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FELIX ISIDORSSON WIBERG

PORTFOLIO Works of industrial design Lunds university 2011-2015

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HELLO!

Felix Isidorsson Wiberg felix.isidorsson@hotmail.com +46 762836865 www.felixisidorsson.com Södra esplanaden 30A 223 52 LUND, Sweden

My aim is to always keep exploring and keep putting up new challenges for myself. Being curious about the unknown opens up for experiences which strive for my goal to not only have a deep knowledge in the things I do know but to actively work for broadening the spectrum of experiences to have deep knowledge in what I do know and great understanding in the things I do. There’s a huge potential in having tools and platforms which allow expressions, new experiences and greater knowledge. As a designer I’m fascinated by how design enables to let people around me improve the way they live. If it’s the way they get themselves to work, or handling problems which create social barriers. As a photographer I actively look for things that create an impression, and photographing people makes it apparent and illustrates behaviours that often go unseen, using my camera as a parrallel tool for my role as a designer in a field study for what is going on and changing constantly around us. Curiosity and necessities are pushing me as a person and designer forward. When sailing on a boat over the Atlantic, our rudder broke two weeks from land, together we as a group ripped away wooden parts from the boat and built a tiller that could take us the last half over the ocean. What I want to provide is my burning interest in people and working as a designer in a group, improving the objects we surround ourselves with today. Through the experiences and knowledge I have, I hope that together we can change and create something new, either if it’s by necessity or curiosity.

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KNOWLEDGE EDUCATION

WORK EXPERIENCE

2011 - 2015 Lund University, Sweden Bachelor program of industrial design

2015 B.A Foto Shop assistant 2011 - 2014 Fokus IT Event group leader

2008 - 2011 Polhemsgymnasiet, Sweden Industrial design

2011 - 2012 Lund University Student ambassador

SKILLS Computer

2010 - 2011 Unfors Instruments Instrument calibrator

Adobe Photoshop Adobe Lightroom

2007 - 2011 Templar Events Event staff

Adobe Illustrator Adobe Indesign Autodesk Inventor Solidworks

PRACTICAL EXPERIENCE

Rhino

2012 - 2013 Lund University Head of university introduction

Keyshot Maxwell Languages

2013 - 2014 Transatlantic sailing Sailed by own boat over the Atlantic for one year

Swedish (native) English Norwegian Danish

Licences

Spanish

Drivers licence B

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S E L E C T E D P R O J E C T S

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HAGLÖFS ALFA

DAGER

NEST CHAIR

6-21

BLACK MAGIC COFFEE BREWER

22-25

THE MOOMIN FAMILY

36-41

42-47

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26-35

TÊTE-À-TÊTE

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HAGLร–FS ALFA AUTUMN 2015

In Motion Supervisor: Charlotte Sjรถdell & Jasjit Singh CREATE AN OBJECT OR PRODUCT THAT IS USED WITH, OR IN MOTION. The goal was to improve safety on ice. Reforming the way poeople estimate ice strenght today, Haglรถfs Alfa is designed to encourage both unexperienced and experienced to explore new landscapes.

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COMPANY BRIEF Design an object for outdoors activity/activities. The product should address the user’s needs in an outdoors activity and is designed to be in line with the Haglöfs family. Context The industrial design project B course started off with the sub theme “In Motion”. The course goal was to develop the creative ability by making effective use of acquired knowledge of design methodology, carrying out a design project with the aim of practising theoretical and artistic knowledge. The common shared sub theme was to focus on designing an object that is used in, or consists of motion. In the initial phase there were two companies that the students could choose to work towards. One of those companies was Haglöfs, the biggest supplier of outdoor clothing, -gear and –shoes in Scandinavia, Europe and Asia. Choosing Haglöfs as a company to work towards, the in house designer Jacob von Matern was present, mentoring the progress of the different projects. The purpose of the Haglöfs oriented project was to practise working towards a company, understanding and improving the student’s skill in branding and having a role as a freelance designer.  

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INSPIRATION Growing up with a father who as young was a sailor, ski bum, trekker and traveller, he often took me out in many different situations in nature. I’ve always trusted my father. When being in nature, I never felt afraid. He opened the nature world to me and I have kept exploring ever since.

who, thanks to the ferries could experience the archipelago. Now, what happens when the ocean freezes? Living in Sweden, the seasons are in great contrast to each other and the landscape distinctly changes into something new and different. This part of the nature, normally so close by, is shut off and closed to the community.

So what if you haven’t grown up with those experiences. How is it possible to unfold the nature which is unexplored and sometimes the closest to us?

During the coldest part of the year, the water freezes on lakes and in the sea in Sweden and is often perfectly safe to walk on. Activities minimize during winter season and a lot of people hesitate to get out on the ice. Today, the majority of the active, recurrent people on the ice are exclusively the long distance ice skaters. Why is the crowd spending time in the winter landscape so secluded, and is there actually an interest in getting out in the nature more? 

During winter, both coasts fo Sweden are frozen to a wonderful ice landscape. Boats is taken up, ferries stop going. The otherwise bubbling life on the small islands of Sweden is drained from people

How could these frozen landscapes be enabled for potentional practitioners?

Personal brief:

Design an object that allows both unexperienced and experienced users to safely explore nature on ice.

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CHOSEN USER GROUP

Active practitioners

Meeting new people

Stressrelieving

Potential practitioners

Exercising

Meeting new people

Experiencing nature in a new way

Stressrelieving

Enabling for people that are not active on the ice to experience unexplored frozen landscapes, not having previous knowledge how to read ice strength.

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Exercising

Experiencing nature in a new way


DANGERS ON THE ICE

Falling through

1. Cold shock The cold water leads to hyperventilation, involuntary gasping & hypertention 2. Loosing cordination Within two to five minutes the body is loosing strenght and the capability of keeping oneself up at the surface 3. Hypothermia Body temperature falls below 35째C, resulting in unconsciousness 4. Cardiac arrest Automated body functions stop working 5. Suffocation When suffering from hypertention the body cramps, and the risk of being pulled in under the ice by currents leads to death.

There is an absolute need to prevent-atively ensure the safety of the potential practitioners staying on the ice

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EXISTING SAFETY TOOLS Use tool on ice

Guess ice strenght Estimate ice quality

Reading ice thickness

Preventative

Permissive

Pole

Ice picks

Hand drill

Rope

Sonar instrument

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SKETCHES & TESTS

Tests done in a climate lab showed that dropping a 1kg weight from 3,5 meters were equivalent to a 120kg person breaking 3,5cm ice

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2cm

3,5cm

65kg

75kg

7cm

85kg

120kg

Height meters 3,5 3,0 2,5 2,0 1,5 1,0 0,5

1

2

3

4

5

6

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7

8

9

10

Amount of tests


USER SCENARIO

Present scenario

Walk up to insecure area

Test ice strength in risk area

Force ice pick on ice on the unsecure area

Fall into the hole which the ice pick caused

Swing the tool

Impacts same dynamic force as a person

Walk around unsecure area

Desired scenario

Walk up to insecure area

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3D MODELING

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RESULT

First rubber ring lets the user easily fasten the weight when in use

Rubber isolating from the aluminum handle

The lenght of the rope enables you to have a safe distance to the unsecure area

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Second rubber ring for carrying


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Fastening knob for rope

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Rubber end on rope creates a softer pull

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HAGLĂ–FS ALPHA The laws of physics never grow old.

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NEST CHAIR SEPTEMBER 2014

2 week workshop project Supervisor: Anna Petersson RETHINKING THE MOST PRODUCED CHAIR IN MODERN TIME The aim of the project was to evaluate how cultural qualities differ in our everyday living. With inspiration from asian cultures, making the unconventional, conventional.

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Re-thinking the natural position of the chair My personal experiences root themselves in not Asia but a really cold winter climate in Sweden. Waking up every morning running down to the breakfast table bare feet, the floor was so cold I always pulled my feet up from the floor keeping them warm under my legs in a cross-legged position. The things creating a new behaviour can both come from emotional and outer physical aspects. By designing for an open interpretation of objects you allow for the user to him or herself use the object in a desired way. I believe it’s not our roles as designers

to shape and force new behaviours on people. What I wanted to do was to re-think what the chair itself allows for different seating positions. I didn’t want to change re regular way the user can be seated, but opening up for new broader ways of use. Trying to sit in a cross-legged position in the normal chair was impossible due to first; the armrests and second, the width of the seating area. When sitting cross-legged without the armrests increased the angle of the thighs, creating a counterbalance in the spine, making the seated person hunch forward not to fall back.

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By increasing the back legs or decreasing the length of the front legs, a tilted seating angle was created allowing for an upright position. Further, the width of the seat was still too narrow, not leaving space for the feet to be pulled up. Therefore I considered creating a metal frame, widening the area. By doing so the feet could be pulled up and then pulling ropes in a structure creating a support area for the legs.


RESULT

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The conventional only become unconventional when taken out of context

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DAGER SPRING 2013

Lighting project Supervisor: Olof Kolte CREATING A ILLUMINARE THAT ENHANCES AND IMPROVE AN ACTIVITY IN A SPECIFIC SPACE DONE IN DARKNESS

The goal was to create a lamp that evaluates what is really needed to be enlighted to bring focus to the task being done, minimizing light pollution.

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It’s getting brighter... For most of our history, daylight was the main way of lighting up indoor space. After the development of electric light and especially after the introduction of the florescent tube lighting, making it relatively cheap to “flood” any space with light. The importance, and the knowledge of how to use daylight has almost disappeared. Very few architects today, consider how it’s dispersed and distributed in the space, and how it is perceived when you use the space. The LED-technology was first introduced in 1962, then only as indicator light for electronic equipment. Since about eight years, more powerful LED:s has been introduced with white light that can be used as a light source. How can we minimize the light profusion in a society that has an overconsumption of electricity and illumination of spaces?

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No light profusion

Reforming how LED light is used

Soft contrast


QUESTION Is it possible to bring insight to the user of how light could be used most effiecient and pleasant by providing a new way of illuminating the environments we over illuminate today?

Why not direct light? Using exclusively reflected light enables a design where there is no possible chance of getting blinded by the light. When looking straight into a light source there a great chance of getting permanent problems, but more than that, the sight gets affected for more than five minutes before going back to a fully functional sight. Having full sight is absolutely needed when spending time in a low light environment. When getting blinded the pupil of the eye have a hard time reading the surroundings leaving us handicapped in the dark.

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BRIEF Creating an table lamp that, in low light conditions illuminates purely what is needed to be lit up. Casting a reflected light, there should be no possibility of glare or getting blinded by the lighting.

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SITUATION >>Good lighting is fulfilling the purpose of the situation. The lamp should adapt for the sensitive eyes in the dark mornings.

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Finding a curve Before starting to work with mock-ups, theoretical curves were created and calculated how they would cast the light. There were different aspects to work with, forming the casted light, he width of the opening of the lamp foot and the height. The form of the revolved curve that were to be the casting element of the lamp played a huge role in how the light was distributed. Thin sheet metal and a laser pen was used to do empirical tests on how the light was reflected on the casting curve element.

BREAD 31.

GLASS

JUG

MILK

BOWL

CEREALS

GLASS

The most fitting shape to create an ambient, surrounding light on a focused area is a revolved shape on the casting element. Therefore I worked with a revolved shape for the foot, that would supply the casting element with an evenly distribution of light.

BOWL


RESULT

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Top piece: Made from three different glass tubes

Bottom piece: Made lathed from aluminum cylinder

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BLACK MAGIC COFFEE BREWER AUTUMN 2014

Industrial design project C Supervisor: Per Liljeqvist HOW CAN FASCINATION RAISE THE EMOTIONAL VALUES IN PRODUCTS? The purpose of this project was to criticize how design often hides the amazing processes behind products in our everyday lives and how they’re made.

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INSPIRATION The enthusiast I remember the weekend mornings when I was a kid. I woke up in my bed and could feel the smell of thick roasted coffee smoke. A few seconds later the fire alarm set off, like every weekend when dad was roasting his beans. My dad always been an enthusiast, in most of things that he does. He went to the local coffee

roaster, hand picked his beans, went home to wash them and start roasting in our oven. After that he had shut off the fire alarm and the beans were ready, he would hand grind them, weigh them up, measure the right amount of water and start brewing. This would take somewhat of a eternity seen from my perspective and I never understood how all that work could be worth one single cup of coffee.

Putting thought into what you do My father is an advocate of understanding the things we encounter. When the frustration doing math homework and you just wanted the solution, the answer always was exposition of the ground constitutions of mathematics. “You need to understand how it all works, no one will evolve if you never understand the basics”. I did not appreciate it then, but my father ended up as the main inspiration for what The black magic coffee brewer project turned out as. When I as a kid asked him how he could think that it was worth all that work for a cup of coffee in the morning he answered me “The process somehow makes the experience more valuable”.

Pick your mix of beans

“The process somehow makes the whole experience more valuable”

Roast ‘em

Get grinding

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Brew & serve!


FUNCTION PROTOTYPE

CYLINDER WORKING AS CONTAINER TRACKS FOR WATER

FLOATING CONE MALE PROFILE

CONAL CUT FEMALE PROFILE

STOP PLUG

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BRIEF Designing a coffee brewer that enhances fascination around the brewing process, resulting in a damn good cup of coffee!

Closed process

Open process

?

How to raise the value in the brewing processes we encounter every day by giving value to the process while keeping the simplicity of machine brew

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RESULT

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1

2

Fill decanter with water

Put coffee in container

And lock into place

Psst! Max limit is one litre

4

3

Let water boil up...

No risk for over-extraction

Coffee’s still inside here, dry and happy!

The air inside the container DS and escapes as bubbles

EXPAN

5

6

Brew preferred time..

Air cools down... The vacuum inside the container gets filled with water instead!

7

8

Pull container up

y

jo

En ur yo tin as

tt

ea gr g

Extract into decanter Coffee grounds out!

e!

ffe

co

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THE MOOMIN FAMILY AUTUMN 2014

Free collaboration, F.Nilsson & E.Lindberg Supervisor: Andreas Hopf FORMING A SERIES OF PORCELAIN OBJECTS THAT IS DESIGN FROM THE SAME CORE AESTHETICS From Tove Janssons “Moomin”, we wated to create a family of objects, inspired of the different characters in the books.

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Snufkin

Little my

Snufkin is a philosophical vagabond who wanders the world fishing and playing the harmonica. He carries everything he needs in his backpack, as he believes that having too much stuff makes life overly complicated.

Little My always wants to decide things for herself. Mess and untidiness don’t bother her at all: in fact, life is much more exciting that way. Being quite small, she can hide in a milk jug or amongst the ladles and whisks in a kitchen drawer. Sometimes she goes to sleep inSnufkin’s pocket.

Snufkin always wears a dark green hat with a wide brim and a similarly coloured, shabby old coat. He first joins the Moomins on their adventures in the book Comet in Moominland.

Snufkin is her half brother. Little My wears her bright, copperred hair in an onion-shaped bun on top of her head and usually wears a red dress.

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RESULT RESULT

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TÊTE À TÊTE SPRING 2015

Bachelor project Collaboration with Erik Thomasson Supervisor: Charlotte Sjödell & Claus-Christian Eckhardt SHAPING A NEW SOCIAL ENVIRONMENT, WHERE INTERACTION IS TAKING PLACE ON EQUAL TERMS FOR EVERYONE

In the project we used the introverted/extroverted characteristics as a tool criticize current conventional behaviours in order to gain a different perspective of current work place situations.

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INTROVERTS/EXTROVERTS

Is there such a thing as an extrovert ideal? People with extroverted characteristics are generally seen as something desirable by society, often associated with a majority of positive attributes, while introverted personalities often is seen as something of lower value. Our admiration for the socially dominant can easily blinds us for what is good, intelligent and wise. This means that we are equating extroverts with success. Doesn’t this mean that we currently have an extrovert ideal? Designers can proceed with creating the physical surroundings that encourages this ideal, or by being aware of creating situations that provides an equal platform for the individual.

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BRIEF “Create an object that encourages and enhances creative discussions between two people as a part of the daily work flow�

Shared workspace Focused individual work

Corridor/common area Potential place for private interactions

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PRESENT BEHAVIOUR

!

! ?

!

! Move away from overstimulating environment

DESIRED BEHAVIOUR

!

?

Move to enhance interaction

Is design currently pushing people into an extrovert behaviour, despite our own personality?

Can we create awareness by raising user questioning in an unsustainable situation?

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PROTOTYPE

Key findings Screen makes available for personalization of stimuli Extra storage space strenghtens stability Legs does not read as having a certain directon

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“We wanted to introduce the natural references of a group room to the table, where the user could choose to ‘close the door’ and letting others know that they’re occupied”

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RESULT

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Changing the work space after you own prefernces of stimuli. The“closed mode� shows privacy while opening up for discussions, like shutting the door behind you.

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ASSEMBLY

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Not a single screw When constructing Tête-à-tête, we wanted to achieve a simplicity in the way the user assembles the object. Too many designed pieces today make the user dependent on outside services and tools, it was therefore desired to design the final product independent of tools. By letting the users install the different components themselves, an understanding for how the product works can be achieved. If someone should spill a cup of coffee, a knowledge of the product, could encourage the user to lift up the circular surface and wipe the wooden body dry.

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“We’re all inconstant and different, therefore it’s crusial changing the work place, enabling the same.”

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Supervisors: jasjit.singh@design.lth.se charlotte@sjodelldesign.com per@liljeqvistdesign.se claus-christian.eckhardt@design.lth.se olof.kolte.design.lth.se anna.petersson@arkitektur.lth.se

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CALL ME! Felix Isidorsson Wiberg felix.isidorsson@hotmail.com +46 762836865 www.felixisidorsson.com Sรถdra esplanaden 30A 223 52 LUND, Sweden

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Felix Isidorsson - Industrial design portfolio  

Selected projects from my studies during my time at Lund University.

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