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ARE YOU A KEEN COOK? HEAD TO HUGHES IN NORWICH WHERE A NEW NEFF CENTRE WITH STATE-OF-THE-ART PRODUCTS WILL INSPIRE YOU TO CULINARY GREATNESS! Hughes’s trained and experienced staff are on hand to demonstrate all the goods and answer any questions - Hughes, Hall Road, Norwich www.hughes.co.uk

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Hughes P R O M O T I O N

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HE HUGHES store on Hall Road in Norwich proudly announces the opening of its new centre for Neff, the leading kitchen appliance manufacturer. There is a basic principle behind everything Neff, a German company which was founded in the 19th century, does, which is: ‘Cooking inspires people, and people inspire us’ - so the company is constantly developing new products to keep up with changing tastes and cooking habits. Neff firmly believes that nothing should be allowed to get in the way of cooking ideas and has created numerous innovative products to help keen cooks express their culinary flair. Now Hughes, one of the region’s leading electrical goods suppliers, and Neff have teamed up, not only to bring all these innovative products together but also to bring them to life. You never really know what a product is like until you can see it in action so they have made sure all the various products on display are fully powered and functioning, so you can really appreciate the benefits that come with the Neff name. Expect products that look good, too, as design is a key part of what Neff are about and they all make life that little bit easier, which is a definite bonus! Hughes has also teamed up with Miele and Liebherr, to install dedicated centres for their own built-in ranges.

Be sure to visit the Hughes store and try out these great products so you can fully appreciate their trailblazing technology: • CircoTherm technology which allows you to cook different dishes on four different levels at the same time without intermingling the different flavours. • The unique Slide&Hide technology with its ‘disappearing’ doors which save space and offer excellent accessibility. • The Pyrolytic self-cleaning cycle on selected ovens which turns splashes and splatters into easy to clean ash, meaning that, with just a quick wipe, the oven is clean. So there’s no need for hours of scrubbing!

www.feastnorfolkmagazine.co.uk


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#thecoaststartshere‌ www.thelodgehunstanton.co.uk

Old Hunstanton, Norfolk PE36 6HX t: 01485 532896 e:info@thelodgehunstanton.co.uk


Editor's letter

www.feastnorfolkmagazine.co.uk

SARAH HARDY, EDITOR sarah@feastnorfolkmagazine.co.uk We would like to apologise for inadvertently reusing a picture of a Chocolate Marquise, as used in the Chef Q&A feature on The Lodge Inn in Old Hunstanton in our April issue, in the Anglia Farmers feature on The Lodge at North Tuddenham in our July/August issue. We apologise for any confusion caused.

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Thanks also to Wanda Djebbar of the Tuscan Farm Shop in Burnham Market who tells us all about the area she farms in Tuscany and the wonderful food and wine it offers. You will be booking your flight there, I guarantee. As ever, Feast Norfolk magazine is packed with plenty for you to enjoy, from restaurant reviews to the latest news from the Hotel School at City College, Norwich. It should keep you going all month! Happy reading and do keep in touch, we always love to hear from you. P.S. Many congratulations to Barbara of North Walsham who won the Delia competition in our June issue so I hope she enjoys her meal there. And don’t forget to enter this month’s great competition - the chance to win an overnight stay at the new look Ffolkes in Hillington, near King’s Lynn.

E’RE BACK, refreshed and raring to go after our summer break and we’re sure you had a great couple of months, too. So, welcome to our September issue and let’s hope that we have a lovely Indian summer with plenty of sunshine to help us get out and about and enjoy the numerous foodie events taking place this month. Our deputy editor Emma Outten guides you through the various festivals which kick off with the North Norfolk Food and Drink Festival at the charming Holkham Hall on September 2 and 3. We’ll be there, helping to judge a chocolate cake competition if nothing else! We also catch up with the powerhouse that is Davina Tanner. She’s the founder of Britannia Café at Norwich Prison and it is a concept that is rolling out, with a newish bistro at the Guildhall in the city centre. With proceeds going to victim support, this social enterprise has really caught people’s attention. Look out for our new photo essay feature which Norwich-based Keiron Tovell is looking after for us. For our first one, he’s visited Norwich Market which is home to an ever increasing number of artisan food producers - so it is right up our street! We hope to dispatch him to cover an interesting subject each month and showcase what is happening via his great photography.

SEARCH FOR FEAST NORFOLK ON

SARAH HARDY


In this issue

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WINE AUC T ION S WOULD YOU DARE?

86 Apples - take a bite. It is the start of the annual apple harvest, says our grow-your-own writer Ellen Mary

WHAT’S ON 16 Enjoy our regular double page spread on the region’s foodie events and activities in September 23 Emma Outten previews the food festivals happening this month and beyond - it is a busy time of year for foodies 26 Our essential news and gossip feature keeps you in the know FEATURES 08 We turn the spotlight on Titchwell Manor this month, as the Snaith family get ready to celebrate 30 years at the top North Norfolk hotel 32 Enjoy our new feature - a photo essay all about the artisan foodie stalls at Norwich Market REVIEWS 36 Andy Newman heads to The Boars at Spooner Row, near Wymondham, for steak night and much more 38 Sarah Hardy visits the family-friendly Jimmy’s Farm in Suffolk for lunch and shopping her favourite two activities

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INTERVIEWS 30 Emma Outten interviews leading comedian and cook, Hardeep Singh Kohli, as he joins us at Porkstock this October 42 We catch up with Davina Tanner OBE, Chief Executive of Britannia Enterprises, on this expanding social enterprise REGULARS 40 This month’s feature, produced in association with Anglia Farmers Affinity, visits the Norfolk Lurcher, a village pub just west of Norwich 44 We look at the new gadgets and gizmos for the kitchen on the market for the autumn 46 Steve Thorpe of City College, Norwich, is ready for the new academic year as the Hotel School bursts back into life 48 Our chef of the month is Andrew Baker who is now offering fine dining at OPEN in Norwich 56 Our featured cookbook is the latest offering from Galton Blackiston, chef patron of Morston Hall in North Norfolk 60 Our monthly round up of new cookbooks has one from Jamie Oliver and another aimed at those heading off to uni 90 Our new feature with Norfolk Food and


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Drink sees us profile one of their members. This month we meet twin sisters Sophie and Lauren Chittock of Nuoi Foods who produce nut butter RECIPES 12 Eric Snaith tempts us with lamb, lobster and lemon meringue! 51 Andrew Baker offers us a beautiful looking blackberry bavarois 53 Our free from writer, Sara Matthews, has a stunning Middle Eastern dish for us as well as a high energy snack idea 87 Ellen Mary cooks up baked apples in syrup DRINK 68 Andy Newman tells us all about his trip to a wine auction in Aylsham 70 Our artisan producer feature sees us visit a vineyard in South Pickenham, near Swaffham, where two white wines are created 73 Wine expert Steve Hearnden tells us the wines to drink with game and chocolate 74 In this month's beer column, Lacons Brewery looks at the importance of malt in the brewing process - and tells us about a new product www.feastnorfolkmagazine.co.uk

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COLUMNISTS 50 Justin Wright of Lovewell Blake examines the benefits of farming diversification as he looks at two family-run cheese makers 65 Norfolk food champion Charlie Hodson continues his love affair with the sausage roll 67 Charlotte Gurney is celebrating after her family farm won the Battle of the Bangers contest TRAVEL 76 Italian farmer and Norfolk shop owner Wanda Djebbar tells us about her beloved Tuscan food and drink 81 Sarah Hardy finds a spot of peace and quiet - and plenty of good food - at Strattons in Swaffham 84 Rachael Young decides that glamping could well be for her as she heads to the Norfolk/Suffolk border GROW YOUR OWN 88 Newbie allotmenteer Rachel Birtwhistle is harvesting the fruits of her labours COMPETITION 66 Win an overnight stay plus dinner at The Ffolkes Arms at Hillington, near King’s Lynn

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THE TEAM

Sarah Hardy, Editor sarah@feastnorfolkmagazine.co.uk Emma Outten, Deputy Editor emma@feastnorfolkmagazine.co.uk Scott Nicholson, Designer studio@feastnorfolkmagazine.co.uk Rachael Young Senior Account Manager | 07900 823731 rachael@feastnorfolkmagazine.co.uk Hannah McKinney Senior Account Manager | 07917 122829 hannah@feastnorfolkmagazine.co.uk

CONTRIBUTORS

Andy Newman, Wanda Djebbar, Steve Hearnden, Justin Wright, Charlotte Gurney, Charlie Hodson, Sara Matthews, Ellen Mary, Rachel Birtwhistle, Rachael Young, Keiron Tovell

PUBLISHED BY

FEAST NORFOLK MAGAZINE is published by Feast (Eastern) Limited - 21 Market Place, Dereham, Norfolk NR19 2AX

PRINTED BY

MICROPRESS, Fountain Way, Reydon Business Park, Reydon, Suffolk, 1P18 6DH


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S P O T L I G H T

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TO T H E M A NO R B O R N AND BA R TITCH WE LL FAMILY RUN HOTEL , RESTAU RA NT THDAY UNDER THE MA NOR CELEBR ATES ITS 30TH BIR ILY NE XT YEA R OW NERSHIP OF THE SN AITH FAM TH NORFOLK TO CATCH UP WITH EMM A OUT TEN HEA DS TO NOR

CHEF OWNER ERIC SNAITH

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Titchwell Manor

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ERIC SNAITH

RIC SNAITH was a mere nine years old when his parents bought Titchwell Manor. Fast forward nearly three decades and he has ended up as the chef owner of the hotel, restaurant and bar which boasts three AA rosettes, and which attracts top chefs from all over the country to its Supper Clubs. Margaret and Ian Snaith bought the elegant former Victorian farmhouse, with its uninterrupted views across open marshes, back in 1988, and it has certainly evolved since then. As Eric recalls: ‘When they bought it there were 10 bedrooms, and there’s 26 now. My mum and dad worked really hard at it in the early years – and they still do.’ Eric began his career in the kitchen of the family hotel at the age of 15 and returned to the family fold, as Head Chef, in 2002. ‘My original passion was the kitchen for the first 10 years and we received the three rosettes which we are really pleased about. But then it made sense for me to free myself up from some of my kitchen duties, and take over everything.’

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Ti tchwell M anor ERIC SNAITH AT ERIC'S FISH AND CHIPS

CHRIS MANN

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www.titchwellmanor.com

Chris Mann is now the Head Chef with Stu Hall as Sous Chef. Eric says: ‘Chris has been with me nine years next year and Stu five years so there’s been stability in the kitchen – I’m proud of that.’ He adds: ‘Everyone works a four day week, which is still quite uncommon in the industry, so I think it’s why we’ve kept chefs for so long - we try to offer a work/life balance. ‘They both went to Norwich City College together and then to London - to Marcus Wareing’s; Chris came here and Stu followed later. It’s nice that they’re local lads.

TITCHWELL MANOR

‘We make sure we employ people who are passionate about good food,’ adds Eric, who is involved with hospitality and catering initiative A Passion to Inspire. The food on offer at Titchwell Manor has been described as modern European, although Eric points out: ‘Over the last year we’ve simplified the dishes, concentrating on better quality and flavours - still using as much of the local produce as we can and some foraged food.’ As for local suppliers, shellfish stars Ben and Cyril Southerland get special mention. ‘We’ve been using them for the whole 30 years so it’s a nice relationship,’ says Eric. ‘I went to primary school with Ben and now he’s taken over from his dad.’ There’s a well-established Conversation menu and Classics menu in the two restaurants (the Eating Rooms and the Conservatory) and plans for the future include developing a kitchen garden and expanding on the afternoon tea offering. Titchwell Manor offers special packages, as Eric explains, including a Foodie Break complete with tasting menu. ‘I cook 80 per cent of it in front of them as they sit at the bar,’ says Eric. Then there are the aforementioned Supper Clubs. Eric says: ‘In the last 18 months we’ve hosted more guest chefs which has been really good – it’s a great opportunity for our customers to meet top chefs from around the country.’ Next up is Adam Smith of Coworth Park, on October 19. ‘He’s going to be one of the top chefs in the country the way he’s going – and he’s only 30,’ says Eric.

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“IT'S ALSO WORTH MENTIONING

THE RESTAURANT AND TAKE-AWAY IN NEARBY THORNHAM

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RECIPES OVERLEAF

It’s also worth mentioning Eric’s Fish and Chips, the restaurant and take-away in nearby Thornham - now in its third year. Eric explains the thinking behind it: ‘I like the simplicity of fish and chips and it being an absolute classless favourite - you’ve got people pulling up in Bentleys and you’ve got little old ladies coming in, midweek.’ Even the curry sauce is homemade. ‘We try to do everything simply but use our chef’s knowledge to improve them.’ Back at Titchwell Manor, weddings are increasingly popular, all year round. Eric says: ‘We offer a completely bespoke package so if people want something specific, we will cater for it. ‘Generally it works if people take over the hotel for a couple of days - I often think the breakfast the next day is as much fun catching up on the day before.’ He adds: ‘I got married here, my sister got married here and my two sisters-in-law both got married here so it’s become a massive part of our lives.’ So what are the plans for the 30th anniversary? ‘We are going to do a series of events throughout the year starting off with a private cocktail party in February,’ says Eric. No doubt the annual Summer Fete (essentially a food and drink festival in the garden), will be bigger and better than ever. ‘The summer fete is quite unique,’ he says. ‘The idea was for our customers to see our suppliers and see the relationships we have with them.’ Beyond that, they are planning to refurbish eight of the bedrooms and develop the outdoor eating area at Eric’s. Eric concludes: ‘We’ve been established for so long we don’t feel like we’re trying to prove anything to anybody else - we just believe in what we’re doing.’


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BRANCASTER LOBSTER, CUCUMBER & APPLE INGREDIENTS For the Lobster 1 lobster, weighing 11/2 pounds For the Cucumber 2 cucumbers; 2 apples For the Baked Apple Purée 4 Granny Smith apples; 100g of brown sugar; 5g of salt; 100g of butter To Finish Borage flowers; 50g of butter; 50g of apple juice

METHOD For the Lobster Cook the lobster in boiling water for 7-8 minutes. Refresh in ice and remove the meat from the shell. Portion into bite sized pieces and keep refrigerated until needed For the Cucumber Take 1 cucumber and, using a 1/2cm melon baller ball, scoop balls from the cucumber and apple, reserve in a little lemon water. With the other cucumber, cut in half so you have roughly two 15cm pieces. Using a mandolin then slice the cucumber thinly on one side until you start to see the seeds in the middle then turn the cucumber over and repeat on the other side. You want about 3 pieces per portion

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For the Baked Apple Purée Quarter the apples leaving the core intact, then, in an oven proof dish, place all ingredients and roast until a dark brown colour at 180°C. Blitz until smooth To Finish Gently warm the lobster in the butter and apple juice. While this is happening, begin rolling 3 cucumber ribbons and placing on each plate. Then add 6 small dots of baked apple purée onto the plate. When the lobster is warm, remove from the pan and place on the plate. Then quickly place the cucumber and apple balls into the same pan as the lobster was in and warm through. Place a spoonful of the balls onto each plate along with a little of the cooking liquid. Finally finish with 2 borage flowers for garnish


Ti tchwell M anor

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NORFOLK LAMB LOIN, CRACKLING & COURGETTE INGREDIENTS For the Lamb 1 saddle of lamb including best end, deboned and trimmed; 2l of vegetable oil For the Courgette 8 courgettes; 50ml of olive oil; salt For the Pickled Shallots 6 red Thai shallots, peeled and quartered; 100g of red wine vinegar; 60g of sugar; 30g of water; 2g of salt For the Charred Spring Onion Oil 250g of spring onions; 20g of vegetable oil; 2g of salt

METHOD For the Lamb Portion the lamb loin into 6 pieces. Take the bellies and place in a pan and cover with the oil, confit slowly in the oven at 100°C for about 6-8 hours or until you can easily put a knife through the meat. Allow to cool in the pan. Remove the bellies and place skin down on a tray and refrigerate until cold, portion into rectangles, 2 per person For the Courgette Take 6 courgettes and, preferably with a mandolin or if not a really sharp knife, thinly slice 5 ribbons from one side of the courgette, then turn to the other side and repeat. You should now be able to pick out 6 good looking courgette ribbons and keep them to one side. With the remaining middle of the courgette, using a knife, trim around the edges so you have a cuboid of courgette. Repeat this process 6 times, reserving the middle cuboids and ribbons for later. Now for the purée take all the trim from the courgettes plus the 2 unused courgettes and finely chop it all together. Then, in a really hot pan, add the olive oil, courgettes and a large pinch of salt, cook the courgettes as fast as possible without any colour. You are trying to evaporate as much of the water as possible. The courgettes will be ready in no more than 5 minutes. Immediately transfer the cooked courgette to a blender and purée until smooth. Keep until needed

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For the Pickled Shallots Bring everything to the boil and pour over the shallots. Keep until needed For the Charred Spring Onion Oil Coat the spring onions in the oil, salt and char in the oven until dry throughout. Take the cooled, charred spring onions and put them in a blender along with 40g of Chardonnay vinegar, 7g of soy sauce, 10g of sugar and 3g of salt and blitz To Finish Begin to warm a pan on the heat with a little oil, immediately place all the portioned belly skin side down. Turn the pan to a medium heat and cook the lamb belly only on the skin side until crisp, then transfer to a 180°C oven and cook for 10 minutes. In the same pan, turn the heat to a medium high and cook the lamb loin, about 3-5 minutes each side depending on how you like it. Once cooked, remove from the pan and allow to rest for 5 minutes. While your meat is resting, begin to warm up your courgette purée. Take your courgette cuboids and lightly colour all 4 sides in a pan. Once coloured, wrap 6 of the reserved courgette ribbons around each cuboid then flash in the oven for 2 minutes until warm To plate Place a spoonful of the purée on the plate, then place the courgette wrap to one side. Half the rested loin and place that along with 2 pieces of crackling onto each plate. Finally finish with the pickled shallots and a drizzle of the charred spring onion oil all over the dish


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Why not enjoy a meal at The Boars, as reviewed by Andy Newman (pages 36 & 37) in this month’s issue of Feast Norfolk? The Boars, a charming country pub near Wymondham, with a beer garden and courtyard seating area, serves fine food and drinks from their bar, including Bullards Norwich Dry Gin - voted the world’s Best London Dry Gin. And, here at Feast Norfolk, we have a real treat for you. Book a table at The Boars for lunch or dinner, Wednesday’s Steak Night or Sunday Lunch and each person will get a free and very refreshing Bullards Norwich Dry Gin and tonic.

FREE* G&T! *CALL 01953 605851 to reserve your table, and simply mention Feast Norfolk when booking to get your free G&T!

SPOONER ROW WYMONDHAM THEBOARS.CO.UK


Ti tchwell M anor

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LEMON MERINGUE PIE SERVES

6

INGREDIENTS For the Pastry 110g of plain flour; 75g of butter, diced; 35g of sugar; 1/2 egg, whisked; 1/2 lemon zest For the Lemon Curd 120g of lemon juice; 125g of sugar; 210g of egg; 100g of butter; 1 leaf gelatine For the Italian Meringue 225g egg whites; 450g of sugar; 130g of water For the White Chocolate Sorbet 175g of white chocolate; 200ml of stock syrup; 550ml of milk For the Oaty Crumb 56g of oats; 35g of plain flour; 50g of sugar; 2g of salt; 60g of unsalted butter

www.feastnorfolkmagazine.co.uk

METHOD For the Pastry Combine the flour, butter, sugar and zest and rub in between your fingertips until the mix resembles breadcrumbs. Then add the egg and form one flat ball of dough. Clingfilm and refrigerate for at least 30 minutes. Roll out the pastry onto a floured surface until about 3mm thick, then using a ring cutter, slightly larger than the moulds you are using, and cut out 6 discs. Line each mould with the pastry and then blind bake using some baking parchment and baking beans for 25 minutes at 160째C For the Lemon Curd Place the juice, eggs and sugar over a bain-marie in a round bottomed bowl. Whisk until cooked and a thick ribbon stage around 85째C. Remove from the heat, whisk in butter and gelatine. Pass and chill

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For the Italian Meringue Put the whites onto whisk on speed 1. Bring the water and sugar up to 121째C. Increase the whisking speed and slowly pour in the hot syrup. Continue whisking until the mixture cools For the White Chocolate Sorbet Bring the milk and stock syrup to the boil and pour over the chocolate, stir until melted. Pass and chill. Churn For the Oaty Crumb Mix all the dry ingredients together in an oven proof dish. Dice the butter and place on top. Bake at 165째C for 20 minutes, stirring every 5 minutes To Serve Pipe the lemon curd into the tart case and smooth off the top with a knife. Pipe the meringue on top of the curd and lick with a blow torch or flash under a hot grill. Place a spoonful of the oat crumb on the plate. Place the lemon meringue pie next to the crumb. Finally finish with a scoop of the white chocolate sorbet


r e b m e t p Se

YOGA RETREAT

Visit www.katherinesmithyoga.com

International yoga teacher Katherine Smith is running a special weekend yoga retreat at West Lexham from September 22 to 24, which will be accompanied by a great vegetarian menu, (catered by Oyster Catcher Catering), including local and seasonal produce. The Revive and Renew Yoga Retreat promises to offer a quintessential English escape in the heart of the Norfolk countryside.

1940s WEEKEND

MOVEABLE FEAST

Multi-restaurant dining experience, Lloyd Addison's Moveable Feast takes place on September 19. Raising funds for Parkinson’s UK, it enables diners to sample the delights of three different Norwich restaurants – all in one evening! Tickets are sold out for this year but, to be added to the waiting list, do email enquiries@moveablefeastnorwich.org. Visit www.moveablefeastnorwich.org

MUSIC FESTIVAL (PICTURED LEFT)

Deepdale is to host its first music festival at Deepdale Backpackers & Camping from September 22 to 24. There will be music, spoken word, dance and more, across two stages, the campsite, and secret venues on Deepdale Farm. The focus is on home grown talent, bands from Norfolk and the adjoining counties, plus you can expect street food and real ale (not to mention gin!). Visit www.deepdalefestival.co.uk

PHOTOGRAPHS BY JON CLIFTON

Join Bakers and Larners as it celebrates everything 1940s on September 16 and 17, as part of the Holt 1940s Weekend. There will be events happening in store as well as throughout the town, including the Holt Ration Book Trail. Plus you can reminisce about the golden era of swing with the Syd Lawrence Orchestra at the Auden Theatre. Visit www.bakersandlarners.co.uk and www.fortiesweekend.com

FISH & CHIP SUPPER

Award winning restaurant Brasted’s is holding a Fish and Chip Supper with the crew of the Caister Lifeboat on September 11. It will be a chance to celebrate the heroic efforts of the local fishermen who crew the lifeboat, with tales, sea shanties and the fish sourced by the crew themselves. Expect posh fish and chips with dessert, and coffee plus the chance to win dinner for two! www.brasteds.co.uk

ONE NIGHT BREAK

Visit www.norwichplayhouse.co.uk

10cc, who helped rule the pop world in the 1970s, will be performing at Potters Resort on September 17. Dreadlock Holiday, I'm Not In Love, Art for Art's Sake, The Things We Do For Love and I'm Mandy Fly Me are just some of the songs that they will be performing live in the Atlas Theatre. The one night break includes a five course dinner with selected wines. Visit www.pottersholidays.com

DON 'T

MISS

CRAFT FAIR

Crafts @ Kirstead, one of the region’s largest artisan craft fairs, returns to the grounds of Homestead Nurseries on September 9 and 10. Award-winning marmalade-maker, Ali Barwick from Loddon, will be selling a selection of her preserves, as will Wildcraft Brewery with their intriguing range of craft ales and spirits. Charities benefiting include East Anglia’s Children’s Hospices – The Nook Appeal. Call 01508 520520

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RESTAURANT CRITIC

Award winning restaurant critic Jay Rayner brings his show, The Ten (Food) Commandments to Norwich Playhouse on September 2. The culinary Moses will attempt to lead us to the edible Promised-Land, explaining why thou shalt always eat with thy hands, why thou should most definitely worship leftovers, and why thou must celebrate the stinkiest of foods.


TEA FIT FOR A FIRE FIGHTER

Come and meet Britain’s first full time female fire fighter, Jo Reynolds, at The Courtyard at Elveden. Jo, who published her first book Fire Woman, in April and is from Thetford, is talking about her role in the 1980s at a special afternoon tea on September 7 at 4pm. Tickets are £12. Visit www.elvedencourtyard.com

GIN CELEBRATION (PICTURED BELOW)

There is A Celebration of Gin at OPEN Norwich on September 16. Bringing around 100 brands of premium gins (and some vodkas too) to the event - from locally produced artisan gins to a variety created overseas. The event will take place in the Banking Hall where a seven-piece Swing Band will be performing live on the main stage. Visit www.bigtimegin.co.uk and www.opennorwich.org.uk

What's On DELIA-DESIGNED DINNER

Delia's Canary Catering welcomes three-time champion jockey Frankie Dettori MBE to Carrow Road on September 1. During the evening you will enjoy a three-course meal designed by Delia and delve into the key moments of the life of the jockey who has ridden the winners of more than 500 Group races

and became a household name through his biggest achievement, completing the Magnificent Seven. Plus, tickets for Bavarian bash Oktoberfest, on October 6 & 7, are selling fast, so don't miss out! Visit www.canarycatering.co.uk

FARMERS’ MARKET (PICTURED RIGHT)

There is a Farmers' Market at Sandringham Visitor Centre Restaurant on September 24. The regular event is proving very popular – offering local produce, including meat, fish, shellfish, fruit and vegetables and home-made cakes, plus plenty more. Visit www.sandringhamestate.co.uk

WALK WITH A FORK

WALK WITH A FORK

DIARY DATES

The holidays may be over but there’s still plenty of chance for us foodies to get out and about, says Emma Outten

www.feastnorfolkmagazine.co.uk

Walk With a Fork Suffolk takes place at Helmingham Hall on September 3. Organised by the Ormiston Families charity, the eight mile charity walk (chosen by Lady Tollemache) has a tasty twist. Local producers have created food stops, all celebrating Suffolk at its finest. Confirmed suppliers include St. Peter’s Brewery, Aspalls and Alder Tree Cream Ice. Visit www.ormiston.org

WINE TASTING DINNER

A new autumn series of wine tasting dinners at the Swan at Lavenham Hotel & Spa begins on September 21. A collaboration between Head Sommelier, François Belin, and Head Chef Justin Kett, the first dinner will feature a selection of fine wines from the South African Sumaridge Estate, which will be introduced by winemaker Walter Pretorius. Visit www.theswanatlavenham.co.uk

And don't forget...

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www.northnorfolkfoodfestival.co.uk


TASTE

A celebration of the finest Norfolk produce. Enjoy 60 of the best Norfolk producers selling their artisan goodies, including breads, chutneys, gins, wines, beers, cheese, charcuterie, cakes, chocolate and more!

CHILDREN'S ACTIVITIES, LIVE MUSIC, REFRESHMENTS BAKING CONTEST

THE KINNERTON CHOCOLATE CAKE COMPETITION Adults - Saturday, September 2 14s & under - Sunday, September 3

Cakes to the chairman’s tent for noon. Winners announced at 3pm.

CREATE YOUR OWN FLAVOUR OF KETTLE CHIPS

Choose from several popular flavours to produce your own unique crisp

THE ARTHUR HOWELL COOKERY THEATRE

Hosted by Mary Kemp, features demonstrations by leading chefs including Eric Snaith, Richard Bainbridge, Chris Coubrough, Richard Hughes, Vanessa Scott, Fran Hartshorne


ENJOY A PINT OF NORTH NORFOLK

8

JUICE RITIES oftheAPSanPLE SINGLE VA gham Estate drin on and bottled

grown, pressed

FOR MORE INFORMATION, RING ANDREW

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LOCALLY BREWED Craft Ales & Lagers Available throughout Norfolk in all good pubs, hotels, shops, delis and restaurants.

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THE DINING EVENT YOU CAN’T AFFORD TO MISS 30TH OCTOBER - 10TH NOVEMBER 2017 Participating restaurants throughout the county will offer either or Restaurant Week menus will be offered Monday to Friday, excluding weekends. Look out for the full list of participating restaurants later this summer. Keep up to date by joining us on social media and sign up to our mailing list. For details visit

A S PEC IA LI ST I N F OOD PHOTOG R A PHY

www.NorfolkRestaurantWeek.co.uk

STICKY TOFFEE

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Proper English Puddings

“Ah, what an excellent thing is an English pudding!’’

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K OW BONO

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Whether you are looking to share the experience with family, friends or work colleagues, we have created a special festive menu perfect for either your office christmas lunch or dinner, a family treat or simply enjoying with friends.

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N0RTH N0RF0LK F00D + DRINK FESTIVAL September 2 and 3 www.northnorfolkfoodfestival.co.uk The North Norfolk Food & Drink Festival takes place in the Walled Garden at Holkham Hall, and, now in its eighth year, has grown into a highly successful event with visitors from across the county and beyond. It features an ever-growing team of local food and drink producers who grow, rear, produce, supply and sell food in North Norfolk. Plus there’s a Cookery Theatre kindly sponsored by Arthur Howell and hosted by Mary Kemp, where eminent North Norfolk chefs will be sharing their culinary secrets and talking you through their dishes.

Foodls Fes t iva

A FOODIE MONTH

The North Norfolk Food and Drink Festival comes at the start of a busy month of food festivals in and around the county. Emma Outten offers this round-up

www.feastnorfolkmagazine.co.uk

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GLUTEN FREE EXP0, THE F0RUM, N0RWICH BRECKS F00D + DRINK FESTIVAL TBC www.strattonshotel.com At the time of going to press, we were still trying to glean more information about the festival, which takes place every September and celebrates local food, farming and countryside of the Brecks. But what we do know is that there will be a special afternoon tea at Strattons Hotel on September 16, when you can enjoy a festival-themed afternoon tea in relaxed, comfy and funky surroundings. Expect unlimited tea or coffee; a selection of savoury delights with finger and open sandwiches; pastries; scones with jam and fresh cream and a selection of homemade cakes.

HIGHTIDE FESTIVAL, ALDEBUberRGH 12 to 17

Septem www.hightide.org.uk Okay, so it’s not strictly a food festival, but the HighTide Festival ber, returns to Aldeburgh this Septem as well as food et stre rs and offe a diverse and varied programme, s, which includes three headline play two ws, sho aret cab 12 comedy and new hours of talks, and 11 pieces from r, writers. Then, for the first time eve on go will ing the festival of new writ d to London’s Walthamstow in a bran ce. spa tre thea ry pora tem new

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October 1 www.yourglutenfreedom.co.uk The Gluten Free EXPO, organised by Feast Norfolk columnist, Sara Matthews, is a free to attend free from food festival, with more than 50 stalls selling some of the best gluten free produce available. Inside The Forum, on the demonstration stage, there will be cooking demonstrations from chefs all day, plus this year sees a bread workshop. Free advice on diet and nutrition will be available from registered nutritionists and health specialists. And there will also be a talk from Andrea Carroll Langan from Health Embrace. Plus, once again, a gluten free junior bake off.


PICTURE © BOKEH PHOTOGRAPHIC

ALDEBURGH F00D + DRINK FESTIVAL September 23 and 24 www.aldeburghfoodand drink.co.uk The Aldeburgh Food & Drink Festival is widely acknowledged as one of the best in Britain, showing that Suffolk is a top producer of very fine food and the festival is the place to find it. Now in its 12th year, the popular event is held in the historic and beautiful setting of Snape Maltings, home of Aldeburgh Music. This year’s festival showcases more than 100 of the region’s finest food and drink producers and again welcomes a host of the country’s leading chefs who will give cooking demonstrations from two stages. And there is something for everybody, with more than 18 street food stalls offering locally made national and international food and drink. New this year is the Adnams Drinks Experience led by beer and drinks expert Melissa Cole. Hillfarm Family Meadow returns, introducing children (and their parents) to Suffolk farming and bringing with them their CLAAS Lexion 770 combine, the largest in the world. Alongside the reed beds you can discover Wild Suffolk and find out about foraging, fishing, game, ethical and sustainable foods, campfire cooking – and the wildlife of Suffolk. The festival is followed by two weeks of Fringe Events (until October 8).

www.feastnorfolkmagazine.co.uk

Food Festivals DISS + HARLESTON FOOD + DRINK FESTIVAL

October 7 www.visitharleston.org.uk This foodie festival, formerly known as the Waveney Valley Food & Drink Festival, includes a Street Market & Applefest at the Market Place and Exchange Street in Harleston on October 7; plus Harleston Open Farm Day (at Hill Farm and Shotford Hall Farm), also on October 7.

AYLSHAM FOOD FESTIVAL October 6 to 8 www.slowfood aylsham.org.uk Aylsham Food Festival is organised by Slow Food Aylsham, and, although complete arrangements are yet to be finalised, the outline programme includes: Friday morning: Aylsham Country Market in Town Hall, where there will be a special 'Taster Session' with the opportunity to sample producers' wares. Saturday morning: Farmers Market in Market Place, plus Love Food Hate Waste; and Foodie Fun for Families in the Town Hall. Saturday evening: Wine Tasting in Aylsham Heritage Centre. Sunday morning: The Big Slow Brunch in the Town Hall.

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N e ws & G ossi p

GETTING TIPSY

New restaurant and cocktail joint The Tipsy Vegan on St Benedicts in Norwich has been going down well with diners. Norwich’s first vegan restaurant serves up exactly what you’d expect from an establishment of that name: An inspiring selection of vegan small bites and hearty meals along with a host of bespoke cocktails, vegan wines and local brewery beers. Visit www.thetipsyvegan.co.uk

NEWS

GREAT TASTE

Congratulations to Happisburgh-based Ollands Farm Foods which has won 2 stars for its Seville Orange Marmalade at the prestigious Great Taste Awards 2017. Great Taste, billed as ‘the world’s most coveted food awards’ celebrates the very best in food and drink, and this is the first time Ollands Farm Foods has received Great Taste stars. Visit www.ollands-farm-foods.co.uk

ROUND-UP

There’s been a bumper crop of news stories breaking during our little summer break, says Emma Outten, who offers this round-up

After winning East Anglia Wine of the Year 2017, Flint Vineyard, based in Earsham, has nearly sold out of it entire first vintage in just four months! Secure your allocation of the 2017 release by becoming a member: VENN Club membership has just opened for 2017 and guarantees a 12-bottle case of limited-release wines plus complimentary tours. Visit www.flintvineyard.com

LEE BYE

VINEYARD’S WINNING WAYS

AND IT’S HELLO TO LEE BYE

Congratulations to award-winning Head Chef, Lee Bye, who has become Chef Patron at Tuddenham Mill. In his new role Lee will oversee all operations; manage hotel, events and restaurant teams and continue to be closely involved in food offering and menu development. Good work! Visit www.tuddenhammill.co.uk

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URBAN SPRAWL (picture above)

Urban Jungle, which is known for selling amazing plants in a fabulous setting in Costessey, Norwich, has just opened a new sister venue in Beccles. And like Urban Jungle Norfolk, Urban Jungle Suffolk has its very own Café Jungle to relax in - and the menu is 100 per cent gluten free. Visit www.urbanjungle.uk.com

RESTAURANT WEEK (picture below)

Restaurant Week is back and this year it’s bigger than ever! Taking place from October 30 to November 10, Restaurant Week is Norfolk’s largest dining event, and after four successful years in North Norfolk, it is going countywide to give you even more restaurants to choose from. Restaurant Week menus will be available at participating venues Monday – Friday across the two week event. Visit www.norfolkrestaurantweek.co.uk


CHARITY AFTERNOON TEA Editor Sarah Hardy enjoyed sampling a Venetian Afternoon Tea at Debut Restaurant, City College, Norwich. It was staged by students on the Level 2 BTEC in Hospitality and raised cash for the MS Society. This tea, which cost £12.50 per person, also saw a selection of sandwiches, plus scones, cupcakes, brownies and even a mini trifle! The students all worked hard and this hands on experience is great for them. Visit www.debut.ccn.ac.uk

Bake Off winner Nadiya Hussain visiting Rocky Bottoms with her new BBC series Nadiya's British Food Adventure has certainly had an effect on the West Runton restaurant run by Ali and Richard Matthews. The Great British Bake Off 2015 winner went sailing with Richard and prepared fresh Cromer crabs with Ali, with Ali saying: ‘It's been bonkers! August has been extremely busy - and having Nadiya with us was just grand.’ Visit www.rockybottoms.co.uk

EXPANSION PLANS

We’re keeping an eye on the Market Bistro in King’s Lynn, which has an exciting new project called Goldings on the go, involving a deli, a traditional pub with eight rooms above - all with the aim of attracting tourism to this historic area. The Bistro is already well-known for its seasonal British food and, quite frankly, we can’t wait to see the results! Visit www.marketbistro.co.uk

PRE-THEATRE DINNER

FARMYARD RESTAURANT

We’re pleased to report that The Farmyard Restaurant in St Benedicts Street, Norwich, is now open for pre theatre dinners, at the earlier time of 5.30pm, meaning it will be ready and waiting to take orders promptly to ensure an enjoyable but speedy service so people can be ready for show-time. Plus there’s a special lunch menu on offer, thanks to chef patron Andrew Jones and the team. Visit www.farmyardrestaurant.com

SHEPHERD STAR

We’ve been hearing good things about The Starden Shepherd, Ewan Cumming, who runs his flock on a variety of pastures in and around the Waveney Valley on the Norfolk and Suffolk border. Together with Sinead Hipwell, they aim to sell high quality lamb and hogget (lamb which is slow grown into the second year, and which is full of flavour and omega-3 oil). Visit www.stardenshepherd.co.uk

MAKE ME BLUSH

Award winning family business The Norfolk Sloe Company, based in Fakenham, has launched its latest addition to the Black Shuck range. The new Black Shuck Blush Gin was launched at a Black Shuck Gin and Cocktail event in aid of Wells Carnival. Visit www.thenorfolksloecompany.com

FOODIE BOUQUET

A new tearoom and deli, called the 'Foodie Bouquet' has opened at The Wheatsheaf pub at West Beckham. A grant from the Pub is The Hub’s Community Services Fund has helped to bring Daniella and Stephen Moorby’s vision of a community pub providing a whole range of services to fruition, and the shop will sell locally sourced produce wherever possible. Visit www.thewheatsheafwestbeckham.co.uk

JUST ADD CHOCOLATE

Sarah Hardy tried the new chocolate afternoon tea at Park Farm, Hethersett, near Norwich, over the summer months. Apart from a fine selection of finger sandwiches and sausage rolls, the chocolate scones, with Nutella, almost beat her - but she enjoyed the mini brownies, macaroons and more. Fortunately lashings of Earl Grey helped. The teas cost £16.50 - and you do need to book. Visit www.parkfarm-hotel.co.uk

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PICTURE © CHRIS TAYLOR

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N e ws & G ossi p THE SWAN’S TRANSFORMATION

LET THE BATTLE COMMENCE

The Grove, Cromer, has been busy running a competition called The Great Satay Battle in its restaurant to raise money for charity. The chicken satay starters has two rubs to choose from: one created by head chef Simon Hunter Marsh, and one by Norwich Market's king of spices, A De Piff. The one who sells the most gets the choice of charity to donate to: East Anglian Air Ambulance or Mind. Visit www.thegrovecromer.co.uk

We’re pleased to hear that The Three Horseshoes in Warham, North Norfolk, has reopened its doors. Over the last few months, the team has been working very hard to inject some much needed TLC into the pub and are planning lots of fun events. Either soak up the atmosphere in the unspoilt bar and dining rooms, or soak up the late summer sunshine in the spacious walled garden. Visit www.warhamhorseshoes.co.uk THE THREE HORSESHOES

WINE AND DINE WITH STEVE

HOPPY TO HELP

A truly North Norfolk ale is on its way thanks to The Sheringham Horticultural Society and Hindringhambased The Norfolk Brewhouse who’ve teamed up to plant a hop garden in the coastal town. The local team of enthusiastic amateurs have planted 30 plants, all down to a gauntlet laid down by brewery owner David Holliday at a talk to the Society last year. Visit www.norfolkbrewhouse.co.uk

Our very own wine pairing columnist, Steve Hearnden, is back at Barnham Broom next month (October 27), to co-host the Wine & Dine Experience. It promises to be another informal evening of fun, food and French wine in the company of Steve of Tastebuds Wines and Head Chef James Conway. Visit www.barnham-broom.co.uk

PILLAR OF THE COMMUNITY

Best wishes to The Cellar House in Eaton, which has been shortlisted as one of six national finalists in the Best Community Pub category in the 2017 Great British Pub Awards. On September 7, at an award ceremony at the London Hilton in Park Lane, it now stands a chance of being crowned the national champion in their award category, as well as the overall Great British Pub of Year 2017. Visit www.thecellarhouse.co.uk

Congratulations to Laura Cotton of Gourmet Hot Chocolate Stirrer business, Cocoa Delicious for being selected by Dragon’s Den star Theo Paphitis as one of his Small Business Sunday winners. Shortened to the hashtag #SBS on Twitter, the social media initiative was created in 2010, and Laura, from East Harling, will be off to meet Theo in February to be awarded with her certificate! Visit www.cocoadelicious.co.uk

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AND DON'T FORGET (pic above)

…Bishop’s Dining Room and Wine Bar in St Andrew’s Hill, Norwich is re-opening on September 19, following a major kitchen re-fit!

Visit www.bishopsrestaurant.co.uk

I SHOULD COCOA COCOA DELICIOUS

LUCKY HORSESHOES

We’re pleased to report that the transformation of The Swan in Southwold is almost complete and will soon reveal its beautiful new feathers from midOctober. Whilst retaining much of its original charm and character, the new Swan has a contemporary, coastal feel with oodles of thoughtful touches to delight all guests, both new and returning. Visit www.adnams.co.uk


HARDEEP SINGH KOHLI

HARDEEP SINGH KOHLI will be appearing on the Cookery Demo stage (of which Feast Norfolk is a media partner) during the daytime festival of Porkstock, which takes place on October 14, at the Norfolk Showground. The winner of The Porkstock Simple Pork Recipe Competition will get the opportunity to cook with him live on stage.


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Hardeep Singh Kohli

www.porkstock.co.uk

Award winning broadcaster, comedian, writer and chef, Hardeep Singh Kohli, is coming to Porkstock in October to do a star turn on the chef demo stage. Emma Outten catches up with him HARDEEP SINGH KOHLI’S love of food began at a very tender age. The Sikh broadcaster, comedian and writer of Indian descent was raised in Glasgow, and, as one of three brothers, ‘one of us had to cook and it was me,’ he explains, ‘as I looked the best in a pinny!’ After his studies, he started to direct children’s TV at BBC Television Centre in London. ‘There was a great food scene,’ he recalls (although not a lot of spare cash to make the most of it so more cooking ensued!). Then, in the 90s, he came to enjoy our great food scene. ‘I lived in Norwich in the 90s - I was working for Anglia Television at the time and I remember being struck by how good the local produce was, and how good the farmers’ markets were.’ Plus, he adds: ‘I’ve spent a few summers next to Sandringham, as friends had a house there - I’ve never needed an excuse to get over to Norfolk really. And I love the area around Hunstanton. I’ve had some amazing meals there.’ At one stage Hardeep was fairly ubiquitous on the small

screen, and is still a regular on Channel 5's The Wright Stuff as both a panelist and guest host. His cookery talents came to the fore when he appeared on Celebrity MasterChef 10 years ago. ‘That changed everything really,’ he says. And it was our very own columnist and local food champion Charlie Hodson who brought Hardeep back to Norfolk – to last year’s Moveable Feast and Porkstock. How did they become friends? ‘We met through a friend, Alan Paton, who is the executive Head Chef at Stoke by Nayland Hotel near Colchester,' Hardeep explains. Porkstock is the perfect festival for him: ‘I’m obsessed with pork. I presented a Radio 4 programme on bacon - I can’t believe I got paid to do that.’ And he adds: ‘If all I had to eat for the rest of my life was pork belly, I’d be very happy.’ So when Charlie mooted the idea of coming to Porkstock last year, ‘I was on my way to Liverpool Street straightaway!’ says Hardeep. ‘There are a lot of food events that are very generic with lots of things on offer but what’s lovely about Porkstock is that it’s so specific and links in with the community.’ And community

is clearly important to him – the day we spoke he was about to host a comedy and curry night in a London pub to raise funds for the victims of Grenfell Tower and their families, for example. Hardeep makes the point: ‘The chats you have when you pick up a piece of meat from the butchers are different from the chats you have when you pick up meat in the supermarket.’ And it makes perfect sense to him to hold a festival all about pork in this part of the UK. ‘There’s just something about knowing how good the pork is in Norfolk and knowing how good the rest of the produce is. It’s very exciting to come and cook and Charlie pays me in pork – but I think he’s going to regret that as he’s going to be three or four pigs short this year!’ he jokes. He’ll be back up this way after Porkstock. ‘We’re working with the City College students for a couple of days in November.’ And between now and then we’ll be able to hear him on BBC Radio 4, notably hosting Hardeep's Sunday Lunch. ‘I’ve just finished recording the next series so it will be out in the autumn,’ he says.


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IN THE FIRST OF A NE W SERIES , W E LE T TH E PICTU RES DO THE TA LK ING. HERE PHOTOG RA PHER KEIRON TOVE LL CA PT URES NORW ICH M AR KE T AN D ITS FOODIE STALLS

ORWICH MARKET, England’s largest open air market, has been going strong for centuries. But it has recently enjoyed a Renaissance, with several new artisan producers joining the more established names. Now there are almost 90 stalls, with half selling food and drink, with everything from a fantastically flavoursome Massaman curry or an innovative Singapore Sling falafel, to a simple cup of tea for 60p and a tasty bacon roll on offer.


PICTURES BY KEIRON TOVELL

www.feastnorfolkmagazine.co.uk

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PICTURES BY KEIRON TOVELL


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Almost 20 new businesses have opened this year including new cakes stalls, South East Asian food, and French and Spanish street food to name but a few. And they join the well established Pickering’s sausage stall, The Cheeseman and the Norwich Providore. So, grab yourself a basket and dive in!

THE MARKET, run by Norwich City Council, opens six days a week, Monday to Saturday, with a handful of stalls opening on Sundays.

www.feastnorfolkmagazine.co.uk

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T hres Boa

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Dedicated foodie Andy Newman leaves the city behind him and dines out at The Boars in Spooner Row, near Wymondham

HOW MANY OF US have bemoaned the closure of our local pub? When you live in a village with just one pub, losing it is a double blow, and often spells the end for any sense of local community. There has been a pub in Spooner Row near Wymondham since the 17th century. Known alternately as The Blue Boars, the Two Boars and The Three Boars, it has physically and metaphorically been at the centre of village life for more than three centuries. So when it was threatened with closure last year, one local couple decided to do something about it. Russell and Clare Evans were concerned it would be the end of the road for the pub when its previous owner wanted to retire after two decades. Rather than see it disappear, the couple - who had been using the pub for 19 years themselves - bought it, and set about transforming it into a modern village hub. It is clear that there has been much investment here. The interior has been considerably smartened up, avoiding the temptation to create a pastiche of an Olde Worlde inn, and instead giving the place a bright, contemporary look. But the first thing they did was reopen the kitchen, realising that the best chance of prospering was quickly to create a reputation for food which would attract not just locals from the village, but foodies from farther afield as well. There are two bars, and a small, smart restaurant, which is where we chose to have dinner. Russell is the man behind the rejuvenation of the Bullards brand, and so our aperitif had to be a Bullards Norwich Dry Gin and tonic. Served with dried orange and cucumber, plenty of ice and Fever-Tree tonic (of course), it was the perfect way to prime our palates for the meal that was to come. Starters were a tartlet of smoked mozzarella, and a dish of black treacle cured salmon. The tartlet base was a surprisingly light circle of puff pastry, topped with sun-blushed tomato and rocket pesto, the tangy smoked mozzarella, Granny Smith apple and confit beetroot. The combination of flavours was well balanced, the sharpness of the apple cutting through the pastry and cheese, the whole pleasingly light. The salmon was cut thick, and served with torched Little Gem lettuce, soused cucumber and coriander mayonnaise. Once again it was the balance of tastes

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www.theboars.co.uk

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which was striking. Here is a chef who evidently has a good palate, and understands how to combine different flavours to good effect. We were there on a Wednesday night, which is steak night. Five different steaks are on offer, with different cuts of beef, a bacon steak and a tuna steak, as well as the regular menu. A well-cooked steak is surprisingly difficult to achieve, so I plumped for a sirloin to see how they did. It was perhaps more medium-rare than the rare I ordered, but it was well seasoned, and the peppercorn sauce (which came in a little jug on the side) was light and not overpowering, as such sauces so often can be. The steak came with proper, skin-on chips, a large Portobello mushroom and a cooked tomato, and I added the surf and turf option: three delicious large prawns swimming in garlic butter for a very reasonable £3 supplement. Meanwhile, Becky chose from the regular menu. Her first choice of ovenbaked hake with potted brown shrimp butter was sadly not available, so she instead chose a pan roasted stone bass fillet, which came with a crispy fishcake (in fact a tennis ball-sized sphere), wilted spinach, lemon shaved fennel and a shellfish bisque. Stone bass is actually a type of grouper, and its flesh is sweet and silky, so the bisque, with its shellfish sweetness, was an inspired idea. The danger was that it would overpower the fish; in fact, the chef had shown admirable restraint with the flavouring and seasoning, and the result was a sauce which perfectly complemented the moist, flaky fillet. The fishcake gave a lovely smoky flavour, and our suspicions that it included smoked haddock were confirmed by the waitress. This is a kitchen which shows a deft touch with the smoker, lifting dishes to a new dimension without overpowering them. We were quite full by that stage, but cognisant of our duty to you, the readers, we bravely made our choice from the pudding menu – and were very pleased we did. Desserts are often the Achilles heel of pub menus (and indeed many a restaurant menu), but here they were the highlight. I went for a honey and almond Norfolk crunch cake. This, it turns out, is their most popular pudding, and with good reason: really moist, laden with honey, with, as the name suggests, a crunchy top. Served with an elderflower poached pear and vanilla ice cream, it was delicious.


MARK ELVIN

Becky’s pudding was also tremendous. An ice passion fruit parfait, it had been tempered so that it was just the right temperature and texture, soft and melt in the mouth. It came with a Norfolk raspberry curd, frozen raspberries and a mango salsa. As you would expect, the selection of beer at the pub is wide-ranging, with six real ales on tap, along with four lagers, two ciders and Guinness. But it was to the wine list we turned to accompany the meal. Thanks to the adoption of the ‘Verre du Vin’ system, they offer the entire list by the glass as well as the bottle – and also in 500ml carafes.

The list has a dozen whites and a dozen reds, along with five fizzes, three rosés and three dessert wines. It has everything you would expect, as well as one or two surprises. A glass of textbook Albariño and an unusually restrained Australian Viognier accompanied our starters; a carafe of Appassimento from Puglia went down a treat with the mains. This unusual Italian red is made from grapes which have been dried on the vines, giving an intense fruit flavour. It is a favourite of mine, and good to see on a pub wine list. It is worth mentioning the service, which was struck the right balance of

friendliness and informality combined with efficiency and attentiveness. Our waitresses were able to talk knowledgeably about the dishes on the menu, and were clearly interested in them, which is not always the case in village pubs. I’m a city boy at heart. I like the fact that I have a whole range of places to go and eat at my disposal. But a pub like The Boars could make me consider village life – and that is high praise indeed. A year on from being saved by the Evans, The Boars is thriving, and based on our visit, it will continue to do so.

BULLARDS GIN


JIMMY DOHERTY

fA r M e R ’ S w O r L d SARAH HARDY HEADS TO SUFFOLK FOR HER FIRST TRIP TO JIMMY’S FARM FOR LUNCH AND A SPOT OF RETAIL THERAPY

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IMMY’S FARM is a great day trip for all family members as there’s plenty for all ages to enjoy. It was the brainchild of Jamie Oliver’s childhood friend, Jimmy Doherty, who, back in 2002, created the Essex Pig Company, based at Pannington Hall, near Ipswich. Helped by a business loan from his celebrity chum, we have followed Jimmy’s adventures as his farm has developed through TV series like Jimmy’s Farm, where we giggled at his lack of traditional farming experience and rejoiced

as he married girlfriend Michaela (they now have three daughters, so time does move on). At the heart of the business is his passion for rare breeds and his determination to educate future generations about what they eat. Indeed, Prince Charles, patron of the Rare Breeds Survival Trust, paid a recent visit to find out more about his work. Now the 170-acre site, farmed using sustainable methods, is home to the likes of Essex Old Spots, Oxford Sandys, Tamworths, and Gloucestershire Old Spots.

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There’s also a Wildlife and Farm Park, where you can meet meerkats, alpacas and tapirs, plus pigs, sheep, goats, ponies and more; a woodland walk, a butterfly house, and lovely gardens to simply soak up. There are lots of great shops, too, including a rather good branch of the ever popular Joules and a gift shop, For All Seasons. I also enjoyed a look around Clarkes, where White Stuff and Barbour ranges are stocked. What I immediately liked is that it doesn’t overdo the telly stuff, or indeed the Jamie Oliver connection. Rather, it is ultra family friendly and has so much to offer - all on a countryside and foodie theme. There doesn’t seem to be too many rules, with children tearing around making dens, and even our four-legged friends are allowed - on leads, of course.


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The restaurant opens daytime only and also stages lots of events such as quiz nights and jazz events keep an eye on the website for full details. Admission to the farm is free although there is a charge for the Wildlife and Farm Park

VISIT

After a good look around and a few purchases (well, rude not to), I was ready for lunch in a 17th century barn where the ‘field to fork’ restaurant has its home. It is a terrific building, with masses of beams that give that rustic feel, and is kept unfussy with wooden tables and chairs. You can see into the busy kitchen, and the young staff, in checked shirts, are relaxed and good fun. The menu is all about local, seasonal produce. Much obviously comes from the farm itself, with Jimmy’s award-winning sausages top of the bill, and good use is also made of herbs, flowers and vegetables from the gardens, polytunnel and greenhouse. I started off with a simply delicious bowl of roasted tomato soup, served with sourdough - the soup bubbled over with freshness and was tangy and moreish. I www.feastnorfolkmagazine.co.uk

w w w. j i m m y s f a r m . c o m

fancied the summer salad with beetroot and goat’s curd but found myself ordering those bangers which came with masses of creamy mash and gravy and seasonal vegetables. It was divine but poor for my ever expanding waistline! The menu also includes Wisbech-based Fruit Pig black pudding hash, a rare breed burger and beer battered fish and chips all good, solid choices. I couldn’t manage a dessert despite a good looking Eton Mess passing my table and I spotted Norfolk Dapple as part of a cheese board offering, too. Had the husband been with me, the chocolate brownie would have been demolished! Interestingly, there is a separate gluten free menu and children are particularly well catered for. The breakfast menu looks good, and Sunday lunch is said

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to be a real winner, with the Yorkshire puddings recommended. Finally, be sure to call into the farm shop, also housed in the glorious barn. Unsurprisingly, a butchery counter takes centre stage and the meat displays were very attractive. You can snap up those great sausages for a start! Lots of our favourite Norfolk producers are on sale, from Crush Foods to Candi’s Chutneys plus many more, and there’s a big Adnams presence. I spotted that Jimmy also has his own range of beer on sale. I liked Jimmy’s Farm, I liked it a lot. It is the sort of place that is constantly developing and has noble intentions at its heart. If my kids were a bit younger, I’d have them there all the time. Go and have a nosey - and go hungry, too!


IN THE COUNTRY

A country pub, just 10 miles from Norwich, has a new name but retains its reputation as a friendly place with great food. Feast Norfolk reports THE NORFOLK LURCHER, tucked away in pretty Colton, about 10 miles west of Norwich, might be better known to you as the Ugly Bug Inn. Alison and John Lainchbury have spent the past 11 years turning it into a popular ‘destination’ pub, with a reputation for fresh, seasonal food. ‘But we felt the name didn’t quite match what we are doing,’ says John. ‘We wanted something that reflected the county and, as we have a Norfolk lurcher, Alfie, it made sense!’ They have retained the pub’s original name for their restaurant which was given to it by the children of the builders who converted it from a fruit barn into a home. The story goes that they unearthed some very large and unusual looking creepy crawlies and nicknamed the place the Ugly Bug Hall, and it stuck!


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A N G L I A

F A R M E R S

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Hotels, B&Bs, restaurants, bistros, farm shops

01603 881 881 www.af-affinity.co.uk

www.the-norfolklurcher.com

One call for electricity, broadband, fuel, gas, heating oil & insurance

VISIT

Now the pub, which has a large bar area, a garden room, the aforementioned restaurant and eight bedrooms, opens every day, and offers a light lunch menu every day except Tuesday and dinner every day. Sunday lunch is a particular highlight. There is a large car park plus a very well-sized garden where you might enjoy the last few weeks of sunshine. Inside it has a proper country pub feel with beams, exposed brickwork, leather wing-backed chairs, several wood burners, plenty of farming memorabilia and a fine collection of tankards on display. John says: ‘Alison and I are now joined by our children, Robert and Penny, and Penny’s partner Daniel, so it really is a family-run pub.’ mixed grill and the sea bass fillets, wrapped in Parma Food lovers are drawn to the extensive menus ham, while the dessert options are also tempting, with which feature local produce and producers, with John chocolate brownies and fruit crumbles. saying: ‘A lot of people claim to source The pub is also proud of its own dedicated local produce but we actually do! vegetarian menu, which features a range of THE NORFOLK LURCHER runs regular Cheese is from Fielding Cottage, our main meals such as vegetable crêpes filled jazz evening nights and magician neighbours, and also Ferndale Farm in with seasonable vegetables in a cheesy cream evenings on Thursdays - keep an eye on the website for full details. North Norfolk; our meat comes from sauce, vegetable balti, served with basmati The Norfolk Lurcher is one of a our butcher in Hethersett; we use rice, poppadoms, raita and mango chutney, and growing number of restaurants and Lakenham Creamery for ice cream, and tagliatelli carbonara. pubs which are members of Anglia Jonas Seafoods from Cromer.’ John says that around 90 per cent of their Farmers Affinity which offers group He adds: ‘And I have my own trade is repeat bookings, saying that customers purchasing power for items such as polytunnel so we grow our own particularly like the pub’s relaxed atmosphere. electricity, fuel and broadband tomatoes, cucumbers, raspberries and ‘We book out a table for the night so they know more.’ that they have it for the evening so can take The use of local producers also extends to the breweries their time,’ he says. used, with Beeston Brewery and Norfolk Brewhouse ales There is a good range of gins of offer, including Black currently on offer. Other local breweries such as Lacons Shuck from Fakenham and the last mention must go and Bullards are featured throughout the year. to the extensive malt whisky list which has about 60 The menus are tantalising, with a team of three, under different types on it, from all around the world. All the head chef Chris Knibb, manning the kitchen. John main chapters from the English Whisky Company at reports that the baked Cromer crab dish is currently Roudham, near Attleborough, are available alongside a bestseller whereas I like the sound of the enormous ones from Scotland and Japan.


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A café with the best view of Norwich, a bistro in a Grade I listed building and now a park pavilion – the Britannia Empire is certainly expanding. Emma Outten heads to Café Britannia to meet co-founder Davina Tanner OBE WHEN GROUND-BREAKING social enterprise Café Britannia opened in 2014, the first day’s takings came to the grand total of £12. Nowadays the head chef and his team will ably cater for more than 200 covers during a Fathers’ Day breakfast. Little did Davina Tanner OBE and former HMP Norwich Governor Will Styles know that a café run by serving and ex-prisoners would become such a success story and lead to two more venues in iconic Norwich buildings (not to mention two vintage catering vans, which are all geared up for events, festivals and parties).

Britannia Enterprises launched in partnership with the Ministry of Justice and HMP Norwich, and was given a year, by Justice Secretary Chris Grayling at the time, to work as a concept. Chief Executive Davina admits: ‘We didn’t know that it would work.’ What sets the café - based at the former Britannia Barracks next to HMP Norwich - apart from thousands of other social enterprises is that the majority of the 30 or so staff employed are serving or ex-offenders. And there’s a big social impact to it all: diners are helping to employ offenders and stop

them from re-offending (Britannia’s re-offending rate is just five per cent, compared to the national reoffending rate of 46 per cent). All tips and profits generated go to rehabilitating prisoners and chosen charitable causes - since the launch, Café Britannia has donated more than £50,000 to Victim Support. And in 2015, Davina was awarded an OBE, in recognition of her services to businesses and the wider community in East Anglia. She says modestly: ‘I got it in the first year I was here - it’s surreal really as you see other people who haven’t


Davina Tanner DAVINA TANNER

PICTURE OF DAVINA BY MATT KEAL

got one and you think ‘why have I got one?’ But she adds: ‘It’s amazing and lovely to be recognised.’ Davina would be the first to admit she’s ‘not a foodie’. She has held senior roles at Arcadia, Tesco and intu Chapelfield shopping centre and says: ‘I would never have left Chapelfield to just go and open a restaurant or a café - that wasn’t my experience.’ However, devising the Community and Custody Project whilst at intu Chapelfield, has clearly inspired her. As did her time at value-driven Tesco. ‘I’m a Tesco girl,’ admits Davina, before describing the food at Café Britannia: ‘The food is very simple and done well - it’s all fresh and we’ve got a good relationship with our supplier, Pilgrim Foodservices.’ Although the menu might not scream locally-sourced, Davina does say: ‘We are talking to Archer's - the sausages are amazing.’ She makes the point: ‘Our USP ultimately is about rehabilitation that’s the core that goes through it all.’

And the other unique selling point, of course, is the fact that the café up on Mousehold affords spectacular views over Norwich. Café Britannia offers a day menu (‘breakfast is probably our busiest time’) and a dedicated afternoon tea room, and there’s also an evening bistro menu, which is popular in the summer months, although Davina is well aware of the fact that ‘there are so many amazing restaurants in Norwich, and in Norfolk’ to choose from. She makes the point: ‘I love Benedicts but it’s not the market I’m in.’ Whereas Café Britannia always has a good special offer on (the Around the World in 80 Days burger promotion ends on October 2, for example). Last year Café Britannia was awarded Best Family Dining at in the Norfolk Food and Drink Awards, and, by the end of the year, Shop Britannia, next door, starting selling gifts, homewares and furniture reupholstered by offenders in the


01.

G a dg e ts & G iz m os

HE Y, GOOD LOOK ING!

AUTUMN SEES MANY NEW PRODUCTS ON THE MARKET FOR YOU TO ENJOY. HERE’S OUR ROUND UP OF THE LATEST GADGETS AND GIZMOS ON OFFER

02.

04.

03.

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WHERE TO BUY 01. Smart Cutter Scissor Knife, £9.99, Looses Cookshop, Norwich, www.loosescookshop.co.uk 02. Smart Tunnel Toaster, £59.99, Hughes, www.hughes.co.uk 03. LSA Gin Serving Set, £295, John Lewis, Norwich, www.johnlewis.co.uk 04. Wesco Elly Bread Bin, £90, www.amara.com 05. Manhattan Bar Tool Set, £39.50, Marks and Spencer, www.marksandspencer.com 06. Grind salt, pepper or spice mill in aluminium casting, £89 for black, £69 for aluminium, www.alessi.com 07. Oliver Bonas Mixed Marble Tray With Cloche, £60, www.oliverbonas.com

hughes.co.uk

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Prisoner Workshop. The café décor has always been what you would call ‘shabby chic’: ‘We did it on a shoestring,’ says Davina. ‘And it’s now become synonymous with who we are.’ Following the success of Café Britannia, Britannia Enterprises was approached by Norwich City Council to become custodians of the historic Grade I listed Guildhall – and the former Caley’s Café relaunched as Bistro Britannia in May of this year, fast becoming known as a place to go for comedy nights, quiz and dinner nights, and ghost nights. Davina has lots of plans for the Bistro, including a Sunday roast carvery and breakfast carvery, from Monday to Saturday.

www.cafebritannia.co.uk

I N T E R V I E W

VISIT

B I G

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And the latest news is that Davina and the team have become custodians of Waterloo Park pavilion, which opened this summer as Park Britannia. ‘What we are doing is opening downstairs initially and then the beautiful building upstairs – it’s an old 1940s dance hall and we want to do weddings and parties up there.’ She adds: ‘We’ll be able to seat 100 downstairs and a 100 upstairs.’ Both the former Britannia Barracks and the Waterloo Park pavilion are Grade II listed, with Davina reflecting: ‘I’ve ended up with three beautiful buildings which are all iconic to the city.’ It doesn’t sound as though Davina will be heading back to the corporate world anytime soon - if she has discovered one thing since starting the social enterprise, it’s this: ‘I’m a lone wolf!’ Besides, as she says: ‘I’m proud of the fact that we’ve made a success of it.’

DAVI NA HAS LOTS OF PLAN S FOR TH E

B I STRO , I N CLU D I N G A SU N DAY ROAST CARVE RY AN D B R EAKFAST CARVE RY

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Davina Tanner

CAFÉ BRITANNIA, BASED AT THE FORMER BRITANNIA BARRACKS

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City College Norwich

ON A PR ACTICAL LEVEL

In our latest City College feature, Emma Outten hears all about two new cookery books with a difference, co-written by Head of Hotel School, Steve Thorpe VISIT

www.ccn.ac.uk

STEVE THORPE is passionate about helping students within the Hotel School become expert chefs of the future. So much so he regularly puts his name against textbooks on the subject. And the latest to be published are Practical Cookery for the Level 3 Advanced Technical Diploma in Professional Cookery, and Practical Cookery for the Level 2 Technical Certificate in Professional Cookery. The Head of the Hotel School has co-written the books with three other colleagues within the education sector: David Foskett, Patricia Paskins, and Neil Rippington. He says: ‘Practical Cookery has been the recognised text for chefs for more than 40 years, and the latest versions are now linked to the professional development of chefs and are considered to be the go-to resource when working in and managing a professional kitchen environment. They have always been written by chefs in education.’ The Level 3 Practical Cookery book covers all the advanced preparation, cooking and finishing techniques students could possibly need to succeed in the professional kitchen.

And this new edition is matched to the NVQ and VRQ Diplomas, and has been fully updated to include recipes that incorporate modern culinary trends and up-to-date techniques. It contains all of the underpinning knowledge that students need - for whichever Level 3 course they are completing. Steve says: ‘With the change in the qualifications for professional cookery and hospitality generally, there’s been a requirement to update the learning resources and materials.’ It contains all of the elements around working in a professional kitchen, including finance, food ordering, health and safety, as well as food hygiene. And there are 400 specially selected, easy-tofollow, recipes in all, covering meat, poultry, fish and shellfish, fruit and vegetables, pasta and rice, and cold desserts.

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At the beginning of the new academic year, Steve also has this update: In the first week of September we will be taking in a large number of students, some of whom might not have not had any experience in the industry but they’ve got the passion and the inspiration because they’ve seen something on TV, or they’ve been to a good restaurant and have had a great experience. On the other hand, some might have been told to do catering by careers advisers or teachers at school, because they are deemed to be unclear or unprepared to do any other form of work. My message would be to always remember that catering and hospitality is a first class career option, and a great opportunity. It is certainly not a last resort and if we nurture, inspire and develop these young people, I’m sure a lot of them will end up being the future stars of our food sector, across the country, if not the world.

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Steve says the aim is to ‘enable the students to develop further background knowledge and understanding in preparation for the formal exams they will sit at the end of their qualifications.’ It could even help beyond the exams, as Steve comments: ‘The book will actually support all of those working in the industry as an aid manual - there are some really good, robust recipes, all of which work linking a very raw product to a finished dish as well as having the relevant information in terms of allergen content and alternative ingredients that could be used.’ And, he adds: ‘It would support internal training and development and programmes where chefs are taking on apprentices and wanting to make sure that an apprentice becomes a future head chef. It gives people that reference.’ The Level 2 Practical Cookery book, Steve adds: ‘is a first introduction to cookery for professional chefs, so looking at how a kitchen is set up, kitchen materials, purchasing equipment and use of resources as well as the basic cooking techniques, whether it’s boiling, baking, frying or grilling, and recipes related to that.’ He continues: ‘One of the big things within both books is ensuring that students start to develop an understanding of the relevance of how food is produced; where it comes from (and what that can mean in terms of the overall selling price); where it fits on a menu and how they can develop it into a dish. And that’s a really important element for chefs of the future.’ He concludes: ‘Understand the flavours, understand service and understand the customer and you should be on the pathway to a successful career.’

www.feastnorfolkmagazine.co.uk

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MY LIFE ON A

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ANDREW BAKER

OPEN

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Meet the new chef at OPEN in Norwich, Andrew Baker, who is introducing fine dining at the Grade II listed building in the heart of the city PICTURES BY

KEIRON TOVELL PHOTOGRAPHY

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w

ho are you and where do you work? My name is Andrew Baker and I’m Head of Catering at the OPEN venue in Norwich. Here I provide a high quality private dining experience, conference catering and also run a café. The profit from all of these ventures goes to the Open Youth Trust which provides activities such as performing arts, climbing and music all aimed at promoting mental health and wellbeing in young people in Norfolk.

What do you like doing when you're not cooking? I volunteer on the SOS Bus and help to provide a safe haven for those

Who has inspired you? From an early age, I was inspired by my dad, watching him work hard in our family restaurant providing for his family as well as his devotion to food. Recently I have worked with many local suppliers and chefs who have rekindled my passion for local produce with a network consisting of Coxfords Butchers, Proudly Norfolk, Bread Source, Brown May, Mr Fruity, Nurtured in Norfolk, Wild Knight Vodka, Norfolk Gin, Norfolk Quail, Norfolk Saffron, Crush Foods and Charlie Hodson, to name a few - it makes you proud to be in Norfolk. One chef I have worked with and coached recently is Rob Sampson. His experience and passion for food and life have helped me develop both as a chef and as a person. www.feastnorfolkmagazine.co.uk

who find themselves in a vulnerable situation in the city centre on Friday and Saturday nights. When I’m not volunteering I enjoy spending time with my family. Where do you like to eat out in the region? My favourite place would be Richard Bainbridge’s restaurant, Benedicts, in Norwich. What would you be doing if you were not a chef? I would be lost! I’m not sure that I’ve ever thought of anything else since watching my dad in the kitchen at the age of five. What's your foodie prediction for the coming months? I believe that a collaboration of Norfolk producers will be vital as customers will be looking for more sustainable local produce on menus.

OPEN is a venue, conferencing, live music and event space in Norwich, on Bank Plain. It was the regional headquarters of Barclays Bank

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RECIPE OVERLEAF

Where did you train? I trained while working for my family run restaurant The Cromer Grill under my dad’s guidance and attended City College, Norwich, where I gained my City and Guilds as well as my NVQs and Assessor qualifications.

What is your signature dish? September marks the start of the apple season so a nice Bramley apple pie or, if I was to choose seafood, mussels with a saffron and garlic butter.

www.norwichopen.org.uk

Where were you before? I was Hospitality Catering coach delivering the Flourish programme for The Feed, a project of LEAP East CIC and I also taught at City College, Norwich, Hotel School.

Got a favourite gadget? I recently purchased a sphericator but have not really had chance to use it yet. For those who don’t know what this is - simply put this is the culinary process of shaping a liquid into spheres which visually and texturally resembles caviar or pearls. However, my favourite gadget is a Global knife which was a gift from a student I coached.

VISIT

How long have you been there? I have only been working for the Open Youth Trust since June, however, through my previous job, I have been using their kitchen and providing catering for conference clients for more than 12 months.

What is your favourite ingredient? I love all food, but if I must choose it would be lamb from Bull Farm in Felthorpe. It’s my all-time favourite.


JUSTIN WRIGHT

Lovewell Blake -

C O L U M N

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S AY C H E E S E !

www.feastnorfolkmagazine.co.uk

VISIT

IN ONE WAY, at least, it has been a cheesy kind of summer for me. First, the annual NFU/Lovewell Blake farm walk was held at Fen Farm Dairy at Flixton near Bungay, home of the Brie de Meaux style Baron Bigod cheese. And then came news that Norton’s Dairy at Frettenham, just north of Norwich, has won yet another award: Best Food and Drink Supplier in the Lovewell Blakesponsored Aylsham Show Norfolk Food Heroes Awards. Both are classic examples of farms which have diversified, and in a way which will help them support multiple generations of farmers by creating multiple businesses within the one farm. This kind of diversification is building a much closer link between farmers and food and drink consumers – and it is also building a wider income base for many farms at a time of huge uncertainty about future income streams, postBrexit. It is often when a new generation comes into a farm business that diversification happens, in many cases to provide a viable business that the incoming family member can make their own. At Norton’s Dairy, for example, Emily Norton was part of the fourth generation of the family to work in the business; it was she who created the St Swithin’s range of soft cheeses which are winning so many awards. Meanwhile at Fen Farm Dairy, Jonny Crickmore joined his father’s farm in 1996. He was inspired to start selling raw milk direct to the public at the farm gate following a visit to an egg farm, where he learned that the farm was selling its ‘seconds’ – those eggs which were either too

www.lovewell-blake.co.uk

Justin Wright, who heads up Lovewell Blake’s specialist food and drink team, applauds two examples of how farm diversification has created a closer link between agriculture and consumers big, too small or double-yokers – direct to the public, at a bigger margin than they were getting for the Grade A eggs from the wholesaler. If it could work for eggs, why not milk? Creating a cheese was a logical next step, and the first batch of Baron Bigod was made in 2012; the farm also now makes a Normandy-style butter. Of course, diversification can take many guises, not all food related (holiday lets and energy generation have proved popular in recent years). But for many farmers, their heart is in producing food, and diversification can offer all sorts of opportunities within that sphere, as Fen Farm and Norton’s Dairy bear witness to. The advantages are clear: developing new income streams, reducing risk in other parts of the business, integrating family members into the business with an eye on succession, and using current products to add value (as in a dairy farm making cheese). A word of warning, though: diversification should be seen as a new business, and the same rigour in terms of financial appraisal and planning is required. In the meantime, consumers will continue to benefit from diversification, which is providing a stream of new top-quality products, and making the link between ‘farm and fork’ ever closer. DISCLAIMER: Please note this article is provided for your information only. Whilst every effort has been made to ensure its accuracy, information contained herein may not be comprehensive and you should not act upon it without seeking professional advice.

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OPEN

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For the blackberry and gin purée/syrup 500g of blackberries (may make more than needed); 75ml of Norfolk Gin; 35g of sugar; 150ml of water

diplOmat

RECIPE FROM ANDREW BAKER

BLACKBERRY

For the Bavarois 150ml of blackberry gin purée; 125ml of milk; 4 egg yolks; 150g of sugar; 3 gelatine leaves, soaked in cold water; 250ml of double cream, semi-whipped

www.feastnorfolkmagazine.co.uk

Blackberry and Norfolk Gin Bavarois on a Genoise sponge soaked in Berry Syrup SERVES

4-5

METHOD For the sponge Whisk eggs and sugar in a large bowl until thick and pale. Gently fold in the sieved flour and melted butter into the egg mixture. Place into a lined Swiss roll tray and bake for 12 – 14 minutes until firm to touch. 170°C fan oven Gas Mark 4 For the blackberry and gin purée/syrup Place blackberries and water into saucepan and simmer for approximately 10 minutes until cooked or cook for longer if you need a thicker purée. Add gin and sugar and cook for further 5 minutes before passing through a sieve. Note the more gin you add could affect setting of mousse For the Bavarois Add the milk to a pan and bring to a simmer. Meanwhile, whisk

the egg yolks and sugar in a heatproof bowl until pale and fluffy. Squeeze any excess liquid from the gelatine, then add to the warm milk and stir to dissolve. Slowly pour the milk onto the eggs and whisk to combine then return to the heat and gently cook until thickens and coats the back of a spoon. Leave to cool to room temperature before adding the blackberry and gin purée to the mix, then gently folding in the semi-whipped double cream and transfer to a piping bag. Putting it all together you can use individual mousse rings or a 20cm spring cake tin. Cut a piece of sponge to fit the bottom of tin or rings, place in tin and brush with some of the leftover blackberry and gin purée. Pipe a good layer of Bavarois mousse so its 4-5 cm thick, gently tap the tin or rings on a work surface and place in fridge for a minimum of 2-3 hours to set. To remove from rings or tin, gently warm the sides with a blowtorch and it will come away easily. You can reduce some of the purée with a little more gin to achieve a syrup to top the Bavarois.

PRIVATE DINING FACILITIES are now available in the historic bank manager’s offices and dining rooms, which have been restored to their former use with professional clients, including bankers, hiring the rooms for fine dining experiences for clients and guests in privacy and splendour. Costs vary depending on numbers and a choice of rooms can be set for small groups from four to eight with larger spaces available for 10 to 40 people.

PICTURES BY

For the sponge 125g of caster sugar; 4 medium free-range local eggs; 125g of plain flour; 25g of butter, melted

CHARLOTTE SHEEHY AKA @NORWICHFOODIES ON TWITTER

INGREDIENTS


Your Gluten Freedo m

SARA MATTHEWS runs Your Gluten Freedom, visit www.yourglutenfreedom.co.uk

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This month our free from recipe writer Sara Matthews creates a spicy supper dish and a high-energy snack!

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APPLE & BLACKBERRY ENERGY BALLS These are such a delicious way to keep your energy levels up. They can be kept in the freezer and taken out to eat as and when you want them. Go for a foraging walk and collect some blackberries to make yours INGREDIENTS

Balls 60g of blackberries; 175g of dates; 60g of dehydrated apple rings, chopped; 200g of gluten free porridge oats; 1tsp of cinnamon; 1 vanilla pod, scraped; 1tsp of ground flax seed; 1tbsp of pumpkin seeds Coating/decoration 2tbsp of pumpkin seeds, finely chopped or crushed; 2tbsp of coconut oil, melted; 4tbsp of raw cacao powder (or you can use cocoa powder); 2tsp of date syrup

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METHOD Place the gluten free oats into a food processor and blend until you have a coarse flour. Add the other ingredients and blitz. Roll into 24 balls and place on a baking sheet covered in parchment. Place in freezer while you make the coating. Place the crushed pumpkin seeds in a bowl and set to one side. In another bowl add the melted coconut oil (if the room is hot it may already be melted; failing that, microwave for a few seconds or place over a pan of boiling water until melted). Once just melted, add the date syrup and cacao powder. Remove balls from freezer, dip each one in chocolate mix, then in crushed pumpkin seeds, return to baking parchment. Repeat this with other balls. I coat some completely and leave some plain, you could also use desiccated coconut to coat. Return to the freezer and remove as required. Will keep for 4 weeks in the freezer

ANOTHER RECIPE OVERLEAF

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Middle of nowhere, centre of everywhere!

TRY OUR NEW

BUFFET BREAKFAST

Fresh, local and seasonal is our ethos here at the Saracen’s Head, so come and enjoy a delicious, locally sourced meal with us

£4.95

See us featured in the Norfolk Table Cookbook

SUNDAY CLASSIC carvery £8.95

PLUS

AFTERNOON TEA & SPECIAL EVENTS!

Lunch orders will be taken from 12-2pm Mon to Sat and 12.30-2.30pm on Sundays. Dinner from 6.30-8.30pm Tues to Sat and 6.30-8pm Sunday and Monday. You are always best to make a booking. Call us on 01263 768909 or email info@saracenshead-norfolk.co.uk

IN THE HISTORIC GUILDHALL, NEXT TO NORWICH MARKET 01603 629364 /bistrobritannianorwich @bistrobritannianorwich

ARK0028 Bistro Britannia Feast Ad FP.indd 1

www.saracenshead-norfolk.co.uk

16/08/2017 16:42

Fresh, local and seasonal is our ethos here at the Saracens. Being in the middle of nowhere is the perfect excuse to come and enjoy a meal whilst you explore this wonderful part of North Norfolk. Our full menu is available every day, lunch and dinner and in addition we have our summer lunch menu from Monday to Saturday. Sunday lunches are very special and we offer the most delicious roast rump of Blickling reared beef. If it’s too far to travel for a meal, why not stay the night and make a quick break of it!

Summer Opening Times In July & August we will be open 7 days a week this summer Lunch orders will be taken from 12.00 to 2.30 Dinner from 6.30 to 9.00, except Sundays and Mondays 6.30 to 8.30

BOOK TODAY

TAKE AWAY CRABS & LOBSTERS AVAILABLE FROM 10AM OPENING TIMES: SUN-THURS 10-5pm; FRI-SAT 10-8pm SERVING FOOD FROM 12 with Surf and Turf on Friday and Saturday CALL US: 01263 837359 OR 07999 959760

www.crownhotelnorfolk.co.uk 01328 710209

CROMER ROAD, WEST RUNTON, NORFOLK, NR27 9QA

www.rockybottoms.co.uk

www.shiphotelnorfolk.co.uk 01485 210333 WELLS-NEXT-THE-SEA

NORTH NORFOLK

BRANCASTER


Your Gluten Freedo m -

R E C I P E S

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CAULIFLOWER TABBOULEH WITH CHARGRILLED CHINESE LEAF, RED CABBAGE & A CREAMY DRESSING

SERVES 4-6

The Middle Eastern favourite, tabbouleh, is a great accompaniment to so many dishes. We grow cauliflower and always have an abundance of them, and this is a fantastic way to use them INGREDIENTS

For the tabbouleh 1 medium cauliflower; 1/3 large or 1/2 small cucumber, chopped into small chunks; 200g of fresh tomatoes, chopped into small chunks; a large handful of fresh parsley, finely chopped; a large handful of fresh mint, finely chopped; zest and juice of 1 large lemon or two small lemons; 1tbsp of organic unrefined olive oil; a pinch of Himalayan sea salt; a good grind of black pepper

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For the steaks 1 large Chinese leaf; 1 whole red cabbage; 1-2tbsp of melted coconut oil For the creamy dressing 100g of soya yogurt or any plant based yogurt (I used Alpro go-on plain yogurt); 1tbsp of tahini; 2tsp of gluten free Dijon mustard; 1tsp of garlic powder; 1tsp of onion powder; 1tsp of gluten free tamari (soya sauce); 2tbsp of water; juice of 1 lemon

METHOD First, make the tabbouleh. Place the cauliflower florets in a food processor and blitz until the mixture resembles couscous, then transfer it to a large bowl. Add the other tabbouleh ingredients, stir, cover and chill until ready to serve. The chilling allows the flavours to develop, and this can be done a day ahead. Next, make the creamy dressing. In a bowl, add all the dressing ingredients and whisk until a smooth paste, cover and chill until needed. Again, the flavours are better when allowed to infuse, so great to make the day before. Either heat a barbecue or a cast iron ridged skillet pan until very hot. Cut the Chinese leaves lengthways into either 4 or 6, depending on how many you have for dinner. Slice the red cabbage from top to bottom to make 4-6 steaks, depending on number of guests. Rub with a little coconut oil and place on the grill until charred, turning over halfway through cooking. This should only take a couple of minutes each side. Serve immediately with tabbouleh and creamy dressing

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G alt on Blackis ton

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FISHY DISHES Celebrity chef Galton Blackiston of Morston Hall publishes his latest cookbook this month - dedicated to seafood. Feast Norfolk tucks in PHOTOGRAPHY IS BY JOHN SCOTT BLACKWELL

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H

HOOK LINE SINKER

Here are three delicious recipes to try at home:

is published this month by Face Publications and costs £20

PICTURED LEF T

TIGER PRAWN AND POTATO FRITTERS WITH VIETNAMESE DIPPING SAUCE

INGREDIENTS For the dipping sauce 250ml of water; 2tbsp of white wine vinegar; 4tbsp of lime juice; 1 chilli, deseeded, finely sliced; 3 garlic cloves, peeled, grated; 1 small lobe of ginger, peeled, grated; 8tbsp of nam pla fish sauce; 4tbsp of caster sugar

For the fritters 750g of self-raising flour; 750ml of sparkling water; 1/2 tsp of salt; 1/2 tsp of caster sugar; 1/2 tsp of turmeric; 3 large Maris Piper potatoes; 12 raw tiger prawns, 3 per serving; 1 litre of vegetable oil, for frying; 8 spring onions, chopped; 1 handful of coriander, chopped

www.feastnorfolkmagazine.co.uk

METHOD To make the dipping sauce, whisk all the ingredients together in a bowl. Set aside until needed. To make the fritters, in a bowl mix together the flour, sparkling water, salt, sugar and turmeric and set aside to rest for 10 minutes. Peel the potatoes and cut into julienne strips. Peel and devein the tiger prawns and cut in half lengthways. Set aside. Heat the oil in a deep fat fryer to 180°C. Fold the potatoes, prawns, spring onions and coriander through the batter mix. Using your hands, shape them into fritters, making sure you have an even distribution of prawns in each fritter. Lower them into the hot oil and fry until crisp and golden brown. Remove from the fryer and drain well on kitchen paper. Serve immediately with the dipping sauce

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GALTON BLACKISTON

MORE RECIPES OVERLEAF

OOK LINE SINKER is a seafood cookbook from Michelin-starred chef Galton Blackiston featuring recipes created through his lifelong love affair with fish and shellfish. Galton has run Morston Hall, near Blakeney, with his wife Tracy, for 25 years, and they also run No 1 Cromer, a modern take on a traditional fish and chip restaurant . Galton’s seafood dishes have always turned heads. He has a knack of taking simple ingredients and pairing them with techniques and flavours that allow the flavours to remain pure whilst bringing a sense of fun to the occasion. The book features more than 90 recipes divided into five chapters - Quick and Easy, Small Plates, Stress-Free, Spicy Seafood and Main Courses. It isn't a huge how-to reference guide, or a seafood bible to teach you everything about each fish in the sea. It's a very personal book featuring Galton's all-time favourite recipes, all of which have featured on his menu in some form over the years, but more importantly, are great to cook at home. The book has a foreword by Michel Roux OBE, who says: ‘Like all the best recipe books, Hook Line Sinker is not merely a collection of recipes but an honest celebration of life, discoveries and ideas: a story shared about the simple, sometimes nostalgic, pleasures of sharing and eating. Few are so intimately and enjoyably written as this one by my friend Galton Blackiston.’


G al t on is t on Black OPEN LOBSTER PIE

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INGREDIENTS For the pastry 250g of plain flour; 1tsp of salt; 1tsp of sugar; 150g of salted butter, softened; 1 egg, beaten For the pie 3 whole eggs plus 2 egg yolks, lightly whisked together; 425ml of double cream; 100g of grated Cheddar cheese; 1 pinch of freshly grated nutmeg; sea salt and black pepper; 3 cooked lobsters, just the meat, chunkily chopped; 4tbsp of chopped basil METHOD For this recipe you'll need 4 individual 7.5cm loose-bottomed flan rings, at least 4cm high, and some baking beans. To make the pastry, sift the flour onto a large clean work surface and sprinkle over the salt and sugar. Make a well in the centre and add the softened butter along with the beaten egg. Using your fingertips amalgamate the butter and egg until you achieve a scrambled egg consistency then add a good splash of water and mix in. Draw in the flour and again using your fingertips bring the pastry together. Wrap in cling film and refrigerate to rest for at least 1 hour. When ready to use, remove the pastry from the fridge, roll out, and line the flan rings. Place on a baking tray and return to the fridge to rest for at least another 1 hour. To make the pie, preheat the oven to 160°C/325°F/ gas mark 3. Remove the lined flan rings from the fridge, cover the pastry-lined rings with baking parchment, fill with baking beans and place in the centre of the oven. Bake ‘blind’ for about 25 minutes, or until the pastry just starts to colour. Remove the baking beans and parchment: if there are any cracks in the pastry, use leftover pieces of pastry or beaten egg yolk to repair it. Return the pastry case to the oven for about 5 minutes, remove from the oven and leave to cool. Whisk the eggs, egg yolks and cream together in a bowl. Add the cheese and season well with grated nutmeg, salt and freshly ground pepper. Add the lobster and chopped basil and mix well. Spoon the lobster mixture into the pastry cases and bake in the preheated oven for 40 minutes or until the tarts are set. Take out of the oven and allow to rest for 10 minutes before serving. To serve, trim the pastry and remove the flan rings, and serve with a light tomato and cucumber salad and some blanched asparagus.

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DUCK EGG WITH BROWN SHRIMPS AND COCKLES WITH SOURDOUGH TOAST INGREDIENTS 4 knobs of salted butter; 4 freerange duck eggs; 100g of brown shrimps, cooked, peeled; 100g of cockles, cooked; 2tbsp of chopped parsley; 2tbsp of smoked paprika; 4 slices of chunky sourdough, toasted to serve

www.feastnorfolkmagazine.co.uk

METHOD Preheat the oven to 180°C/350°F/ gas mark 4. Gently heat 4 small ovenproof frying pans on the hob. Add a knob of butter to each, and when it starts to foam crack a duck egg into each pan. Fry until the egg whites start to set. Scatter over

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the shrimps and cockles and put the pans into the oven to carry on cooking the yolks: be careful not to overcook them – keep them nice and runny. Remove the pans from the oven, sprinkle with chopped parsley and smoked paprika. Serve with the toasted sourdough bread.

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New Releases

The start of autumn means the latest offering from Jamie Oliver, and a very timely cookbook for students

H A LF PRICE

5 INGREDIENTS: QUICK & EASY FOOD by Jamie Oliver ÂŁ13

Following the motto, cooking doesn't have to be complicated, there are more than 130 inspiring recipes in the latest cookbook from Jamie Oliver. Think roast tikka chicken - a whole bird rubbed with curry paste and roasted over golden potatoes and tender cauliflower, finished with fresh coriander. Or, crazy simple fish pie - flaky smoked haddock, spring onions, spinach and melty Cheddar, all topped off with crisp, golden filo, and ready to tuck into in less than 30 minutes. Sounds mouth-watering.

TOM KITCHIN'S MEAT & GAME by Tom Kitchin ÂŁ20

Tom's passion and talent for game is showcased in this book. With every recipe there comes a fresh new way to treat much loved classics: roast pheasant with cabbage and apple salad; partridge and game pie; rabbit au vin; roast rack of venison with a blueberry and juniper crust; pigeon, lentil and spelt burgers; pheasant and partridge Scotch egg; hare cannelloni and the Ultimate 11s grouse sandwich are just some of the essential gamey recipes to try out and enjoy. Deliciously different.


books

SLOW COOKING

PRONTO!

STUDENT EATS

£12.99

£16.99

£9.99

by James Martin

James Martin's recipes range from family favourites such as soups, roasts and one-pots, to more unexpected and adventurous dishes that embrace the slow philosophy, such as fresh mackerel pickled with oil, vinegar and whole spices or fillet of beef wrapped in cling film and slowly roasted until perfectly medium rare. It’s a case of good things come to those who wait.

by Gino D'Acampo

This collection of 130 recipes preempts Gino's new October television series. It includes handy hints and tips for quicker cooking, such as organising your workspace, the equipment that you really need (and the stuff you can do without) and essential store cupboard ingredients for fast flavour. Plus there are shortcuts to get ahead, such as making flavoured oils and freezing chopped herbs and batches of sauce to have on standby – all good ideas.

by Rachel Phipps

An easy, modern cookbook, perfect for students on a budget, which offers tried-and-tested meals that can be made with minimal utensils, no fancy gadgets and affordable ingredients. With 200 recipes, a store cupboard shopping list, and simple menu plans for one, two, four or more, it has been created by a student who is now a graduate.

DI AR Y DA TE : f Gal ton Bl ack isto n of Mo rsto n che lk rfo No ing lead , 20 ber tem Sep On boo k, Ho ok Lin e Sin ker at Ha ll wil l be sign ing cop ies of his late st . Tic ket s are £7 . The Pa ntr y Res tau ran t, 6pm for 6.3 0pm Mo re det ails on www.j arr old. co.u k

www.feastnorfolkmagazine.co.uk

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INGREDIENTS er or King 500g of Norfolk Maris Pip and cut into Edward potatoes, peeled che; a knob of chunks; 4tbsp of crème fraî eseed oil; 2 rap butter; 1/2 tbsp of Norfolk each cut and d core les, app local Norfolk m traditional into 12 wedges; 8 Walsingha 2 sprigs of fresh sausages; 1 onion, sliced; ml of Whin sage, finely chopped; 500 p of Monty’s 1tbs r; cide l stil Hill medium Norfolk wholegrain mustard

OW DO YOU LIKE YOUR SAUSAGES? Fried, grilled or baked? However you like ‘em, there’s no disputing that the humble banger is a hugely important part of British cuisine. Indeed, sausage and mash is right up there with fish and chips and bacon and eggs as a firm family favourite. The sausage is so versatile - think of sausage casserole, toad in the hole, spicy sausage pasta, hot dogs and more. And don’t forget a healthy dollop of mustard or ketchup. While they are popular with children, gourmet sausages are very on trend, with wonderful flavour combinations. Much use is made of chilli, fresh herbs, fruits and even alcohol, with gin a popular addition these days. You can make your own sausages but there are so many great options available from your local butcher, it is barely worth the effort! Have a shop around and see what takes your fancy. Let us know what you find!

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METHOD pan, cover with Put the potatoes in a large Cook for 15-20 water and bring to the boil. and mash n drai n the der, mins until ten he. Season with 2tbsp of the crème fraîc k, heat the coo s atoe pot the ile to taste. Wh g pan. fryin ed butter and oil in a large lidd the add ing, foam just is ter When the but medium heat apple wedges. Cook over a , or until just for about 2 mins each side the pan with turning golden. Remove from Add the e. asid set and on a slotted spo sages and onion Walsingham traditional sau mins – turn the to the pan and cook for 6-7 all over, and wn sausages so that they bro h. Pour in the catc sn’t doe it so n stir the onio cover and n the , cider and bring to the boil tard, sage, mus the in Stir s. min cook for 10 apples. the and remaining crème fraîche mash the with e serv and e Season to tast


Coxfords Coxfords Butchers Butchers

PROUDLY NORFOLK All o

For the love of local food!

f our prod is sourced lo uce cally

Try our tasty Walsingham sausages, made in our butchery with at least 85% pork. All our pork is local and outdoor reared, from farmer Tim Allen at Morley Farm, South Creake TRY OUR

Pork Chops ‘BATTLE OF only THE BANGERS’ £5.95kg Proudly

AWARD-WINNING Norfolk HONEY ROAST SAUSAGES MADE USING A TRADITIONAL 100 YEAR OLD RECIPE

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All our prod uce is sourced locally

11, Market Place, Aylsham | 01263 732280

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BUTCHERS • DELI • TAKEAWAY • HIGH WELFARE, FREE RANGE MEATS FROM LOCAL FARMS • • NORFOLK FOOD AND DRINK CHAMPIONS •

www.archersbutchers.com 177-179 Plumstead Road, Norwich

Tel 01603 434253

We only stock the best beef, lamb, pork and poultry available PADDOCKS BUTCHERY & DELI STORES Church Farm,Norwich Road, Hethersett NR9 3AS 01603 812437 Paddock Farm Shop, Norwich Road, Mulbarton NR14 8JT 01508 578259 The Street, Bunwell, NR16 1AB 01953 789708

CATERING DIVISION Wood view Farm, Church Lane, Wicklewood, NR18 9QH, 01953 602470

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! em T ail ele o r d ph o e rs n e A we N D lco me

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Supplying meat, sourced directly from local farms, ensuring quality and traceability. award winning handmade pies & pastries from Clarke’s Farm Kitchen, Hevingham 73 MARKET PLACE, SWAFFHAM PE37 7AQ 01760 721791 SHOP@IMPSONBUTCHERS.CO.UK

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THE GIN TRAP INN is a traditional and cosy 17th century coaching inn. Serving delicious homemade fare & offering luxurious rooms. Open from 11:30am to late daily

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6 High Street, Ringstead, Hunstanton, Norfolk PE36 5JU www.thegintrapinn.co.uk


CHA

RLIE HODSON

it's

Charlie Hodson

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NORFOLK FOOD CHAMPION CHARLIE HODSON REPORTS ON THE SEARCH FOR THE ULTIMATE NORFOLK SAUSAGE ROLL

PORKSTOCK is a family friendly food and music festival held at the Norfolk Showground on October 14. Visit www.porkstock.co.uk

www.feastnorfolkmagazine.co.uk

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JUST SOME PORK WRAPPED IN PASTRY SURELY?’ Well, in some High Street purveyors of bakery goods, the answer might be yes.. But to the winner of the Porkstock Roll Off Competition held at Woodforde’s in Woodbastwick, it’s a very different tale. Our judging panel was made up of James Ellis and Ben Handford (the original founding fathers of the festival), Stephen Plume aka the Sausage King, and Pippa Lain Smith from Plain Speaking PR and part of the Porkstock family. The sponsors (Hatch Brenner Solicitors in Norwich and Cranswick Country Foods from Watton) were eager to put aside an afternoon in the office especially when the words ‘sausage roll’ were mentioned. And they were joined by James Hughes and Nick Dolan from the brewery. Entries came from keen Norwich foodie Johnny Needham, Sam Bagge and his team at Walsingham Farm Shops, Jamie Archer from Archer’s butchers in Norwich, and Rick and his team from the White Horse at Neatishead. Competition was fierce and judging was taken very seriously indeed! Finally, after much deliberation, it came down to a tie-break between Jamie Archer and Johnny Needham - and then it was all about a question of provenance and Jamie just pipped Johnny at the post! And this wasn’t bad considering that Jamie is a third generation butcher and Johnny was a fishmonger in a previous life! Jamie gets his meat from Morley Farm in South Creake, puff pastry from his own shop in Plumstead Road in Norwich, and chutney from Candi’s Chutney - plus a few more secret Norfolk ingredients. And it all adds up to a delicious and locally-sourced sausage roll maker - and one fit to represent Norfolk. This winning sausage roll will now go to London in January, to the great Sausage Roll Off, held each year at the Red Lion in Barnes. It is a national contest which sees top chefs compete against each other for the ultimate accolade of winning champion sausage roll.


Compe t i t ion

CHAN

C E TO

VISIT

www.ffolkes.org.uk

WIN!

WHAT FFUN!

This month we’ve teamed up with The Ffolkes in Hillington, near King’s Lynn, to offer one lucky reader (and a guest) the chance to win a dinner, bed and breakfast stay in one of the gorgeous rooms FORMER COACHING INN, The Ffolkes, has been restored to its former Georgian glory having recently undergone a £2m refurbishment. Gone are the Artex ceilings and maroon bathroom suites of decades past, and reinstated are the elegant presence of Georgian inspired fittings, furnishings, and curiosities. Featuring six stunning rooms above the main inn, a further 18 rooms will be available upon their timely completion next to The Stables (a superb events facility catering for weddings, special occasions, and corporate functions). www.feastnorfolkmagazine.co.uk

HOW TO ENTER

er To enter our competition, simply answ : stion que the following

How many rooms will there be, in total, at The Ffolkes? , address and Send your answer, plus your name etitions@ a daytime telephone number to comp also enter by feastnorfolkmagazine.co.uk. You can on our Facebook liking and sharing the competition gorgeous the of one in stay a is prize page. The one night, rooms at The Ffolkes in Hillington for breakfast, based on double occupancy. Bed, ded in the and a scrumptious dinner will be inclu al Feast Norfolk prize. Terms and Conditions: Norm final. It is open rules apply. The editor’s decision is used in be to Not e. abov and 18 aged to those otion. prom or offer other any with n conjunctio ative. The Subject to availability. No cash altern r 30, 2017 when competition is open until Septembe m. The winner will a winner will be selected at rando 30, 2017. need to claim the prize by November

The menu offering at The Ffolkes is wholesome, with hearty meals that appeal to most palates (with a penchant for pies!). Dining is suited to those looking to enjoy food with friends, family meals, special events, and passers-by, looking for a pit stop en route the A148. Oh, and Sundays at The Ffolkes are not to be missed with their Pie Carvery in place of a traditional roast carvery. Families are well catered for at The Ffolkes, with a yummy children’s menu and Little Ffolkes play area (which will keep them entertained for hours!).


PICTURES © ANTON

Y KELLY

R H STE VIE WO NDE TTE GUR NEY WIT OLIV ER & CHA RLO

EY G O BA IL W IT H H U N C RI ER TH E TO W

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EVERY VOTE COUNTS! Charlotte Gurney is more than a little chuffed this month, as White House Farm was crowned worthy winner of this year’s Battle of the Bangers 2017, as voted for by the public

AS YOU MAY well be aware, back in June and in the heat of the sun, we won the prestigious Battle of the Bangers competition in Norwich, as voted for by the public! Never having entered this (or any other) competition in the past, we were quite literally blown away by the accolade. As we stood in the sweltering heat, barbecuing away, and feeding the 6500 Norwich folk who had piled out in their masses to enjoy Fathers’ Day, we could never have expected such a result. Competition was fierce, with some seriously professional looking butchers wearing all the gear. I thought I might have seen a raised eyebrow when we turned up with a Land Rover, trailer and not a bit of fancy branding. But ultimately, and quite rightly, it was all about flavour, and all Norwich Food and Drink Festival organisers asked was that you shut your eyes and enjoy the meaty flavours and vote in order of preference. We had them all: the ‘you've got my vote’ to the indecisive types coming back time again to eat as many tasters as they could - whatever it took to get their vote. Stevie Wonder, our butcher, nearly melted in the heat of it all, and his wife and children kindly helped out. Even the lovely Lilly from the shop did her bit!

ROAD, NORWICH RM, WROXHAM .UK WHITE HOUSE FA NORWICH-PYO.CO W. W W 7 OR VISIT TEL 01603 41935

The farmer, of course, was roped in once again and no end of our wonderful customers passed by with the odd ice cream and words of encouragement. As ever, the community vibe rocked Norwich and it was a foodie event like no other. We even had the Town Crier on the end of a banger at one point! Since then, new customers have been down to suss us out and see what all the hype is about. Jack Attack, our hard grafting, young apprentice, has gone from zero to hero on the journey with us and it's been a great boost to morale in the White House Farm camp. So, as we look to pack those barbecues away (dare I say it), at least there's always the Sunday morning fry up to look forward to! A top result, I am sure you'll agree, but thank you, as ever, to our old and new customers alike - as we said on the day: ‘every vote counts!’

The next Farmers’ Market is on Septem ber 16, from 9.30am-1pm

e t i h W se Hou Farm


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ANDY NEWMAN BRAVES THE AUCTION ROOM IN SEARCH OF SOMETHING DIFFERENT TO PUT IN HIS GLASS I’M BECOMING INCREASINGLY frustrated about the identikit wine ranges on offer in our supermarkets nowadays. Once upon a time they led the way on educating us about wine, introducing us to new grape varieties, new regions and countries, and generally broadening our wine knowledge. Sadly, more recently they seem to have reverted to playing it safe, filling their shelves with the same old bottles that they know will have mass appeal. Increasingly you have to look elsewhere for something interesting to put in your glass. Of course, that is where independent wine merchants step in. Because they know their customers – and because those customers tend to be more knowledgeable and more open to new ideas – they can experiment, cajole us and generally lead us into new avenues of vinous pleasure.

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But if you are looking for something completely different, one place to find it is in the wine auction room. I’m not talking about the rarified London auction houses where collectors’ bottles change hands for six figure sums; I mean the regional auction houses where there are still bargains to be had and oddities to be found. Last month I found myself at Keys Auctioneers in Aylsham for their wine auction. Keys have built up a quiet reputation for their periodic wine auctions, attracting a growing crowd of enthusiasts and amateurs curious to see what is going under the hammer. Of course, you do take a risk buying this way. If the bottle is off, there is no comeback, it’s a question of buyer beware. But the flip side of this is that there are some real bargains to be had for the careful bidder.


Andy Newman Three wines Andy has enjoyed this month

01. PARAMOS DE NICOSIA VERDEJO, 2015

(Lea & Sandeman, £13.95) One you certainly won’t find in the supermarket: an oaked Verdejo from Rueda in northern Spain, buttery with an attractive ripe tangerine fruit and substantial but not overwhelming oak. Definitely a food wine, for Spanish style fish dishes.

In 2012 I bought a case of 1966 Port at a Keys wine auction, and stashed it in my cellar for my 50th birthday in 2016. By then, the demand for 50-year-old wines to celebrate such landmark birthdays was considerable, and the price had more or less quadrupled from the £40 or so a bottle I paid at the auction. It just made every mouthful even more delicious. You do need to know what you are doing, of course. Any wine auction will include lots to be avoided: in general any white wines more than a few years old, red wines from dodgy vintages, and cases containing 11 bottles, where it’s clear that someone has tasted one and found it horrible, so put the rest into an auction. You also have to have your wits about you. At one auction I wasn’t really paying attention, and thought I was bidding on a different lot to that which was actually being sold. As I raised my hand, the auctioneer laughed and brought down the gavel, revealing to me that I had bought a box of 12 completely random wines – albeit for the princely sum of £18.

01.

02. FRANCIACORTA BRUT CORTEAURA

(Lea & Sandeman, £17.95) Franciacorta is Italy’s riposte to Champagne, and this version is made from the Champagne grape Chardonnay, aged for two years on its lees to give a generous palate of ripe fruit, bread and even mocha. It’s softer than Champagne, but still has the good acidity levels which any fizz needs. Excellent value.

03. VIÑA VALORIA RIOJA COSECHA 1995

(Majestic, £24.99 as part of a mixed case of six bottles) A rarity: a Rioja which has been aged in terracotta rather than oak, giving huge expression to the fruit. Closest in style to a Gran Reserva, but actually quite different; ochre in colour, with coffee, candy, dried fruits (even mince pie) and mint on the nose. 1995 was arguably the best ever vintage in Rioja, and this is a fascinating insight into a very different way of making it.

02.

03.

There was only one thing to do: invite some friends round for a ‘Russian Roulette wine tasting’, where we opened all 12 bottles and dived in. There wasn’t much hope for the 1969 Chablis, and it was followed down the sink by four of the other bottles. But to our surprise, the rest were more or less drinkable, and we found one gem, an intact and rather rare bottle of Picolit from northern Italy which was worth more than twice what I had paid for the whole case. So sometimes it is worth taking a punt. Aside from paying attention and knowing which lot you are actually bidding for, there are a couple of tips which you should bear in mind if you are going to give the wine auction a go. First, make sure you inspect the bottles themselves, looking for signs that the cork has dried out, such as leakage or a low level in the bottle. And although the state of the label doesn’t necessarily reflect the condition of the wine in the bottle, generally a well-preserved label does suggest that the wine has at least been stored in a dry place. Second, don’t forget that the price you bid is not the price you pay – there is always a buyer’s premium to pay on top. Generally that is around 20 per cent, plus VAT, so this will add almost a quarter to the hammer price. It’s a good idea to work out in advance how much you are willing to pay, and then calculate your maximum bid accordingly. But my advice is to dive in and have a go. The auction room can be an exciting place, you may end up with a real bargain, and as long as you don’t get carried away, the worst that can happen is that you come away thirsty.


VISIT

www.southpickenham.co.uk

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South Pickenham Wines -

A R T I S A N

P R O D U C E R

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01. SPARKLINGUT WINE 2012 BRl clear wine

This fabulously crysta yellow colour. has a slight green and t upwards in a floa s ble bub all Even, sm bouquet of The . ent continuous movem with slight d che tou is rs, pea it, soft fru es. The slight honey and brioche ton appears to give a dis n soo ar sug al residu dic taste. The aci htly slig very fresh and balanced and the ll we is r eve how dity aci sh. wine has a medium fini

A Breckland Vineyard

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ONE OF NORFOLK’S LEADING COUNTRY ESTATES PRODUCES ITS OWN WINE. SARAH HARDY VISITS SOUTH PICKENHAM NEAR SWAFFHAM TO FIND OUT MORE ENGLISH WINE is on the up! Gone are the days of it being, quite frankly, rather embarrassingly poor now it is positively fashionable! Since Lee Dyer at Winbirri Vineyard scooped his prestigious award (see our last issue) for his Bacchus, we have all become much more interested in what wines are made locally. Norfolk has a goodly selection of vineyards, with the South Pickenham Estate, near Swaffham, having six acres put over to vines, with five different grape varieties - Chardonnay, Bacchus, Muller Thugall, Seyval Blanc and Schonburger. Assistant estate manager Simon Kroon explains that the vineyard is a small part of the overall 3000-hectare estate which is also home to an organic beef herd and much more. Indeed, the estate, now owned by a Malaysian family, is well known for its shooting parties, rents out several properties and does much conservation work. The River Wissey runs through it and there is a fabulous Grade II listed country house which was remodelled in an Arts and Craft style in the early 1900s. Simon, who has worked at the estate since 2000, continues: ‘At present we produce two wines: a medium dry white wine and a sparkling white. The vines were planted in 1986, mainly for the then owner’s personal consumption, and in 2010, we were able to start to sell directly to the public.’ He continues: ‘The vines are planted on a south facing slope in a sheltered location, in order to minimise the potential damage from late and early frost during the growing season.’ The grapes are pressed, fermented and bottled in Cambridgeshire, with around 4000 bottles produced a year. The majority go to local restaurants and pubs, and it is hoped that they might start to make a rosé wine before too long.

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at the estate The wines are for sale website. ate est the office and via Hearnden, who ve Ste , ert exp e win r Ou at Strumpshaw, runs Tastebuds Wines st. Here he cki near Acle, is also a sto es: not g tin offers his tas

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Food & Win Pairineg

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TAKE TWO Wine expert Steve Hearnden writes about what to drink with game and chocolate in his latest column

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based at Strumpshaw Post Office (not online though). For other wines, visit www.tastebudswines.co.uk or contact Steve at steve@tastebudswines.co.uk

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Both wines are available from Tastebuds Wines,

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MANY REGULAR readers will know that I do not take too much notice of the seasons. I write about Christmas food in April and asparagus when the English season is all but finished! So for the September issue, I am writing about an important date in August for us foodies. In the good old days it was as important as the Beaujolais Nouveau race as restaurants strove to be the first to serve grouse. I remember one member of a London gentleman’s club asking me to get him a bottle of Nuits St George to accompany his grouse, but I am afraid I declined. I was surprised not to be sacked but he did accept my recommendation of 2eme Cru Bordeaux which we had on the wine list. At the end of his meal he complimented me on my excellent choice of wine and said that he would note it for future occasions. Claret, as red Bordeaux is affectionately known, can be a high priority for wine investments and for drinking, but the prices these days for a good claret are very high. The Chateau Perron la Gourdine 2013, which I stock, is drinking well but not within the Grand Cru classification. It is produced in an area where the two rivers split which can make for very unpredictable weather. This deepish red wine has blackberries and redcurrants on the nose. The taste does show some tannins but once the wine has breathed a while these diminish on the taste. At £12.95 a bottle, it is a good value claret. I also have a very sweet tooth and so the dessert, pudding or sweet section of any menu is a main attraction for me. I often think that I could miss the other courses and just eat three from the last list. I love chocolate and so a perfect pud for me would be chocolate fondant. Now, of course, the problem starts because not all wines would accompany this chocolate heaven. In the 1980s, Moët and Chandon produced a special drink to go with this sort of dish. Made just up the road from Epernay, from Champagne grapes, Petit Liquorelle was born. Because of the acids and fats, Champagne is a non runner with chocolate so they created this special beverage. I have not seen it for years so assume it is now out of production. However, not all is lost, as, apart from a Romanian red wine I import, there is another French wine which is perfect. Made by Martine Paget at Domaine la Bouysse, the Cartagene is wonderful. At 15 per cent, it is not to be drunk lightly and you should only use small glasses, too. It has a gorgeous clear, dark, amber colour with aromas of spirit and candied fruit. Walnuts, plum and honey are not far away. It is made from wine and eau de vie de marc, the grapes are Grenache Blanc and Carignan Blanc. The vines are 40 years old and the grapes are late picked to get the most sugar, and then, after fermentation, the eau de vie de marc is added and the wine is left in oak barrels for seven years! They only make 2000 half bottles at a time and it is not cheap at £19.50 per 500ml bottle, but it will last in the fridge for many puddings or just as a small aperitif.


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HE ART OF BREWING has been around for thousands of years and during this time there has been lots of new ingredients and brewing styles introduced that offer drinkers a brand new experience. Despite this, there are still four key ingredients used in brewing: water, malt, yeast and hops. Malt plays a huge part in balancing flavours and can also impact the look of a beer.

THE

IMPORTANCE OF MALT THIS MONTH YARMOUTH-BASED BREWER LACONS DISCUSSES ONE OF THE KEY INGREDIENTS IN THE MAKING OF YOUR PINT! Follow us on social media or sign up to our newsletter at www.lacons.co.uk/newsletter to stay informed


Lacons -

The maltin g process: SO WHERE DOES MALT COME FROM? Starting its journey as barley (a cereal grain which looks similar to long grass), the barley grains are soaked in water over a two day period to maintain their moisture level in order to live through controlled germination. During the second stage of the malting process, the grains are allowed to germinate with high air flow entering the silo to help them grow evenly over four days. They are regularly turned to make sure that they don’t stick together. To stop germination, the barley is then roasted in a kiln between 55°C and 100°C. This imparts the colour and desired flavours into the malt. By lightly roasting the malt during the kilning process, this allows brewers to craft a paler beer and when the grain is heated for a longer period, a darker beer.

www.feastnorfolkmagazine.co.uk

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Malt & other ingredients used in real ale: IF YOU EVER ASK a brewer the question about the best malt on the market, you will never get the same answer because it’s down to individual tastes. For us, we love to use Maris Otter as our base malt because of its versatility and historical significance to us as a brewery. We source this malt from a premium local supplier based in Fakenham called Crisp Maltings. Introduced in 1965 and originating from the UK’s Plant Breeding Institute on Maris Lane, Maris Otter is a strain of barley used in brewing traditional real ale and offers some beautiful flavours to charm the taste buds. According to Sprowt Labs, 11 of the most recent 15 Champion Beers of Britain are made with Maris Otter. With so many combinations available when brewing beer, brewers will use a base malt as well as other malts and grains to change the look, taste and aroma of their beers. To give our ales their unique personalities, we add other malted barley variants such as Crystal Malt which gives the beer sweet toffee flavours or Special B from Belgium and Special W from Germany which both produce a dark fruity ale. Brewers also use other grains such as wheat which gives beer good head retention and oats which gives more body when brewing heavier ales such as stouts or milds.

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What to expect in September: SEPTEMBER IS A BUSY MONTH for Lacons. Not only will we be judging the Pub category at the Norfolk Food & Drink Awards, as well as announcing the winner at the prestigious ceremony on September 11, there are plenty of exciting local events happening too! September also sees us celebrate the launch of a fine range of sausages at the Honingham Buck called ‘Serendipity Sausages’ which all have our ale in them. Then we will be creating a special festival brew called Out There Ale for Out There Festival, a brilliant annual arts event in Great Yarmouth that runs from September 15-17. We’re also planning to launch a new permanent ale to our range called Patriot.


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THE TUSCAN KITCHEN

OUR ITALIAN FARMER WANDA DJEBBAR TELLS US ABOUT THE SACRED TRIO OF TUSCAN CUISINE - OIL, WINE AND BREAD Wanda runs the Tuscan Farm Shop in Burnham Market. Visit www.tuscanfarmshop.com

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URIOUS ABOUT TUSCAN FOOD? Let’s see what I can recommend from the area where I farm - Montalcino and the Val d’Orcia in southern Tuscany. If I suggested that you sought out ‘poor cooking/ cuisine’, you would probably say that was what you were trying to avoid! You would be thinking zero cooking skills, no food knowledge and a reliance on deliveries of products from an articulated truck. But no! In Tuscany I recommend that you seek out la cucina povera, poor cooking, which is the very essence of Tuscan cuisine. It is homely food made out of a limited number of ingredients, which will have been grown, foraged or produced at home or in the vicinity. It is seasonal food par excellence, treated with knowledge and thought. Innovation is not seen as vital! This is la cucina della nonna, grandmother’s cooking, and it is what Tuscans like to sit down to twice a day. The good news is that restaurants in Tuscany, like most of Italy, serve the same food that people eat at home. It will tend to be heavier on meat but, as long as you take this into account, you can work your way through some genuine Tuscan classics. The staple items that form the backbone of the Tuscan kitchen are the sacred trinity of bread, oil, and wine. The word oil means only one thing to a Tuscan; that of the olive trees that are integral to the Tuscan landscape. The oil also has to be good extra virgin oil, preferably produced by themselves or someone they know and trust. Oil is not a cooking medium, it is an ingredient and flavouring vital to every dish.

TO E AT O R S TAY The Giglio hotel and restaurant, Montalcino | www.gigliohotel.com The Porta di Sotto Osteria, Buonconvento | www.laportadisotto.it Il Conte Matto, Trequanda | www.contematto.it Santa Maria Agriturismo, Pienza | www.santamariapienza.it Dal Falco, Pienza | www.ristorantedalfalco.it

www.feastnorfolkmagazine.co.uk

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TUSCAN SOUR BREAD

Tusc a ny

Tuscan bread, which is unsalted, forms a part of every meal, as an accompaniment and as an ingredient in many dishes. In summer your first introduction to the centrality of bread is likely to be in the form of pappa al pomodoro, a tomato, bread, oil and basil soup or panzanella. The stale (yes, it must be stale) bread is soaked and squeezed dry before being shredded between the fingers to resemble breadcrumbs. It then soaks up the tomato juice and oil. In winter, ribollita soup contains stale bread, and carabaccia, onion soup, will be thickened with it. Soups throughout the seasons will have a slice of bread in the bowl. In spring, stuffed artichokes, carciofi ritti, and innumerable stuffings and dishes will contain bread. There is even a frittata omelette based on bread. Wine, except in the height of summer, means red wine. The majority of Tuscan wines have the backbone of the Sangiovese grape, which takes on different names in different areas of Tuscany. Brunello or Rosso di Montalcino, Chianti or Chianti classico, Vino Nobile di Montepulciano or Morellino di Scansano are all expressions, mixed or otherwise, of Sangiovese. Other native Tuscan grapes are Canaiolo, Ciliegiolo and Colorino which blend seamlessly with Sangiovese to produce a true taste of Tuscan terroir. Pasta exists in Tuscany in the form of pici, a simple pencil thin flour and water, hand-rolled, long pasta, soul food, specially in southern Tuscany. Unsurprisingly, one of the ways of dressing it is con briciole, fried breadcrumbs, but try al aglione, tomato and garlic sauce, or delicious cacio e pepe, Pecorino cheese and black pepper. Rice and polenta are both grown and used in Tuscany but are latecomers, and there are far fewer dishes made with them. A risotto with artichoke will probably be on the menu in spring, whilst farinata, combining borlotti beans, kale and polenta, is sustaining in winter. Your wild boar cinghiale in umido may be served with some griddled slices of polenta. Verdure or ortaggi ‘greens’ or ‘from the veg patch’ underpin Tuscan food. Until prosperity came in the 1960s, these made up the majority of people’s diets. Protein was

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provided by fagioli, beans, either borlotti or cannellini. Tuscans are known as mangia fagioli or bean eaters and beans remain incredibly popular and appear in a myriad of dishes, from fagioli al fiasco, cooked in a flask in embers, to rich soups. There are also many recipes enriched with eggs, such as the ciancifricola senese. Tuscans continue to make good use of their wild larder. In spring you find an insalata del campo, foraged ‘field salad’, on menus and in the local market. Autumn sees wild mushrooms appear after the first rains of September. Never pass up the opportunity of a salad of raw porcini or ovoli mushrooms, or indeed porcini a le brace, cooked over wood embers. Basted with good oil, these are a feast. Another autumn favourite is the chestnut which provides a naturally slightly sweet flour that is used in cakes, biscuits and bread. Truffles are also grow in Tuscany with San Miniato and San Giovanni d’Asso both holding autumn truffle fairs. Game is more prevalent than in Norfolk, but is lean and self supporting. Venison, wild boar, pheasant, hare and smaller birds are all on the menu. Honey bees benefit from the beauty and diversity of Tuscany as much as any resident or tourist; there are many different sorts of wild flower for them to sip on. Sulla is of the clover family and covers fields in swathes of dark pink, while corbezzolo, the strawberry

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TO S E E Montalcino: World famous Brunello wine, the country road to Sant Antimo abbey has the best vineyards of all. Try Pian del Orino, Biondi-Santi and Mastrojanni. Buonconvento: The Saturday market. San Giovanni D’asso: Truffle Fair second and third weekends in November and March. Trequanda: Olive oil at the Pro Loco, off the charming square. Pienza: A Renaissance jewel, noted for Pecorino (ewes’ milk) cheese. Monthly producers’ market.

tree (arbutus unedo), provides a lightly bitter honey, excellent served with pecorino cheese. You will look in vain for rich creamy puddings or desserts. Modern tiramisu or a pannacotta are likely to be alone in this type, although you might find the exception with a Florentine zuccotto. Cakes are simple and rustic, but Tuscany’s medieval trading past is visible in the pastry shops of Siena where the rich almond, spice and candied citrus peels combine in panforte, a sliver of which makes a perfect ending to a meal.

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T R A V E L

TUSCAN CHEESE

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Sarah Hardy continues her passion for Strattons Hotel in Swaffham, which she has known since it first opened 27 years ago!

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VISIT

www.strattonshotel.com

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K, I KNOW it can’t seem possible but it’s true. I was a young trainee reporter (or possibly a newly qualified one) based in Swaffham back in 1990 when Les and Vanessa Scott opened their rather glamorous hotel, Strattons, in the heart of the town. I loved it and them, as they were a bit quirky, full of passion and great fun. Fast forward to 2017 and everything but nothing has really changed!

Strattons has gone from strength to strength and is now generally regarded as one of the leading boutique hotels in the region. Les and Vanessa remain as hardworking as ever and are joined by their daughter, Hannah, and her husband, Dominic, to keep it very much a family affair. And me? Well, I have some grey hairs, two children and a husband, but I’m still writing away about terrific places in Norfolk like Strattons. I have returned over the years and seen more bedrooms added on, the garden mature into something very beautiful and a café and deli open. Julia (Jules) Hetherton is now executive head chef and Daniel Freear is the head chef.

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But the ethos of the place is constant - to serve seasonal, locally produced food, have a strong green philosophy and plenty of fun along the way. My husband and I stayed overnight, with Bella the border collie, this summer and loved this calm oasis, as Strattons is tucked away up a little alleyway, away from the main thrust of the town. It is an immediately attractive building, built as a Palladian-style villa in the 18th century, with large windows and double exterior staircases. And inside has what is


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generally regarded as a wow factor. Les and Vanessa met at art college and boy does it show. The interiors are opulent, with a bold use of colour, dramatic murals, wacky sculptures and oversized mirrors. Look out for chandeliers and chaises longues, big fireplaces, dramatic wallpapers and endless little touches that give the place a real sense of individuality. There are 14 bedrooms in all, with the majority in the main house. Four are set in the grounds, including Print Room One, where we were based and which also operates as a self catering option, with a kitchen area, large lounge, huge bathroom and bedroom. It is also dog friendly and has a lovely enclosed terrace where you can soak up your historic surroundings. Interestingly, it has its own cinema screen so you can relax after a day’s exploring to enjoy a movie or two in some splendour. We arrived in time for lunch in the new CoCoes, created out of an existing barn with some additions. It is a lovely spot, with both indoor and outdoor seating and a fresh, light menu. Think salads, tarts, fishcakes - and of course, a wide selection of cakes which are Jules’s trademark. www.feastnorfolkmagazine.co.uk

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I enjoyed beetroot, mackerel and horseradish on sourdough while himself had a classic cheese and chutney sarnie which set us up well for a walk on the Nar Valley Way in nearby Narborough, walking alongside the crystal clear river for about four miles, trying and failing to tire Bella out. Prior to our evening meal, we sat a while in the Med inspired garden, admiring the lush planting and sipping Prosecco, before heading inside to The Rustic, the hotel’s main restaurant. Set in the basement, with more pretty mirrors and subtle lighting, a

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fine dining tone is set with crisp white linen and a great wine list which I know Les has put a lot of effort into. The menu has about six choices per course and does reflect what is available on the doorstep. Indeed, vegetables, salad leaves and herbs come from the garden, eggs are from Vanessa’s own hens, meat is from Impson’s in the town, Cole’s of King’s Lynn supply fish, and apple juice is from nearby Ashill. I started with Cromer crab, with a light basil mayo, and a smattering of heritage tomatoes which I loved. Himself had the super fresh carrot soup which disappeared quick. Next I had a charming chicken dish, gently pan fried with broad beans, shallots, smoked bacon, baby gem and granola. It was a triumph and very moreish! My husband had a pea and watercress risotto, with local cheese and lemon which was basically summer on a plate. He only managed a scoop of ice cream for pud but I had the banana and blackberry pudding with a caramel sauce and vanilla ice cream, which was again somehow both decadent yet light. The food has always been a highlight of Strattons; Vanessa was championing local produce long before it became fashionable and her chefs are continuing to offer imaginative dishes where the quality of the ingredients is allowed to speak for itself. After a great night’s slumber, breakfast is back at CoCoes with lots of choice, from vegeree to tomatoes on toast, although we both went for the full vegetarian with spinach, mushrooms, tomatoes and the freshest fried eggs imaginable. Then we headed to Castle Acre, with its 15th century castle ruins and priory - and more glorious walking as the sun was shining kindly on us. This is a wonderful part of Norfolk: unspoilt with masses of history to uncover and yet about half an hour in the car to both Norwich and the North Norfolk coast. Make time for Oxburgh Hall, a National Trust property in nearby Oxborough, too. Afternoon tea is a real hit here and look out for a shop opening on site soon. Plus Christmas events are taking shape - watch this space.


Riddleswor th Park

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GL0RI0US GLAMPING

FOR A QUICK GLAMPING GETAWAY AFTER SCHOOL, RIDDLESWORTH PARK, ON THE NORFOLK/ SUFFOLK BORDER, HAS IT ALL, SAYS GLAMOROUS CAMPING CONVERT RACHAEL YOUNG VISIT

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HILST I LOVE the idea of life under canvas - children running freely in the big outdoors, gulping in fresh air and letting off steam - when it comes down to it, I don’t have a great track record. My last trip to Wales ended abruptly after aForce Nine gale left my tent poles broken and my zeal for outdoor life severely dampened. Packing everything but the kitchen sink, and setting off with the kids squashed in the car, just seems a bit too much hassle

www.riddlesworthglamping.co.uk

to be a holiday. I need the camping experience without all the clobber. And so Riddlesworth Park Glorious Glamping, a site set in farmland in the beautiful Brecks, might just offer a solution. The packing bit is easy – we just needed our clothes, some food and towels (although you can pay £2 for these if you want to) as everything else is provided at the site. So far so good! We made a quick getaway after school on Friday and were there enjoying the sunshine by 4.30pm. With just five beautiful yurts, (supplied by SoulPad) set in a wild grass field of five acres, it is a place of real peace and tranquillity. The yurts get replaced every year, so they look clean and fresh, and

come with pretty lights and bunting, to make things magical. Ours was fully equipped with a double bed and two double bunks (both with proper bedding), a wood burning stove, all the kitchen kit you could possibly need, including a cool box, the all-essential fire pit, logs and a cob barbecue. And there were even fresh flowers on the table! As well as each yurt having its own fire pit, there is also a large communal one, so you can be sociable if you want to. It also makes the site a great option if you are looking


for somewhere to go with a large group - by booking all five yurts you can accommodate up to 30 people. My children soon got stuck into the giant sand pit and, once their cousins had arrived and our fab barbecue devoured, enjoyed the swing-ball and football available from the communal marquee, too. There’s also a French boule piste as well as den building and

wooden tree trunk automobiles in the woodland next to the field. Nearby, horses and the abundance of wild birds provided a natural soundtrack which soothed the mind. We had ordered the breakfast box when we booked and so had a full English the next morning. With everything sourced locally via the village store in Garboldisham, plus eggs from the farm (which also supplies the local Tesco), it was delicious. We especially liked the chipolatas and the local apple juice. After breakfast we walked to Knettishall Heath, just 10 minutes away across the farmland. It was a hot day and the children decided on a paddle in the river followed by

an ice cream from the van that resides there most of the time. The Heath is a beautiful place to walk with open grassland, pine trees, and the Little Ouse running alongside it. Although we only stayed one night, I left feeling relaxed and refreshed much different to my last canvas experience. So, even if you know you are not a camper, you might just be a glamper.


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GROW ALL OVER THE WORLD and, due to the most famous story of them all, when Eve took that bite of the apple in the Garden of Eden, they have been known to mankind forever! Here in the UK we enjoy them in so many dishes and they are a staple fruit in the fruit bowl. Does an apple a day keep the doctor away? Well, it should! With an outstanding amount of polyphenols acting as antioxidants, apples are full of fibre, packed with vitamin C and work towards reducing the risks of many diseases. On top of that, they have no fat and are incredibly low in calories, making it even sweeter when you take a bite of your own homegrown apples.

This month our kitchen gardener Ellen Mary sings the praises of the original fruit: the apple Kitchen Gardener Ellen Mary is a presenter, journalist and garden designer. You can contact her on social media or at www.ellenmarygardening.co.uk

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Autumn Fruits -

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DNA research shows that apples originated in Kazakhstan (which throws the Adam and Eve story into great debate). Spreading across Europe, there is evidence to prove that we had wild apples in Britain until the Romans brought varieties sweeter for our taste buds. September sees many apples ready to harvest and ‘Katy’ is one of the easiest to grow as it tends to keep its shape with minimal pruning - along with having the most beautiful blossom. Not only that but Katy can be picked and enjoyed straight from the tree, cooked in a pie, made into juice - and it also produces the best cider! A superb all round apple.

ELLEN MARY

APPLE ‘KATY’

How to grow

GROW Most apples require a pollinating partner, which means - unless you have a neighbour with a tree suited to yours - you will need another apple tree to help pollination. Katy grows well with ‘Discovery’ which is well-known and a readily available variety in the UK. Make sure you stake your tree when you plant it to avoid a whole load of problems later on and, whatever variety you do grow, give it plenty of water in its first year. CARE Give the trees a good mulch of well-rotted manure in autumn and whilst you may not want to remove apples, it’s always a good idea to thin them out. Remove the biggest apple from a group around June to allow the remainder to swell up nicely and produce better fruits. Whilst Katy requires little pruning, many apples do need to be kept in shape so make sure you read the instructions with the variety you have chosen. HARVEST It’s all in the timing. Apples can be harvested for many months depending on the type but don’t pick Katy too early as the flavour won’t be quite as nice - and eat her up quickly as she doesn’t store well for long. Place the apple in your hand and give it a gentle twist and pull. The stalk should easily come away still attached to the fruit - and handle the apples carefully to avoid bruising.

RECIPE WITH ELLEN MARY

BAKED APPLES IN SYRUP

SERV E

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I am particularly partial to an apple crumble with custard but these naughty and very nice baked apples are a dream! One each is the perfect early autumn dessert INGREDIENTS 4 eating apples; 40g of butter; 40g of brown sugar; 1 zested orange; 3tbsp of honey; 1tsp of cinnamon; vanilla ice cream; a little brandy (if you fancy it) METHOD Heat up the oven to 180°C/gas mark 4. Core the apples with an apple corer so there is a nice hole in the middle for the syrupy sauce, then place them on a baking sheet on an ovenproof tray. Gently melt the butter, sugar, orange zest and cinnamon in a saucepan. Pour the melted mixture over the apples, making sure plenty makes its way down where the apple cores have been removed. Bake in the oven for about 20 minutes or so. Place each apple on a plate and serve with a scoop of ice cream and a spoonful of brandy over the top. Delicious served with seasonal berries as well!


RACHEL BIRTWHISTLE


Allotments -

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Nature’s Bounty First time allotmenteer, Rachel Birtwhistle, is busy reaping what she’s sown down on the allotment, but an unexpected vegetable is causing a few problems

DON’T I LOOK SMUG? Well that’s because I am! For the last few weeks I have fed my family with something straight from the allotment every day. We’ve had lettuce, tomatoes, cucumber, spinach, chard, sugar snap peas, courgettes, potatoes, baby beets, carrots, raspberries and blueberries. Success in some areas of the plot has been so good that I have a glut of veg – namely beans and courgettes. My first set of beans failed miserably, but this lot must have noticed my disappointment and have produced crops we can’t keep up with. I have discovered that it’s a really lovely thing to be able to give friends and family something delicious that I’ve grown and to share my allotment delight. My son reminded me that I don’t have to exclaim at every meal time ‘I grew that’ because ‘it’s boring to keep saying the same thing’! But I pinch myself when I think that the entire meal we ate last night started off as seeds in my inexperienced hands. My friends and family will just have to

humour me for the next few weeks as the allotment is bountiful and I fully intend to take advantage of everything we harvest because …… yes …… ‘I grew that’! As a general rule of thumb, it is probably wise to discard any crops that might be used as offensive weapons – by this I mean monstrous marrows! I only intended to grow courgettes but following our two-week family holiday and absence from the allotment I have produced club like marrows too heavy for a small child to carry and a little off putting to attempt to eat. It looks as though I should be exhibiting these oversized veg in some kind of competition, but the truth is I don’t have a clue what to do with them. I have encountered a problem I never thought I’d have. I have grown (unintentionally) something I loathe. ‘Is it a snozcumber’ asked my son? Check Roald Dahl’s BFG for definition. ‘No, it’s worse than that,’ I explain. My Mum, who is my favourite chef, used to make stuffed marrow when

I was a child, presumably because she too had allowed her courgettes to mutate. I remember this meal as being a grey mush of marrow and minced beef (sorry mum). Having trawled the internet for alternatives to create something delicious from my marrows, I am going to have to concede that with this veg I have bitten off more than I can chew. Guiltily I assign them to the compost heap. September marks the start of autumn so in the next few weeks I’ll be harvesting the last of the remaining summer veg. I’ll be stocking the freezer with beans and beets and gathering the remaining raspberries. Focus will turn to later crops such as spuds and leeks and ensuring the broccoli and red cabbage I have planted continue to flourish. The growing year is far from over and I’ll probably try and squeeze in a few more rows of salad – just to prolong the taste of summer that little while longer. • Find out more about Rachel’s allotment on Twitter: @treatlikedirt

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P R O U D L Y

N O R F O L K

Where are you based? Our kitchen is based in Diss and we both live in Norwich. What exactly is nut butter? Nut butter is similar to peanut butter but we use a whole range of different nuts, seeds, and other natural ingredients such as coconut flesh and coconut nectar to get a unique range.

How long have you been going? We started in January 2017 and have been overwhelmed by the positive response from our customers and the lovely support from local people and businesses.

www.nuoifoods.com

Who are you and what do you do? We are twin sisters Lauren and Sophie Chittock, and we run Nuoi Foods. We believe that food should be wholesome, natural and sustainable which is why we use 100 per cent natural ingredients, no refined sugar, no palm oil and absolutely no additives in any of our products. Everything is completely vegan and gluten free. We have started our health food journey with a range of all-natural nut butters in flavours that aren’t currently available in Britain.

VISIT

This new column is supported by Norfolk Food & Drink and highlights its Proudly Norfolk members. For more details, visit www.norfolkfoodanddrink.com

IN THE FIRST OF A NEW COLUMN CELEBRATING PROUDLY NORFOLK MEMBERS, WE MEET TWIN SISTERS FROM NORWICH WHO PRODUCE NUT BUTTERS

What inspires/inspired you? Whilst travelling in Australia, Sophie was an avid gym-goer and health food enthusiast and found that the country offered a great range of interesting nut butters and spreads. These were made with a variety of different nuts, flavours and interesting ingredients. Upon returning to the UK, she realised that the UK market failed to offer much more than standard supermarket peanut butter. Both of us are nut butter lovers and decided that, if we couldn’t buy different blends that had no sugar or palm oil, we would make them ourselves. We started making nut butters in our home in Norwich for breakfast and slowly began

LAUREN & SOPHIE CHITTOCK

WL DA H B O

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Nuoi Foods

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experimenting with different nuts and flavours. After our friends tried our blends and told us how amazing they tasted, we discovered we had found a gap in the market. It is a great name - does it mean anything? Nuoi is Vietnamese and is means to nourish, to nurture, to feed and to grow. We travelled Vietnam last summer and loved their communal food culture and discovered this word on our travels. So when we were thinking of business names ‘Nuoi’ cropped back up. Where can we buy your products? Rainbow Wholefoods, City Farm Shop, Earsham Street Deli, Norfolk Deli, Little Shop of Vegans (with many more in the pipeline). Have you got a best seller? Pecan Pie is always a winner. Any future plans? We would like Nuoi Foods to become a household health food brand name with a range that expands beyond nut butter. What do you like doing when you're cooking? We spend entire weekends making nut butter and rarely leave the kitchen. We put on our chef whites and hair nets (take the occasional selfie) and listen to music whilst making our products. How has Norfolk Food and Drink been able to help you? They have been a great support to us as a new business and given us many opportunities that we wouldn't have even known about ourselves. They supported us in getting to the Norfolk Show and introduced us to Mike Fish at Scrummy Pig at Wroxham Barns who sponsored us to be part of Proudly Norfolk.


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Feast Norfolk Magazine September 17 Issue 19  

Feast Norfolk is a fresh new monthly magazine dedicated to the thriving food and drink scene in Norfolk.

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