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Portfolio


Advertising

Briefs

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Portfolio – Silveri


designer Kelly, Pan, and Silveri Advertising

Client

Apple iPhone 5s ObjeCtives

Propel the new launch of iPhone 5s target audienCe

Middle to upper Class, 18 - 54

Client

Ron Abuelo ObjeCtives

low Priced highclass rum target audienCe

lower - Middle Class 21+

Client

Client

Instagram

Visit Maui

ObjeCtives

ObjeCtives

show how quick Create new travel and beautiful taking sensation to Maui, photos with instaHawaii gram could be target audienCe

Middle to upper Young adults, 16 -35 Class, 18 - 35 target audienCe

strategies

simplicity, detail and strategies sohpistication, deliquality, show the slick thin new body. cacy tiMefraMe

tiMefraMe

1-2 Weeks

1-2 Weeks

tOtal estiMated

tOtal estiMated

COst

$1000

COst

$1500

strategies

Client

Andrea Bocelli ObjeCtives

visualize the power of bocelli’s specatular voice to sell his latest album target audienCe

Middle to upper Class, 18 - 54

strategies

use Multiple frames Colors,excitment, big strategies of different users waves, surf, shades, shattered glass holding a square and seabreeze tiMefraMe fram tiMefraMe 4 Weeks tiMefraMe 3 Weeks tOtal estiMated 4 Weeks tOtal estiMated

tOtal estiMated COst

$5000

3

COst

$2500

Portfolio – Silveri

COst

$3000


Advertising

Design

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Outdoor Advertising 6

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LogoDesign 8

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Kelly, Pan, and Silveri Advertising

R

ec

or d

s

Jazz

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Branding 10

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CaseStudy 14

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Portfolio – Silveri


A few things about Chocolate that you should know Dark chocolate has more cacao (the beans that chocolate are made from) and less sugar than other chocolates, so it is considered healthier than milk and white chocolate.

❖ Dark chocolate contains lots of antioxidants that help the cardiovascular system by reducing blood pressure. ❖ Eating dark chocolate widens arteries and promotes healthy blood flow that can prevent the buildup of plaque that can block arteries. ❖ Eating dark chocolate every day reduces the risk of heart disease by one third. ❖ Flavonoids found in cocoa products have antioxidant, anti-inflammatory, anti-clotting effects that can reduce the risk of diabetes by improving insulin sensitivity. ❖ The smell of chocolate increases theta brain waves, which trigger relaxation.

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Portfolio – Silveri


A Brief History of a Sweet Thing

W

hen most of us hear the word chocolate, we picture a bar, a box of bonbons, or a bunny. The verb that comes to mind is probably “eat,” not “drink,” and the most apt adjective would seem to be “sweet.” But for about 90 percent of chocolate’s long history, it was strictly a beverage, and sugar didn’t have anything to do with it. “I often call chocolate the best-known food that nobody knows anything about,” said Alexandra Leaf, a self-described “chocolate educator” who runs a business called Chocolate Tours of New York City. The terminology can be a little confusing, but most experts these days use the term “cacao” to refer to the plant or its beans before processing, while the term “chocolate” refers to anything made from the beans, she explained. “Cocoa” generally refers to chocolate in a powdered form, although it can also be a British form of “cacao.” Etymologists trace the origin of the word “chocolate” to the Aztec word “xocoatl,” which referred to a bitter drink brewed from cacao beans. The Latin name for the cacao tree, Theobroma cacao, means “food of the gods.” Many modern historians have estimated that chocolate has been around for about 2000 years, but recent research suggests that it may be even older. In the book The True History of Chocolate, authors Sophie and Michael Coe make a case that the earliest linguistic evidence of chocolate consumption stretches back three or even four millennia, to pre-Columbian cultures of Mesoamerica such as the Olmec. Last November, anthropologists from the University of Pennsylvania announced the discovery of cacao residue on pottery excavated in Honduras that could date back as far as 1400 B.C.E. It appears that the sweet pulp of the cacao fruit, which surrounds the beans, was fermented into an alcoholic beverage of the time. “Who would have thought, looking at this, that you can eat it?” said Richard Hetzler, executive chef of the café at the Smithsonian’s National Museum of the American Indian, as he

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displayed a fresh cacao pod during a recent chocolate-making demonstration. “You would have to be pretty hungry, and pretty creative!” It’s hard to pin down exactly when chocolate was born, but it’s clear that it was cherished from the start. For several centuries in pre-modern Latin America, cacao beans were considered valuable enough to use as currency. One bean could be traded for a tamale, while 100 beans could purchase a good turkey hen, according to a 16th-century Aztec document. Both the Mayans and Aztecs believed the cacao bean had magical, or even divine, properties, suitable for use in the most sacred rituals of birth, marriage and death. According to Chloe Doutre-Roussel’s book The Chocolate Connoisseur, Aztec sacrifice victims who felt too melancholy to join in ritual dancing before their death were often given a gourd of chocolate (tinged with the blood of previous victims) to cheer them up. Sweetened chocolate didn’t appear until Europeans discovered the Americas and sampled the native cuisine. Legend has it that the Aztec king Montezuma welcomed the Spanish explorer Hernando Cortes with a banquet that included drinking chocolate, having tragically mistaken him for a reincarnated deity instead of a conquering invader. Chocolate didn’t suit the foreigners’ tastebuds at first –one described it in his writings as “a bitter drink for pigs” – but once mixed with honey or cane sugar, it quickly became popular throughout Spain. By the 17th century, chocolate was a fashionable drink throughout Europe, believed to have nutritious, medicinal and even aphrodisiac properties (it’s rumored that Casanova was especially fond of the stuff). But it remained largely a privilege of the rich until the invention of the steam engine made mass production possible in the late 1700s.

Portfolio – Silveri


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Page Layout

George Lois

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Infographics

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Portfolio – Silveri


1950-1994

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Portfolio – Silveri


1950 - 1960

Giveaways, contests, quiz shows proliferate

Giveaways, contests, and quiz shows proliferated in the '50s. Quaker Oats mailed out 5 tons of dirt from the Yukon in little pouches. Three coffee companies put actual money into their packages. Dial soap gave away an oil well. Remington Rand gave away one share of every company listed in the N.Y. Stock Exchange. One contest offered a free butler service. Competition was unbounded. The New Yorker found 312 "finests," 281 "world's bests," and 58 "America's onlys" in its pages over a 6-month period.

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Portfolio – Silveri


1960 - 1970

Madison Avenue emerges as center of the advertising Doyle Dane Bernbach’s “Think small” ad for American Volkswagen becomes one of the most famous ads of the decade, establishing a strong market position for the smallest European import. The agency’s slogan for Avis, “We’re only No. 2, so we try harder” is also very successful. New York’s Madison Avenue becomes known worldwide as the center of the advertising world and features the best in advertising creativity.thriftiness.

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Portfolio – Silveri


1970 - 1980

Multinational ad companies emerge

The 1970s saw the emergence of the multinational advertising agency/holding company, with offices and affiliates all over the world. The 10 largest advertising companies based on sums they spent for their clients in 1974: 1) Denfsu Advertising (Japan) $907.7 million 2) J. Walter Thompson (U.S.) $867.5 million 3) Young and Rubicam International (U.S.) $750.5 million 4) McCann-Erickson (U.S.) $703.3 million 5) Leo Burnett Co. (U.S.) $577.7 million 6) Ted Bates (U.S.) $565.8 million 7) Batten, Barton, Durstine and Osborn (U.S.) $525.5 million 8) Ogilvy and Mather International (U.S.) $523.7 million 9) Grey Advertising (U.S.) $391.0 million 10) Doyle, Dane, Bernbach (U.S.) $355.1 million

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Portfolio – Silveri


1994

Online Advertising opens new doors Since 1994 when online advertising originated, the industry has faced many obstacles. Ad Age's interactive section provides a fascinating chronicle of the beginnings of online advertising. After the dot com crash in 2001, online advertising's success diminished, but has since re-established itself and is now a thriving $8.4 billion dollar industry. (Kridler,2004) The use of online advertising as an advertising medium is increasing in popularity at a fast pace. It is projected that the online advertising industry will to grow three times faster than advertising in any other medium. (Kridler,2004)

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