone didn’t make a difference, big pharma swooped in. Lipitor, Crestor, Zocor. Today sales of cholesterol drugs are in the tens of billions of dollars. Yet, heart disease still ranks as the leading cause of death in the United States (cdc.gov). Drugs don’t seem to be fixing the problem. Considering the possible side effects—muscle soreness, liver damage, links to neurological problems (including Alzheimer’s), and increased blood sugar levels—the “cure” could be doing more damage than good (mayoclinic.org).


HB | HEALTH

GOOD

Functional medicine is the science-based, natural way to become healthy.

(HDL) HIGH-DENSITY LIPOPROTEIN

BAD

Considered the “good” protein, HDL is a heart plaque that transports fat around the body. This is not the plaque that causes heart attacks. ›

(LDL) LO W - D E N S I T Y LIPOPROTEIN

Considered the “bad” protein because it forms a soft plaque on the arteries, LDL actually offers benefits to the body, including building healthy muscle. A recent study by the American College of Cardiology suggested low LDL levels influenced the development of cancer (ACC 61 st Annual Scientific Session; March 2012).

fumbling the facts “If your premise is wrong, your solution is going to be wrong,” says Dr. Petchauer. “By 1992, low LDL numbers and the low cholesterol diet was the dogma,” explains Dr. Petchauer. Nobody was educating the public on the importance of cholesterol. Without the correct levels, the body doesn’t function properly. In fact, though the liver eliminates excess cholesterol out of the body through bile, it will produce LDL cholesterol if the body doesn’t ingest sufficient amounts.

C R E S TO R C R E S T I N G Now that a generic form of Lipitor is available, Crestor is the most popular branded cholesterol drug. Yearly sales exceed $6 billion (fiercepharma.com).

“So people are on a low-cholesterol diet and the liver begins producing cholesterol because it’s essential to our cells,” says Dr. Petchauer. “Doctors respond by prescribing a statin medication to block the enzyme that produces cholesterol. But it also blocks Coenzyme Q10, an enzyme that makes energy to grow and repair cells.” It’s a case of not seeing the forest for the trees. Or, perhaps more accurately, razing the entire forest because one species of tree has a disease.

huddle up From his office in Holland, Michigan, Dr. Petchauer educates patients on the benefits of chiropractic health, nutrition, and functional medicine. Functional medicine is the science-based, natural way to become healthy. Getting on his patient list isn’t as easy. Patients must fill out a 30-page questionnaire and complete two blood tests before even being granted a sit-down with the man himself. During the first meeting Dr. Petchauer’s goal is nothing less than to dramatically shift their paradigm on how they recognize and treat their health problems. “We are a medically minded society,” he explains. “It takes a lot of talking and explaining to break down what is essentially propaganda. Culturally, we believe the role of medicine is to treat visible symptoms. But to achieve health, we need to investigate why we have the symptoms.”

S AY Y E S TO T H E YO L K The reign of the egg-white omelette is over…yolks are in again! See our feature on EGGS and their health benefits on page 50.

BENEFITS OF CHOLESTEROL

Helps the body process vitamin D Allows the body to manufacture hormones Repairs damaged cells Acts as an antioxidant

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HB | HEALTH

SMOKING STRESS EXCESS SUGAR/STARCH FAMILY HISTORY

tackle the real issue The root of the problem can be summed up in one word: inflammation. With too much inflammation, the cells in the walls of the arteries crack. LDL particles become oxidized, filling those cracks, and accumulating on the compromised artery walls. Just as a scab forms on a cut, oxidized LDLs will scab a cracked artery wall. What causes inflammation? Put simply, dehydration and lack of nutrition— the very same high-carb, low-fat diet prescribed to people with high cholesterol. “Inflammation of the cells is caused by a high-sugar, high-carb diet, too many trans fats, dehydration, devitalized foods, and the imbalance of our Omega 3s and Omega 6s,” says Dr. Petchauer (see page ## for more on these essential fatty acids). “Lifestyle factors, such as smoking, stress, eating excess amounts of sugar and starch, and our family history weakens our immune system, making it less effective.”

A NUMBERS GAME

High cholesterol numbers keep dropping: 50 years ago, 240 was considered high for the combined total of HDLs and LDLs. Then 200. Now, the American Heart Association includes numbers as low as 180 as high cholesterol (heart.org). The lower the target number, the more likely it is that you will need a prescription to stay “healthy.” T O R E A D M O R E about functional medicine

and Dr. Petchauer, go to drpetchauer.com or find him on Facebook at “Petchauer Chiropractic.”

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in the zone So, what’s the solution? How do we stop our artery walls from cracking so the cholesterol doesn’t latch on and block our blood flow? The answer goes back to homeostasis. What nutrient does the most good? Dr. Petchauer says it is different for everyone, because it is usually the nutrient you’re most deficient in. You need to investigate why your body isn’t functioning properly. Tests may reveal you may have elevated cholesterol and triglyceride levels, but don’t assume that means you’re ready for one prescription drug which will cure you for the rest of your life. It means you need to investigate why your body isn’t in a state of homeostasis. The imbalance could be from dehydration, a vitamin or mineral deficiency, or because your diet and lifestyle need to change. The solution for each person is different. It’s a patient’s responsibility to improve his overall wellness, and a doctor’s responsibility to investigate beyond the simple solution. Start by switching to an antiinflammatory diet. Give your body nutrients. Choose whole foods—ones that aren’t processed, modified, sweetened, flavored, and colored. “Plants make vitamins, but not minerals,” says Dr. Petchauer. “So, I suggest organic whenever possible, because at least you know it could provide minerals from the soil.” He also implores his patients to exercise. “Get out there and sweat,” he says. “The body is made to move.”

Finally, look for a progressive doctor. They may be hard to find, but those with an interest in functional medicine may be a starting point. Open the dialogue with your current practitioner. Together, you may find cholesterol is not the root concern after all. T I P S F O R YO U R T I C K E R Aside from the usual advice of eating heart-healthy (it’s not too late to start!) and getting more exercise (take the stairs next time!), here are a few more tips to keep your ticker in great shape: ›

USE MODERATION IN YOUR MEALS while you don’t have to forego the nachos altogether, also don't consider “if they’re stuck together, they really count as one” a good rule of thumb GO ORGANIC and browse your local farmer’s market once in a while TRY A TASTY DRESSING made with apple cider vinegar instead of ranch on your greens—it offers all kinds of health benefits, including lowering cholesterol SQUIRT SOME LEMON IN YOUR WATER for a refreshing pick-me-up…its high potassium content is a zesty bonus


Building a Beach Body Still need some last-minute training before you’re comfortable shedding the shirt? We talked to a pro to learn the best way to get fast results.

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HB | HEALTH

Let’s take a moment to evaluate. Look at your muscles. Seriously. Give them an honest assessment. How do they look? Are they hidden under a blanket of fat? Are they barely visible because you’ve failed to lift anything heavier than a bottle of whiskey since last summer? Or are they rock solid, the result of disciplined hours working at the “bar”?

the real reason we ask is because we want to know which muscles you flexed as you checked yourself out. If you’re like most people, you struck a pose to see if your forearms and biceps would pop. That’s because, as the most visibly exposed muscles on the body, our guns garner a lot of attention. We’re guessing that’s one reason we focus so much of our training on beefing up the biceps. “Jeans or board shorts can hide our skinny legs,” says fitness coach Kyle Stuart, “but when our shirt comes off, we can’t hide the truth of our upper body.” In his experience, men who desire big arms seem to spend a disproportionate amount of time isolating muscles in their biceps and triceps, but Stuart says there are better ways for them to get the results they want.

PYRAMID TRAINING is a weight cycle that begins with a high number of sets and reps done at a low weight and peaks with low sets and reps at a max weight.

the secret to maximizing your moves The most efficient way to gain mass in your arms could seem counter intuitive. “The answer isn’t to spend all your time doing barbell curls,” Stuart explains. “A better method is to opt for compound movements and pyramid your weight training.” Compound movements engage multiple muscle groups, giving the body the power it needs to move more weight. That heavier weight stimulates a response to produce mass (muscle) in an effort to meet the demands of your workload. Isolated movements focus on one muscle. For example, an isolated bicep movement would be performed while leaning against the wall or sitting. Though this move can be effective for building a bicep, it avoids increased grip strength, balance, and full-body engagement. It’s not the best return on your investment. Compound movements force the highest rate of muscle response, helping you achieve the look you want in a shorter period of time.

coach’s take-away tips Stuart sees three main errors in DIY training programs. 1 . FA L S E F O C U S The first is that triceps are often ignored in favor of a focus on biceps. But triceps account for 2/3 the size of your arms, so if you want to look jacked, make sure you spend time building this set of three (tri) behind-the-scenes muscles.

2 . T O P H E AV Y The second error is that people overlook squats. This may come as a surprise, but squats provide upper-body gains. “Squatting isn’t a fun exercise, and it can be done poorly, but the muscles in our legs are too large to ignore,” explains Stuart. The power in any of our movements begins from our hip and legs, so when we increase our strength in the lower body, everything will improve—including the numbers in our upper-body lifts, such as the bench press. “A lot of people avoid lower body training because they don’t want to be sore after a hard leg day, and they think they don’t need to build their legs if they can just hide them under a pair of shorts,” says Stuart. “But if you fail to progress your legs and glutes, you’re holding yourself back.”

3. ENERGY ERRORS An added benefit to building leg muscles as part of the overall strategy to bulking the upper body: increased muscle requires more fuel so you get to eat more. But don’t fall into the trap of thinking just because you work out you can eat anything you want. It’s the third training error Stuart sees many athletes make.

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HB | HEALTH

FOOD IS FUEL REFUEL 4-5 TIMES A DAY

intake effects output “You can’t out train a bad diet,” says Stuart, repeating the mantra of coaches worldwide. “If you’re going to invest inside the gym, invest out of the gym as well. Nutrition is the piece of your training where you have 100% control of the results.” Stuart says supplements, such as protein shakes, aminos, and fish oil have immense value in training, but—as their name indicates—they supplement a diet. They don’t make a poor diet healthy. Think of your food as fuel and your body as the machine. Refuel 4-5 times a day so your tank isn’t empty. This avoids the feeling of hunger, plus prevents a drop in your sugar level. Choose lean meat, lots of vegetables, some fruit, and whole grains. “If you experience bloating from eating grains, switch to sweet potatoes as your main carb source,” suggests Stuart. “Neither is right or wrong; do what’s best for your body.” Avoid the temptation to reward yourself with food. Instead schedule treats into your diet by planning days for alcohol, dessert, and fatty foods. This makes social time and days off with family easier to navigate (and guilt-free).

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armed with a plan Before you begin any new training program, it’s best to find a coach who understands your goals and is qualified to construct a plan to help you reach them. Certification alone does not mean you’ll be pleased with the coaching results, so take the time to interview more than one coach in order to find a good partner. If you’re ready to add a few moves to an already well-balanced training cycle, Stuart suggests choosing from among these four exercises. You’ll see benefits beyond larger arms since these movements place demands on the entire upper body. Start with 3 sets of 10-15 reps, performing your sets 2-3 times a week. You’ll see results with this moderate work load, but for more substantial results, work with a trained coach and let your goals determine your schedule.

1 . DIPS Use a dip machine to raise and lower your body. Remember to lean forward at about a 30-degree pitch and avoid flared elbows. Tip: Increase the challenge by wearing a weight vest or a chain with added weight. 2 . CLOSE-GRIP BENCH PRESS Lie on a bench and raise and lower the weighted bar with your arms held shoulder-width apart. Keep arms close to the torso during the movement. Tip: A closer grip places more demands on your triceps rather than relying on the strength of the chest.

3 . CHIN UPS—FACING PALMS Grab a pull up bar with palms facing you rather than away. Tip: this is more effective than an isolated bicep curl, because it forces the muscles to respond vigorously as you lift your entire body weight. 4 . DUMBBELL HAMMER CURLS Hold dumbbells with weighted ends vertical to your body. Keep your elbows tucked as you raise the weight to your shoulder and return to a lowered position. Tip: This movement not only stimulates the bicep muscles, it also builds forearm muscles and improves grip strength.

KYLE STUART

Fitness coach Kyle Stuart is also a firefighter/EMT, and first-place winner of Men’s Physique at the 2016 ABFF Super Natural Show in St. Petersburg, Florida.


We want to make your day Gorgeous hair and skin, flawless style, and the transcendent Aveda experience is what we do. Making your day is why. The character of AFROHEAD'S BRILAND 07 is that of a 7-year-old rum blended to deliver a silky smooth flavor of burnt toffee with notes of toasty oak and honey. At the heart of AFROHEAD'S XO is a blend of 15-year old rums that inspire this drier, complex expression which begins creamy with tobacco notes and hints of vanilla then finishes extra long and elegantly smooth.

2016

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San Francisco World Spirits Competition Gold Medal

International Rum Producer of the Year*

www.afroheadrums.com Respect Your Rum Responsibly.

The Landings: 4952 South Tamiami Trail Whole Foods Center: 1421 1st Street Fresh Talent: 3501 South Tamiami Trail Cooper Creek: 8231 Cooper Creek Blvd

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IN THE CELLAR

Organic Wine By now, we’re all aware of the wisdom of eating clean and organic. But what about drinking organic? Is it worth hunting down

Andrea Johnson Photography

a bottle of vino labeled as such, and is what you’ll find on the shelves any good? Just what makes wine organic anyway?

THE ORGANIC CLASSIFICATION The regulations regarding organic classification for wines vary based on the country of origin. Worldwide, organic wines must be made from organically grown grapes—prohibiting the use of chemical fertilizers, pesticides, fungicides, and herbicides. But the U.S. goes a step further— in order to get that “USDA Organic” label, there can be no added sulfites. Therein lies the dilemma. Sulfur dioxide (a.k.a. SO2, or sulfite) is important to the winemaking process. It has antimicrobial and antioxidant properties that help prevent oxidation and preserve the wine’s freshness. While the

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absence of sulfites doesn’t initially affect the taste of the wine, it does reduce the wine’s shelf life, allowing it to deteriorate before it has a chance to mature. Translation: no sulfites mean your wine might turn to vinegar. This is obviously problematic— unless the wine is intended to be consumed young—since many wines improve with age, as the flavors, aromas, and even colors change and become more integrated with time. THE CONTROVERSY OVER SULFITES As you can imagine, the use of sulfites is the subject of debate, especially with organic

winemakers. Those two little words on wine labels “Contains Sulfites” cause consumers consternation. In reality, though, only a small percentage of people are allergic to sulfites (5-10% of people with asthma suffer severe sensitivities). What about the headache you got after polishing off that pinot noir? Don’t blame the sulfites. While they may make some sneeze and have a runny nose, they don’t cause headaches. It is more likely that you didn’t drink enough water or have a sensitivity to tannins. Sugar could also be the culprit, especially if you were dehydrated.

NO WINE BEFORE ITS TIME...

While the absence of sulfites doesn't initially affect the taste of the wine, it does reduce the wine's shelf life, allowing it to deteriorate before it has a chance to mature.

Reviewed by Julie Pepi, second level sommelier with Masters of Wine; Certified Wine Educator, Specialist of Wine, and Specialist of Sake.


St . Arma nds Circle w w w.d in e s h o re .c o m

Sarasota’s #1 Seafood Restaurant and Best Sandwich Award-winning food with local flavors is conveniently located in the heart of downtown Sarasota. $5 Happy Hour, Free Passenger Shuttle, and Delivery 1435 Main Street, Sarasota, FL 34236 (941) 312-4001

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HB | IN THE CELLAR

WHEN IN ROME In ancient Rome, winemakers burned candles comprised of sulfur to prevent wine from turning to vinegar.

SULFITE-FREE? No wines are completely free of sulfite, even those labeled USDA Organic. It is a natural byproduct of the fermentation process. A label reading “no added sulfite” simply means just that. The wine still contains some sulfites, but none were added to that which is produced naturally. LABEL LAW You won’t see the words “Contains Sulfites” on any European wine labels—not because they don’t contain sulfites, but because labeling isn’t required there. Only the U.S. government and Australia have regulations regarding this. Stateside, if added sulfites bring the total amount in the wine above 20 parts per million, it must be labeled as such. GRAPES OF WRATH Sulfites aside, the chemicals used in traditionally grown grapes are numerous. In fact, the grapes from conventional vineyards get more pesticides and fungicides than almonds, tomatoes, or strawberries. Conventional growers also risk contaminating the groundwater and even making their winery workers sick. The bottom line is that no one needs to be ingesting pesticides.

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ORGANIC ≠ ADDITIVE-FREE (OR VEGAN) Organic wine may include additives like yeast, egg whites, and animal enzymes.

GOING GREEN Growth of “eco” wines (sustainable, organic, and biodynamic) are on the upswing as 16% of U.S. wine consumers now look for these labels.

W I N E S W I T H O R G A N I C C E R T I F I C AT I O N Wondering what to drink? Here are some suggestions, representing a host of different varietals, regions, and price points. NV Mionetto, Organic Prosecco, Treviso, ITALY 2012 Lapostolle, Canto de Apalta, Rapel Valley, CHILE 2012 Domaine des Cèdres, Côtes du Rhône, FRANCE

W I N E S M A D E F R O M O R G A N I C A L LY G R O W N G R A P E S W I T H O U T C E R T I F I C AT I O N While not certified organic, these three popular American vineyards come very close to the mark. The difference between these bottles and those with the USDA label is the added sulfite content. Choosing longevity over labels, these winemakers have determined to grow organic grapes and preserve their fine flavors with traditional processes, including the addition of sulfites.

2012 Amapola Creek, Monte Rosso Zinfandel, Sonoma, CA 2012 Château La Nerthe, Châteauneuf du Pape, Rhône Valley, FRANCE 2014 Sokol Blosser, Pinot Gris, Willamette Valley, OR

FRUIT OF THE (ORGANIC) VINE

Organic wine saw growth in 2014, with over $200 million in sales. Big players like Costco—the largest wine retailer in the U.S.—made the move into organics, with the increase in demand causing shortages in the domestic supply (although Europe’s production remains sufficient).


America’s original craft vodka Tito’s Handmade Vodka is designed to be savored by spirit connoisseurs and everyday drinkers alike. Our process is similar to that of a fine single malt scotch, requiring more skill and effort than others, but it’s well worth it. Visit us at www.titosvodka.com

COCKTAIL CULTURE Downtown Sarasota’s cosmopolitan culinary experience pays homage to a provocative era, when well-mixed cocktails, sophisticated food and good company were status quo.

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©2016 Tableseide Restaurant Group. All Rights Reserved. All names and their logos are trademarks of the Tableseide Restaurant Group.

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I TA L I A N E L E G A N C E , N E A P O L I TA N I R R E V E R E N C E

Gianluca Isaia

The ISAIA brand holds true to its roots with inimitable style, plenty of class, and a touch of rebellious individuality that sets the wearer apart from the masses. With flagship stores in Milan, Capri, Beverly Hills, New York, and Japan as well as franchise shops in Russia, Azerbaijan, Ukraine, and China, ISAIA is a leading line of menswear. Combining hand-craftsmanship and fashionforward style with innovative, luxurious fabrics, the storied company creates sophisticated silhouettes to appeal to “The Modern Gentleman.” At the helm is Gianluca Isaia, who was raised in the business, learning his family trade from the ground up—literally— roaming the factory floors as a child in Napoli and working in London with one of the company’s top clients as a young man. Now as president and CEO of ISAIA, he has brought a style that is contemporary, yet playfully sensuous, resulting in a “Modern Sartorial” success with the ethos of “luxury with a meaning.” WHERE TO FIND IT

isaia.it Beverly Hills ISAIA 9527 Brighton Way 38

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Images courtesy ISAIA


HB | ISAIA

Double breasted, peak lapel jacket. Wool/Delain silk. 100% cotton shirt.

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Single-breasted, notch lapel, Sciammeria suit. 100% Aquaspider performance wool. 100% cotton shirt. above: 7 fold silk ties. Signature ISAIA coral pattern. right: 1960s vintage-inspired swim trunks. Polyester.

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HB | ISAIA

Single-breasted, two-button, notch lapel, Sciammeria jacket. Cashmere/ silk/linen. 100% cotton shirt.

Double-breasted, peak lapel jacket. Cotton/wool. 100% cotton shirt.

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Double-breasted, peak lapel, Sciammeria suit. 2-ply Sartoria wool. 100% cotton shirt.

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HB | ISAIA

Double-breasted, peak lapel jacket. Linen/cotton, unlined. 100% cotton shirt.

Single-breasted, notch lapel jacket. 3-ply Aquaspider performance wool. 100% cotton shirt.

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Double-breasted, peak lapel suit. Wool/ Delain silk. 100% cotton shirt. 44

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Single-breasted, notch lapel Sciammeria jacket. Cashmere/silk. 100% cotton shirt. Flat front wool pants.


HB | ISAIA

Single-breasted, two-button, notch lapel jacket. Wool/silk/ cashmere. Flat front wool pants. HOMME BLEU

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Spring Summer 2016  

It's our much-anticipated Arts Edition with something for all our stylish femmes and hommes!

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