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BOGOTÁ D.C. IDENTITY SYSTEM Federico Zuleta Rios


GROWING UP IN BOGOTA AND COMING TO NEW YORK FOR COLLEGE MADE ME REALIZE HOW MUCH COLOMBIAN AND LATIN AMERICAN DESIGN CULTURE HAS BEEN INFLUENCED BY AMERICAN CULTURE. DESIGN SCHOOLS IN LATIN AMERICA TEACH THE SAME THINGS THAT ARE TAUGHT IN THE U.S. AND EUROPEAN DESIGN SCHOOLS. THIS CREATES A GENTRIFICATION OF CULTURE. NO MATTER WHERE YOU ARE, THE VISUAL LANGUAGE LOOKS THE SAME. I WANTED TO CREATE A PROJECT WHERE I WOULD BE ABLE TO EXPLORE LATIN AMERICAN DESIGN, SO I DECIDED TO EXPLORE THE VISUAL LANGUAGE THAT MAKES BOGOTÁ UNIQUE. 2


TABLE OF CONTENTS Thesis Survey Talks Latin American Design Explorations Color Beauty in Chaos Bogotรก D.C. Visual Identity Acknowledgments

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THESIS Globalization creates a cultural homogenization, making the visual language of different places look the same. SOLUTION Create a brand which reflects Bogotá’s aesthetic and culture and doesn’t derive from American or European standards.

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FOR THIS PROJECT I CONDUCTED A SURVEY TO GET A SENSE OF WHAT PEOPLE FROM BOGOTÁ THINK ABOUT THEIR CITY. I SENT OUT A QUESTIONNAIRE TO 200 PEOPLE. SOME OF THE ANSWERS WERE A LITTLE BIT EXPECTED, FOR EXAMPLE THAT THE COLORS THAT BEST REPRESENT BOGOTÁ ARE GREY AND RED. BUT THIS SURVEY GAVE ME A BETTER UNDERSTANDING OF HOW PEOPLE SEE BOGOTÁ. I COULD SEE THAT MANY PERCEIVE BOGOTÁ AS A CHAOTIC AND PROBLEMATIC CITY, BUT AT THE SAME TIME THEY FIND IT TO BE DIVERSE AND FULL OF ENERGY.

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Survey


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WHO REPRESENTS BOGOTÁ THE MOST?

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BECAUSE OF THE MAGNITUDE OF THIS PROJECT I FELT THE NEED TO INTERVIEW SOME PEOPLE THAT COULD HELP ME WITH THE DESIGN PROCESS AND TO HAVE A BETTER UNDERSTANDING OF THIS TOPIC. FIRST I TALKED WITH LUKAS WEBER, A GERMAN DESIGNER THAT SPECIALIZES IN NATION BRANDING. I ALSO SPOKE WITH RAFFAEL TOLEDO, A BRAZILIAN GRAPHIC DESIGNER.

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Talks


My project began because living in Colombia and then coming to the U.S. for design school, made me realize how much influence European and American design culture has on Latin American design. If you look at big time companies in places like Ecuador, Colombia or Peru, they have the same visual language than big time European and American companies. And that made me think that there is probably a huge opportunity in those countries to create a local design identity. So I want to know your view on this matter. Do you think its important for those places to start creating their own local design identity, or that because of globalization it would be almost impossible to achieve that (because people in Colombia are looking at the same things that lets say people in NY. Same music, clothes, food, social networks etc).

LUKAS WEBER First of all I would like to say that my knowledge of Latin American design and visual outcome of organizations or corporations is not sufficient to answer your question completely – if this is even possible. However, I will attempt to answer your question based on my experience with the topic “Nation Branding”. The first thing that comes to mind regarding your question is the fact that, in a historical context, nearly ever country has visual valuables (e.g. arts and culture) which offer an excellent basis for understanding a visual language. An excellent example is the former Soviet states in

Europe. I believe, for example, that the Ukraine’s visual outcome is of very little importance in the eyes of the other European states, because of it’s dependence on global design standards to be economically attractive. The valuable art, colour, shape, and design principles which represent the nation remain untapped, unrecognized and undeveloped. Basically, a designer should be able to recognize this content and be willing to communicate it. In light of this it is very important to recognize the broader question of finding an own identity and making use of it in an confident way. Also to express it within an organization or corporation. That maybe works a little better in younger branches of economy or for “start ups”, whereas “big player” or their partners are under the influence of global economic trends. I believe that the younger business models or unconventional solutions from specific countries/regions can help to strengthen local design identities and draw attention to the fact that design can play an important role. This is an example of how markets and products, and the associated general design language, have become standardized in the 21st century. Interesting examples of this are the visual designs (especially logos) of “Global Media Events”, including Olympic Games or World Cup. Only in certain cases, if at all, is it possible to recognize a “country-typical” background which could be a good basis for a conclusive design concept. In this case, the framework set by stakeholders (e.g. IOC and FIFA) determines the visual design. Another interesting 16


TALKS - LUKAS WEBER

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example can be found in the logo design of for the Olympic Games. If we examine the logos over the history of the games, we obviously see an influence of current trends and social conditions. However, and more interestingly, we also see a strong influence of the designer – especially during the “golden-age” of design from the end of the sixties to the beginning of the nineties. Lance Wyman (Mexico 68), Otl Aicher (Munich 72) and Joan Miro (Barcelona 92) are three designers who had a deep understanding of their surroundings/countries, which resulted in much more exciting and effective logo designs. This was probably easier in the past then it is today and I would suggest that the power/ influence of imagination through design is losing its importance as economical factors continue to gain influence over the design process. As a result of these constraints the designer is no longer free to choose unconventional design solutions. The visual presentation, particularly of “Global Media Events”, becomes more standardized and the designer in that process more anonymous. I feel it’s the responsibility of designers to improve the selfimage of graphic design. However this does not mean that only “local” designers are able to create visual identities (corporate/non-corporate). Regardless where the designer comes from, it’s important that he/she can free himself from global design standards as soon as it becomes obvious that they don’t function. I feel it is especially important to act responsibly and sensitively in every design process, especially when it deals with local design constructs. In

certain cases it can actually be beneficial for a designer to have a different cultural background, because of the unique perspectives that come along with it. In major branding projects it is relatively seldom that local projects are carried out by local designers. In general it’s important that the designer has a deep understanding both of the design and the key cultural factors and expectations. This benefits both the organization/ corporation and the target audience. An excellent example for that is the Peru branding of Futurebrand (Buenos Aires office) in 2012. In this case a global-acting design agency created a good design without losing sight of Peruvian culture and people. I believe that this example (Peru) can be adapted well to visual design for other Latin American companies/organizations.


TALKS - RAFFAEL TOLEDO

RAFFAEL TOLEDO Never before there were so many designers in Latin America, and never before companies were so aware of the benefits of investing money on it. All these things can help the industry grow exponentially. Regarding trends, everything is still very influenced by others cultures, but every now and then there’s something worth seeing. Internet has made this a little bit harder on us. There’s a lot going on down here right now, but maybe there won’t be major changes in the field. Absolutely we’ll keep evolving along with every other cultures in which regards technologies, but is a little bit dreamy to think someday we’ll let go on American and European influences. I think what we really need is to be more proud of what is produced here, and always keep in mind that the projects we design need to be genuine in every single aspect. I’m not sure if it’s possible to have a language to express Latin American design, we live in a globalization era, which makes this harder than this could have been 30 years ago.

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STEFAN SAGMEISTER A new local language will only be relevant, if it is of the now, and that implies that it would take influences from other countries, cultures seriously. All interesting new local developments I have seen included international considerations. The trick is going to be to truly make that new mix it locally relevant.

TALKS - STEFAN SAGMEISTER

Why is globalization bad for the development of local visual language in design? Isn’t it possible that because of globalization new visual languages can emerges from the mix of cultures creating visuals that wouldn’t be possible otherwise.

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Latin American Design


QUESTTONO BUY A DOG & BE HAPPY

QUESTTONO BUY A DOG & BE HAPPY

QUESTTONO BUY A DOG & BE HAPPY

KRIANDO NUXEN IDENTITY

KRIANDO OLIFRAN IDENTITY

COLLECTIVO REMIX IDENTITY

QUESTTONO DESIGN OK 2012

COLLECTIVO MALABAR FILMES

PENTAGRAM PEREMIX SOCIAL IDEAS LOGO

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GAD DESIGN FESTIVALMA 2010

COLLECTIVO ZAXY IDENTITY

COLLECTIVO CLUBE CANIBAL IDENTITY

QUESTTONO Q VISUAL IDENTITY

COLLECTIVO CONSPIRACAO IDENTITY

LATIN AMERICAN DESIGN

KRIANDO CBDG IDENTITY

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COLLECTIVO PORNO FALCATRUA IDENTITY

MOOZ ECO RESORT DO CADO INDETITY


TATIL DESIGN RIO DE JANEIRO 2016

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LATIN AMERICAN DESIGN

TARATUBA TRANSPETRO EDITORIAL

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QUESTTONO SKYTONE

QUESTTONO DESIGN OK 2012


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EXPLORATIONS - BOGOTÁ


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BOGOTÁ STREET

CEMENTERIO BOGOTÁ

BOGOTÁ SKY

RAINNY DAY BOGOTÁ

COLOR - BOGOTÁ

RAINNY DAY BOGOTÁ

PARQUE SIMÓN BOVLIVAR

RAINNY DAY BOGOTÁ

MONSERRATE

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COLOR - BOGOTÁ


ROGELIO SALMONA LAS TORRES DE PARQUE

ROGELIO SALMONA BIBLIOTECA VIRGILIO BARCO

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ROGELIO SALMONA LAS TORRES DE PARQUE

COLOR - BOGOTÁ

ROGELIO SALMONA BIBLIOTECA VIRGILIO BARCO

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COLOR - BOGOTÁ


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COLOR - BOGOTÁ


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COLOR - BOGOTÁ


AFTER ALL MY RESEARCH I CONCLUDED THAT WHAT MAKES BOGOTÁ UNIQUE IS THE BEAUTY THAT COME FROM ITS CHAOS. WITH THIS IN MIND I CREATED A CONCEPT AND CALLED IT “BEAUTY IN CHAOS”. SO I STARTED TO DO MORE RESEARCH AND LOOK FOR IMAGES THAT SUPPORTED THIS CONCEPT.

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JULIE MEHRETU UNTITLED

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“In

all

chaos

there cosmos, all

secret

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is

a in

disorder order�. Carl Jung

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OSCAR MURILLO UNTITLED (MANGO)

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BEAUTY IN CHAOS

OSCAR MURILLO UNTITLED (WATER)

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“I THINK PERFECTION IS UGLY.

I WANT TO SEE SCARS, DISORDER, Yohji Yamamoto

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SOMEWHERE IN THE THINGS HUMANS MAKE, FAILURE, DISTORTION.”

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MARTIN KLIMAS FROZEN FLORES EXPLOTION

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BEAUTY IN CHAOS

MARTIN KLIMAS FROZEN FLORES EXPLOTION

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BEAUTY IN CHAOS


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BEAUTY IN CHAOS


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BEAUTY IN CHAOS


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BEAUTY IN CHAOS


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BEAUTY IN CHAOS


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LIMA, PERÚ

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BEAUTY IN CHAOS


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BEAUTY IN CHAOS

BOGOTÁ D.C., COLOMBIA

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AFTER EXPLORING MY CONCEPT I DECIDED TO START CREATING IMAGES THAT REPRESENT BOGOTÁ. I CHOSE THE LETTER “B” AS THE MAIN VISUAL SYMBOL THAT WOULD REPRESENT BOGOTÁ. THEN I STARTED TO EXPLORE DIFFERENT COLORS AND TEXTURES THAT COULD EXPRESS THE IDEA “BOGOTÁ”. FINALLY I TOOK ALL THOSE ELEMENTS AND STARTED TO CREATE THE FOLLOWING IMAGES WHICH ARE MY INTERPRETATION OF WHAT BOGOTÁ IS. FROM THOSE IMAGES I STARTED TO CREATE BOGOTÁ’S VISUAL IDENTITY.

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BOGOTÁ IDENTITY SYSTEM


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DIN NEXT ROUNDED LT

A B C D E F G H I J K L M N Ñ O P Q R S T U V W X Y Z a b c d e f g h i j k l m n ñ o p q r s t u v w x y z 0 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 ¿ ? ¡ ! , . : ; 110


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BOGOTÁ IDENTITY SYSTEM


BUSSINESS CARD & LETTERHEAD

Andrés Uribe Secretario General Calle 70 No. 5-60 Bogotá Colombia T + 57 (1) 213 5403 info@culturabog.com facebook.com/culturabog culturabog.com

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Mr. Recepient’s name Mr. Recepient’s Title Recepient’s address City, Zip code City, Date, Year

Dear Mr. Zuleta

BOGOTÁ IDENTITY SYSTEM

Lorem ipsum dolor sit amet, consectetur adipiscing elit. Nunc commodo vestibulum eros, id sodales nunc malesuada nec. Sed condimentum est ut orci blandit et lacinia ante ultricies. Integer tellus ipsum, ultrices eget feugiat interdum, tempor eget elit. Vestibulum vitae quam id leo adipiscing porta ut non augue. Aenean ut luctus ante. Phasellus sit amet tempus velit. Nunc pulvinar enim adipiscing lacus sodales eleifend. Nam et erat a nibh posuere placerat sed sit amet libero. Nam in odio a velit pharetra volutpat et mollis justo. Quisque enim nisl, lacinia ac fermentum quis, porttitor a velit. Morbi neque est, faucibus sed tempor ut, sagittis at urna. Ut viverra nibh in sem bibendum non semper lorem facilisis. Quisque at massa non eros aliquet lobortis. scelerisque nibh, vitae ullamcorper orci lobortis at.

Sincerly,

Federico Rios

Carrera 4 No.9-40 , Bogotá, Colombia T +54 1 347 9861 www.bogotadc.gov

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Bogotá  

Thesis

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