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COOPERATIVE BAPTIST FELLOWSHIP | WWW.THEFELLOWSHIP.INFO

GENERAL ASSEMBLY 2006

Fellowship Baptists learn, respond to ‘world in need’ during 16th annual Assembly More than 4,100 gather in Atlanta for two-day event

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he 16th annual General Assembly of the

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Mark Sandlin photo

part … of what God is doing pastor of Baptist Fellowship 19 new field personnel — six in his church and in his world. Group, East Point, Ga., as Global Service Corps field Cooperative Baptist Fellowship drew 4,100 personnel that will serve up May we have an audacious faith moderator; Harriet Harral, an and an authentic witness so that organizational and leadership to three-year assignments and to the Georgia World Congress Center this renewal may continue.” consultant from Fort Worth, 13 AsYouGo affiliates that join The $32,800 given by CBF Global Missions with their to focus on being the presence of Christ to a world in Assembly participants for own financial support. need — including those affected by HIV/AIDS, poverty the second annual Jimmy The Assembly marked a leadand Rosalynn Carter Ofership change for CBF Global and social injustice. fering for Religious LibMissions with Rob Nash of erty and Human Rights Rome, Ga., being approved as son said. “The role of the The Assembly featured an will be divided with new global missions coordinator. church is for the pain and hurt HIV/AIDS summit attended two-thirds of the offering In business sessions, the Asand suffering of the world to by more than 400, a keynote designated for the Fellowsembly approved a constitutionbe concentrated and held and address from South African ship’s religious liberty and al preamble pastor and The Fellowship’s new officers: Joy Yee, human rights ministries highlighting social justice immediate past moderator; Emmanuel and one-third going to its allegiance advocate McCall, moderator; Harriet Harral, moderator-elect; and Hal Bass, recorder. the Baptist World Allito Jesus Trevor Hudance for similar work. Texas, as moderator-elect; Christ and son, the com“There was a very good and Hal Bass, political science commitment missioning of spirit to this Assembly,” said professor at Ouachita Baptist to the Great 19 CBF GlobJoy Yee, immediate past modUniversity in Arkadelphia, Commission, al Missions erator. “There was a draw to Ark., as recorder. McCall is a $17 million field personfocus on what God is doing the first African American to budget, an nel and the in the world and what God is serve in the Fellowship’s highamendment collection calling us to be. There’s no way est elected position. requiring the of $32,800 we can reach out to the world Emphasizing the imporAssembly’s for the secGeneral Session participants gave $32,800 to the second annual Jimmy and on our own. It’s just wonderful tance of Baptist values, coapproval on ond annual Rosalynn Carter Offering for Religious Liberty and Human Rights. that we can come together and operation and partnership, future nomiJimmy and take on this work together.” f! and a commitment to being nees to serve as CBF representamaybe even healed. I hope Rosalynn Carter Offering for the presence of Christ in the tives on boards and the nomithat at this Assembly we can Religious Liberty and Human LEARN – Visit The CBF Store world, the Assembly heard nating committee’s report. open our hearts to the groans Rights. The Assembly also apat (888) 801-4223 or www.thefelfrom CBF Coordinator Daniel The slate of officers afthat are here, that we can share proved a new constitutional lowship.info to order a video or Vestal, who challenged the firmed by the Assembly are our groans and be the church preamble, $17 million budget CD of the evening general sesFellowship to continue its Joy Yee, pastor of 19th Avenue and hold the pain of the world and a slate of officers that insions and select workshops. work as a renewal movement. Baptist Church, San Francisco, and be Christ to one another.” cluded the first-ever African“CBF is a renewal moveCalif., as immediate past modBy Carla Wynn, CBF Friday night worship inAmerican moderator. ment,” Vestal said. “We are a erator; Emmanuel McCall, Communications cluded the commissioning of At the Fellowship’s first HIV/AIDS summit, participants broke the silence about the health pandemic by increasing their awareness and Baptist Church in Louisville, Ky., communication, the ability In making the motion to apROB NASH was unanimously committing to a personal reNash served on the first global to respect differences, and prove Nash as CBF Global Miselected to the top missions sponse concerning the global missions task group of the Felability to create sions coordinaadministrator post for the Cohealth crisis. Many of the Aslowship in its fledgling years. understanding,” tor, search comoperative Baptist Fellowship sembly’s more than 100 minThe search committee, Brendle said. mittee chair Tim during the June 21 Coordinatistry workshops focused on which began its work at the Nash lived 13 Brendle outlined ing Council meeting. ways individuals and churches 2005 General Assembly in years in the Philthe criteria the Nash, 47, is a former miscould enhance their ministries Grapevine, Texas, was made ippines where committee folsionary kid with extensive to a world affected by poverty, up of Jana Benjamin of Tulhis parents lowed in making local church ministry experiillness and social injustice. lahoma, Tenn.; Rusty Brock served as Baptist its selection. ence and currently serves as Other workshops discussed of Ardmore, Okla.; Frank missionaries. He “One of the dean of the school of religion specific ministry opportuniBroome of Macon, Ga.; Beth has also studrequirements and international studies at ties, resources and insight. Fogg of Richmond, Va.; Harriied in or made was that the Shorter College in Rome, Ga. South African pastor Trevet Harral of Fort Worth, Texas; extended visits candidate must “We will utilize every creative or Hudson challenged the AsRob Nash, newly elected CBF Global Missions coordinator, and Earl Martin of Jefferson to more than have signifi cant force … to sense what God is sembly attendees to step out of will begin work Aug. 1. City, Tenn. f! 30 countries in cross-cultural doing around the world and join their comfort zone and listen Asia, the Middle East, Africa, experience — knowledge God in that great work, ” said to the groaning of the world. Europe and South America. of differing cultural norms, Nash during a workshop at the By Lance Wallace, CBF “We are not separate from As pastor of Beuchel Park challenge of cross-cultural Fellowship’s General Assembly. Communications the pains of the world,” HudMark Sandlin photo

Council approves Nash as Global Missions coordinator


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The courage to care New field personnel sent out with candid appeal for greater support

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ineteen people were commissioned for missions service at the

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and global missions encourager at First Baptist Church in Oklahoma City, Okla., • Brandon and Tirzah Turner, who 16th General Assembly of the Cooperative Baptist Fellowship. will serve as advocates for the poor administrative assistant at the Project Six of the new field personnel are part in the Baltimore-Washington, D.C., Ruth School and train gypsy pastors at of CBF’s Global Service Corps (GSC), corridor, the Gypsy Smith School in Bucharest, which means they will serve for one to • Calandra and Jessy Togba-Doya, Romania, three years. The other 13 personnel are who will be working in a village in Liberia • Lizzie Fortenberry of Waco, who financially self-supported personnel going destroyed by a 14-year civil war, will serve as an advocate for international under the auspices of CBF’s AsYouGo Af• Greg and Sue Smith of Fredericksfiliate program. burg, Va., who Jack Snell, the Fellowship’s interim will provide coordinator for CBF Global Missions, resources for charged the new field personnel and churches in Lathe estimated 2,200 present at the tino outreach closing session. and help coordi“It was out of his compassion that nate activities for Jesus went where people were hurting the Latino Netand helpless,” Snell said. “That’s what work of Virginia we have commissioned these to be inBaptists, volved in: to preach in a variety of ways, • Connie and to teach and to heal. In short, we emRod Johnson body the very compassion of our Lord.” of Houston, Snell said that the new field perTexas, who will sonnel will enter a world where the facilitate teams Jack Snell commissioned Calandra and Jessy Togba-Doya, who will be working in a village in Liberia destroyed by a 14-year civil war, as CBF Global Missions AsYouGo most neglected live. aiding with affiliates. “It takes courage to care,” Snell medical and women and families in Los Angeles, said. “Caring can be a dangerous thing. It other physical needs in Mexico, • Taisha Rose of Stone Mountain, opens us to hurts. To express the compas• Mary Katherine Williams of LexingGa., who will return to her hometown of sion of Christ will most likely move us out ton, Ky., who will transition from a GSC Brooklyn, N.Y., to assist with the ongoing of our comfort zones. It has done that for position to an affiliate and will continue development of ministry among children, those being commissioned tonight. Many working on the urban team in Brooklyn, teens and families. of them are leaving family and friends, N.Y., GSC field personnel work one-to leaving jobs and security. We bless them • Keri Gage of Fort Walton Beach, Fla., three-year assignments that meet strategic and honor their commitment as they go who will continue working with Touching needs around the world. out from us to be the presence of Christ.” Miami With Love, an urban ministry Commissioned as AsYouGo affiliates: Those commissioned as GSC personthat focuses on sharing Christ-like love • Brian McAtee of Greenville, S.C., nel are as follows: with families and individuals in inner who will serve as a research consultant • Laura Barton of Wilmington, N.C., city Miami, who will serve as the holistic development coordinator for the China team, • Eric Bebber of Thomasville, N.C., who will serve as the network coordinator for local ministry and volunteers in Washington, D.C., • Susan and Wes Craig of Waco, Texas, who will, respectively, work as an

• Annette and Steve, were commissioned as videographers to tell the story of immigrants. AsYouGo affiliates are self-supporting. They serve through their career as teachers, professors, business people, medical professionals, etc., or through the direct financial support of partners. Snell also offered a challenge to the Assembly participants, encouraging them not to forget their responsibility. “What we are participating in involves all of us, not just for tonight but for the future,” he said. “Each of us is being challenged to enter into the pain of the world. There is so much to be done, and we are doing so little. It breaks my heart. “Our offerings are flat. We haven’t reached our Offering for Global Missions goal in several years,” he said. “In many cases our passions are dulled and our compassion is defeated by fatigue. Yet there continue to be unbelievable statistics that tell us one of four has not yet had the opportunity to hear and respond to the word of Jesus Christ. The world is groaning. I challenge you to be no less than Christ in a hurting world and challenge all of us to become nothing less than global disciples. Jesus is calling us to see the need, to be gripped by compassion and to move out from this place into the harvest field.” Due to global security concerns, the names and location of some CBF Global Missions personnel will not be publicized. f! By contributing writer Sue H. Poss, Greenville, S.C.

Vol. 16, No. 4 COORDINATOR • Daniel Vestal COORDINATOR, COMMUNICATIONS & RESOURCE DEVELOPMENT • Ben McDade EDITOR • Lance Wallace MANAGING EDITOR • Patricia Heys ASSOCIATE EDITOR • Carla Wynn PHONE • (770) 220-1600 FAX • (770) 220-1685 E-MAIL • fellowship@thefellowship.info WEB SITE • www.thefellowship.info

f fellowship! is published 7 times a year in Sept./ Oct., Special I (Oct.), Nov./Dec., Jan./Feb., Mar./Apr., May/June, Special II (Aug.) by The Cooperative Baptist Fellowship, Inc., 3001 Mercer University Dr., Atlanta, GA 30341-4115. Periodicals postage paid at Atlanta, GA, and additional mailing offices. USPS #015-625

C O O P E R AT I V E B A P T I S T F E L L O W S H I P

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POSTMASTER: Send address changes to “fellowship!” ffellowship!” Newsletter, Cooperative Baptist Fellowship, P.O. Box 450329, Atlanta, GA 31145-0329

MK Scholarships — From left, Rob Nash, new CBF Global Missions coordinator; R. Kirby Godsey, retiring president of Mercer University; Daniel Vestal, CBF national coordinator; and Bill Underwood, new Mercer University president, signed a memorandum of understanding for Mercer to provide scholarships for the children of CBF Global Missions field personnel. The agreement was signed during a Mercersponsored reception after worship on the first night of the General Assembly.

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Global Missions Commissioning


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Replacing silence with compassion Fellowship Baptists gather to learn, respond to HIV/AIDS crisis

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mong moderate Baptists, the silence about the global HIV/AIDS pandemic is being broken.

ranged in focus from basic scientific information about the disease to stories from people who live with HIV/AIDS. To increase personal awareness, participants were urged to form relationships with people living with the disease. These relationships allow participants to be a supportive presence to those who may face some of the psycho-social impacts of the illness, including social isolation and fear. “We need to reach out to the invisible and make them visible,” said workshop panelist Gretchen McDaniel, a Samford University

according to Sam Nixon of Lott-Carey Foreign Mission Convention. An HIV/ AIDS class is required for students at a Zimbabwean seminary, where the disease has a daily impact on the sub-Saharan African country, he said. Through a public concert with Grammy-nominated musical group Salvador at the General Assembly, the Fellowship aimed to spread HIV/AIDS awareness beyond the Fellowship community.

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Mark Sandlin photo

Mark Sandlin photo

Beckmann made a connection between More than 400 people gathered June HIV/AIDS and poverty, arguing that 21-22 in Atlanta, for the Cooperative fighting to alleviate global poverty can Baptist Fellowship’s HIV/AIDS Summit, make a difference in curbing further “Breaking the Silence: Compassion for an HIV Positive World.” Held in conjunction with the Fellowship’s annual General Assembly, Engaging in the fight the event engaged participants in Fellowship Baptists were presented plenary sessions and a with a variety of ways to respond to the variety of workshops HIV/AIDS crisis. The spiritual response in efforts to incite might include praying for those infected a personal, church and affected by the disease. Beckmann and Fellowship-wide also challenged participants to get response to this involved in their communities by working growing health crisis. to prevent further HIV contraction This year AIDS among at-risk groups and by ensuring turns 25 years that those with HIV have access to old, and summit adequate medical treatment. organizers believe the David Beckmann, president of CBF partner orga“Right now God is nization Bread for the World, spoke to the Summit need for increased achieving a great liberation in audience. awareness still exists. our world … and we can be spread of HIV/AIDS. The summit provided participants with part of it,” Beckmann said. Poor access to health opportunities not only to learn more Beckmann also said care, lack of education about the disease but also to respond. personal response involves about the disease, and “We know it may have taken some changing laws and a sense of not being time to break the silence, but God has systems that may limit the in control of one’s life not been waiting 25 years,” said David effectiveness of government are all byproducts of Beckmann, president of CBF partner and non-government poverty that affect organization Bread for the World. “God is organization response. the prevention and in the midst of this.” Individuals can lobby for treatment of HIV/AIDS. Sam Nixon, left, of the Lott-Carey Missionary Society, listened as Harvard Divinity increased spending for these School student Anne Jernberg, of Somerville, Mass., shared her impressions of the Confronting the issue “People who are response organizations. HIV/AIDS summit “Breaking the Silence: Compassion for an HIV Positive World.” really poor — who don’t With an estimated 40 million people Engaging in Bread for the have enough to eat, who drink dirty water worldwide living with AIDS and HIV, nursing professor. “They want somebody World’s targeted advocacy campaigns for — are much more likely to contract HIV. the virus that causes AIDS, it is a global to listen to them.” global poverty alleviation can also have They don’t have the same resistance,” health crisis that has changed the world. One speaker, who asked to remain an impact, he said. he said. The summit addressed a wide range of anonymous, has lived with HIV for 10 “What we do with human suffering issues resulting from the crisis. years. She told participants about the and pain … is really the acid test of the “The things we’re importance of Christian faith,” said CBF coordinator uncomfortable with support from Daniel Vestal. we don’t want to talk friends and Sessions focused on developing a about,” said musician family, from personal, church and Fellowship-wide Kate Campbell. whom she once response. What makes hid her diagnosis “The emphasis for this event was HIV/AIDS unsettling because of fear of dialogue, discussion and listening,” said varies from lack of their response. John Derrick, CBF Global Missions awareness about “They chose associate coordinator for field personnel the disease to education over training and co-chair of the summit. stereotypes and ignorance,” she “From the questions, concerns and ideas stigmas, particularly said. “No one has that were generated, we can encourage in the United States, ever turned their each other and work together to develop where primary back on me.” individual, church and Fellowship contraction has come As one responses.” f! Summit participants discussed the HIV/AIDS pandemic during a breakfast session. from homosexual workshop LEARN – For more information on transmission, Beckmann said. discussed, spreading awareness could the HIV/AIDS network or the Fellowship’s Promoting understanding “God is not put off by the sexual happen at seminaries, where future response to the HIV/AIDS crisis, visit www. character of this disease,” he said. “There Part of the challenge to an HIV/AIDS church leaders could be educated about thefellowship.info/AIDS. are more important things at stake response is combating lack of information the disease and the need for a local church than that.” about the disease. Summit workshops response. It wouldn’t be a new idea, By Carla Wynn, CBF Communications

HIV/AIDS Summit

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G E N E R A L A S S E M B LY 2 0 0 6


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‘A welcoming voice’ McCall makes history as CBF’s first African American moderator

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he new moderator of the Cooperative Baptist Fellowship said he is “bursting with energy” and ready to lead and support an

graduation from Southern Seminary Being on the cutting edge is nothing in 1962 led to his working in Black new to Emmanuel McCall, who started Church Relations with the Home Mission his one-year term as moderator at Board for 23 years. During those years, the Fellowship’s General Assembly in he helped agencies throughout the June. McCall lived through the racial convention foster racial reconciliation and desegregation of the 1950s and 60s, encourage diversity. integrated the Baptist Student Union “As an African at the University of “For an AfricanAmerican, Emmanuel Louisville, and became the first African American Baptist pastor McCall represents a welcoming voice and a American professional to lead CBF articulates unifying presence,” said to be housed in the offices of the Home our dream and vision for Fellowship Coordinator Daniel Vestal. “For an Mission Board of CBF to be inter-cultural African American Baptist the Southern Baptist pastor to lead CBF Convention. and multi-ethnic.” articulates our dream and “I’m glad to be a part vision for CBF to be inter-cultural and of CBF,” McCall said. “We are stressing multi-ethnic.” the importance of the whole church being Another major part of McCall’s involved with missions. We are partnering ministry has been his work with the with others without demanding control Baptist World Alliance (BWA). He and are looking at new partnerships all has been a part of the boards and the time. All of this, and what we’re doing commissions of the BWA since 1976 and with theological education, is cutting is currently serving a five-year term as edge.” vice president. He was instrumental in McCall’s participation with an helping the Fellowship gain admittance to interracial pastors’ group after his

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organization on the “cutting edge of Baptist work.”

In 1991, McCall left denominational work to start and pastor a new church in Atlanta, where he remained until his retirement in 2004. McCall came out of retirement this past May to serve as pastor of Baptist Fellowship Group in East Point, Ga., a new church constituted with 266 charter members. McCall sees his role as moderator as supporting initiatives that the larger body has agreed upon. He said he will not be looking necessarily to create new programs but to strengthen emphases already begun, including the hunger and HIV challenges. He will also work to make CBF more diverse by reaching out to Emmanuel McCall spoke to the Assembly after becomming moderator. more ethnic groups. “I feel a deep kinship with BWA in September 2003. CBF,” said McCall, who has been a part of “Emmanuel brings a spiritual maturity CBF since its beginning. My personal goal that equips him for effective leadership is to help CBF achieve the objectives it of CBF,” Vestal said. “He knows and sets for itself.” f! understands CBF as a pastor and as a person who has participated in leadership in the past. He also understands CBF By contributing writer Sue H. Poss, within the world Baptist family.” Greenville, S.C.

African American Network celebrates God’s work through disaster recovery

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American churches get started and connected with the Fellowship. Most recently he has worked with Bernard Roberson to start a church in Baltimore, Md. “People are leery of a jack-leg preacher,” Roberson said. “When Edgar [visited], people were able to see him and better understand what we Dancers from Harvest Fellowship and Living Word Church in Greenville, Miss. performed at the African American network luncheon. were a part of.” is held annually during the Fellowship’s have much more in common than we have Alton Taylor, a member of the General Assembly. f! differences. I am always inviting new people Coordinating Council and pastor of New to come to see what CBF is about.” Life Christian Ministries in Marietta, Ga., LEARN – For more information on The African American Network is said it is important for African Americans the African American Network, contact one of three ethnic networks within to participate with CBF. Berryman at (601) 421-0974 or the Fellowship — Asian and Hispanic “Each year we see more and more people eberryman@thefellowship.info. are the others — that seek to integrate like us at these meetings,” Taylor said. “Most different ethnicities into Fellowship life. By contributing writer Sue H. Poss, people here may not look like us and the The African American Network luncheon Greenville, S.C. worship style may be different, but we Mark Sandlin photo

EVERYONE WILL HAVE their own Katrina hit their lives, Rossie Francis of Gulport, Miss., said at the Cooperative Baptist Fellowship’s African American Network luncheon June 23 at the Omni Hotel. “My house was torn up. My church was torn up. We’ve been through our storm, but we keep holding on,” said Francis, pastor of Grace Temple Baptist Church in Gulfport. “But everyone here will go through their own Katrina. It may not be wind and rain and water, but there will be a storm in your life that will test your faith. When stuff goes wrong, when stuff gets ugly, when you have your Katrina, keep holding on. The Lord will pick you up.” Edgar Berryman of Carthage, Miss., the network’s national director, works to strengthen CBF relationships with African American churches, including helping pastors continue their education. “Since many of our pastors are bivocational, it’s hard for them to continue their education in traditional ways,” Berryman said. “I try to help them connect with distance learning opportunities available through our CBFrelated colleges and schools.” Berryman also helps new African

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New CBF Moderator

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African American Network


GENERAL ASSEMBLY

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BWIM releases ‘Women in Baptist Life’ report

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n 1964, the number of ordained Baptist women in the South was easy to count — one. Now, 42 years after Addie Davis made

history at Watts Street Baptist Church in Durham, N.C., the number of ordained Baptist women has increased dramatically, making counting a little more difficult. the number of ordained Baptist women in the United States at approximately 1,600. “One of the biggest challenges was identifying women on church staffs,” said Durso. “I don’t think we have even skimmed the surface. Baptist churches don’t report to an agency or organization, so there’s really no one keeping track of that sort of information. We came up with 400 names, but that may be only five

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Baptist Women in Ministry (BWIM), a Cooperative Baptist Fellowship partner organization, has attempted to summarize the current number of Baptist women in leadership positions. At the organization’s annual meeting in June, BWIM released “The State of Women in Baptist Life” report, which provides statistics on women serving as pastors, co-pastors, chaplains, and women in leadership roles at denominational schools, boards and organizations. “The report helps us look back and see how far we’ve come and celebrate that,” said BWIM coordinator Rachel Gunter Shapard. “But we can also see how far we have to go. I hope that churches will celebrate but will also examine their own leadership and figure out ways to involve women. BWIM wants to be a resource for churches trying to do that because we believe it is important.” “The State of Women in Baptist Life” focuses primarily on the Baptist organizations with which BWIM supporters most closely identify — the Fellowship, Alliance of Baptists and American Baptist Churches USA. According to the report, 60 Baptist women were ordained in 2005, putting

to 10 percent of the actual number.” Of the women identified as working on church staffs, the largest percentage — 31 percent — work in preschool or children’s ministry. Durso said it was easier to identify women serving as pastor or co-pastor because most national organizations keep records of congregational leaders. In 2005, the report estimates 5.5 percent of CBF affiliated churches had women serving as pastor or co-pastor. The report, which BWIM plans to update on a yearly basis, was researched and written by Eileen CampbellReed, doctoral candidate in religion at Vanderbilt University, and Pam Durso, associate director of the Baptist History and Heritage Society. “From an advocacy and research per-

CBF Statistics Percentage of women in leadership roles in 2005 according to report. Pastors 5.5 % Chaplains 28% Global Missions field personnel 49% Coordinating Council 35% Students at partner schools 37% Faculty at partner schools 25.5%

spective there are lots of good reasons to produce this report every year,” said Campbell-Reed. “By continuing to put factual and clear information in front of people it heightens the awareness of women in clergy leadership, encourages and thanks those who are already advocating for women’s leadership and prompts those who are not.” The annual meeting included a worship service titled “In a Different Voice.” BWIM also presented its annual Addie Davis awards, recognizing McAfee School of Theology graduate Stacy Cochran as the winner of the award for outstanding preaching and Baptist Theological Seminary of Richmond student Debra Anne Carter as the winner of the award for outstanding pastoral leadership. f! LEARN – For more information on BWIM or to access a copy of “The State of Women in Baptist Life” report, go to www.bwim.info.

BWIM coordinator Rachel Gunter Shapard broke bread for communion during the organization’s worship service.

By Patricia Heys, CBF Communications

Reyes, Vestal observe moment of silence for immigration reform THE CENTRAL QUESTION in the debate on U.S. immigration policy reform is not about economics or politics, the National Convocation of Hispanic Baptist Leaders stated June 23. “The basic issue is whether Jesus still has a mission to the poor,” Albert Reyes, president of Baptist University

of the Américas (BUA), explained as he introduced a document titled “Proclamation for Immigration Reform” at a meeting designated a “solemn assembly” during the Cooperative Baptist Fellowship’s General Assembly. “As Hispanics we need to be a prophetic voice and challenge people to

Vestal calls for ‘Renewal’

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Fellowship Coordinator Daniel Vestal reminded General Assembly participants that the Fellowship movement is a movement of renewal. He said, “So what is to be done so that CBF continues as a movement of renewal and not harden into a denominational structure? How do we nurture and foster renewal?” Vestal highlighted four ways in which the Fellowship can continue to be a movement of renewal: “We nurture renewal as we confess and celebrate our center. We nurture renewal as we clarify and communicate our values. We nurture renewal as we create community and cooperation. Daniel Vestal We nurture renewal as we commit ourselves to mission.” We want to hear from you! How do you think CBF can be renewed as it seeks to maintain momentum as a renewal movement in the Baptist family? Read the full transcript of the sermon, and fill out the online form at the bottom of the page. To read Vestal’s full address, go to http://www.thefellowship.info/News/GAcoverage/ 060623Vestal.icm. To access the audio file go to http://www.thefellowship.info/News/GAcoverage/ GA06audio.icm and click on “Daniel Vestal, Friday morning, June 23.” To purchase audio and/or a DVD of Vestal’s message, visit The CBF Store at (888) 801-4223 or www.thefellowship.info/thecbfstore.

B a p t i s t Wo m e n i n M i n i s t r y

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Hispanic Network

prayer for our leaders,” Reyes said. “Our role is not to make law — we are not legislators. But we are called to encourage those who do make the laws to take a Jesus type of action.” The one-page proclamation opened by noting, “Our beloved United States of America, a nation of immigrants, is in the midst of the most dramatic immigration policy reform in the 21st Century.” The proclamation affirmed reforms championed by the National Hispanic Christian Leadership Conference. The proclamation urged the following: • More responsive legal avenues for workers and their families to enter the United States and work • The option to apply for permanent legal status and citizenship • Border protection policies that are consistent with humanitarian values “We are not gathered for this solemn assembly as Democrats or Republicans — or even primarily as Americans,” said Daniel Vestal, CBF’s national coordinator. “We are assembled as followers of Christ. This issue is not an ‘either-or’ choice between secure borders or just pathways

to citizenship. I believe the solution can be ‘both-and,’ and it is in that spirit that we pray for God to work in our midst.” The issue reaches beyond the borders of the United States, said Javier Elizondo, vice president of academic affairs at BUA. He pointed out that “when we pray we should also pray for the governments of Mexico and Guatemala and Chile — whichever countries the undocumented come from.” After several public prayers, the group of about 30 people observed a moment of silence to “think of people who need the help of our churches.” The solemn observance expanded from the location of the convocation to cover the entire crowded exhibit hall, which fell silent after it was announced over the public address system. The Fellowship is currently in partnership with BUA and the Hispanic Convention to start 400 new Hispanic churches. f! By contributing writer Craig Bird, San Antonio, Texas

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G E N E R A L A S S E M B LY 2 0 0 6


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Faces of the Fellowship The General Assembly in Atlanta provided spaces for worship, education and fellowship Immediate past moderator Joy Yee, pastor of 19th Avenue Baptist Church in San Francisco, Calif., addressed the General Session audience.

For those unable to attend the 2006 General Assembly, audio and video recordings offer the opportunity to experience stirring messages from CBF Coordinator Daniel Vestal, South African pastor and social justice advocate Trevor Hudson; and CBF moderator Joy Yee. In addition, the annual CBF Global Missions Commissioning Service provides you a birds eye view of CBF’s newest field personnel and the manner in which they will be serving alongside the most neglected. Hear and see each one tell of their missions journey.

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Twenty-four workshops are available on CD-Rom and include topics related to church health, family ministry, HIV/AIDS advocacy and cross-cultural issues.

Adam Fendley and Christian Taylor tasted international food as part of the new CBF Global Missions resource Form.

A complete listing of these resources can be found online at www.thefellowship. info. Each offers a practical and economic resource for church leaders. Add them to your media center, share them with your leadership and utilize them during large and small group gatherings.

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General Assembly comes to you through audio, video recordings

Performance artist Al Staggs, of Albuquerque, N.M., inspired general session audiences with a challenge from Dietrich Bonhoeffer.

Craig Bird, Ashley Grizzle, Patricia Heys, Courtney Hodges, Alex King, Bob Perkins Jr., Sue Poss, Mark Sandlin, Susan Settle, April Shauf, Lance Wallace and Carla Wynn.

Chris Avila and members of Iglesia Bautista El Pastor de Newnan led music at the Hispanic/Bilingual worship service.

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The following contributors assisted with coverage of the 2006 General Assembly through articles and photography:

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Assembly coverage

Members of the Coordinating Council prayed for new CBF Global Missions coordinator Rob Nash and his family.

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Harding Epps and the sanctuary choir of the Baptist Fellowship Group led the Friday morning general session in worship.

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General Assembly


GENERAL ASSEMBLY

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The prayer labyrinth, which includes music, art and media, provided a quiet place during General Assembly for prayer and mediation.

CBF-endorsed Navy chaplain Peter Ott and his wife, Melissa, participated in worship.

The Resource Fair served as a gathering place for Assembly attendees, as well as an informational and educational center.

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At the General Assembly’s closing session, new CBF Global Missions field personnel Taisha Rose (center) and Laura Barton (right) served communion to Ellen Burnette, who serves in Thailand as one of CBF’s field personnel.

General Assembly

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G E N E R A L A S S E M B LY 2 0 0 6


CONGREGATIONAL LIFE RESOURCES

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Free resources available online ■ Conversations Around the Lamp Post: A Study Guide to ‘The Chronicles of Narnia’ for Personal or Group Discussion and Reflection This study guide is designed to be used with the “The Chronicles of Narnia” movie and/or book series by C.S. Lewis. The study guide is divided into seven sections — one section on each of the seven books or stories in the “The Chronicles.” “C.S. Lewis made it quite clear that the books were not to be understood as straight Christian allegory,” writes study guide editor Rickey Letson in the introduction. “Instead, Lewis said that Narnia was a supposal. In other words, suppose there was a world like Narnia that actually existed and that was in need of redemption as is our own world. How would God go about doing it? The seven “Chronicles” form Lewis’s answer to that question and in so doing, introduce us to a world through which we can quickly find many parallels to our own world worth pondering, savoring and discussing.” The study guide provides a framework for individual and groups, such as Sunday school class series, book and movie clubs, one-day seminars and discipleship groups, to discuss “The Chronicles.” At the end of each lesson are ideas on how to discuss the story with children. www.thefellowship.info/ documents/Narnia.pdf ■ Responding to ‘The DaVinci Code:’ An Outline Resource for Church Leaders Produced by the Cooperative Baptist Fellowship, Responding to “The DaVinci Code” is designed to assist pastors and congregational leaders in discussing Dan Brown’s best-selling “The DaVinci Code” book and/or movie with their church and community. “’The DaVinci Code’ gives congregations a wonderful opportunity to respond to the curiosity that has been peaked in everyday folks about a variety of issues, including extra-biblical works, gnosticism, basic aspects of church history and the life of Christ,” said Rickey Letson, minister of adults at Johns Creek Baptist Church in Alpharetta, Ga., who wrote the discussion guide component of the resource. The book has raised issues for Christians and non-Christians around the origin of the Bible, the nature of Jesus, the role of women in the early Church, and the revelation of modernday Gnosticism. The online resource also includes talking points for leaders, handouts, bibliography and links to additional Web resources. www.thefellowship.info/ documents/tdvc.pdf

C O O P E R AT I V E B A P T I S T F E L L O W S H I P

Fellowship produces new spiritual formation resource guide

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hen The Baptist Church of Beaufort, S.C., called Eric Spivey as its first minister of Christian formation and missions, one of his

first tasks was to explain part of his job title — Christian formation. Spivey’s church is not alone — Cooperative Baptist Fellowship congregations are learning in greater numbers what it means to be involved in Christian formation, also known as spiritual formation, and defined by the Fellowship as “the process of being shaped in the image of Christ by the gracious working of God’s Spirit, for the transformation of the world.” Building on its strong history and with Spivey’s leadership, The Baptist Church of Beaufort started spiritual formation small-group studies and is now in its third installment. “Intergenerational Christian communities have developed, Sunday Bible study groups have grown deeper and church committees have begun to see God’s presence in their work,” Spivey said. “I am amazed at how God has moved within our

congregation. Individuals have been spiritually stretched in new and exciting ways.” Understanding the importance of spiritual formation to churches, the Fellowship now offers “Light for the Path: A Guide to Spiritual Formation Resources,” which provides information for churches and individuals interested in engaging the ministry of spiritual formation Written and compiled by members of the Fellowship’s Spiritual Formation Network, including Spivey, the resource guide provides: • an introduction to the concept for spiritual formation • personal spiritual formation resources • congregational spiritual formation resources • a bibliography of Christian devotional classics • children and family spirituality resources • spiritual formation resources recom-

mended by surveyed pastors, church staff members, religion professors, chaplains, counselors and laypersons • a glossary of Christian spirituality terms “This is an exciting new resource guide for Fellowship Christians,” said Bo Prosser, the Fellowship’s coordinator for congregational life. “The insights from the contributors as well as the many resources form a lifetime of opportunities for growing and forming a stronger faith lifestyle. I wish I’d had this when I was serving in the local congregation.” Why should churches learn about and embrace spiritual formation? Because “engaging in this process of formation strengthens our faith, in some cases even restructures our beliefs and practices,” Prosser said. “Congregations and faith leaders need to ensure that our folks are on the journey toward Christ-likeness — being formed, reformed and transformed into the likeness of Christ,” Rick Bennett, the Fellowship’s associate coordinator for congregational life. “The Spirit is the agent of this transforming work, but we help our folks be present to it.” f! LEARN – For more information, contact Bennett at (770) 220-1605 or rbennett@thefellowship.info. The guide can be purchased through The CBF Store at www. thefellowship.info or (888) 801-4223.

By contributing writer Melanie Kieve, Alabaster, Ala.

‘Companions in Christ’ debuts spiritual formation resources for adults, children NEW SPIRITUAL FORMATION resources for children and adults are available as part of the “Companions in Christ” series produced by The Upper Room, a Cooperative Baptist Fellowship partner. “‘Companions in Christ’ resources are the first resources we turn to for spiritual formation,” said Rick Bennett, the Fellowship’s associate coordinator for congregational life. “The new resources continue to develop the spiritual formation concept for individuals and congregations.” Faith formation is one of the Fellowship’s strategic initiatives, which makes resources like “Companions in Christ” so important. The foundational resource of “Companions in Christ” is a 28-week study designed for small groups within churches. The effectiveness of the initial resource has led to the latest resources, The Way of Transforming Discipleship for adults and The Way of the Child for children. The Way of Transforming Discipleship is a six-week study for adults about connecting

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spirituality and discipleship. Designed for small groups, the study is a journey of selfdiscovery as participants explore the meaning of authentic spirituality and are equipped to make a difference in their world. The resource is written by Trevor Hudson, a South African pastor who is engaged in social justice and reconciliation work in his country. The study, which would be good for missions groups, concludes with a pilgrimage and retreat into the surrounding community. Separate books for participants and leaders are available. The Way of the Child, a 39-week resource for children 6-11 years, could be used in Sunday school, weekday camps or after-school programs. Based on the recognition that children have an innate spirituality, the resource teaches children spiritual practices that can draw them into a deeper relationship with God. Sessions are themat-

ically organized under God’s love and care, prayer, Advent and Epiphany, acts of love, Lent, Easter, parables and meaningful scriptures. A leader guide, booklet for families, CD of music for families to listen to, and introductory DVD are available as accompanying products. The Fellowship has partnered with The Upper Room to provide spiritual formation resources and facilitate spiritual formation events for the last four years. f! LEARN – For more information on “Companions in Christ” resources, including The Way of the Child and The Way of Transforming Discipleship, contact Rick Bennett at (770) 220-1605 or rbennett@thefellowship.info. All resources can be ordered from The CBF Store at www.thefellowship.info or (888) 801-4223.

By Carla Wynn, CBF Communications

New Spiritual Formation Resources

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Online Resources


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‘It’s Time’ helps churches discover their mission

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ooking for a way to call their members to missional renewal,

Photo courtesy of Hampton Baptist Church

called to be and to do,” Cannon said. “We have also seen and celebrated our church’s Hampton Baptist Church in Hampton, Va., and First Baptist strong role in that call, and have a heightened awareness of the call to be on misChurch in Dalton, Ga., found “It’s Time: A Journey Toward Missional sion that is ours.” To begin its study, Hampton Baptist Faithfulness” to be just the resource they needed. established a steering team with coordinators as is recom“Our church has long considered sermended in the curriculum. vice as a major portion of our faith, but The coordinators, who were this material represented the opportunity assigned responsibilities rangto focus upon it intentionally,” said Dan ing from worship to publicTatum, minister of congregational life at ity, set up their own teams, Hampton Baptist. involving as many people as “It’s Time” is an eight-week CBF curpossible in the process. riculum designed to help churches and “The unifying factor Christians discover and fulfill their Godthis resource brings to given mission. The resource includes the congregation cannot sermons, small-group studies, personal be underestimated,” said devotionals and other materials. Hampton Baptist pastor “Our hope is that Baptist Christians Charles Smith. “Having the and churches would begin to live entire congregation on the missionally, that they would live their lives same page for several weeks and do church attuned to the mission with sermons and Wednesday of God in the world,” said Rick Bennett, night Bible studies coinciding the Fellowship’s associate coordinator with the weekly Sunday for congregational life. “’It’s Time’ seeks School material was huge. to help churches and Christians join Enabling the congregation to the missional journey, to embrace the channel its energy and passion perspective that God is at work in the together in one direction world and that God has invited us to join Lit Little built benches for the Eastover retreat center, one of several missions projects recently initiated by Hampton Baptist was gratifying. Offering in that work.” Church members. opportunities for mission First Baptist Church in Dalton used “It’s adult Sunday School lessons that used Jeaction and creating an atmosphere Time” as its study guide during the 2006 sus as a model for being on mission. where service and outreach are not only Lenten season to celebrate the church’s “This entire experience has been a encouraged but blessed is enticing. Our missional call. To accompany the book good one for our people as it helped us congregation emerged stronger because of study, Phillip Cannon, minister of educato more fully realize what we have been ‘It’s Time’.” tion and administration, wrote a series of

Missional ministry grant Find out how churches that complete the “It’s Time” study can apply for grant money to support their missional ministries. http://www.thefellowship.info/ItsTime/ TheMissionalChurch/grant.icm

“’It’s Time’ offers a more relevant emphasis than the dated tent revival approach while still providing the same revivalistic feeling that our older church members are so nostalgic about,” Tatum said. “It represents a way for a church to focus upon its mission that is relevant to today’s culture.” Tatum said that as a result of the study, more members have taken the initiative to start missions projects on their own. For example, some members have agreed to pack bag lunches one Saturday a month at a local agency that serves the poor, a need members learned about through the “It’s Time” study. Another of the major effects is the organization of a team whose purpose is to communicate and organize mission opportunities. f! LEARN – For more information, contact Bo Prosser at (770) 220-1631 or bprosser@thefellowship.info. To order “It’s Time,” contact The CBF Store at (888) 8014223 or www.thefellowship.info.

By contributing writer Sue H. Poss, Greenville, S.C.

Church start resources Meet Bernie Moraga WHO is Bernie Moraga? Bernie Moraga is the Fellowship’s Hispanic Church Start Initiative consultant. A native of Chile, Moraga has 35 years of pastoral experience in the Hispanic community. He is based out of Albuquerque, N.M. WHAT is the Hispanic Initiative? The Hispanic Initiative was formed with the purpose of helping to create new Hispanic churches in the United States. The Fellowship works together with the Hispanic Baptist Convention of Texas, Baptist General Convention of Texas and Baptist University of the Américas to link congregations in one-toone partnerships. Part of the Initiative’s goal is to create indigenous churches with bi-vocational pastors that are self-supported from their first day. WHEN? Since its creation in 2003, the Hispanic Initiative has helped to create 105 new Hispanic churches. The Initiative’s goal is to create 400 churches by 2010. WHY is the Hispanic Initiative important? “Hispanic churches are among the fastest growing within CBF because of the changing demo-

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graphics,” Moraga said. “Hispanic churches are primarily made of people much younger than Anglo churches. The future of the Fellowship depends on reaching a young, diverse Hispanic audience. The way in which CBF Hispanic churches are being started is unique among Baptist circles. CBF Hispanic churches are started with the idea that they will be self-sustaining and nourish an environment for indigenous worship. In addition, the model empowers workers to minister to the needs of their community.”

Meet Phil Hester WHO is Phil Hester? Phil Hester is the Fellowship’s associate coordinator for new church starts and restarts and has been doing church start work for the Fellowship since 2000. Before coming to CBF, Hester served in a variety of roles: advertising agency president, professor, consultant and church starter. He is based out of St. Petersburg, Fla. WHAT is New Church Starts? The focus of New Church Starts is on birthing congregations based on the indigenous principle — each church is based on and shaped by the culture of its location, therefore, making each church unique. The Fellowship also promotes a research-driven approach, involving focus groups and demographic studies. The Fellowship’s New Church Starts personnel work together with CBF state and regional organizations to help support and encourage new church starts.

HOW does Moraga help churches? Moraga is a resource for churches and individuals who are interested in starting or supporting Hispanic churches. He works together with CBF state and regional organizations and Fellowship partner organizations to help pair Fellowship churches with Hispanic congregations. Moraga works to promote cultural awareness and increased awareness of the Hispanic Initiative. He helps to provide demographic information, feasibility studies, possible partners and connect congregations with leaders.

WHEN? Since 2000, the Fellowship has helped start churches in 21 different states.

Contact Moraga at (505) 610-1945 or bmoraga@thefellowship.info.

WHY is the Church Starts ministry important? “There are no conventions, denomi-

Church Start Resources

nations or movements that are experiencing growth in the U.S. that are not successfully starting new churches,” said Hester. “The U.S. is the third largest nation in the world in terms of unchurched people, and the great commission and great commandment is the reason to start new churches. In the first six years of CBF church starts, most of our church starts have been the result of partnerships and individual entrepreneurship. Where we need to be in the future is churches starting churches.” HOW does Hester help new church starts? Hester is a resource for congregations and individuals interested in starting or restarting churches. Hester helps people to develop the necessary steps in the church planting process — from selecting a location to identifying a church planter to assisting in fund development. Hester is the organizer and facilitator of the annual CBF Boot Camp for Church Starts, which helps to prepare church planters to start churches. Contact Hester at (770) 220-1651 or phester@thefellowship.info.

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CBF Global Missions inspires congregations with missions education resources

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fter more than 300 interviews with missions leaders, the Cooperative Baptist Fellowship has developed and released new

missions education resources designed to inspire entire congregations. The new resources, produced by CBF Global Missions, include age-specific curriculums for preschoolers, children, youth and adults. Each resource — Form, Spark, Ignite and Affect — is tailored specifically to the needs and interest of the specific age group. “For several years, we have provided solid missions education material for use by our partnering churches,” said Jack Snell, associate coordinator for CBF Global Missions field personnel. “But the new curriculum makes a quantum leap in providing material that is attractive, userfriendly and theologically and missiologically sound. And that will enable users to become familiar with the work CBF Global Missions is doing around the world.” All four of the new resources feature

C O O P E R AT I V E B A P T I S T F E L L O W S H I P

the stories, experiences and work of CBF Global Missions field personnel around the world. For example, preschoolers and children have the opportunity to learn about field personnel Ana Marie and Scott Houser and their children and how the entire Houser family ministers to caregivers in South Africa. In Ignite, teenagers are exposed to the wide range of locations where the Fellowship ministers — from Thailand to South Dakota to Eastern Europe to South Florida — and are encouraged to find their own passion for missions. Affect engages adults in current global missions issues, like the AIDS pandemic, and provides opportunity for action. “These resources will help churches become more missional,” said Fellowship

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Coordinator Daniel Vestal. “They are biblical in foundation, global in scope and relevant to today’s world. The face of missions is changing daily, but the mandate of our Lord remains the same. It is encouraging to me that CBF missions is practical and personal while being strategic. These resources will inform and form all who use it.” f! LEARN – All resources can be ordered from The CBF Store at www.thefellowship.info or (888) 801-4223. For more information on CBF Global Mission’s resources, visit www.missionseducation.org.

By Patricia Heys, CBF Communications

■ Form — The preschool resource, designed to help form preschoolers’ ideas about God, others and themselves. Preschoolers will learn through experiences such as blocks, art, music, nature, puzzles, books, group time and CBF Global Missions field personnel stories. Form is a quarterly publication with weekly sessions. ■ Spark — The children’s resource, intended to spark children’s interest in missions. Spark lessons will offer children and leaders many choices, covering six areas of interest — field personnel profiles, food, the arts, games, cultural experiences and the Bible. Spark is a quarterly publication with weekly sessions. ■ Ignite — The youth resource, a 12-month plan to fuel teenagers’ passion for missions. This resource — divided into 12, self-contained chapters — includes missions studies, Bible studies, project ideas and worship ideas and can be used in a retreat format or as a weekly study guide. ■ Affect — The adult resource, which will encourage a missional lifestyle among adults by giving them missions insight and opportunities to respond. Affect participants will receive a monthly, magazine-like product with a feature story, devotional reflection, book group suggestions, prayer calendar and a call to action.

Visit www.missionseducation.org to order the new resources or to download free samples.

CBF Global Missions Resources


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Children use new resources at General Assembly

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he Cooperative Baptist Fellowship introduced its new missions education resources at the Fellowship’s General Assembly in June,

and preschoolers and children had an opportunity to sample the new resources at the Children’s Assembly. The preschoolers and children learned to make beaded jewelry, play African rock games and cook an unfamiliar food. Each project taught the children an aspect of South African culture as they learned about CBF Global Missions field personnel ministering in and around Johannesburg — Ana Marie and Scott Houser and Caroline and Josh Smith. “The curriculum can provide ideas for Sunday School, Bible study and children’s sermons,” said Leon Castle, managing editor for CBF missions resources. “We are after meeting the needs … to lead children into happy learning experiences.” Form, the curriculum designed for preschool-aged children, helps shape the preschooler’s ideas about God, self and others. The curriculum uses guided play to teach preschoolers, who are in the “foundational stage” of faith development, said Tamara Tillman, the Fellowship’s associate coordinator for missions education. “Play is the work of the preschooler,” Tillman said.

Spark, a resource for school-aged children, was built around feedback from surveys and focus groups indicating children want to be active and experience missions. Spark works well in rotational settings, according to Tillman, offering children six interest areas. “This workshop gave me an idea of how [the curriculum would] allow children to look at the full package and interact with what they were learning,” said Lee Ritchie, minister to youth and children, First Baptist Church in Commerce, Ga. At the Assembly, participants were able to try the curriculum before deciding on whether to implement it in their own churches. “Our church’s leaders are anxious for something new and meaningful,” said Becky Lynch, a member of Boulevard Baptist Church in Anderson, S.C. “This appears to be good material for them, and I’m excited about it.” f! By contributing writer Ashley Grizzle, Atlanta, Ga.

Reading groups compliment new missions education resources ANYONE WHO likes to read will find the reading group option in the new monthly Affect missions education resources for adults the perfect way to reflect on missions and engage in a missional lifestyle. Carol Prevost, a retired teacher who volunteers as a literacy advisor for Together for Hope, CBF’s rural poverty initiative, is writing the reading group material. Each month, she suggests one primary and two secondary books that relate to the missions theme. The leader’s guide includes suggestions on how to lead a discussion on the primary book. “Carol has carefully suggested the book titles and written a discussion guide to use with the featured book,” said the Fellowship’s associate coordinator for missions education Tamara Tillman. “The books suggested reflect the theme in the mission study, but do not necessarily duplicate it.” The book selections will be a mixture of commercial bestsellers, classics and religious books. The books are both fiction and nonfiction. “Some books will extend knowledge of a country or a person who has experienced life in similar ways to those in the mission stories,” Prevost said. The September study features Gandhi High School in Pecs, Hungary, and tells the story of justice and hope among gypsy students there. The primary book for reflection is “Robert G. Clark’s Journey to the

CBF Global Missions Resources

House” by Will Campbell that talks about Holmes County, Miss., where, like the Romany gypsies, African Americans struggled with lack of access to quality education. In another study, former secretary of state Madeline Albright’s memoirs of growing up in Czechoslovakia, “Madam Secretary,” Albright, will relate to the Fellowship’s work with the Slavic population in Asheville, N.C. “We want these reading groups to be a thought-provoking and spiritual pursuit,” Prevost said. “We want to engage people who are interested in reading but not necessarily involved with missions in other ways. We are not trying to dumb this down. We want to challenge adults. We want our people to use their imaginations, to reach out to others and to have fun.” Prevost said up to 20 people could be in a reading group with the ideal number be-

ing about 10 to 12. The reading groups can be used to extend the lessons of the missional study or they can be totally separate and stand on their own. f! LEARN – All resources can be ordered from The CBF Store at www.thefellowship.

info or (888) 801-4223. For more information on CBF Global Mission’s resources, visit www.missionseducation.org.

By contributing writer Sue H. Poss, Greenville, S.C.

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G E N E R A L A S S E M B LY 2 0 0 6


Ashley Grizzle photo

0610P005

Lynda A. Schupp, chaplain, Lake Forest Good Samaritan Village, Denton, Texas

■ Retirement Community

Charles Simpson, board certified chaplain, APC; chaplain, U.S. Army Reserve, Little Rock, Ark.

■ Military

chaplain, East Alabama Medical Center, Opelika, Ala.; Leanna J. Pearse, board certified chaplain, APC; chaplain, St. Joseph Hospital, St. Louis, Mo.; Stephen L. Saunders, CPE resident, Scott and White Hospital, Temple, Texas; Terry J. Tatro, board certified chaplain, APC; chaplain, Norton Healthcare, Louisville, Kent.; Audrey L. Wilson, chaplain, Department of Veterans Affairs, Durham, N.C.

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Carita L. Brown, CPE Resident, Methodist LeBonheur Healthcare, Memphis, Tenn.; Michael E. Bumgarner, board certified chaplain, APC; chaplain, Norman Regional Hospital, Norman, Okla.; David K. Chan, supervisor-in-training, ACPE; chaplain, The Methodist Hospital, Houston, Texas; David B. Gladson, CPE resident, AnMed Heath Pastoral Services, Anderson, S.C.; Richard J. Forest, chaplain, Norton Healthcare, Kosair Children’s Hospital, Louisville, Ky.; Judith A. Grace, part-time chaplain, Hillcrest Health System, Waco, Texas; William H. Hemphill II, board certified chaplain, APC; chaplain, Dekalb Medical Center, Decatur, Ga.; Phillip S. Lee, board certified chaplain, APC;

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Carol Fletcher, chaplain, VistaCare, Bogart, Ga.; Craig S. Klempnauer, chaplain, Southern Care Hospice, Waco, Texas; Vicki G. Lumpkin, part-time chaplain, Hospice of Rockingham County, Wentworth, N.C.

■ Hospice

Daniel D. Bland Jr., chaplain, Federal Bureau of Prison, FCI-Beckley, Beckley, W.V.

■ Corrections

THE FOLLOWING chaplains and pastoral counselors were recently endorsed by the Fellowship:

New chaplains and pastoral counselors

■ Hospital

and pastoral counselors featured a presentaAT THE Cooperative Baptist Fellowship’s tion about “Contemplative Prayer” by Loyd General Assembly, Fellowship-endorsed Allen, professor of church history and spirichaplains and pastoral counselors were tual formation at McAfee School of Theolchallenged practically in a conference, ogy in Atlanta, Ga. learned about conThe luncheon hontemplative prayer at ored newly-endorsed their annual luncheon chaplains, current and honored one of chaplains and pastoral their own for significounselors in all fields, cant contributions to and a special presenthe Fellowship’s entation was made to dorsement program. pastoral counselor Troy Molly Marshall, Petty, who was recogpresident and profesnized for his service as sor at Central Baptist chairman of the CounTheological Seminary cil on Endorsement. in Kansas City, Kan., The Fellowship has presented “Renewing Chaplain Joseph Scott Blair talked with 526 endorsed chapa Theology For MinGeorge Pickle, the Fellowship’s associate lains and pastoral istry: A Call to Care” coordinator for chaplaincy and pastoral care, at the conference. counselors who serve at the chaplaincy and in businesses, universities, correctional pastoral counseling conference. facilities, hospitals, hospice ministries, Focusing on “Trinitarian Soundings for military, pastoral counseling practices and Practitioners of Care,” Marshall presented a public safety. f! theology of ministry and outlined Trinitarian virtues that sustain ministry: creativity, LEARN – For more information on compassion, centeredness and community. chaplaincy and pastoral counseling, con“Whether it is a stranger in distress … tact George Pickle at (770) 221-1617 or or a burdened colleague, as we open the gpickle@thefellowship.info. door, we become more sensitive to the quiet sound of angels,” she said. By contributing writer Ashley Grizzle, Friday’s annual luncheon for chaplains Atlanta, Ga.

Chaplains, counselors gather for learning, fellowship at Assembly

Mark Sandlin photo

(800) 352-8741

www.thefellowship.info

P.O. Box 450329 • Atlanta, Georgia 31145-0329

Cooperative Baptist Fellowship

Serving Christians and churches as they discover and fulfill their God-given mission

More than 4,100 Fellowship Baptists gathered in Atlanta for the 16th annual General Assembly.

Pages 8-11

Inside this issue: New church resources for fall

General Assembly 2006

GENERAL ASSEMBLY 2006

COOPERATIVE BAPTIST FELLOWSHIP | WWW.THEFELLOWSHIP.INFO

f fellowship!

CBF

July/August 2006 fellowship!  
July/August 2006 fellowship!