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INDEX 1.- Introduction 2.- Background 3.- Location 4.- Study Area 5.- Hipsography DIAGNOSIS 6.- Environment 7.- Sociodemographic Aspects: Population and Housing 8.- Communications and Transportation Infrastructure 9.- Urban Image

15.- Issues Summary FORECAST 16.- Scenario Trends Forecast STRATEGIES 17.- Environmental Strategy 18.- General Tourism Development Strategy 19.- Tourism Development Strategy per Area 20.- Support Strategies Oriented Towards Tourist Activity 21.- Nautical Facilities and Transportation Systems 22.- Tourist and Urban Programmatic Scenario 23.- Urban Strategy

10.- Territorial Diagnostic

24.- Urban Image Strategy

11.- Tourist Activity

25.- Triggering Tourist Projects

12.- Supply and Demand Analysis

26.- Target Image

13.- Tourism Structure

27.- Remarks

14.- Competition and Target Market Analysis

28.- Aknowledgements

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Introduction Tourism is one of the sectors that the Republic of Haiti’s Administration has identified as a successful factor to stimulate national economy. This is currently one of the most dynamic sectors and this trend is expected to continue in the immediate future. It also represents a realistic option for foreign investments and consequently for the economic well-being of Haiti’s population. In this regards, the Tourism Ministry is working to reposition Haiti as a Tourist destination. The Ministry’s action policy is based on four priority areas: education, regulation, the development of natural (and tourist) heritage areas, as well as promotion. In order to meet these courses of action, from 2011 to 2013 the Ministry has taken steps to develop regions in Haiti with tourism potential through the implementation of a strategic program for the integral development of tourist areas across the Northern and Southern regions of the island. Basic planning studies oriented towards tourist development are being carried out which has led to this study called General Tourism Development Program and Target Image of Haiti’s Southern Region” which covers the development of the country’s South and Southwest coastline from Port Salut to Jacmel. This will give rise to the development of catalyzing ecotourism projects and their positioning in the international tourism map. The outright conclusion derived from launching this program is that the Tourist Corridor proposed from the cities of Port Salut to Jacmel represents an investment opportunity with a potential market for tourists that arrive in the area for it has a great location advantage in the Caribbean. The development of this Tourist Corridor will generate major economic and social benefits for the communities and their area of influence by generating employment, infrastructure and services as means to improve the population’s living standard. Haiti, the jewel of the Caribbean, deserves the opportunity of attracting investments and positioning its tourist products, making of Haiti a new tourist destination.

Source: CMS Company, Photograph archives. Lozandieu Bay and Duverger Lagoon aerial photo. Haiti´s visit March 2013

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Background

This report has been developed by establishing planning objectives that lead to short, mid and long term strategies and actions, which will enable quality tourism as a catalyzing element for the development of the Southern and Southwest regions. This area features a great tourism potential due to its natural and cultural richness and it also features valuable land reserves. The area has also gained experience in the promotion and development of this destination as a result of the existing tourism to areas such as Port Salut. Note that in order to carry out the “General Tourism Development Program in Haiti’s Southern Region” study, the “Diagnostic Report and the Policy on Haiti’s Coastline management” created by expert advisors to the Haitian Government were used as reference.

Source: Kedar, Daniel. Haití From Above.Jacmle´s urban center. Opus Publishing, 2003.

Within the collaboration agreement framework between Mexico and Haiti, Haiti’s Tourism Ministry states that it is necessary to have a planning instrument that favors the organized and sustainable development of tourism activities in Haiti’s southern region.

Source: Kedar, Daniel. Haití From Above. Côtes de fer´s coastline. Opus Publishing, 2003.

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Location The Republic of Haiti is located in the central area of the Caribbean Sea; it is located on 18º 20’ 6’’ and 71º 20’ and 74º 30’’ latitude and west longitude, respectively, near Central America. It occupies the western side of the La Española Island and it is directly adjacent to the Dominican Republic. It abuts with the Atlantic Ocean to the north and with the Caribbean Sea or the Antilles to the South and to the West. The country’s total area is 27,750.07 square kilometers on a mountainous morphology. Its borderline with the Dominican Republic covers 275 kilometers and its coastline covers a little over 1,771 kilometers with a 5,000 sqkm continental platform along the Atlantic Ocean and the Caribbean Sea. The island’s population was estimated at 10,413,212 inhabitants in 2012 with a mean population density of 375 inhabitants per sqkm. The country’s capital city, Port-au-Prince, has a population density of up to 266,741 inhabitants per sqkm which makes it one of the most densely populated cities in the western hemisphere.

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Study Area The study area belongs to Haiti’s southern coast and it is comprised by the South and Southeast Provinces. Les Cayes, capital city of the South Province, is located on 18º 12’ 0’’ and 73º 45’ and 07’’ latitude and west longitude, respectively and; Jacmel, capital city of the Southwest Province, is located on 18°13’59.88’’ North and 72°31’59.88’’ West, respectively.

For the purposes of this program, note that different levels of information analysis are covered, depending on information availability for each topic. Research was conducted in provinces, municipalities, cities and in specific cases, some properties were analyzed in detail. Likewise, and in order to make the results and proposals more explicit, the coastline from Port Salut and Jacmel will be referred to as the Tourist Corridor of Haiti’s Southern Region.

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Hipsography

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Environment

In order to carry out the sustainable tourist development in Haiti’s South and Southeast regions, an analysis of the area’s both physical and biotic environmental characteristics is key to the appropriate use of the resources found in the region.

In this vein, the intention is to carry out ecotourism projects, implementing protection, preservation and conservation environmental policies, and where needed, restoration in areas or land that require it, as is the case with tourism development for Haiti’s southern region.

Given the environmental deterioration of Haiti’s Southern coastline, there are no environmental conditions to carry out tourist developments in the area, and thus, the proposed tourist and urban [development] actions must be performed in balance and harmony with the environment.

Some natural areas within Haiti’s southern coast region such as mangrove swamps and wetlands, reefs, lake systems, rivers, runoffs, forests and beaches require protection, conservation and even maintenance actions. 8


Sociodemographic Aspects: Population Demographic and housing information for the study area is presented in three time periods (2003, 2009 and 2012) based on the definite results from the 2003 census and estimates for 2009 and 2012 as to the total population, the population of 18 years of age and more, number of homes and density; both reports created by the IHSI (French acronym for Haitian Institute of Statistics and Data Processing) Note that the sociodemographic analysis of this document was carried out based on the information collected from Haiti’s last Census, and thus the information used for several topics herein is not updated to the year 2012. In this regard, the Haitian government is recommended to carry out an objective Population and Housing census within a short term as to social and economic issues which will be very useful for all research and public administration services.

at 1,343,263 inhabitants which accounts for 12.9% of Haiti’s total population. The population growth increase from 2003 through 2012 was 236,937 inhabitants for the 9-year period. The population territorial distribution is divided into Villes, Quartiers and Sectiones Rurales. In 2012, 45.85% of the country’s population is located in cities (villes); 3.65% in neighborhoods (quartiers) and; 50.50% in rural sections (Sectiones Rurales).

The above includes the information on total population, male population, female population in the different geographical and political areas—Arrondissements (districts), Communes (municipalities), Villes (cities or towns) and Quartiers (neighborhoods). The Southeast Province is comprised by three districts: Jacmel, Bainet and Belle Anse, while the South Province is comprised by five districts: Des Cayes, Port Salut, D’ Aquin, Des Coteaux and Chardonnieres. The study area includes 8 districts (arrondissements), 28 municipalities (communes), 28 cities (villes), 13 neighborhoods (quartiers) and 28 rural sections (Sectiones Rurales). In 2012, Haiti’s population was estimated at 10,413,211 inhabitants. The population in the South and Southeast provinces was estimated

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Sociodemographic Aspects: Population In the South province, growth rates feature another scenario that would be important to analyze. The highest Annual Mean Growth Rates were recorded in the Vieux Bourg d’Aquin quartier at 5.52%; Torbeck at 4.96%; Chardonnieres at 4.74%; being the Vieux Bourg d’Aquin and the Torbeck quartiers near the Aquin and Cayes cities. On the other hand, cities like Coteaux, Tiburon and Cayes recorded growth rates of 3.73%, 3.66% and 3.50%, respectively. Other cities such as Cavaillon, Saint Louis du Sud, Port a Piment, Roche, Roche a Batea, Anglais, Port Salut, Saint Jean du Sud e lle a Vache recorded rates under 3.48%. Estimated Annual Mean Growth Rates for cities and quartiers in the South Province.

Estimated Annual Mean Growth Rates for cities and quartiers in the Southest Province 6.00

5.00

4.00

3.00

2.00

1.00

0.00

Source: CMS Company with information of the Ministry of Economy and Finance. Haitian Institute of Statistics and Data Processing, (IHSI French acronym), Total population, population of 18 years and over. Homes and estimated densities in 2009 and 2012. January 2012.

Active population distribution by main economy sector in the South and South East provinces, Haiti, 2003. Source: CMS Company with information of the Ministry of Economy and Finance. Haitian Institute of Statistics and Data Processing, (IHSI French acronym), Total population, population of 18 years and over. Homes and estimated densities in 2009 and 2012. January 2012.

In the Southeast province, 85% of the population is found in rural sectors and only 13% in cities. In the South province, 78% of the population is found in rural sectors and only 19% in the cities. This indicates a high dispersion of the population of up to 83% found in rural areas for both provinces. Growth estimates for cities include the period from 2009 through 2012. The Quartiers (neighborhoods) have also been included in the analysis for major growth rates have been detected in urban areas in both provinces. The Southeast province recorded mean annual growth rates ranging between 3.44 and 3.47% while the South province recorded growth rates ranging between 0.59% (the lowest) and 5.52% (the highest) in the study area.

at 3.49% and 3.48% respectively; cities like Cayes Jacmel, Bainet, Thiotte and L’Anse a Pitre recorded a 3.47% growth rate. This reflects a population increase in the rural sector while the Jacmel, Cote de Fer and their quartiers recorded a 3.46% growth rate.

Source: CMS company with information of the Ministry of Economy and Finance. Haitian Institute of Statistics and Data Processing, (IHSI). Definite results of the Population and Housing General Census. Haiti. 2003.

The records for Economic Activity sectors are grouped in 3 sectors: primary, secondary and tertiary. The primary sector includes agricultural, cattle, fishing, hunting and forestry activities. In the study area, 155,299 people, equivalent to 63% of the Economically Active Population (EAP), are in this economic sector. The Secondary sector includes the electricity, gas and water, extraction, manufacturing, production and distribution activities along with the construction industry and represents 8% of the total economically active population in the study area with 19,170 people. The tertiary sector includes activities related to commercial, collective, social and personal services. In the study area, this sector represents 29% of the economically active population with a total of 70,040 people. The population working in the hotel and restaurants sectors is equivalent to 0.17% of the EAP with only 410 people working in this sector in both provinces.

The highest growth rates were recorded in the Seguin and Grand Grosier Quartiers (neighborhoods) 10


Sociodemographic Aspects: Housing According to the definite results of the 2003 Census, Haiti’s population reached 8,373,750 inhabitants. In the same year, the number of homes recorded in Haiti grew to 2,016,247 of which, 129,442 were located in the South province and 108,010 in the Southeast province.

simply buried in the fields.

Note that the information associated with 2009 and 2012 is based on estimates calculated by the Haitian Institute of Statistics and Data Processing (IHSI), as the official source which identified a total of 2,147,693 homes in Haiti in 2009; 146,610 of those homes are located in the South Province and 128,342 in the Southeast province.

96% of the occupied homes do not feature drinkable water services. 48% of the homes get water supply from fountainheads or water springs. Only 11% of the homes in the Southeast province feature a faucet inside.

14% of the homes feature electricity services; 70% of the homes are lit by gas lamps. Coal is used in 45% of the homes in the South province for cooking.

In 2012, the South province recorded 153,888 homes for 739,565 inhabitants with a density of 58 homes per square kilometer, whereas the Southeast province recorded 134,681homes for 603,698 inhabitants with a density of 66 homes per square kilometer. Both provinces together account for a total of 288,569 homes for 2012 equivalent to 12.8% of the total number of homes found in Haiti. The housing supply covered the demand of 2,260,092 inhabitants. Home characteristics and utility services 31.8% of families occupying homes get water supply from natural water springs. The second main water source consists of wells and the third main source consists of public water sources and rivers. However, only 1.5% of all the homes located in such province feature drinkable water connections Sewage services inside the homes are also limited. Only 1.8% of the homes have a toilet. Most homes feature individual or collective latrines. 54% of homes in the South province do not feature any kind of sewage and waste is

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Sociodemographic Aspects: Housing Only 1.3% of the total number of homes feature water supply inside and only 1.6% feature sewage services.

Percentage of utility services inside the homes of the South and Southeast provinces in the year 2013.

10% of the homes are lit by candles. Only 8% of the homes feature electricity services and the remaining 80% are lit by gas lamps. Housing demand in 2003 In the South province, 3.5% of the homes are made of precarious and very fragile materials. 5,064 homes are not fit for dwelling. The housing demand in the Southeast province grew to 3,523 families that do not have a home in appropriate dwelling conditions which represents 2.6% of the total number of existing homes found in this Southeast province in 2003. Percentage of utility services inside the homes of the South and Southeast provinces in the year 2003.

Source: CMS Company, based on the Ministry of Economy and Finance. Haiti. Haitian Institute of Statistics and Data Processing (IHSI). Final Results of the 4TH Population and Housing General Census. Haiti. 2003.

Source: CMS Company, based on the Ministry of Economy and Finance. Haiti. Haitian Institute of Statistics and Data Processing (IHSI). Final Results of the 4TH Population and Housing General Census. Haiti. 2003.

Source: Kedar, Daniel. HaitĂ­ From Port Salut port. Opus Publishing, 2003.

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Communications and Transportation Infrastructure The South and Southeast provinces are connected with the capital city of Port-au-Prince through the National Route RN2. This road connects the country’s southern regions. This national Route, RN2, is a two-lane paved highway that runs from the capital city of Port-au-Prince to the Leôgane district extends through 33 kilometers and 121 kilometers to Jacmel. Provincial routes and connections with the RN2 road At the RN2 and Leôgane intersection, the national route highway splits towards Miragoâne and extends through 94 km and 88 km towards Jacmel.

The National Route connects the cities of Leôgane and Miragoâne. This road features paving damages in some stretches and isolated preventive signaling. This road splits into two in Miragoâne: The first road connects Miragoâne Bay, a Northeast corridor along the coastline (The Southern Canal) called RD201, with other roads towards the southern end of the country connecting the central area of the Southeast and South provinces—it keeps the RN2 code. The National Route, a highway between Miragoâne and Aquin, is a two-lane, paved, signaled road which connects the cities of Saint Michel de Sud, Fond des Negres, La Hatte, Saint Medard, Saint Castor, Vieux Bourg’d Aquin and Aquin. The National Route RN2 from Aquin to the southern end of the country is a two-lane road connecting the Les Cayes city. It is a narrow road given the area topography (slopes and coastlines) connecting the cities of Saint Louis du Sud, Cavaillon and Les Cayes. The Aquin to Les Cayes stretch covers 56 kilometers. The highway infrastructure is limited in this stretch for it features two lanes and a limited hard shoulder. There is no information or prevention signaling that marks distances between the cities. There are some stretches where traffic tieups are common at intersections of the National Route and province routes in all cities. International Air Transportation Haiti’s international airport is located in the capital city of Port-au-Prince called the Toussaint Louverture International Airport. Several airlines have fights to several countries such as France, Panama, Cuba, United States Canada, Chile, Santo Domingo, among others. 13


Communications and Transportation Infrastructure Local Air Transportation

c) Transportation on motorcycle taxis

Some local airlines offer regular flights on airplanes of up to 19 seats across several cities such as Cap Haitien, Jeremie, Les Cayes, and Port de Paix. Charter flights to Jacmel, Hinche and Pignon may also be purchased.

It is estimated that there are around 3,362 motorcycle taxis—mainly scooters and bike taxis. In Port-auPrince’s metropolitan area, most taxis are scooters, whereas in the countryside, most taxis are motorcycle cabs which represent 70% of all the taxi vehicles in the country, while scooters account for the remaining 30% approximately. The Southeast and South provinces account for 5% and 9% of all the taxis in the country, respectively.

a) Regional urban transportation Urban and regional transportation does not feature boarding and unboarding areas for passengers (bus stops) that guarantee their safety. In accordance with the 2004-2005 Transit Survey applied nationwide, and which assists with gathering information on the public transit situation in the study area, the public transit for passengers is classified as: Public transit with stop times and without stop times.

d) Maritime transportation The transportation survey identified 342 vessels that arrived in ports of the countryside. The South, Southeast, Nippes and Artibonite provinces recorded maritime transportation rates ranging between 4 and 7%, the lowest in the country.

• Public transit with stop times. Transit vehicles feature well-defined circuits with accurate points of departure and points of arrival. The total number of vehicles stands at 4,198 units, of which 3,499 vehicles correspond to public transit vehicles with stop times which account for 84% of all public transport vehicles. Most of these vehicles are tap tap buses which account for 85.8% of public transit vehicles with stop times; Canter vehicles account for 3.4% and the mini buses account for 2.9%. Public transit vehicles with stop times in the South province account for 13.2% over the total number of public transit vehicles and are better equipped in terms of quality, whereas public transit vehicles with stop times in the Southeast region account for 5.5% over the total number of public transit vehicles. • Public transit without stop times. In contrast with public transit with stop times, vehicles without stop times have no fixed destination. Most of these vehicles may be found in the North, Artibonite and Southeast provinces in cities kike Cap Haitien, Gonaives and Jacmel.

Source: Port au Prince. Aerial view. “iipdigital.usembassy.gov”.

b) Merchandise transportation Merchandise transportation vehicles account for 6.9% of all the vehicles with only 286 units. The North province records 27.7% of all merchandise transportation vehicles while the South province records 5.2%. Source: http://www.wanafrika.org/2013/04/ aeropuerto-en-haiti-recibira-el- nombre.htm

Source: CMS Company, Photograph archives. Public transport called “Tap-Tap” buses. Haiti´s visit. March 2013.

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Urban Image Although the urban image concept refers to the urban context, the study area embodies the relevance of a coastline landscape in its rural context with flora and fauna environmental features pertaining to the Caribbean region. Territorial configuration determines the characteristics of the urban image which is analyzed based on existing cities and the different elements that shape them. In order to tackle the urban image issue, once the territory has been analyzed along with its cities and their urban and regional characteristics, a brief analysis on and a description of the urban image elements is presented based on Kevin Lynch’s classification which takes the following elements into account: a) Paths. “Paths are the channels along which the observer customarily, occasionally or potentially moves. They may be streets, walkways, transit lines, canals and railroads .” b) Edges. “Edges are the boundaries between two phases, linear breaks in continuity: shores, railroad cuts, edges of development, walls. They are lateral references rather than coordinate axis .” c) Districts. “Districts are the medium-to-large sections of the city, conceived as having two-dimensional extent…and which are recognizable as having some common, identifying character.” Districts may include neighborhoods. d) Nodes. “Nodes are points. The strategic points in a city into which an observer can enter, typically junctions of paths, or concentrations of some characteristic.” Nodes are strategic points with population

density in the city. e) Landmarks. “Landmarks, the points of reference considered to be external to the observer, are simple physical elements which may vary widely in scale.” These points of reference may include buildings, monuments, churches, signaling, mountains, squares, stores, etc. that are visible from various angles and distances. 15


Urban Image The different urban image elements are presented based on the classification detailed above. See urban image map .

architectural and heritage value and is located near the city of Aquin, as well as the Duverger Lagoon (Tete L’etang) which is a natural landmark with environmental and landscape value.

Port Salut city. Being a coastal city located in an area with major slopes, the provincial route RD25 is a coastline communication path with other towns and cities. As the rest of the cities along the coastline, Point Abacou is a natural edge. The urban center of Port Salut, which features high landscaping value, is classified as a neighborhood. The public beach at Point Sable is classified as a node.

Côtes de Fer City. This is a coastal city. The RN41 road is the main access route to the city. The coastline and the beach are natural borderlines for the city. The public square is one of the main nodes. Landmarks are points for social interaction such as the church, the police station, and sports and recreational spaces. As part of its cultural identity, the city of Cotês de Fer holds a major fest dedicated to Saint Joseph on March 19.

Les Cayes City. The Word “Cayes” means “low island, rocks, banks formed by mud and coral”. Apparently, Les Cayes city was refounded in 1726, according to a blueprint created by M. Lance. A Spanish town, called Salvatierra de Zabana (Land saved from the rising waters), was founded there first in 1503 by the Spaniard Nicolás Ogeda.

Bainet City. The provincial highway RN41enables road access to Bainet City along with RN2. Its natural borderlines are comprised by the coastline and the beach. The districts and/or neighborhoods are points with high landscape value. The Harbor Master’s Office. Jacmel. Jacmel is an urban center with high architectural, cultural and heritage value. Founded in 1698, Jacmel has an important economic and cultural history, being deemed as a commercial center. Jacmel once was one of the major coffee and essential oil exporting ports in the Caribbean.

Les Cayes is the third largest city in Haiti and is the South province’s capital city. It is the coastal city with the second largest population in the South province and its main access road is the RN2. Given its territorial configuration, it is a unique city with a coastal city that includes both a coastal strip and beaches. The urban center is a district or neighborhood with high architectural and heritage value that is also classified as a node. Other nodes are those found at the Gelée public beach, and the public square of this urban center. The church and the commercial port are among several landmarks in this urban center. The most important celebration in Les Cayes that shapes part of its cultural identity is the “Our Lady of Assumption” party held on August 15.

Nowadays, Jacmel maintains a peculiar urban identity and is considered by many as the cultural capital city of the country’s southeast region. Known for its peculiar artistic traditions, Jacmel has lodged a number of famous painters and poets. Its theatrical carnival, its French colonial architecture, beautiful beaches, impressive mountains and comfortable hotels attract Haitian and foreign tourists who look for authentic enchantment. All these factors give Jacmel the reputation of being one of the most dynamic and interesting tourist spots in Haiti.

Ilé à Vache. This town features natural physical boundaries since it is locates on an island. It has majestic landscapes and high environmental value. This city is classified as a district or neighborhood featuring a yacht port that serves as a node. Saint Louis du Sud city. Being a coastal city, road communications are possible through the RN2 road. Given its territorial configuration, the coastal line and bays are its natural physical boundaries. The Oliviers and the Des Anglais fortresses are two landmarks that have high heritage and architectural value in this area. The latter is located on the Saint Louis du Sus Island. Aquin city. The territorial configuration features less steep slopes that enable wide spaces in the city with a public square as its main node. The National Route is the main road that facilitates access to the city. The districts and neighborhoods can be identified within the city, being the downtown section the area with most cultural value. Two of the main landmarks are: The Bonnet Fortress which features high

The RN4 route highway and the RD45 provincial highway are the paths that enable access to the city and connect it with other towns. The public square, yacht port and the Harbor Master’s Office are the city’s main nodes, while Jacmel Cathedral is its main landmark. 1)

2)

Source: CMS Company, Photograph archives. 1) Public square Côtes de Fer; 2) Public Square de Aquin. Haiti´s visit. March 2013.

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Territorial Diagnostic (South)

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Territorial Diagnosis (Southeast)

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Tourist Activity Regional Trends International tourism grew by 4% in 2012 reaching 1.035 million tourists, pursuant to the last Barometer of the WTO. Emerging economies recorded higher growth rates than first world economies at +4.1% and +3.6%, respectively, being the South Pacific Asian region the one with the best results.

International tourist arrivals to the Caribbean, 2000 - 2012

International tourism was up by 39 million in 2012, recording 1.035 billion tourists over the 996 million in 2011. It was the first time in history the number of tourists breaks the 1 billion mark. The demand was rated as good most of the year and it recorded better figures in the fourth quarter than it was originally anticipated. When comparing all the regions, the best of them all was the Asia and the Pacific region which recorded a growth rate of 7%; both the Southeast Asia and the North of Africa subregions recorded growth rates of 9%, whereas Central and East Europe topped the ranking at +8%. Tourism is the world’s greatest industry. If supplementary activities are included, tourism is estimated to generate 11 per cent of the world’s Gross Domestic Product and exports. According to data released by the World Tourism Organization (WTO), this sector increased by 28 times in half a century moving from 25 million tourists in 1950 to nearly 800 million in 2004. In 2013, growth rates are expected to drop slightly (between +3% and +4%) over 2012 and in line with the WTO’s ling term forecasts. The Caribbean Tourism Organization stated that 20.9 million tourists arrived in the Caribbean during 2012. This figure has been increasing by half a million tourists every five years since 17.1 million tourists arrived in the Caribbean in the year 2000 and this number grew to 18.8 million in 2005, to 19.5 million in 2010 and to 20.1 million in 2011. These figures confirm that the Caribbean has been receiving more visitors on a yearly basis, and thus Haiti may be positioned as one more destination within this market. The Caribbean holds around 9% of the world’s tourism, being most of the tourists from foreign origin, especially from Spain (most are Balearic). Major destinations, including Cuba, the Dominican Republic, Puerto Rico, and the U.S Virgin Islands, have maintained the historic leading growth trend in the region. According to data gathered by the Caribbean Tourism Organization, the main tourist destinations (top 10) in the region during the year 2012 as per the number of tourists were: 1) The Dominican Republic, 2) Cuba, 3) Jamaica, 4) Cancun, 5) The Bahamas (although this destination ranks number one in the number of tourists arriving on cruise ships).

Source: CMS Company, based on the World Tourism Organization (UNWTO). International Tourist Arrivals by (sub) regions. April de 2013). Available at: http://dtxtq4w60xqpw.cloudfront.net/sites/all/files/pdf/ingresos_por_turismo_internacional_eeuu_miles_de_millones.pdf

While Haiti does not appear in the data released by such tourist organization, Haiti may be placed at number 19 on the list of tourist of tourist destinations in the Caribbean according to statistical data provided by the Haitian Tourism Ministry. The country of origin of most tourists in the Caribbean is the United States. American tourists account for 92% of all the tourists visiting Puerto Rico; 89% of all the tourists in the Virgin Islands; 79% in the Bahamas and; 74% in Cancun. Additionally, most tourists visiting the Dominican Republic are also U.S citizens. In the case of Haiti, there is no data to define the origin of its visitors. Supply and demand in Haiti From 2005 through 2012, Haiti has seen a moderate and unstable number of visitors. Actually a negative Mean Annual Growth Rate (MAGR) between 2005 and 2006 was recorded when the number of tourists decreased. From 2006 to 2007, a major growth increase was recorded at 13.61 percentage points, when the number of visitors tripled. However, the number of tourists dropped again during 2008 and once

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Tourist Activity again in 2010. Haiti’s best year for tourism was 2009 with the arrival of 387,220 tourists. Tourist arrivals at the top 10 destinations in the Caribbean in 2012

The Bahamas ranks atop as to the number of visitors to the Caribbean arriving on cruise ships, with 8,595,430 tourists between 2011 and 2012. Cozumel, Mexico ranks second with a little over 5.5 million tourists and the Virgin Islands in the U.S rank third with nearly 4 million tourists. As to the arrival of cruise ships, Haiti also ranks 19 among 21 countries analyzed by the Caribbean Tourist Organization, receiving 348,775 tourists during 2011 and 225,835 tourists during 2012. Note that the Northern area of Haiti concentrates the cruise lines market, for the cruises do not currently enter the southern side of the island. There is no information available in relation to the number of tourists visiting Haiti’s South and Southeast provinces.

Source: CMS Company, Photograph archives. Saint Louis Island. Haiti´s visit. March 2013.

Source: Caribbean Tourism Organization. Latest Statistics 2012. Table 3 Tourist Arrivals by Main Market in March 2013.

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Supply and Demand Analysis Tourism supply at the study area In 2013, 66 hotels were recorded in the study area. These hotels account for 816 rooms in 10 Communes (municipalities): Cayes, Aquin, Camp Perrin, Port Salut, Ile a Vache, Port a Piment, Coteaux, Roche a Bateau, Cavaillon and Jacmel. The greatest number of establishments can be found in the Des Cayes Commune (municipality) with 30 hotels—511 rooms and 340 beds. The Port Salut Commune ranks in second place with 10 hotels—62 rooms and 26 beds, and the Aquin and Jacmel Communes rank third. A total of 7 hotels—100 rooms were recorded in Aquin, while Jacmel features also features 7 hotels; a total of 6 hotels are recorded in the Camp Perrin Commune which account for 71 rooms. In the lle a Vache Commune only 2 hotels for 37 rooms were detected. The average room rate per night in the study area comes to $110 USD. The highest rates were recorded at the Ideal Guest House hotel located in Cayes and at the Port Morgan Hotel in lle a Vache for $120 USD per night, while the least expensive hotel rate was detected at Port a Piment Auberge de la Cote for $9 USD per night. Total Hotels in the study area, 2013

According to data from Haiti’s Tourism Ministry, 2009 was the best year in terms of tourists arrivals. The number of tourists that arrived by air in 2009 grew to 387,212 for a 50.04% increase with respect to 2008. This upward trend was favored by the political ease that originated in 2006 and that has been maintained in the following years and by the seemingly improvement of the social and safety conditions in general. By 2011, a total of 945,317 tourists traveled to Haiti, was up by 19.28% over 2010. 348,755 tourists stayed in hotels while 596,755 arrived on cruise ships. The number of tourists stating in hotels was up 36.91% over 2010. Tourists from the North America region account for 70% of all the tourists in the country, while 7% come from Europe, 19% form the Caribbean and 3.5% from the rest of the world.

Historic evolution of tourists arrivals towards Haiti and growth rate of tourist arrivals from 2005-2012.

Arrivals by region, 2008.

Average cost per room per night at the Hotels in the study area, 2013

Source: CMS Company based on quarterly Bulletins 2008-2012. Ministry of Tourism at: http://www.visithaiti.gouv.ht/banque_documents.php

Source: CMS Company, based on Statistical information of Haiti’s Ministry of Tourism. May 2013.

Source: CMS Company based on the Haitian Ministry of Tourism, South Regional. Magazines Magic Rebelle Haiti in June 2012 and July, September 2012 and January 2013. Haiti 2012 Professional Pages

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Tourism Structure In 2013, 66 hotels were recorded in the study area. These hotels account for 816 rooms in 10 Communes (municipalities): Cayes, Aquin, Camp Perrin, Port Salut, Ile a Vache, Port a Piment, Coteaux, Roche a Bateau, Cavaillon and Jacmel.

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Competition and Target Market Analysis Main competition destinations

Target population with earnings over 50,000 USD by sector in the year 2010

The main countries with a significant tourism market and that rank among the top 10 as to the numbers of tourists they receive are: the Dominican Republic, Cuba, Jamaica, Cancun (Mexico), the Bahamas, Puerto Rico, Aruba, Barbados, the Virgin Islands (U.S), and San Martin. The destination with the best tourist infrastructure is the Dominican Republic with nearly 67,000 hotel rooms and enjoys more than 4 million visitor arrivals a year. This country also records high hotel occupancy rates at nearly 67%. Although Cancun and the Mayan Riviera feature a considerably lower number of hotel rooms, recording 71% occupancy rates, the Dominican Republic generated less revenue on account of tourism.

Offer and demand in some countries of the Caribbean, 2010 Source: Census Bureau, Current Population Survey, Annual Social and Economic Supplement, 2010. Table 20. Earnings of Full-Time, Year-Round Workers 15 Years and Over by Sex and Age: 2010 Internet release date: November 2012

It is important to point out that Haiti’s will create a market by positioning the southern region as a quality tourism destination in the Caribbean. Thus, this proposal includes, but is not limited to the U.S market since other markets like the Canadian and European tourists, who have historically enjoyed the Caribbean region, may also be addressed. Source: Source: CMS Company, based on Jamaica Tourist Office, Ministry of Tourism - Jamaica National Tourism Secretariat - Chetumal Quintana Roo Mexico, Cancun Hotel Association, Central Bank of the Dominican Republic, Haiti’s Ministry of Tourism, 2010.

Target market for Haiti’s Southern region U.S tourists are still the predominant market for the Caribbean region. This trend is confirmed through figures recorded by its neighboring tourist destination, the Dominican Republic, with over 30% of American visitor arrivals. Therefore, the primary target market is American tourists with yearly income above $50,000 USD in the segment between 45 and 64 years of age, namely, the Baby Boomers. This population segment represents 47% of the population that can afford traveling and that will generate higher revenue for the first stage of the projected tourism destination.

Similar International Destinations: Punta Cana in the Dominican Republic The arrival of tourists to the Dominican Republic grew moderately during 2010 by 3.3% with a total of 4,124,500 tourists, out of which 85% were foreign visitors. Visitor arrivals rose by 2.3% and by 3.9% during summer. The only decline in the number of tourists was recorded in April for a 3.2% drop in tourists stay time. U.S tourists remained the most important market for the Dominican Republic representing nearly 30.0% of all tourists with at least 1,226,400 visitors. The number of Canadian tourists recorded a slight rise at 2.0% with a little over 659 thousand tourists. A 4.9% decline was recorded in the number of European visitors to the Dominican Republic in 2010 with 1,184,300. The number of visitors arrivals on cruise ships plummeted once again near the levels recorded in 2008 by a significant 29.0%. This trend was basically observed every month during 2010, except in August. The Dominican Republic saw an annual average increase of 9% in the number of foreign visitors, as 23


Competition and Target Market Analysis Arrival of tourists to the Dominican Republic for main market in the months of January and February 2010.

Beaches in the Dominican Republic per region

Source: http://www.godominicanrepublic.com/rd/images/files/DIRECTORIO%20FLYER_baja.pdf

Source: CMS Company, based on Caribbean Tourism Organization. Data supplied by member countries; available in April 9th 2013.

Hotels in the Dominican Republic per region

well as an aggressive expansion of its hotel capacity. It has become one of the main tourist destinations in the region given its abundant supply of hotels and resorts that range from monumental and luxurious hotels owned large national and international hotel chains to smaller and cozy hotels. It features a great number of options for all kinds of visitors such as families, couples, groups, singles and executives. The adult and youngsters segments feature all-inclusive, boutique and bed & breakfast options. The domestic hotel infrastructure is comprised by nearly 67,000 hotel rooms and this number is growing. There are multiple scenarios to choose from: coastal and city resorts within in the North, East or South regions. However, the sun and beach segment poses the highest demand from tourists, especially at the following beaches: The emergence of the real estate tourism industry in the country also generates new lodging options such as villas and apartment buildings for sale or rent designed in a modern and comfortable style located in strategic areas. Source: http://www.godominicanrepublic.com/rd/images/files/DIRECTORIO%20FLYER_baja.pdf

24


Issues Summary The following map depicts a summary of the issues detected in different topics addressed in this diagnostic. Natural environment • • • •

Deficient natural areas (forests, reefs, rivers and stream) conservation and protection policies. Indiscriminate logging. Wastewater dumping into the sea derived from the lack of sanitary infrastructure. Lack of a solid residue collection and disposal system.

Road communications • • • •

Highways in poor condition and areas with severe traffic tieups. Lack of signaling, public transit stops/stations and intersection. Lack of intra urban communications among cities in the South and the Southeast. The addition of sustainable transportation means, for public transit and load transport, are suggested in the short term.

Urban • • • • • •

Lack of hydraulic and sanitary infrastructure. Lack of urban planning. Scattered population that hinders the Access to urban and infrastructure services. Les Cayes and Jacmel have urban and infrastructure services coverage deficits. Housing, drinkable water, electric energy and sewage deficits. If urban sprawl remains uncontrolled, environmental and urban issues will increase in the short term, negatively affecting the region’s economic development.

Source: CMS Company. Photograph archives. Indiscriminate logging in the Sutheast region. Haiti´s visit. March 2013.

Tourism • Lack of efficient regional means of transportation towards the Southern region for the arrival of tourists. • Low tourism supply and demand in the southern region given the low capacity of the hotel industry and the lack of international quality hotel rooms. • Lack of subsidies to support tourism. • Natural and landscaping resources in the South region are not well used.

Source: CMS Company. Photograph archives. Housing in Jacmel, located by the bank of the river. Haiti´s visit. March 2013.

25


Issues Summary

26


Scenario Trends Forecast The Haitian Institute of Statistics and Data Processing (IHSI), being the agency responsible for growth estimates, has defined the population tendencies and perspectives for Haiti’s main cities.

Scenario Trends: Housing demand for the South and Southeast provinces in the years 2005, 2010 y 2015

In this report, only two cities are included in the study area: Jacmel and Les Cayes. According to the IHSI, the mean annual growth rates were estimated at 3.7% and 3.3% which will imply the consolidation of the urban profile for such cities. This scenario was estimated based on the number of homes estimated by the Haitian Institute of Statistics Scenario Trends: Urban population, Annual Mean Growth Rate of the population in the main cities of the country 2000-2015 Source: CMS Company, based on the Ministry of Economy and Finance. Haitian Institute of Statistics and Data Processing (IHSI). Tendencies and Perspectives of Haiti´s population by provinces and municipalities in the years 2005, 2010 and 2015. February 2009. * Note: The estimation of housing demand was calculated with the percentage of housing demand for the year 2003 corresponding the 3.5% in the South Province and the 2.6% in the Southeast.

Scenario Trends: Housing demand for the South and Southeast provinces in the years 2005, 2010 y 2015

4,620

and Data Processing for the years of 2005, 2010 and 2015 as set forth in the document referred to as “Perspectives of Haiti’s Population across its Provinces and Municipalities”.

2005

4,428

4,093

3,771

Source: Trends and perspectives of the Haiti´s population by province and municipality 2000-2015. Haitian Institute of Statistics and Data Processing, (IHSI). Demographic and Social Statistics Office. Ministry of Economy and Finance. February 2012

5,425

5,014

2010 Viviendas Sur

2015 Viviendas Sureste

Source: CMS Company, based on the Ministry of Economy and Finance. Haitian Institute of Statistics and Data Processing (IHSI). Tendencies and Perspectives of Haiti´s population by provinces and municipalities in the years 2005, 2010 and 2015. February 2009. * Note: The estimation of housing demand was calculated with the percentage of housing demand for the year 2003 corresponding the 3.5% in the South Province and the 2.6% in the Southeast.

27


Environmental Strategy Environmental Policies Environmental policies are a key tool to aid the decision making process. These policies make it possible to determine the intensity of resource use, the prioritization in fostering productive activities and even the elimination of such activities. The categories used in proposals of Environmental Management Units within the Regional Environment System for Tourist Development in Haiti’s Southern region are intended to refer to the implied policies and actions through words as follows: Use, Protection, Conservation and Restoration. Environmental Management Units If the potential of the landscapes is to be achieved, and the management of ecological criteria, guidelines, measures and recommendations is to be applied in a special context, then environmental management units must be defined.

Such units are characterized by their homogeneity in relation to the natural attributes and/or their environmental issues and are obtained by overlapping ecological regionalization maps (geoecological units) with the environmental diagnostic and the territory’s natural resources. Characteristics of Environmental Management Units (EMU): EMU I.- Land flora and fauna protection. This region is located between D’Aquin Bay, RN2, Duverger and the coastal fringe at sea levels of 10 and 200. It includes the Duverger (Tete L’etang) Salty Lagoon. EMU II.- Flora and fauna conservation. Mountains and plateaus are included within a 100 m elevation above sea level within the limits of the regional environmental system—2,000 meters above sea level along the Southwest and Southeast region from Tiburón to Jacmel. EMU III- Agricultural-forest use within 40 and 100 meters above sea level. This region is located along the coastline from Bainet to Jacmel. EMU IV.- Forest use within 40 and 100 meters above sea level. This region is located along the Lozandieu, Laborieux and Calebassiere bays. EMU V.- Tourist and urban development within 10 and 60 meters above sea level. The useful areas are distributed along the Port Salut-Jacmel tourist corridor coastline in the Port Salut peninsula covering the Flamands, Mesle, Pointe Nicolás and Lozandieu bays to Jacmel city. EMU VI. Rivers and streams conservation. It includes the Les Cayes, D’Orme, Côtes-de-Fer, Bainet and Jacmel rivers. EMU VII.- Lake systems protection. It includes the region between Girondel, Lozandieu and Calebassiere EMU VIII.- Mangrove protection. It includes the region between Girondel, Lozandieu, Laborieux and Calebassiere bays. EMU IX.- Protection of reef areas, flora and fauna and coral reefs in Lozandieu Bay, Laborieux and Magic Camp in the southeast region, near Aquin city. EMU X.- Sport fishing use. It consists of the coastal fringe and 7km into the sea to Saint Louis Du Sud and Aquin. EMU XI.- Commercial fishing use. This region extends from the coastline and 30 into the sea from Saint Jean Du Sud, Torbeck, Les Cayes and around Vache Island.

Source: CMS Company, Photograph archives. Duverger Lagoon. Haiti´s visit. March 2013.

28


Environmental Strategy

29


General Tourism Development Strategy The potential for tourism development was determined based on the analysis of environmental, ecological and characterization factors of bays, beaches and cliffs, as well as on the analysis of planning and infrastructure requirements. More than 17,800 hectares were analyzed, applying different territorial use percentages and densities, calculating a capacity of 35,196 hotel rooms distributed across the five areas. In Integral Ecotourism Development Areas 1, 2 and 3, 60% of the lodging supply corresponds to hotel rooms (14,392 rooms), while 40% (9,630) corresponds to tourist residences and condominiums. Area 4, a Tourism Development Area under a Consolidation Process, and the areas defined as Traditional Beach Centers feature Traditional Beach Hotels where 100% of the lodging supply, corresponds to hotel rooms -no tourist residences or condominiums-. 7,574 new hotel rooms are expected for Area 4 and 3,600 hotel rooms for Traditional Beach Centers. The Lozandieu Bay area features an estimated capacity of 16,052 hotel rooms along the Côtes de Fer-Bainet corridor (accounts for 5,250); the Bainet-Jacmel corridor features 2,720 hotel rooms; Vache Island, 1,507 rooms—with a 1.1 general hotel rooms density per hectare and; Port Salut, St. Jean Du Sud, Flamands Bay, Du Mesle Bay and Point Nicolás combine for 6,067 hotel rooms., Within the total capacity of 35,196 hotel rooms established in the General Program, 3,600 hotel rooms will be added at Traditional Beach Centers such as: Les Cayes, Gaby Plage, Aquin, Còtes de Fer, Bainet and Jacmel. * Note: In the design of the Master Plan, the division into lots shall be specified for each land use (hotel, condominium or residence, and general equipment). The actual density for each use shall be established in this Master Plan and shall range between 20 and 80 rooms per hectare.

General Tourism Development Strategy

TOURISM SYSTEM REFERENCE

CODE

CONCEPT

LOCATION

FIRST DEVELOPMENT STAGE FRACTIONS

BEACH´S LENGHT (KM)

TOTAL AREA (HA)

USABLE AREA (%)

17,930.0 1 BTU

Integral Ecotourism Development Area 1

IEC IEDA 1

Integral Ecotourism Center

Lozandieu Bay

BTU

MTU

IEDA 2

Integral Ecotourism Development Area 3

IEDA 3

Tourism Development Area under Consolidation 4

IEP

60%

206.5

35,196 5.0

1,032

2

2.8

74.2

60%

44.5

5.0

223

0.9

135.3

60%

81.2

5.0

406

4

10.9

2,338.9

60%

1,403.3

5.0

7,017

5

7.1

1,172.7

60%

703.6

5.0

3,518

6

4.8

586.0

60%

351.6

5.0

1,758

7

3.5

398.4

60%

239.1

5.0

1,195

8

1.9

240.9

60%

144.5

5.0

723

300.0

60%

180.0

1.0

180

43.4

5,590.5

60%

3,354.3

5.0

16,052

9

Coastline Côtes de Fer - Bainet

Total

1749.9

60%

1049.9

5.0

5250

BTU

Integral Ecotourism Project

Coastline Bainet Jacmel

Total

906.7

60%

544.0

5.0

2720

IEP

Integral Ecotourism Project

Île à Vache

4,567.5

30%

1,370.2

1.1

1,507

BTU

TDAC 4 BTU

Beach Tourism Units

Port Salut

1,704.3

60%

1,022.6

2.0

2,045

St. Jean Du Sud

1,172.5

60%

703.5

2.0

1,407

Flamands Bay

890.2

60%

534.1

2.0

1,068

Mesle Bay

1,040.0

60%

624.0

2.0

1,248

Pointe Nicolas

248.4

60%

149.0

2.0

Subtotal UTP

5,055.4

TOTAL

TBC

TBC

9,411.8

TOURIST ACCOMMODATIO N UNITS

Integral Ecotourism Projectº

TBC

Traditional Beach Center (Traditional Beach Hotels )

344.1

GROSS DENSITY (ROOMS / HA)

3

Total Integral Ecotourism Development Area 2

11.6

USABLE AREA (HA)

TBC TBC TBC TBC

Traditional Beach Hotel Traditional Beach Hotel Traditional Beach Hotel Traditional Beach Hotel Traditional Beach Hotel Traditional Beach Hotel

Total

3,033.3

9,622.9

298 6,067

4,403.5

7,574

Les Cayes

10.0

100%

10.0

60.00

600

Aquin

10.0

100%

10.0

60.00

600

Côtes de Fer

10.0

100%

10.0

60.00

600

Bainet

10.0

100%

10.0

60.00

600

Jacmel

10.0

100%

10.0

60.00

600

10.0

100%

10.0

60.00

600

Gaby Plage (Torbeck) Total

IEC IEP BTU MTU TBC TBH

60.0

60.0

3,600

Integral Ecotourism Center Integral Ecotourism Project Beach Tourism Units Mountain Tourism Units Traditional Beach Center Traditional Beach Hotels

30


General Tourism Development Strategy

Total capacity: 35, 196 rooms Planning Perspective: 2013-2045 • 2015; 200 rooms, an 18-hole Golf Course with 300 condominium and or residential use lots , 50 of them will be on sell. • 2017; 1,400 rooms (includes 300 rooms in Ile á Vache and 100 rooms in Port Salut) • 2020; 4,649 rooms • 2030; 20,308 rooms • 2045; 35,196 rooms

31


General Tourism Development Strategy

General Tourism Development Program of the year 2015 to 2045 ESTIMATION OF HOTEL ROOMS AND RESIDENCES - CONDOMINUIUMS IN THE PERIOD 2015-2045

General Tourism Development Strategy

2013 - 2017

2018 - 2045

2015 2º SEMESTRE 2013

2014

ACUMULADO

TOURISM SYSTEM

REFERENCE

CODE

CONCEPT

LOCATION

Constrution of 200 rooms ( 80-room Executive Boutique hotel and project of 2 a 120-room Grand hotels (an 80Tourism hotel) room Boutique and an 18-hole hotel and a 120Golf Course room Grand Tourism hotel) and an 18-hole Golf Course with Executive project real estate of the first 5-star development. hotel of 400 rooms

Condominiums/ residences

2016

2017

Rooms

Condominiums/ residences

Rooms

Condominiums/ residences

50

200

150

650

50

200

200

850

2018 - 2020 Rooms

Condominiums/ residences

100

550

300

1,400

Starts operation of 200 rooms ( 80-room Boutique Starts operation of the first 5hotel and a 120-room Grand star hotel of 400 rooms and Starts operation of the second starts the sale of 50 Tourism hotel) and an 185-star hotel of 400 rooms and hole Golf Course; starts the residential lots of the course the sale of 100 residential lots golf. sell of the first 50 residential of the course golf. A total of lots. 1,400 rooms operating, including 300 rooms from Ile Vache and 100 from Port Salut. Constrution of the second 5Executive project of the Construction of the firt 5- star star hotel of 400 rooms and second 18-hole golf course. hotel of 400 rooms. Executive starts the sale of 100 project of the second 5-star residential lots of the course hotel of 400 rooms. golf.

BTU

Integral Ecotourism Development Area 1

IEC

IEDA 1

50

Integral Ecotourism Center

200

150

400

100

400

Rooms

Condominiums/ residences

758

2,978

1,058

Rooms

1,815

4,237

4,378

2,873

8,615

207

200

215

410

89

134 1,000 600

162

244

300

600

Lozandieu Bay

Rooms

2,600

6,590

5,473

1100 200

Integral Ecotourism Development Area 3

IEDA 3

IEP

2035 - 2040

Rooms

Condominiums/ residences

3,277

6,174

15,205

8,750

21,379

800

1,000

500

417

600

1,200

207

711

400

500

303

555

478

717

289

434

2040 - 2045

2045

Rooms

Condominiums/ residences

Rooms

850

3,093

130

994

9,600

24,472

9,730

25,466

TOTAL

35,196

180

SUBTOTAL

IEDA 2

2030 - 2035 Condominiums/ residences

BTU

Integral Ecotourism Development Area 2

50

200

150

400

100

400

758

1,358

1,815

1,710

Integral Ecotourism Project

Coastline Côtes de Fer - Bainet

BTU

Integral Ecotourism Project

Coastline Bainet Jacmel

IEP

Integral Ecotourism Project

Île à Vache

200

100

700

507

Port Salut

50

50

1,800

2,700

1,777

2,834

16,052

800

1,200

1,000

1,100

350

800

500

400

500

800

5,250

BTU

TDAC 4

BTU

Beach Tourism Units

TBC

500

400

400

100

280

280

280

300

168

Flamands Bay

60

250

250

250

150

108

Mesle Bay

50

300

300

300

150

148

Pointe Nicolas

50

50

100

50

48

1,260

1,887

1,330

1,280

993

424

60

100

150

100

100

90

60

100

150

100

100

90

40

100

200

160

100

Traditional Beach Hotels

Les Cayes

TBC

Traditional Beach Hotels

Aquin

TBC

Traditional Beach Hotels

Côtes de Fer

TBC

Traditional Beach Hotels

Bainet

TBC

Traditional Beach Hotels

Jacmel

TBC

Traditional Beach Hotels

Gaby Plage (Torbeck)

250

SUBTOTAL Integral Ecotourism Center Integral Ecotourism Project Beach Tourism Units Mountain Tourism Units Traditional Beach Center Traditional Beach Hotels

390

300

TBC

IEC IEP BTU MTU TBC TBH

130

St. Jean Du Sud

SUBTOTAL

Traditional Beach Center (Traditional Beach Hotels)

2025 - 2030 Condominiums/ residences

MTU

Tourism Development Area under Consolidation 4

2020 - 2025

150

60

100

440

100

200

300

2720

345

40

40

120

200

200

360

640

1,360

560

500

180

7,574

3,600

Source: CMS Company, own creation. * Note: In the design of the Master Plan, the division into lots shall be specified for each land use (hotel, condominium or residence, and general equipment). The actual density for each use shall be established in this Master Plan and shall range between 20 and 80 rooms per hectare.

32


Tourism Development Strategy per Area

33


Integral Ecotourism Development Area 1 IEDA 1 Integral Ecotourism Development Area 1 (IEDA 1) is comprised by beach-front land fractions, divided by streams or rivers with major water flow, and a lot (9) in the mountain area known as La Baleine. This area covers 5,590.53 hectares equivalent to 55.90 square kilometers, of which, 3,354.32—33.54 sqkm—may be developed with an average density of 5 hotel rooms per hectare, equivalent to 500 hotel rooms per sqkm. The total capacity is 16,052 hotel rooms.

IEC. Integral Ecotourism Center, BTU. Beach Tourism Units, MTU. Mountain Tourism Units

* Note: In the design of the Master Plan, the division into lots shall be specified for each land use (hotel, condominium or residence, and general equipment). The actual density for each use shall be established in this Master Plan and shall range between 20 and 80 rooms per hectare.

34


Integral Ecotourism Development Area 2 and 3 IEDA 2 and 3 IEDA 2. This region is comprised by 14 land fractions to be developed in the midterm. This area is intended for the organized development of resorts, condominiums and tourist residences (second homes), commercial areas, tourist infrastructure. -golf courses and natural spaces-. All this has been established as part of a Master Plan.

IEDA 3. The region is comprised by 11 land fractions to be developed in the long term and which include the development of hotel resorts, condominiums, tourist residences (second homes), commercial areas and natural spaces. All this is also established in the Master Plan. The region consists of 906.7 Hectares equivalent to 90.6 sqkm, 60% of which is usable equivalent to 572.83 Hectares (57.2 sqkm) can be developed. The average general density is 5 rooms per hectare equivalent to 500 rooms per skqm. The total lodging capacity will stand at 2,720 hotel rooms to be developed.

The total area consists of 1,750 hectares equivalent to 17.5 sqkm with a usable area of 60% and a density of 5 rooms per hectare, equivalent to 500 rooms per sqkm. This results in a tourist lodging capacity of 5,250 units.

* Note: In the design of the Master Plan, the division into lots shall be specified for each land use (hotel, condominium or residence, and general equipment). The actual density for each use shall be established in this Master Plan and shall range between 20 and 80 rooms per hectare.

35


Tourism Development Strategy TDAC and TBC Tourism Development Area under Consolidation 4

Traditional Beach Center (TBC)

This area (TDAC 4) covers 9,622.9 hectares in total. The area is divided into two tourist systems: IEP and TBC.

These centers are characterized by featuring traditional tourist activity in the Southern Region with the existing hotel infrastructure and will have the same consolidation policy than a Tourist Development Area under Consolidation 4 (TDAC 4). Beach hotels were detected in Les Cayes, Aquin, Côtes de Fer, Bainet, Jacmel, Gaby Plage and Torbeck which combine for 60 hectares—100% usable. The total lodging capacity will stand at 3,600 rooms.

An Integral Ecotourism Project (IEP) located in Vache Island covers a total area of 4,567 hectares equivalent to 45.6 sqkm, of which 30% is—1,370.2 hectares or 13.7 sqkm—and a general density of 1 room per hectare equivalent to 100 rooms per sqkm. The total lodging capacity would then stand at 1,507 rooms. Likewise, the area features five Traditional Beach Units in Port Salut, Saint Jean du Sud, Flamands Bay, Mesle Bay and Point Nicolas for a total area of 5,055.4 hectares equivalent to 50.5 sqkm, of which 60% is usable—3,033.2 hectares equivalent to 30.3 sqkm. The density is 2 rooms per hectare or 200 rooms per sqkm. Therefore, the lodging capacity to be developed is equivalent to 6,067 hotel rooms.

* Note: In the design of the Master Plan, the division into lots shall be specified for each land use (hotel, condominium or residence, and general equipment). The actual density for each use shall be established in this Master Plan and shall range between 20 and 80 rooms per hectare.

36


Support Strategies Oriented Towards Tourist Activity Roadways and Transportation Strategy The main highway that connects the Jacmel, Bainet and CĂ´tes de Fer regions requires improvement as to the compaction of its rock materials as well as the correction of the route at those spots near the coastline.

In compliance with international standards, it was determined that one telephone trunk line is required for every 100 rooms and two landlines for each condominium or tourist residence.

It will be essential that such studies detect the appropriate location of the land or lands to be used for the final disposal of solid waste, as well as the use of third generation technology at landfills.

To sum it up, it is expected that in order for the 35,196 tourist lodging units—hotel rooms, residences and c ondom i ni um s — to be developed by the year 2045, water demand equivalent to 692.5 liters per second will have to be met, which in turn will generate 554 liters of wastewater per second. In addition, 176 MVA will be needed in order to light such hotel rooms; and 3,520 telephone lines will be required. Finally, a disposal site with capacity for 87.9 tons of solid waste to be generated in the long term shall be provided.

Telephone networks

* Note: Each development may alternatively generate its own energy. In case an energy surplus is generated, then such surplus may be offered to other developments in the area.

In this strategy it is proposed to improved mobility by means of road communication and regional transport, not only in the National route RN2, but as well as the provincial roads. The purpose is to enlarge the two lane road when possible and to place on bus stops that allow boarding and unboarding areas for passengers. To integrate those themes, a mobility study for the southern region is suggested. Drinkable water The infrastructure system foresees the construction and equipment of deep wells for the extraction of drinkable water (independent wells). These wells will be strategically located and dug, with enough literper-second capacity to cover the demand of each town and tourist area detected (see infrastructure requirements table). Elevated tanks and aqueducts will be built for water management and distribution. They will also be strategically placed for each town and tourist region. Wastewater treatment Biodigesters will be used for the treatment of wastewater placed at each tourist and central developments. These biodigesters will service residential and/or condominium lots and will be installed at operation stations in accordance with the development stages. Electric power Power plants (independent service plants) are expected to be used for the transmission of blocks of power to hotels, homes, condominiums and the tourist infrastructure in general. Likewise, energy is expected to be generated for the urban towns within the project influence area. Solid waste As a fundamental aspect of urban and tourist planning, studies on the collection, handling and engineering works for the final disposal of urban solid waste (USW) shall be carried out.

37


Road and Transport Strategy

38


Hydraulic Infrastructure Strategy

39


Electric Infrastructure Strategy

* Note: Each development may alternatively generate its own energy. In case an energy surplus is generated, then such surplus may be offered to other developments in the area.

40


Nautical Facilities and Transportation Systems Accessibility The General Tourism Development Program has been designed by considering the following transportation or communication aspects: road transportation through National Highway RN2; air transportation through the Port au Prince, Jacmel and Les Cayes International Airports; and maritime transportation through recreational and private vessels arriving at the Jacmel and Les Cayes ports.

In terms of nautical tourism, ship stops at ports with docks and ramps located at strategic places have been planned. These ports will connect different regions in the island’s South and Southeast provinces. Environmental and coast management studies as well as barometric studies will have to be carried out across the region.

41


Tourist and Urban Programmatic Scenario Based on the environmental and tourism strategy set forth above, the tourismoriented actions program could be created, this will enable the region to have the number of targeted hotel rooms in the long term, -35,196 rooms by the end of 2045-.

Benefits estimation generated by the tourism activity at Haiti´s Southern region for the projected period, 2015-2045

Hotel rooms estimation at Haiti´s Southern region for the projected period, 2015-2045

Source: Data obtained from CMS Company’s archives based on the calculation of hotel and tourist capacity for the years projected within Haiti’s South and Southeast areas. a) It refers to the number of rooms programmed during the different periods of time. In the first stage, 250 rooms will be constructed to trigger tourist activity. b) It is the product of multiplying the number of rooms, occupation, and density by the 365 days of the year and divided into the stay time. c) It refers to 90% of the total number of visitors. d) It refers to 10% of the total number of visitors. It is the product of multiplying the number of foreign visitors by the stay days by their expenditure (in USD) in the tourist destination. e) It is the product of multiplying the number of domestic visitors by the number of stay days by their expenditure (in Gourdes) in the tourist destination f) Construction costs are estimated at $120,000 USD per room. g) It refers to the number of days as the minimum stay in a hotel. h) Foreign tourists are estimated to spend an average of $160 USD per day; such expenditure will increase according to the quality of the tourist infrastructure in the area. i) Domestic tourists are estimated to spend 60% (in Gourdes) of what a foreign tourist would. j) The occupancy rate is estimated at 60% for the new Areas of the Integral Ecotourist Development. k) It refers to the number of people that occupy a room per day. Source: Data obtained from CMS Company’s archives based on the calculation of hotel and tourist capacity for the years projected within Haiti’s South and Southeast areas.

The programmatic scenario is determined in this way distributing the tourism potential in each stage. In other words, establishing a specific number of new hotel rooms per time period from 2015 through 2045. The tourism development potential of the different areas is established by taking into account a general density of 5 rooms per hectare, of which 60% will be hotel rooms and 40% condominiums and tourist residences (second homes). In some areas, 100% of the lodging supply will exclusively consist of hotel accommodation. The key factor to spark off tourism activities in the region is to implement tourism support strategies within the Integral Ecotourism Development Area 1. In the first phase, the Lozandieu Bay was selected given its

extraordinary natural characteristics and accessibility through the existing highway. Lozandieu Bay is expected to have capacity for 7,500 rooms in the long term. In the short term, by 2015, the immediate construction of 200 rooms is expected in the Integral Ecotourist Center, along with 50 condominiums and/or residences. This first stage will gradually position Haiti among the most renowned destinations in the Caribbean. According to estimates, within the shortest term possible (by 2015), direct benefits may be predicted for Ecotourism Development Area 1 which includes Lozandieu Bay. It will feature 200 tourist lodging units and 50 condominiums and/or tourist residences for around 32,850 visitors. By the year 2017, 1,000 hotel rooms and 200 condominiums and/or tourist residences will have been added to the inventory to accommodate around 128,115 visitors. Note that the Vache Island and Port Salut are estimated to feature 300 rooms by 2017. The efforts in this development stages should focus on the high-end, sun and beach segment to meet the lodging demand for fivestar, Grand Tourism and Boutique hotels. In the short term, by the year 2015 and as a consequence of tourist activity, around 737 new jobs will be created in total. These jobs represent the income of a head of a family or whole families that will require new homes. In other words, there will be demand for 737

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Tourist and Urban Programmatic Scenario Estimation of new housing, population and new employments that will be generated with the tourism, based on the calculation of hotel and tourist capacity projected for the period 2015-2045

Source: Data obtained from CMS Company’s archives based on the calculation of hotel and tourist capacity for the years projected within Haiti’s South and Southeast areas a) It is estimated that the hotel industry creates 1 direct job per each hotel room and 3 direct jobs per each residence. b) 2.4 indirect jobs are created per hotel room. c) It corresponds to the sum of direct and indirect jobs. d) A new home for each employee within the tourist sector; 1 home for each job. e) It is obtained from multiplying the average number of inhabitants in each home in Haiti’s South and Southeast area (4.65 family members per home) by the number of new homes constructed.

Estimation of new homes, inhabitants and new employments that will be generated with the tourism, based on the calculation of hotel and tourist capacity projected for the period 2015-2045

Source: Data obtained from CMS Company’s archives based on the calculation of hotel and tourist capacity for the years projected within Haiti’s South and Southeast areas a) It is estimated that the hotel industry creates 1 direct job per each hotel room and 3 direct jobs per each residence. b) 2.4 indirect jobs are created per hotel room. c) It corresponds to the sum of direct and indirect jobs. d) A new home for each employee within the tourist sector; 1 home for each job. e) It is obtained from multiplying the average number of inhabitants in each home in Haiti’s South and Southeast area (4.65 family members per home) by the number of new homes constructed.

homes for around 3,426 inhabitants for the new tourist development area. As seen in the table above, the housing demand proportionally corresponds to the number of rooms to be built during each stage. Finally, by the year 2045, housing demand is estimated at 454,933 new homes. The following table shows the number of new homes, inhabitants and jobs created and the way they will spread out in relation to the lodging facilities (hotel rooms) that will be constructed across different planned tourist developments: IEDA 1, IEDA 2, IEDA 3, TDAC 4, and Traditional Beach Centers. Source: CMS Company, Photograph archives. Meslé Bay . Haiti´s visit March 2013.

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Urban Strategy Urban strategy is designed under the cities system concept based on the hierarchy of the cities that comprise the tourist corridor in Haiti’s Southern coastal region as per the size of their population and based on theories on cities systems and networks.

Cities System in Haiti’s Southern Region Camp Perrin

Cavaillon

These two criteria were selected for the cities located in the Port Salut – Jacmel corridor for them to take part in the major economic boost that Haiti will experience once tourist activities gather pace in the region. In addition to the tourism support strategies, the goal is to facilitate the establishment of new relations and the strengthening of existing ones between the cities. The purpose is that such relations are solid enough in terms of infrastructure and the implementation of new transport routes and telecommunications—key elements to establish any kind of relation between cities.

St. Louis du Sud

Jacmel and Les Cayes are the most prominent cities as to their population growth and serve as services providers for rural sectors and adjacent communities. Les Cayes is the city with the larger number of city networks related to smaller cities. In fact, its close connection with Torbeck, Chantal and Camp Perrin makes it a very attractive regional focal point of Development for the implementation of urban and tourist actions and to foster the consolidation of the traditional beach destination tourism that is currently emerging in the area. Aquin, a city with nearly 9,000 inhabitants, is a medium-size city that together with the metropolitan area of teh Quartier Viex Bourg de Aquin forms an urban area that provides infrastructure and services to adjacent communities. Likewise, it forms a city network with Saint Louis du Sud. Cities System in Haiti’s Southern Region Les Cayes and Jacmel are the capital cities and the most important cities in the South and Southeast provinces. For the purposes of the urban strategy they will be referred to as Regional Pole of Development to maintain their hierarchy as capital cities, providing the population with regional services. Aquin, being a medium-size city within the cities system, is deemed as a second-class city in the southern region. However, it interacts with the southern region by providing intermediate quality services, and

Aquin

Côtes de Fer Chantal

Les Cayes Torbeck

Bainet

Jacmel

Arniquet

In this regard, the urban strategy defines a series of recommendations and actions in the short, mid and long term to consolidate the cities system by fostering interaction among them. This leads to the creation of benefits associated with urban structure design and its nodes interaction. Hierarchy of coastal cities in the South and Southeast provinces as per population size in 2012.

Quartier Vieux Bourgh de D´Aquin

St. Jean du Sud

Île à Vache

Port-Salut

Source: CMS Company based on information of tourism and hotel capacity by area and year projected for the area south and southeast of Haiti.

thus, together with Port Salut—also a medium-size city in the southern peninsula—it will be referred to as Subregional Pole of Development. The cities of Côtes de Fer and Bainet will be referred to as Local Poles of Development since moderate growth is expected as a result of the tourist activity proposed for the region, along with improvement to the surrounding areas and utility services. The proposal is to establish and strengthen a network for continuous cooperation among Les Cayes, Aquin and Jacmel through the implementation of a strategy to improve transportation and telecommunication services, as well as favoring economic activities (including the that may derive from tourism development in the southern region). This will also favor growth and the improvement of the urban environment in coastal cities, including Côtes de Fer and Bainet. Through the implementation of the strategic actions set forth below, the consolidation of a cities system is anticipated. This will enable the tourism programmatic scenario which will lead to the economic boost required in Haiti’s southern region. 44


Urban Strategy Recommended actions for the five coastal cities that integrate the Port Salut—Jacmel tourist corridor. The lack of communication between the regions has been a limiting factor for Haiti’s tourist industry. Hence, the commissioning of local airports that serve as an air bridge among Haiti’s provinces, the southern region would open up to the tourist market and would consequently have a greater impact on tourism and urban development in its cities. It is essential to have intraurban communication. This refers to communication among cities in order to consolidate the cities network and create cooperation ties among them. As to required short term action, the implementation of a roadways and communications strategy is proposed which shall be consistent with the construction of a transportation network (ecological buses). Such exchange is currently taking place between cities which results convenient as to the use of urban services and infrastructure. However, emphasis must be made on the need to create cooperation networks as a consequence of new economic activities derived from developing tourism within the Port Salut – Jacmel Tourist Corridor. The immediate surroundings of urban centers must be revamped through new modern and renovated housing projects that give the city quality, order and identity. A new policy is recommended for the consolidation and control of urban expansion by implementing mixed-use (housing and ground floor retail land use) and housing developments.

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Urban Strategy Population growth estimate according to the tourist programmatic scenario by the years 2015, 2016 and 2017 Camp Perrin

Cavaillon St. Louis du Sud

Aquin

Development areas that will expected to have new homes and population in the short term, years 2015, 2016 and 2017.

Hierarchy of the coastal cities in South and Southeast of Haiti by size population in the 2012

Quartier de Year 2016 Vieux de Bourg 1,530 homes D´Aquin 7,115 population

Côtes de Fer Chantal

Les Cayes Torbeck

Year 2015 737 homes 3,426 population

Bainet

Year 2017 1,483 homes

Arniquet

Jacmel

6,851 population

St. Jean du Sud Port-Salut

Year 2017 515 homes 2,395 population

Île à Vache Year 2016 773 homes 3,592 population

Population growth estimate according to the tourist and urban programmatic scenario. Côtes de Fer City For the first stage of the Integral Ecotourist Center to be completed by the year 2015, the cities located in the immediate surroundings are expected to absorb a new population that will come about as a result of tourist activity in the region. Côtes de Fer City, which had a population of 2,227 inhabitants in 2012, is expected to feature 737 new homes for a total of 3,246 new inhabitants by the year 2015. The natural population growth estimated for that year is 2,466 inhabitants, which added to the new population, the total growth will reach 5,892 inhabitants in the new Côtes de Fer. By the year 2016, according to our own estimates, two cities are expected to be benefitted with the addition of new population, namely Île à Vache City and the Quartier de Vieux de Bourg D´Aquin City.

Source: CMS Company’s own estimation based on the calculation of hotel and tourist capacity, the conservative and programmatic scenarios for growth population projected for different years in the Haiti’s southern region

With the tourist activity being developed in Île à Vache, by the year 2016, this island will feature 773 new homes which translates into 3,592 inhabitants, and according to its growth trend it will reach a total of 5,674 inhabitants for that year. Urban legalization and consolidation is proposed for Quartier de Vieux Bourg D´Aquin with the addition of 1,530 new homes equivalent to 7,115 inhabitants which by adding the growth trend, the population will reach 11,480 inhabitants by 2016. In 2017, the cities that will have a population influx will be Côtes de Fer and Saint Jean du Sud. For the estimated growth periods, the introduction of sociocommunity infrastructure is proposed. In cities with population levels of over 5,000 inhabitants, education institutions such as a Kindergarten an elementary and

a secondary school will be required. And those population clusters with over 5,000 or 10,000 inhabitants will require a healthcare center. As to supply and commerce issues, such cities will require a public marker and at least one shopping center to supply goods to both the rural and urban population. Likewise, the construction of a regional supply unit in Haiti’s southern coast is expected.

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Urban Image Strategy (South)

The following actions are proposed for the urban image strategy in order to improve the urban environment located adjacently to the new tourist area known, in this first phase, as Integral Ecotourism Center located in Lozandieu Bay. • The improvement and/or renovation of public squares is proposed. These squares are important for social gathering and they represent a point of interest in the city as an urban integrating factor. • It is recommendable to renovate the cities’ downtown areas so that they convey an organized image with green areas and ornamental plants in the area. • It is also recommendable to remodel the buildings located around the downtown area located in areas visited and paths used by the tourists. 47


Urban Image Strategy (South east)

• • • •

Better highway signaling. Appropriate urban equipment in accordance with the urban and tourist context that gives identity to areas with tourist potential and urge tourists to return to such destination. The construction of waterfront promenades with ocean view in cities like Cote de Fer and Bainet is proposed. Those projects that are under construction aimed at renovating the harbor in Jacmel have not been ruled out, since the port is a node (meeting point) for social and economic interaction in the area.

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Triggering Tourism Projects Site selection FIRST DEVELOPMENT STAGE (IEDA 1, fraction 4)

FIRST DEVELOPMENT STAGE

The Integral Ecotourism Development Area 1 (IEDA 1) is comprised by 8 beach-front land fractions, divided by streams or rivers with major flow, and a land fraction (9) in the mountain area known as La Baleine. This area covers 5,590.53 hectares, of which, 3,354.32 may be developed with an average density of 5 hotel rooms per hectare. The total capacity is 16,052 hotel rooms

For the selection of the land fraction (4) of the first stage of Integral Ecotourism Center 1, several factors such as the ones below were taken into account: • • • • • •

Highway accessibility Large area that may be easily developed given its natural conditions. Mostly, a flat plot of land. The land features elevated areas with panoramic views. The land features a bay area and a clean, light-colored, fine-grain sand beach. Due to its regional context, it will become the pole of attraction of the tourist corridor.

According to the total estimated capacity of 7,017 rooms, the provision of utility services and infrastructure will be as follows:

IEC. Integral Ecotourism Center, BTU. Beach Tourism Units, MTU. Mountain Tourism Units

9 1

2

3 4

5 6

7 8

4

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First Development Stage IEDA 1, Conceptual Diagram

The design of the concept scheme considers environmental, functional, aesthetic and symbolic principles. The outline is based on economic, social and ecological sustainability when the urban grid networks are established as a result of the natural layout and use of the terrain’s slight slopes, wide squares, walkways, bicycle paths, green areas and gardens, as well as absolute respect to endemic species. The construction of buildings along the coastline at 5.00 meters above sea level—with minimum separation of 100 meters—is being considered. Source: CMS Company. Prepared based on Google Earth, Landsat Image 2013, and CMS’s design of the Concept Scheme for the Project Draft of the Integral Ecotourism Center Master Plan for Area 1 (ZAEI 1) in Lozandieu Bay. May 2013.

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First Development Stage IEDA 1, Land Uses

The proposed land uses at the scheme level are intended for a mix of tourist and urban products that enable the harmonic balance among housing developments, hotels, retail spaces, mixed-use developments (shopping centers in the ground floors and housing in the upper floors) and in general, with the tourist infrastructure including: golf courses, beach clubs, commercial corridors, waterfront promenades by the lakes and by the Caribbean Sea Coastline. The principle behind this proposal consists of land uses favoring the interaction between inhabitants and visitors. Source: CMS Company’s creation of the Concept Scheme and the project draft of the Integral Ecotourism Center Master Plan for Area 1 (ZAEI 1) in Lozandieu Bay. May 2013.

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Triggering Tourism Projects The planning stages of Triggering Tourism Projects were designed to drive, on a single course of action and with specific goals to be met in the short term, investments in tourism projects in the region. It conveys the purpose to use and assign a value to the natural attractions found in the study area and which have potential for the development of tourist activities.

Estimation of Parametric Cost´s for the Triggering Projects

This is essential for the promotion and marketing of tourist developments with international quality standards that attract foreign currency flows and create well-paid jobs for the local population. These actions have already been proven in the sector worldwide. For this purpose, the Central Government, through the support from International Development Banking Institutions and private investments, has planned to carry out the following “Triggering Projects” in the short term (second quarter of 2013 through 2017): • The construction of a 4.5 km, one-lane (for the first stage) Boulevard to access the Integral Ecotourism Development 1. • An 80-room Boutique hotel • A 120-room Grand Tourism hotel • An 400-room 5-Star hotel • An 18-hole Golf Course with real estate development (300 condominium and or residential use lots, including the construction of a club house. • A 3,000 sqm shopping center with condominium housing for the upper stories. (1,500 sqm year 2015) • An aerodrome with a 2,400 linear meter runway. • Infrastructure to provide drinkable water, sewage, electric power, telephone services, the collection of solid waste and a site for waste final disposal.

Costs are parametric, they were obtained from similar projects with haiti prices *It is expected to be built a one-Lane Boulevard by 2015 it includes an underground duct for services **At this stage it is planned to build a 1,500 m2 commercial center (1,200,000 USD). ***The estimated costs per kind of room hotel are: Boutique hotel = 280,000 USD per room. Includes: land cost, furniture, decoration, equipment, outside construction and ornaments and more. Grand Tourism Hotel = 255,000 USD per room. Includes: land cost, furniture, decoration, equipment, outside construction and ornaments and more. 5-Star Hotel = 128,500 USD per room. Includes: land cost, furniture, decoration, equipment, outside construction and ornaments and more. Source: CMS Company’s based on the calculation of hotel and tourist capacity of the General Tourism Development Program areas from Haiti’s southern region.

Based on the approach above on the capacity and number of triggering projects that are comprised by a diversity of tourist products, the following may be concluded:

1

The strategy for positioning Haiti in the International scene entails the creation of a critical number of tourist lodging units of up to 1,400 by 2017. One thousand rooms will be operational at Lozandieu Bay, three hundred at Ìle à Vache and 100 at Port Salut. This will make it possible to establish the cost-benefit ratio between the number of international flights and the number of rooms. With this number of rooms airliners will be able to ensure tickets for flights to Haiti are purchased.

7 2

3

8

6

4 5

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Triggering Tourism Projects First development stage INFRASTRUCTURE REQUIREMENT PROGRAM, FIRST PHASE OF THE FIRST STAGE

Source: CMS Company’s based on the calculation of hotel and tourist capacity of the General Tourism Development Program areas and parametric costs from Haiti’s southern region.

A use of 1,700 lts. per day is estimated for rooms and 300 lts. per day for tourist residences. An 18-hole golf course is estimated to use 5 lts. per square meter per day, equivalent to 40.5 lts. per second. The use of 20 lts. per square meter per day, equivalent to 0.106 lts. per second, is estimated for a shopping center with housing units on the upper floors. The consumption of water for irrigating the golf course is estimated at the start of the project. Once the number of hotel rooms, condominiums and residences has been consolidated, irrigation will be carried out with treated water or wastewater. 1) The parametric cost of drinkable water supply in 2015 includes: • • • • •

Geohydrological studies to determine the location and depth of well to extract drinkable water in the area—at least 1 well. Drilling to extract drinkable water until the depth determined through the geohydrological is reached. Construction of a water tower to regulate drinkable water capacity for 50,000 gallons. Purchase, installation and equipment of a water pump to extract drinkable water, including the surveillance booth and electric wiring. Construction of an aqueduct with a hydrologic PVC pipe or similar. It shall include trace, leveling, digging and ditch filling.

2) The parametric cost of the wastewaters system includes: • Installation of an industrial biodigestor or a sustainable water treatment system. 3) The parametric cost of the telephoning system includes: • Installation of the antenna or cellular module for services (first stage-260 mobile lines in the area). 4) The parametric cost of the solid waste collection system includes: • A study to determine the area for dumps, landfills and / or a sustainable system for collection and separation of solid waste based on the biological waste utilization. It will also determine the cost of construction and maintenance, and it will be with in an influence radius near the development. It is planed to employ state of the art technologies. • Likewise, it will determine the cost per trash ton that will be removed from the tourist area. For the year 2017, only the ton/day cost is included. The Ministry of Tourism through an operating agency shall coordinate and carry out the preparation of studies, master plans and executive projects, among others; for those jobs it must be provided economic resources of at least 3 million dollar. 53


Triggering Tourism Projects Activities program For its implementation, a critical timeline will need to be followed with short but enough deadlines to carry out specific studies, project design, executive projects, the development of a one-lane, 4.5-kilometer boulevard and the construction of superstructure under the following premises:

For irrigation, the golf course shall feature a computer system or a water dripping system that saves water by 100%. The water used for irrigation shall be treated water from the tourist development including the golf course, hotel facilities or other developments in the area.

Tourist Boulevard

In case of the first golf course as a catalyzing project, the hydraulic system shall be designed in such a way that at the start of operations the irrigation process is employs the minimum amount of drinkable water. Once condominium, housing or hotel facilities exist, wastewater shall be used for irrigation.

It will consist of a simple trace with maximum use of the territory’s natural condition, avoiding drilling, promontory cuts and/or major land slides. It will also include the design of broad walkways, sidewalks, traffic isles, squares and round abouts with the appropriate equipment and image and tree planting to create shade in the short term. It is recommendable to implement a low consumption irrigation system that is controlled and monitored by state of the art computer systems.

Specific studies program

Grand Tourism, Boutique and 5-star hotels, and a shopping center development with housing units on the upper stories In order to prevent hydrometeorological hazards and other natural hazards, the superstructure’s footprint in the hotel zone shall be at a height of 5 meters above sea level and at least at 100 meters from the seaboard. It shall feature optimum orientation to prevent unnecessary sun lighting within habitable areas. Pursuant to the technical regulations (in process) as to the land occupation ratio (COS, for its acronym in Spanish), free space shall contain green areas, walkways, squares and tree landscaped gardens. Treated water shall be used for irrigation of these areas. Recycled or treated water shall be used to fill swimming pools, fountains or any similar designs or devices that require water, so that their final disposal is carried out in green areas. In general, treated water shall be used in sanitary ware furniture. This will lead to the design of a mandatory hydraulic sanitary system in buildings with double and even triple circulation pipelines. In terms of sustainability, water use shall be optimized to the maximum possible extent until zero flushing levels are reached. Golf Course For course design, the natural surroundings shall be respected to the maximum possible extent, including healthy and young trees that offer landscaping value as well as those endemic species that must be protected, restores and conserved, integrating them to the golf course’s design and landscape.

Le Ministère du Tourisme, à travers une Agence opérationnelle, sera chargé de la coordination et de l’exécution des études, plans directeurs et projets exécutifs entre autres. Pour cela il faudra prévoir une enveloppe budgétaire d’au moins 3 Millions de Dollars. Source: CMS Company’s based on the calculation of hotel and tourist capacity of the General Tourism Development Program areas from Haiti’s southern region.

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Triggering Tourism Projects Target Image

Boulevard (4.5 km, one lane for the first stage) Source: CMS’s own design and creation of the 3D target images (renders). Based on the Concept Scheme and the project draft of the Integral Ecotourism Center Master Plan for Area 1 (ZAEI 1) in Lozandieu Bay. May 2013.

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Triggering Tourism Projects Target Image

Boutique Hotel 80 rooms Source: CMS’s own design and creation of the 3D target images (renders). Based on the Concept Scheme and the project draft of the Integral Ecotourism Center Master Plan for Area 1 (ZAEI 1) in Lozandieu Bay. May 2013.

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Triggering Tourism Projects Target Image

Grand Tourism Hotel 120 rooms

Source: CMS’s own design and creation of the 3D target images (renders). Based on the Concept Scheme and the project draft of the Integral Ecotourism Center Master Plan for Area 1 (ZAEI 1) in Lozandieu Bay. May 2013.

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Triggering Tourism Projects Target Image

5-Star Hotel 400 rooms Source: CMS’s own design and creation of the 3D target images (renders). Based on the Concept Scheme and the project draft of the Integral Ecotourism Center Master Plan for Area 1 (ZAEI 1) in Lozandieu Bay. May 2013.

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Triggering Tourism Projects Target Image

5-Star Hotel 400 rooms Source: CMS’s own design and creation of the 3D target images (renders). Based on the Concept Scheme and the project draft of the Integral Ecotourism Center Master Plan for Area 1 (ZAEI 1) in Lozandieu Bay. May 2013.

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Triggering Tourism Projects Target Image

18-hole Golf Course with real estate development Source: CMS’s own design and creation of the 3D target images (renders). Based on the Concept Scheme and the project draft of the Integral Ecotourism Center Master Plan for Area 1 (ZAEI 1) in Lozandieu Bay. May 2013.

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Triggering Tourism Projects Target Image

A 3,000 sqm shopping center with condominium housing for the upper stories. Source: CMS’s own design and creation of the 3D target images (renders). Based on the Concept Scheme and the project draft of the Integral Ecotourism Center Master Plan for Area 1 (ZAEI 1) in Lozandieu Bay. May 2013.

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Triggering Tourism Projects Target Image

An aerodrome with a 2,400-meter runway. Source: CMS’s own design and creation of the 3D target images (renders). Based on the Concept Scheme and the project draft of the Integral Ecotourism Center Master Plan for Area 1 (ZAEI 1) in Lozandieu Bay. May 2013.

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Target Image The target image includes a diversified and systematic structure for the Jacmel—Les Cayes Tourist corridor according to its natural environment and detected potential for development. The proposed structure takes into account four Integral Ecotourism Development Areas, defining their development stages in accordance with their location, accessibility and capacity. The concept of Development Areas is oriented towards high quality and low density integral products, and insofar as the land size allows it, these Development Areas may include golf courses. According to their location, these areas may allow a combination of Integral Developments and lodging establishments and exclusive residences located on large plots of land with panoramic views that are more integrated to the landscape and the environment. Beach-front and lake-view lodging establishments, condominiums and residences with panoramic and cluster-like views on relatively small lots may also be included; as well as tourist infrastructure such as shopping centers featuring housing units for the upper stories (mixed-use developments), beach clubs, commercial boulevards, waterfront promenades, and if the land size allows it, golf courses (associated with real estate development such as tourist residential and condominium developments) and theme parks.

Tourist correlation • Incorporation of elements that enable an integral and harmonic experience (tourist resources + activities + training + marketing) • Respect for Haitian culture and traditions. Community training • • • • • •

Promoting the integration of social groups that enhance the visitor’s positive experience. Promote the tourist activity cost-benefit concept in the community. Make efforts to improve the inhabitants’ living standard within the influence area. Maintain the site’s integrity. Trained service providers, government agencies, planners and visionaries. Continuous action plans and control tools.

Likewise, the Tourist Corridor target image embodies those privileged areas with exclusive beachfronts and extraordinary views, as well as establishments and scattered low-density, top quality and exclusive individual facilities featuring boutique hotels and small scale real estate development known as Beach Tourist Units. These developments feature high ecological and landscape value, mainly in Port Salut, St. Jean Du Sud, Flamands Bay, Meslie Bay and Pointe Nicolás. A major supplementary element of the Tourist Corridor found in Bailene and surrounding areas is Adventure Tourism. The construction of 180 ecotourist cabins and a tourist services office. The location of this Tourist Corridor has the potential to attract tourists that enjoy outdoor activities like the observation of nature (plants and wildlife), interpretive hiking, horseback riding, trekking, zip lining and rappelling, among others. Sustainable tourism: • Prevent the overexploitation of natural and tourist resources • Attracting high-end tourists • Attracting responsible visitors who care about environmental and resource conservation who avoid polluting, save resources, water and energy.

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Target Image

Boutique Hotel Lake 1 Source: CMS’s own design and creation of the 3D target images (renders). Based on the Concept Scheme and the project draft of the Integral Ecotourism Center Master Plan for Area 1 (ZAEI 1) in Lozandieu Bay. May 2013.

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Target Image

Waterfront promenades and Hotel lake 2 Source: CMS’s own design and creation of the 3D target images (renders). Based on the Concept Scheme and the project draft of the Integral Ecotourism Center Master Plan for Area 1 (ZAEI 1) in Lozandieu Bay. May 2013.

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Target Image

Boutique Hotel Boutique Hotel Lake 3 Source: CMS’s own design and creation of the 3D target images (renders). Based on the Concept Scheme and the project draft of the Integral Ecotourism Center Master Plan for Area 1 (ZAEI 1) in Lozandieu Bay. May 2013.

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Recommendations In the short term

development project.

According to the estimated projection set forth in the General Tourism Development Program contained within the General Development Strategy, (especially during the 2013-2017 period) in relation to the start of: 1) operations of 1,000 hotel rooms (120 correspond to Grand Tourism hotels, 80 are Boutique hotels and 800 are 5-star hotes); 2) 1,500 sqm in commercial areas and housing developments on the upper floors; 3) a 18-hole Golf Course (related to the development of 300 lots for condominiums and tourist residences); 4) the construction of a tourist boulevard (one lane only for the first phase) and; 5) the construction of an aerodrome (with a 2,400 linear meter runway), it would be essential to carry out the following tasks this year:

At the same time and under a tight deadline, the architectural and executive projects will have to be carried out:

• A geohydrological study whose main objective would be to detect underground water tables, both for their use and to prevent their pollution. Likewise, the study will assist with finding the location to dig a well or wells, the construction design and recommendations in compliance with the effective law for the extraction of drinkable water. • A topographic survey of the land located in Lozandieu Bay in the Municipality of Aquin, South Province at 20 km from the town of Aquin will be required. The land features an area of 2,600 hectares. The land is characterized by its natural and man-made resources like phase one of Ecotourism Development Area 1. • A Soil Mechanics Study shall be carried out in places previously determined, but mainly in the areas where the boulevard and the superstructures will be constructed, so that it enables the calculation of soil mechanics and its characteristics. This study will establish the type of laying foundations, the structures of the superstructures and other technical data required to construct and urbanize the buildings. • Studies on the collection, handling, location of the terrain and engineering works for the final disposal of solid urban waste (USW).

• • • • • • •

Boutique hotels Grand Tourism hotels Two 5-star hotels Shopping Center An 18-hole golf course—for real estate development. Tourist Boulevard—only one lane will be built along the first 4.5 kilometers. Aerodrome with a 2,400 meters long runway.

Within this same period, as part of the Tourism Development Master Plan, essential studies will have to be developed which will take an average of 12 months to complete. Among such studies are: • • • • • • • •

Sea tides Winds Beachfront conditions Orography Barometry Extreme Conditions and Flooding Levels Rivers and streams dynamics Any other studies that may be required according to the natural needs of the areas.

Another key recommendation is to assess the progress of the projects proposed in the Program with strict follow up to determine success factors and if needed, reasons for delays or development. The

In addition to the studies and based on the concept scheme of the Tourism Development Master Plan (first phase of the first stage) of Ecotourism Development Area 1, it is essential to start the executive 67


Recommendations suggestion is to carry out such assessment every 6 months in compliance with the proposed agenda for the development of the studies and executive projects. General Recommendations Tourist Activity In order for the Ministry of Tourism to be able to measure and assess Haiti’s tourist activity, it is advisable to design a system that features indicators, data bases and mechanisms to analyze: 1) the flow of tourists; 2) their origin; 3) reason for visiting and the specific place they are visiting; 4) hotel occupancy in terms of the number of nights the rooms are vacant or occupied; 5) average stay time (both international and domestic tourists); 6) general and average room rates; 7) projects and hotel (rooms) under construction; as well as other relevant data. Such mechanisms may be referred to as Tourist Barometer whose results have been successfully proven in world class tourist destinies. Investments The sector is intended to be developed by implementing triggering projects and tourist support strategies (with basic public infrastructure and utility services) through public and private direct investments from international development banking institutions, and companies both in the public and private sectors. In this regards, the creation of a Planning Agency or a Tourism Development Trust for Haiti is prosed. These public bodies are intended to: 1) start Integral Ecotourism Developments that trigger growth in those areas with development potential; 2) provide and facilitate investments in tourism by granting attractive conditions for investors.

Source: CMS Company, Haiti´s opportunities map.

Education, health, supply and commerce For the estimated growth periods, the introduction of sociocommunity infrastructure is proposed. In cities with population levels of over 5,000 inhabitants, education institutions such as a Kindergarten an elementary and a secondary school will be required. And those population clusters with over 5,000 or 10,000 inhabitants will require a healthcare center. As to supply and commerce issues, such cities will require a public marker and at least one shopping center to supply goods to both the rural and urban population. Likewise, the construction of a regional supply unit in Haiti’s southern coast is expected.

Source: CMS Company, Photograph archives fishers island at Lozandieu Bay. Visit to Haiti March 2013.

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Remarks Being aware of the challenge that the General Tourism Development Program and Target Image of Haiti’s Southern Region represents in order to foster tourist developments in Haiti’s South and Southeast provinces, the Central Government extended an invitation to the public and private sectors to join efforts within a competitive environment to achieve the objectives set forth herein. Food security constitutes, in principle, an almost instinctive impulse of human groups to guarantee their survival in times of shortage. The time variable, associated with uncertain expectations derived from the production-availability ratio, represents a key factor to consider when food reserves are established to meet current and future demand. In Haiti, guaranteeing food production must be placed in new development scenarios which implies special management from the Central Government based on a prevention strategy and on the availability of new agricultural and distribution technologies to streamline and increase production. In regions where tourist activity is expected, food security must become a national issue under an economy policy that prevents unbalance both in the urban and tourism sectors. Not only does the success of this Program depend on federal investments, but on private investments as well. These investments are the cornerstones of this great project to achieve its sustainability. Investments shall be integrated through public annual operative programs portfolios, and to any extent possible aided by private portfolios as well. In addition, the Central Government shall grant legal validity to this program and disseminate it in order to motivate Communities and the international Business world for joint participation. The above is conceived through an institutional transparency framework to provide investment certainty and continuous follow up and assessment and full completion of the tasks set forth.

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Acknowledgements We want to thank the Government of the Republic of Haiti for cooperation, support and information provided. We want to give special thanks and acknowledgement to the Ministry of Tourism, which made the realization of the General Tourism Development Program and Target Image of Haiti’s Southern Region possible. We also thank the support of the collaborators and advisors, who worked on the research, development and consulting process for the creation in this document. Collaborators:

Advisors:

Arq. Felipe Ortiz González.

Ing. Fernando Quezada Medrano.

Mtra. Fabiola Bonilla Dueñas.

Lic. Alejandro Morones Ochoa.

Mtra. Pamela Pino Juárez.

Arq. Pascual Valdez Cárdenas.

Mtra. Deidre Cárdenas Delgado. Mtra. Raquel Vargas Lara.

Lic. Adalberto Enrique Füguemann y López.

Mtra. Elisa Chandeze De La Vega. Dr. Alfredo Patiño Siciliano. Biól. Ivonne Garduño Escobedo. Biol. Florence López Galicia. Biol. Denisse Montes de Oca Medina. Mtro. Ricardo Álvarez Calderón. Mtro. José Luis Jiménez Tiburcio. Mtro. Miguel Ángel Ortiz Toriz. Arq. Francisco Ortiz Toriz. Arq. Gerardo Jiménez Pérez. Arq. Israel Caballero Campos. Ing. Cecilia Rodríguez Sánchez. DCG. Alfonso Martínez Bautista. Arq. Alfonso Martínez Camarena. Lic. en LMI Ricardo Reyes Guevara. 70


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