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WELCOME TO OUR MARCH ISSUE where we celebrate fish which forms a big part of many people’s diets. We’re blessed here in Norfolk to have such a great coastline and so many terrific restaurants which make the most of the fruits of the sea. For me, not much beats a seafood platter, with thick wedges of lemon and a dollop of mayo - and maybe a slice or two of sourdough bread, too. Heaven! As Zena, one of our best known local foodies, shows Emma Outten, you don’t need to be afraid of cooking fish - just don’t do what I usually do which is overcook it. We have plenty of fishy recipes to try and also ones for a spot of Easter baking, with Sara Matthews and Julia Martin offering up ideas for sweet treats. And Coxfords Butchers of Aylsham provides a perfect roast rib of beef recipe to impress your mum with this Mothering Sunday. We take a look at some of the self catering holiday companies in the region as hiring your own rural retreat is an increasingly popular option, and you’ll love Andy Newman’s foodie trail of Paris. Where didn’t he go is what I want to know! Our eating out reviews take in The Kitchen at St George’s Distillery at Roudham, near Attleborough, and The Black Horse in Norwich, and we find out a bit more about a Fakenham-based chocolate manufacturer. Finally, don’t forget to enter this month’s competition to win tickets to the Spring Fling which is a great family-friendly event at the Norfolk Showground, and also, do vote for one of our columnists, Charlie Hodson, who is in the running for a top national award. Go, Charlie! Have a lovely month and our next issue, our April edition, will be available just before the Easter weekend. • Do remember to follow us on Twitter, Facebook and Instagram and remember that you can subscribe - see online for details where we also list the majority of our stockists. If you really want to guarantee a copy, it is best to subscribe as they do disappear nice and quick. And when they are gone, they are gone!

SARAH HARDY, EDITOR sarah@feastnorfolkmagazine.co.uk

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FEASTNORFOLKMAGAZINE.CO.UK

Editor's Letter


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It’s Paris in the spring for Andy Newman but he’s not looking at the sights, rather he’s trying out all those restaurants

ABOUT US 03 Editor’s Letter WHAT’S ON 12 Mothering Sunday and the Easter weekend dominate our food and drink diary dates this month 14 To read all about new cafés and restaurants, and who’s won what award, look no further than our news and gossip pages 76 We take to the water on Herbert Woods’ 1927 cruiser, The Spark of Life, now available for day hire FEATURES 44 As Easter eggs start to fill the shelves, we take a closer look at Fakenham-based chocolate maker, Kinnerton

COVER STORY

26 Emma Outten and her daughter head to Lodge Farm at Bawburgh near Norwich to get a masterclass in fish from Zena Leech-Calton, part of a new campaign to get us eating more seafood

EATING OUT 16 Emma Outten discovers that whisky, not unsurprisingly, features on the menu at The Kitchen, the new restaurant at St George’s Distillery at Roudham, near Attleborough 20 Mark Nicholls enjoys a fireside supper with his wife at The Black Horse in Norwich

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INTERVIEWS 42 Emma Outten takes a tour of British Sugar at Cantley in the Yare valley and interviews Factory Manager Daniel Green 84 Sarah Hardy talks to Angela Gifford of Able Community Care about the importance of home cooked food to those in advancing years REGULARS 06 The quirkily named Purple Plum Catering, run by Julia Martin, comes under the spotlight 24 Our regular City College features meets two hospitality students who are on course to be food service leaders of the future 33 The gadget and gizmo page is fish-themed this month 34 Keiron Tovell heads to Southwold Harbour for his latest photo shoot 50 Scandi culture is taking over - we even love their sarnies. Find out more in Trine Hahnemann’s new cookbook, Open Sandwiches 54 Our Jarrold cookbook spread travels to the Middle East and Venice for recipe suggestions 60 Step inside the new Adnams shop in the centre of Norwich - and have a go at making your own gin!


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86 Our Proudly Norfolk column features the Chet and Waveney Valley Vineyard at Bergh Apton in South Norfolk RECIPES 11 Julia Martin offers us apple, cinnamon and sultana loaf plus chickpea fattet 28 Wells Crab House showcases two seafood recipes - one with plaice and one celebrating the last few weeks of the mussel season 46 Sara Matthews, our free from writer, looks forward to Easter and the asparagus season with her three seasonal recipes 79 Ellen Mary has a rainbow salad for us feel the goodness! COLUMNISTS 31 Lucy Bartlett from Ingredients for Cooks has potted prawns with pickled cucumber for us this month 40 Charlie Hodson is in the running for the 2018 Tourism Superstar award 58 Daniel Matthams of Green Farm Coffee takes us on a bean to cup journey 75 It’s Ask The Expert with Norwich chef patron Roger Hickman 82 Andrew Jones tells us about a day in

the life of Farmyard in Norwich 83 Julia Martin tells us about turning vegan - and it’s not as tricky as you might think! DRINK 59 Our wine expert Steve Hearnden suggests wines to go with roast pork in his monthly column TRAVEL 64 It’s Paris in the spring for Andy Newman but he’s not looking at the sights, rather he’s trying out all those restaurants 69 We look at some of the region’s holiday cottage companies as staycations continue to grow in popularity GROW YOUR OWN 78 Ellen Mary is celebrating salad days this month 80 Rachel Birtwhistle updates us with the latest news from her Norwich allotment COMPETITION 22 Win four tickets to the Spring Fling at the Norfolk Showground next month

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THE TEAM

Sarah Hardy, Editor sarah@feastnorfolkmagazine.co.uk Emma Outten, Deputy Editor emma@feastnorfolkmagazine.co.uk Scott Nicholson, Designer studio@feastnorfolkmagazine.co.uk Rachael Young Senior Account Manager | 07900 823731 rachael@feastnorfolkmagazine.co.uk Diane Green Brand Manager | 07988 867483 diane@feastnorfolkmagazine.co.uk

CONTRIBUTORS

Andy Newman, Lucy Bartlett, Mark Nicholls, Steve Hearnden, Charlie Hodson, Roger Hickman, Andrew Jones, Ellen Mary, Rachel Birtwhistle, Keiron Tovell, Sara Matthews, Julia Martin, Daniel Matthams

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FEAST NORFOLK MAGAZINE is published by Feast (Eastern) Limited - 21 Market Place, Dereham, Norfolk NR19 2AX

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VISIT

p r ppuat le ch PICTURE BY RJA PHOTOGRAPHY

Julia's

www.purpleplumcatering.co.uk


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SK JULIA PURPLE MARTIN what PLUM CATERING she likes IS A NORWICHcooking most BASED CATERING AND of all these EVENTS COMPANY days, and the answer will SPECIALISING IN simply be two LOCALLY SOURCED vegetables, AND PRODUCED mushrooms FOOD. EMMA OUTTEN and kale, pan-fried in some coconut oil. In INTRODUCES OUR fact, the founder of Purple Plum Catering LATEST COLUMNIST, is becoming increasingly interested in vegan food, something which will, no JULIA MARTIN, WHO doubt, be reflected in her new column for FOUNDED THE Feast Norfolk, which starts this month! BUSINESS Her love of food in general began when she was a child, as she explains: ‘My dad was a racing driver and we travelled around the world – so I was always really fascinated by hotels and food. Plus my mum home-cooked everything (this was the 70s).’ She grew up in Swaffham, and continues: ‘I took a hotel management course at City College Norwich, which was amazing you did front of house, hotel housekeeping and basic cheffing. I still remember a lot of the skills they taught me. And nowadays I’ve got quite a few people working for me from there, which is nice.’ As for her first job in the industry, she says: ‘I ended up running the front of house at Greens, a beautiful seafood restaurant on Upper St Giles.’ So how did Purple Plum Catering come about? ‘Someone asked me to do allergy friendly food for a wedding out in Whitwell. I had no idea what I was doing, we just went along with beautiful food and loads of bowls - it was great fun and spiralled from there.’

www.feastnorfolkmagazine.co.uk

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PICTURE BY RJA PHOTOGRAPHY

She set up Purple Plum in 2011. ‘I built it up slowly and did a lot of sharing platters at first, before dipping my toe in set plated.’ Although she particularly likes Ottolenghi-inspired dishes (‘I like food to look beautiful - you don’t want a beautiful salad put in a white bowl or, worse, a plastic bowl’), it was not long before Julia and her team were providing three course meals for 250 people. And nowadays, they work out of a 1300 square foot premises in Hellesdon. Purple Plum caters for weddings (there were around 40 such events last year), corporate events, lunches, intimate dinners, and parties, with a huge selection of gluten free, wheat free and dairy free alternatives to suit every taste. She is the go-to caterer in Norfolk. Her company has been the preferred supplier at Holkham Hall, for instance, and getting the gig at Sandringham Flower Show last year must’ve been quite the catering coup. Plus, once again she and the team catered for corporate clients in the Members’ Area at the Royal Norfolk Show, forging a new partnership with Kofra in the process. ‘They came on board with their lovely coffee - that was great.’

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Locally sourced food is very important to her. ‘I think Easters with its fruit and veg is lovely.’ Plus she is a big fan of the foodie shops in and around the Golden Triangle, where she lives: the fishmongers on Gloucester Street, The Green Grocers and Kuzma, The Spice Merchant - both at Earlham House Shopping Centre; plus Spice Land and Pye Baker – both on Dereham Road. Her personal interest in food has definitely heightened since starting Purple Plum Catering: ‘I completed an online degree course in nutrition four years ago and really loved it.’ And then there is her developing passion for vegan food (‘I’m vegan about 50 per cent of the week,’ she says). It sounds as though she can work wonders with just a butternut squash, some pine nuts and feta! And never underestimate the power of adding capers or fennel to a dish, as Julia comments: ‘People will say ‘Oh my god, what was that?’’ Many weddings, for example, are now booked in for completely vegan food - and yoga retreats have also become a growing business for Purple Plum. ‘Combining vegan food and the retreats is what I really love doing,’ says Julia. They tend to take place at West Lexham near King’s Lynn and also Potash Barns in Suffolk. ‘I’ve done yoga for about 25 years now - it’s so good for your headspace. Plus it goes so well with really lovely food. I’m wanting to do a lot more of that.’ Julia has also been inspired by something called the Yoga Brunch Club. ‘It’s a London idea that would be nice to bring to Norwich one day.’ A case of watch this space! Julia adds: ‘A woman at one yoga retreat said ‘you’ve inspired me to cook for myself again’. Without sounding pious, that’s what I really love.’

RECIPES OVERLEAF www.feastnorfolkmagazine.co.uk

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CHICKPEA FATTET

SERVES FOUR

Fattet is Lebanese comfort food with layers of flavours and texture: an aromatic chickpea stew topped with tahini yogurt and mingled with crispy pitta and pine nuts

INGREDIENTS 3 wholemeal pitta; 4tbsp of olive oil; 75g of pine nuts; 1 large onion, finely chopped; 1/2tsp of allspice; 1/2tsp of chilli flakes; 1/4tsp of cinnamon; 1/2tsp of dried mint; 200ml of passata; 3tbsp of pomegranate molasses; 2 x 400g tins of chickpeas, drained and rinsed; 1 garlic clove, crushed; 400g of soya yogurt at room temperature; 3tbsp of tahini; 350g of kohlrabi, peeled; juice of 1/2 a lemon; 1tsp of honey; 60g of parsley, leaves and stems finely chopped; 1tsp of sumac; pomegranate seeds to garnish METHOD Preheat the oven to 180째C. Slice open the pitta and cut each half into 2.5cm squares. Season, toss in the two tablespoons of oil and spread on a baking tray. Spread the pine nuts on a separate baking tray. Bake both for 20 minutes, or until the pine nuts are golden and the pitta cro청tons are toasted and very crisp. Fry the onion in two tablespoons of oil for 10 to 15 minutes until soft and caramelised. Add the spices, mint, passata, molasses, chickpeas and 100ml of water. Simmer uncovered for 15 minutes. You want to reduce the sauce but still have a good amount left. Add more water if needed. Mix the garlic and a generous pinch of salt into a paste, then blend well with the yogurt and tahini. Finely grate the kohlrabi, sprinkle with lemon and honey, season with salt and mix well. Set aside for a few minutes. Mix in the parsley and sumac. Add a third of the cro청tons and pine nuts to the chickpeas. Divide the chickpea mixture between the plates. Spoon some of the yogurt mixture on top and sprinkle with more cro청tons and pine nuts. Garnish with pomegranate seeds and serve with the kohlrabi salad

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Makes 1 large loaf

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APPLE, CINNAMON & SULTANA LOAF

WITH NIGELL A SEED BUT TER INGREDIENTS 7g sachet of fast acting dried yeast; 80ml of lukewarm water; 110ml of almond milk; 1 x egg replacement; 75g of caster sugar; 75g of sultanas; 1 heaped tbsp of ground cinnamon; 60g of vegan spread; 1 Braeburn apple, coarsely grated; a pinch of Maldon salt; 475g of strong bread flour For the nigella honey butter 2tbsp of almond butter; 2tbsp of nigella seeds; 3tbsp of clear honey

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METHOD Dissolve the yeast in the lukewarm water and leave for 10 minutes to activate. Put the almond milk, egg replacement, sugar, sultanas, cinnamon, 40g of the vegan spread, grated apple and salt into a large mixing bowl and mix well. Stir in the activated yeast liquid, then add the flour. Blend until a slightly sticky dough has formed. Use a little extra flour to help bring the dough together, then knead it for a couple of minutes. Place the dough in a bowl, cover it with a clean tea towel and leave to rest for 11/2 hours. To make the nigella honey, blitz the seeds using a spice grinder or pestle and mortar, until fine. Put the almond butter into a bowl and add the seeds powder, honey and work them into the butter until evenly combined. Refrigerate until 15 minutes before needed


CARVERY LUNCH

Treat your mum to a well-earned break this Mothering Sunday, March 11, at The Maids Head Hotel in Norwich. A threecourse carvery lunch will be served in the WinePress restaurant, and every mum will also receive a special gift from the hotel. Plus there will be an Easter Sunday Lunch at the hotel, on April 1. Visit www.maidsheadhotel.co.uk

AUTHOR TALK

Expect plenty of Mothering Sunday lunches and Easter Egg Hunts this month, says Emma Outten!

STRATTONS HOTEL AFTERNOON TEA

DIARY DATES

Author Chris Brookmyre is booked in at Briarfields Hotel in Titchwell for the next popular Bookfest event on March 18. Tickets include afternoon tea, along with the book signing. Visit www.briarfieldshotelnorfolk.co.uk

EGG HUNT

The English Whisky Company is holding an Easter Egg Hunt from March 30 to April 2. Collect your Treasure Map and Stamp from Reception, then follow the hunt. Collect your bag of treats at the end from reception. Plus The Kitchen will be open for food and drinks. Visit www.englishwhisky.co.uk Maisebrooke Farm, between Beccles and Bungay, is holding an Easter Fair and Egg Hunt on March 31. Find Maisebrook Farm on Facebook Take part in an Easter Egg Hunt at Fairhaven Garden on March 30. Hunt for the colourful eggs that will lead you to a chocolate egg prize, plus there will be face painting and Easter crafts for children. Every child gets an egg. Visit www.fairhavengarden.co.uk

Also...

…Cedric's Chocolate Bunny Burrow takes place at Bewilderwood from March 24 to April 15. Visit www.bewilderwood.co.uk …a Spring Foraging Course takes place at Thetford Forest Park on March 24. Visit www.forestry.gov.uk

AFTERNOON TEA

A special Mother’s Day afternoon tea is available at Strattons Hotel in Swaffham on March 10 and 11. Enjoy unlimited tea or coffee, savoury delights such as smoked creamy haddock and spinach on toasted sourdough; and sweet sensations such as roasted pear and vanilla éclair. Visit www.strattonshotel.com

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WEEKEND CELEBRATION

The Deepdale Hygge, Deepdale’s celebration of the North Norfolk Coast, takes place from March 23 to 25. It’s a weekend celebration of walking, cycling, swimming, boating, live music, fire pits, star gazing, plus, of course, great food and drink. Visit www.deepdalehygge.co.uk


WHAT'S ON in

March

PAMPERING EVENING

PLANT GEEK

Enjoy an evening with ‘Mr Plant Geek’ himself, Michael Perry, at Urban Jungle near Beccles on March 2. There’ll be a glass of fizz on arrival and a three course dinner in the new Suffolk Café Jungle, followed by a Macmillan charity auction including prizes from local Suffolk businesses. Visit www.urbanjungle.uk.com

There will be a Ladies’ Charity Pampering Evening at The Library Restaurant in Norwich on March 7. Radio Norwich presenter Rob Chandler will host on the night, plus you can enjoy a pink cocktail on arrival, a fashion show, a designer handbag and accessories auction, a raffle and an after party. Visit www.thelibraryrestaurant.co.uk

INDULGENT LUNCH

Treat your mum to an indulgent lunch out on Mothering Sunday, March 11 at The Crown at Woodbridge. The threecourse menu will be served from 12 noon until 8pm but book a table from 4pm onwards and children up to 12 years of age can eat for free from the kids’ menu. And all mums will also receive a tempting little chocolate to take back home. Visit www.thecrownatwoodbridge.co.uk

MARMALADE MAKING

The second Norfolk Marmalade Making Awards takes place at The Norfolk Deli in Hunstanton on March 31, at the end of one of its Showcase Saturdays. Director Mark Kacary says they had more than 30 entries last year and is hoping to do as well if not better this year. The event will once again be supported by Ali Barwick from Season’s Bounty who is herself a marmalade making world champion. Visit www.norfolk-deli.co.uk

ZOO VISIT

Take your family to Amazona Zoo in Cromer on Easter Sunday and each child will receive a free Creme Egg! As well as exploring and learning about a varied and fascinating selection of animals native to South America, there is also the lakeside Jungle Cafe which provides a wide range of hot and cold snacks, meals and drinks. Visit www.amazonazoo.co.uk

TALK OF THE TOWN

The next Talk of Wells at The Globe Inn is with Peter Barton, a British military historian, author and filmmaker specialising in trench warfare during World War I, on March 5. There will be a special menu of two courses and a glass of wine, and £5 of the ticket price will be donated to The Wells Maltings Trust. Visit www.theglobeatwells.co.uk

MAKE EASTER EGG-STRA SPECIAL THIS YEAR Easter is a great time to get the family together and to make the most of your outdoor space, especially when an Easter egg hunt is on the cards! Sybil Cottage ticks both boxes and is just a short walk from Holme beach, yet comes with an acre of magical garden, a ‘secret wood’ and a playhouse; perfect for children to let their imaginations run wild! And with stylish accommodation throughout and a master suite with a free-standing bath, you have every excuse to enjoy a lazy start! Prices for Sybil Cottage, Holme-next-the-Sea start from £718 for a 3 night break and £982 for a 7 night break.

Visit www.norfolkhideaways.co.uk Call 01485 211022 Email enquiries@norfolkhideaways.co.uk


AFTERNOON TEA I’ve finally had the pleasure of paying a visit to the new Lime Kiln Kitchen restaurant at Thetford Garden Centre, which opened towards the end of last year. I loved the eclectic decor and enjoyed a highly indulgent afternoon tea, with catering manager Lisa Billman. The terrace is shaping up nicely, too, so I hope she invites me back in the summer! Visit www.thetfordgardencentre.co.uk

MIGHTY MITRE

Visit www.mitrenorwich.com

Have you visited the Mitre coffee house and bistro on Earlham Road in Norwich yet? The St Thomas Norwich Church group has really injected new life into the former public house, making it a truly light and airy space to enjoy a catch up over a coffee during the day or a bistro meal and a craft ale in the evening. And you can bring your dog, too – woof to that!

N EWS

MEET NICK Jarrold’s has a new wine consultant in the shape of Cambridgeshire-based Nick Adams. Working with Peter Graham Wines of Norwich, he is slowly refreshing and expanding the range of wines available in store - both to enjoy at The Deli bar and to buy for home use! He says: ‘We will be serving more wines by the glass and also changing wines with the seasons.’ More wine tastings, a wine club and events are planned, too, so watch this space. Visit www.jarrold.co.uk

R OU N D - U P We’re springing forth with another bumper crop of news stories for you, says Emma Outten

Visit www.theboars.co.uk

SARAH'S SUPPER

CROMER CAFE

Editor Sarah Hardy enjoyed the first Supper Club at The Boars at Spooner Row, near Wymondham. With an Italian theme, the four courses included a delicious mozzarella starter, a yummy plaice dish and a fab panna cotta for pud - plus Pecorino cheese with a terrific chutney as a big finish. At £45, including wines, it was great value and great fun as there was a family feel, with food served in big, homely dishes. The clubs are held on the last GOLD GIN Tuesday Congratulations to Norwichbased St Giles Gin for garnering of the month and a Gold award in the prestigious always World Gin Awards. Inspired have a by journeys around the globe theme and created in a customsay the made copper still, the gin is handcrafted by infusing a blend cuisine of Spain. of 11 exotic botanicals, including They are grains of paradise, rose petals definitely and lemongrass. Hasn’t head distiller Pete Margree done well? worth a look. Visit www.stgilesgin.com

We’re always interested to hear about new café openings and here’s another one: Café Dane in Cromer. The family business, run by Andy Homer, is bringing a bit of Scandinavian ‘hygge’ to the heart of the town, and specialises in waffles and homemade Danish pastries. Find @cafedanecromer on Facebook

KEEPING MOBILE We’re coveting the new Camp Champ deluxe mobile kitchens, which are now available to rent in the UK for exclusive premium outdoor catering events. Director Oliver Roberts of Camp Champ UK is based at Holkham Studios, and works with preferred caterer, Connor from Carway-Roe Events, to bring a unique experience to al-fresco dining. Find Camp Champ UK in action on Instagram (search for the tag #campchampUK)

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A TALE OF TWO CITIES A very special beer is to be launched at this year’s City of Ale Festival in May, brewed in collaboration with Northmaen Brewery, from Rouen, and The Norfolk Brewhouse. Norwich and Rouen share a history and connection going back much further than when the two cities became twinned in 1959, and the new beer is the brainchild of David Holliday. Visit www.cityofale.org.uk

CHARITY BEER Three cheers to Nigel Morter and Claire Nugent, owners of the Control Tower B&B, for launching a charity beer, ‘Drink to Remember’, to help raise money for the construction of a befitting memorial at the former RAF North Creake. Brewed by award-winning Mark Riches of Beeston Brewery, around 15p per pint sold will go towards the memorial. The beer will be available for the duration of the ‘Time to Remember’ campaign (ending August 2020). Visit www.controltowerstays.com and www.beestonbrewery.co.uk


Ne w s & Gossip

DON'T forget...

…that March means re-openings of our favourites, such as Rocky Bottoms in West Runton, on March 9 (complete with a new crab shack); and the Garden Kitchen Café at Hoveton, just in time for Easter, where award winning chef Alex Firman will be using some of Norfolk’s finest produce to inspire a fresh seasonal menu. Hurrah for that! Visit www.rockybottoms.co.uk and www.gardenkitchencatering.co.uk

GOLD STANDARD CHOCOLATE We can’t wait to try the new Nelson’s Gold Artisan Ganache Chocolates. Suffice to say the chocolates are made from the caramelised English vodka, made from the finest golden Norfolk barley and sugar beet, and look seriously moreish! They will soon be available in the Deli at Jarrold’s. Visit www.nelsonsgold.co.uk

DONUT DELIGHT We’re looking forward to visiting Daddy Donut’s first shop in Stalham! The Norwich-based donut delivery service, set up by Karl and Kayleigh Linturn from Salhouse, already offers an impressive range of donuts online, including such delights as ‘The Mars Attack’ and ‘Twix Delight’, and the new dessert parlour will offer waffles, milkshakes, a cereal bar, and more. Visit www.daddydonuts.co.uk

NEW BEGINNINGS It is great to see the Parson Woodforde at Weston Longville, near Norwich, open. Allyson and Steve Marlow are now in charge and are serving everything from breakfasts to afternoon tea - and all things inbetween. There are four bedrooms, plenty of original features and plans aplenty. Visit www.theparsonwoodforde.com

We’re champing at the bit to book one of the 11 new bedrooms at the Grade II-listed Globe Inn at Wells. The new rooms are situated around the courtyard area, and owner Antonia Bournes says the proportions of the coach house have enabled them to create some pretty big bedrooms and they’ve had lots of fun with the décor and furnishing. Visit www.theglobeatwells.co.uk

EIGHT FOR EIGHT (pic below) Roger Hickman’s Restaurant in Norwich is celebrating its eighth birthday, by offering a special eight course tasting menu until March 17, featuring many favourite dishes from the past eight years. The restaurant in Upper St Giles is also looking forward to unveiling a new £500,000 expansion in the spring, which will include a 20-seater private dining room and a second kitchen. Visit www.rogerhickmansrestaurant.com

GARDEN KITCHEN CAFÉ

GLOBAL EXPANSION

PETAL POWER We’ve been hearing really good things about the new Petals Tea Room in Dersingham – a short walk from the Sandringham Estate. Run by Angie Bates and Wendy Williams, their vision has been to run a proper tea room, but with a slight twist, as they offer placements for young people not in education, employment or training (NEETS). Good for them, we say. Visit www.visitpetals.co.uk

IVY GROWTH We can’t wait to get another update about the Ivy brasserie which is set to open in London Street, Norwich in the summer! The restaurant will feature an all-day dining menu and will be open seven days a week. The Ivy Collection is a group of restaurants, brasseries and cafés, established in London and now growing regionally across the UK. Visit www.ivycollection.com

A SPIRITED SOFT DRINK Has anyone else tried Seedlip, the world’s first distilled non-alcoholic spirit? Editor Sarah and colleague Rachael taste tested it at The Hero in Burnham Overy Staithe recently, plus the Warwick St Social and The Wildebeest are going to start stocking it, too. There’s either the herbal Garden 108, or the aromatic Spice 94 to choose from - if you’ve spotted it anywhere else, do keep us posted! Visit www.seedlipdrinks.com www.feastnorfolkmagazine.co.uk

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VISIT

www.englishwhisky.co.uk

SPIRIT T H AT ’ S T H E

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I’VE OFTEN CLOCKED the And ordering is a very THE KITCHEN, THE NEW brown tourist signs for St relaxed affair - you make your RESTAURANT AND COFFEE George’s Distillery, home of choice and pay at the counter. HOUSE AT ST GEORGE’S The English Whisky Company, Although there was a wine list, DISTILLERY IN BRECKLAND, whilst driving down the A11 to I thought it much more fitting USES ITS AWARD-WINNING London. to sample the St Peter’s The But I’ve never managed Saints Whisky Beer - with its SPIRITS IN MANY OF ITS to turn off and pay a visit to measure of English Whisky. DISHES. EMMA OUTTEN England’s first traditional It was most definitely rich SAMPLES SUNDAY LUNCH whisky distillery (in more than in flavour and probably, in 100 years). It was built by the hindsight, a bit strong for a Nelstrop family for the specific purpose of producing Sunday lunchtime, but, hey, at least I wasn’t driving! the very finest English single malt whisky. However, Sunday lunch means just one thing, doesn’t the opening of The Kitchen, next door to the distillery, it? A Sunday roast! I had the nut roast (£10.95), is what finally lured me in. served with plenty of seasonal vegetables and a Once inside the building, it’s an impressive space. giant Yorkshire pudding, which was great fun. At the front is the Whisky Shop, which offers more I liked the fact the veggie gravy came in a tiny than 200 single malts from around the world. And at English Whisky jug so much so I bought one the back is the restaurant with its high industrial chic in the shop on the way out. My dining chum, ceilings and plenty of natural light coming through meanwhile, had roast loin of pork (£11.95), the windows – it looks like a lovely place to work in, which came with crackling something which was reflected in the smiles on the and lots of those faces of the staff who work there (and that includes lovely veg, and the far from harassed looking chef who emerged from disappeared his kitchen after lunch). Clientele-wise, it appeals to pretty all walks of life - from very young families to the more mature among us!


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menu from 12-9pm. The menu, from award-winning chef Philip Milner, focuses on fresh, locally sourced ingredients cooked on an open wood-fired fire pit. 2 9 M A R K E T P L A C E , B U R N H A M M A R K E T, N O R F O L K P E 3 1 8 H F www.number-29.com

01328 738498

reservations@number-29.com

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THE SURREY KITCHEN & BAR

COME & SEE US FOR BREAKFAST, LUNCH & DINNER - OR JUST A DRINK!

Contemporary dining with a relaxed atmosphere 44-46 Surrey Street, Norwich, Norfolk NR1 3NY

01603 559135


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On the way out the retail and tourism manager, the very jovial Julian, treated us to a tasting, including of the Chapter 14, The Norfolk - Parched and an interesting Japanese one called Nikka Coffey. My personal favourites were the Nelstrop’s Pedro Ximenez sherry and the Norfolk Nog – a very English take on cream liqueur. The English Whisky Co and The Kitchen at St George’s Distillery are launching two new tour offers: the St George’s Tour and Lunch Offer (£17.50pp); and the World Whisky and Lunch Offer (£37.50pp). Both include a £5 voucher to spend in the shop on any English Whisky over £30. For more information or to book call 01953 717939.

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quickly and with much appreciation. Crackling can be hard to get just right but this was nice and crunchy! The other big thing at The Kitchen is that they do breakfast at any time of day, offering, say, toast with English Whisky marmalade or a St George’s breakfast with local free range eggs (plus award winning Norfolk black pudding as an added extra, if you fancied it). Mains included the ‘Kitchen’ house steak, in a creamy whisky sauce, and there’s a little menu offering little roasts. For pudding, I had the English Whisky and vanilla crème brulée (£5.95), which was very well presented. You could definitely taste the whisky but it was not too overpowering. They also do crepés, and so my friend had the very traditional lemon and sugar version (£3.50) which was another winner. However, if you fancy something a little lighter than lunch, you can just pop in for tea and cake. There’s a good selection, including a freshly baked fruit scone with clotted cream and English Whisky raspberry conserve. Or, for something a little lighter, you could just go for an Americano Coffee and an English Whisky Macaron. It struck me that you don’t have to particularly like whisky to appreciate a trip to The Kitchen. Having said that, if you know someone who really is a fan, then this is the perfect place to bring them to eat, isn’t it? Particularly when you think that St George’s Distillery does tours as well.


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STRAIGHT FROM THE HORSE’S MOUTH MARK NICHOLLS AND HIS WIFE SHARON ENJOY A COSY FIRESIDE DINNER AT THE BLACK HORSE IN NORWICH’S TRENDY GOLDEN TRIANGLE

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AS SOON as you walk into The Black Horse, you can’t help but be struck by the atmosphere. We arrived on a Saturday evening, with the pub already busy with diners and drinkers. The balance between those enjoying a couple of pints and others out for dinner was seamless, and a credit to the ambience created by pub owner Rose Hanison. My wife Sharon and I found ourselves on a corner table by the wood burner where we could study the straightforward, uncrowded menu with its selection of snacks, starters, interesting mains, traditional pub classics, and ever-tempting desserts. While the list of cocktails was tempting, I opted for a pint of Doom Bar from the good choice of ale on offer and Sharon, the designated driver, chose an elderflower pressé. The pub boasts a long history; built in 1714, it has traded continuously as a public house and has always been known by the name it carries to this day. Back in the Victorian and Edwardian days, the large garden was a bowling green and you can see photos of the bowlers with their amazing moustaches on the walls in the pub. Books line shelves and other prints show Norwich in days gone by including the great flood, the building of the cathedral and the market.

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The garden, with its terrace, now has an outdoor seating area for the summer months, there are plenty of parking spaces, and the inn is dog friendly - truly a pub for all seasons. But let’s get down to the food. I chose the salt beef with pickled onions, charred chilli and smoked garlic aioli (£6.50) to start and Sharon opted for the pastrami salmon (£7) with cream cheese and pickled cucumbers on homemade wholemeal bread. For the main course she chose Norfolk sausages – a traditional bangers

and mash with seasonal greens and shallots (£12.50) - while I enjoyed the superb chilli and garlic crab linguini (£11.50), which had tremendous flavour, with a touch of spice yet light too, so I was very pleased with my decision. On the menu during our visit was also fillet of hake (£14.50), Gressingham duck (£16) and peanut sticky tofu (£13), but Rose is keen to stress that The Black Horse menu changes regularly and is versatile with locally sourced produce to create seasonal menus, so always expect something different.


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www.springfling.rnaa.org.uk

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FLING IS THE THING

ONE OF NORFOLK’S MOST POPULAR FAMILY-FRIENDLY EVENTS TAKES PLACE NEXT MONTH - AND WE HAVE A COMPETITION TO WIN TICKETS TO IT means little ones can meet even more animals than in previous EASTER sees many of Norfolk’s leading attractions opening years and Mr Mawkin, the friendly scarecrow. for the new season and many great events taking place. A very Visitors can also have a go at making their popular family-friendly one is The Norfolk own flavoured crisps with Kettle Foods, Spring Fling which returns to the Norfolk HOW TO ENTER explore the roots of dairy farming and how Showground on April 10 - for a remarkable Feast Norfolk Magazine has ice-cream is made with Danns Ice Cream 19th year! teamed up with The Norfolk Spring and learn how to make goats’ cheese with The day out is aimed at children aged Fling to offer one lucky family the Fielding Cottage. between 4-11 years, and is a great opportunity chance to win four tickets to The Tony Bellinger, Education Manager for to learn about the countryside, agriculture, Norfolk Spring Fling on April 10 at The the Royal Norfolk Agricultural Association food and farming - especially the link between Norfolk Showground. To enter simply and the Food and Farming Discovery Trust, the countryside and what appears on our answer the following question: says: ‘At the RNAA we are committed to plates. Where is The Norfolk teaching and helping children understand This year, as well as more than 70 interactive about the countryside, food and farming stands and Spring Fling favourites such as Spring Fling held? from a young age. It’s important for not just The Sheep Show, there are two new areas. Send your answer, plus your name, children but the whole family to learn about The Emergency Services Zone is a handsaddress and a daytime telephone number, to where their food comes from and through on experience with demonstrations and competitions@feastnorfolkmagazine.co.uk. Norfolk Spring Fling. we’re able to do this in activities, and the chance to meet local Please mark your entry, Norfolk Spring Fling. You can also enter by liking and sharing the a way that’s fun and educational.’ emergency service teams. It also provides a competition on our Facebook page. brilliant opportunity to learn about the vital • Tickets cost £9.50 and include a hog roast services that they provide across Norfolk. Terms and Conditions: Normal Feast Norfolk Mr Mawkin’s Machinery is another new lunch (or vegetarian option) and an apple competition rules apply and the editor’s decision is final. Entrants must be aged 18 area dedicated to tractors and farm machinery. juice drink. Tickets can be bought online or over. The prize is four standard entry Children will have the opportunity to ride from www.springfling.rnaa.org.uk. Children tickets to Spring Fling 2018 and includes combine harvesters and try out tractors. age two and under have free entry, but food lunch. The closing date is March 31 2018 when a winner will be chosen at random. Mr Mawkin’s Farm, the petting farm and and drink is not included. All children must Employees of the RNAA, their immediate animal meet and greet, is now housed in its be accompanied by an adult. The event runs families and agents may not enter. very own farming shed. The new location from 9.30am until 3.30pm.

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complemented by the restaurant-style dining area. As Rose says: ‘Our ever changing menu offers a wide range of styles of food, from restaurant a la carte options to pub classics, bar snacks and sandwiches. We also have a lunch menu, do a very popular Sunday roast and offer breakfast between 9 and 11am on a Saturday and Sunday morning.’ There are always vegan and gluten free options and a popular children’s menu. A landmark on Earlham Road, close to the centre of Norwich and still independently run, The Black Horse has a consistent proud history, and looks set for a bright future, too.

PICTURES BY KEIRON TOVELL

The pub classics are wholesome with good portions for big eaters – the cheese and bacon burger (£13.50) and the ale battered haddock were popular choices (£12.50), as was the 28-day sirloin steak at £19.50. From the dessert offerings, the lemon crème brulée was tempting but instead we opted for the apricot bread and butter pudding (£5.50) and the chocolate brownie (£5.50). There’s also a Norfolk Cheese Board for £9.50 which caught my eye. Late in 2015, Rose undertook major renovation work and breathed new life back into the building, creating the relaxed bar area serving a range of real ales on tap, bottled beers and a selection of wines,

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HOSPITALITY AND CATERING student Sophie Ralph looked remarkably fresh, considering she had been part of the front of house team serving 500 corporate diners at Delia’s Restaurant the previous evening. ‘It was the biggest event I’ve done,’ says the City College Norwich student, who is more used to the 40 covers in the evening at Debut Restaurant. Her new part-time role is the direct result of the recent student chef takeover at the Carrow Road venue where she worked front of house. ‘They offered me a job that night.’ Sophie’s interest in the hospitality industry began at school, as the 19 year old says: ‘I really enjoyed food tech, as it was a practical subject and I had a really inspiring teacher. Before I was born my mum used to be in the industry and I wanted to follow in her footsteps.’ So why City College? ‘It has a really good reputation and it was local,’ adds Sophie. Initially, she had enrolled on the Introduction to Professional Cookery course, although she became interested in food service, after doing the lunch service in Debut Restaurant one day a week. By the time she had reached Level 2 she was also doing evening service, ‘so more of the fine dining,’ says Sophie. ‘I then decided to do the Level 3 in Hospitality Supervision and Leadership. ‘Although I thought I was interested in the cooking side, doing the lunch and then the evening service showed me a different side of it and I wanted to pursue that more.’ Sophie proves that there’s plenty of opportunity to progress in different directions, once at the Hotel School, although she adds: ‘I still enjoy cooking, and support the Junior Chef SOP

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The internationally renowned HOTEL SCHOOL at CITY COLLEGE NORWICH provides all sorts of opportunities to progress within hospitality and catering. Emma Outten heads to DEBUT RESTAURANT to meet two of the food service students

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DEBUT RESTAURANT MANAGER ALAN GEORGE, HAS SOME NEWS ABOUT THE FIRST EVER EASTER SHOP:

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‘Following on from the success of last year’s Christmas shop in Debut Restaurant (our Christmas puddings sold out in the first week!) we have decided to open an Easter Shop. We will open just before the Easter break, from March 27 to March 29, and from 11.30am to 2pm, and on offer will include Simnel cake, marzipan bunnies and mice, and – my favourite – chocolate rice crispy nests decorated with Cadbury’s Mini Eggs. We will also be selling handmade chocolate eggs. The shop will be the result of the hard work of the Hospitality and Catering Entry Level 3 students and the Skills For Life students, and one of the key aspects of the shop is it provides a real workplace experience with real customers – which is essentially what the training restaurant represents. It will be a fantastic learning opportunity for the students to put customer service into practice, as well as an opportunity to improve their English and Maths skills.’

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course on a Saturday morning, helping to teach 10-15 year olds how to cook.’ Although she could, say, go on to study a BA (Hons) in Hospitality, Tourism and Leisure Management, the keen Sea Cadet says: ‘I’m in the process of applying to the Royal Navy - still working in hospitality.’ Her course-mate Edward Vergel knew barely any English when he came from the Philippines to Norwich with his mother in 2015. ‘It’s been a really big change for me,’ says the 20-year-old. However, he adds: ‘Ever since I’ve been to City College my English has improved.’ He explains what attracted him to the entry level Food and Beverage Service course at City College: ‘Back home my grandmother took me to a fine dining restaurant and got me hooked on the elegance of it all.’ Edward then went on to study Level 2 Professional Cookery (‘I was curious about cooking’), before embarking on the same Level 3 course as Sophie. Outside of college, he has a part time job as a catering assistant at the Norfolk and Norwich University Hospital. ‘It’s quite a bit different but it’s still the same principle of serving a customer.’ As Level 3 students, both Sophie and Edward are gaining the experience of supervising the Level 1 and 2 students, and, as well as doing theoretical assessments (they are classroom-based one day a week),

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they are busy planning their forthcoming practical assessments – when they will each have to plan, run and evaluate a movie-themed lunch. Sophie’s Mamma Mia themed lunch is at the end of this month. ‘The menu is going to be Greek inspired,’ she says. Edward’s is in April: ‘I will be hosting a Chinese-inspired lunch - the theme is Crouching Tiger Hidden Dragon.’ As for the future, Edward says: ‘I hope to work in a fine dining restaurant or hotel, gain as much experience as I can, then go home and start my own business.’ Joe Mulhall, Curriculum Programme Manager, says: ‘I’m so proud of our food service students and the customer facing skills they are developing here at City College. It’s good to hear Sophie and Edward talk about their progression - and both are proving that the jobs are there, If you put your mind to it and have the determination to succeed.’

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sIMPlE SEAFOOd SUPPERs

THE NEW FISH 2 A WEEK HEALTH CAMPAIGN IS ENCOURAGING THE UK TO ADD SEAFOOD TO ITS MENU TWICE A WEEK, AS PART OF A HEALTHY, BALANCED DIET. EMMA OUTTEN AND HER DAUGHTER HEADED TO ZENA LEECH-CALTON’S COOKERY SCHOOL NEAR NORWICH TO LEARN MORE

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www.lovenorwichfood.co.uk AND

EVER MIND me having to make a concerted effort to add seafood to the menu twice a week - I swear my daughter would happily eat sushi seven days a week given half the chance. So, in a sense, the new Fish 2 a Week health campaign, backed by panindustry body Seafish, could’ve been a case of preaching to the converted in our particular household. Indeed, my daughter jumped at the chance of joining other like-minded children at Lodge Farm Kitchen at Bawburgh, near Norwich, run by expert chef Zena LeechCalton. The cookery school was one of six picked, from around the country, to serve up a special seafood cookery class where parents and children could learn how to make a series of simple suppers as part of a ‘Fish is the Dish’ Back to School campaign. East Anglia is certainly swimming in the stuff, as Zena points out on her blog, Love Norwich Food: from the smoke houses of Lowestoft and Cley, to the haul of fish landed in Great Yarmouth. And Lowestoft-born Zena was the perfect choice for a host, as it turns out her ancestry is firmly rooted in the fish industry - both her grandfather and great grandfather were skippers. From squid to salmon, we were about to be shown the fun and creative ways to enjoy cooking with seafood together.

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Out came an impressive selection of seafood: whole bream, whole bass, smoked haddock, cod, haddock, herring, mackerel, squid, salmon, shell-on prawns, and smoked mackerel. She then taught us how to fillet and prepare this wide variety of different species – the children were more than happy to be hands-on, with Zena commenting afterwards: ‘I was pleasantly surprised how the children handled the fish - it didn't seem to bother any of them.’ We then got the chance to work together to cook and plate up a range of seafood suppers, and the best bit was that they all took between 10 and 15 minutes to prepare (or even less if you include the smoked mackerel pate we made for starters). The smoked haddock rarebit, which was easy to make, went down extremely well with the children, as did the cod en papillote. On the hob, Zena made light work of teriyaki mackerel and pan fried herring, and everyone got stuck into preparing a versatile prawn bisque, by deshelling prawns for the stock and chopping the vegetables. The beauty of the bisque is that it can be used as a soup or a sauce – so after sampling it as a soup, Zena then used it later for pan-fried salmon with crushed peas. The point she made on the night was that you can easily knock up a restaurant style healthy dish in less than 20 minutes. To finish off we enjoyed a hands-on sushi making workshop, tasting some sashimi as we went along. Needless to say, my sushi-obsessed daughter was more than happy to take her handiwork home with her!


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SEAFOOD is centre-stage at Wells Crab House and why not when it is literally on their doorstep? Husband and wife team, Kelly and Scott Dougal, opened their informal restaurant almost on the quay in pretty Wells in 2016, and it has gained quite a reputation for serving ultra fresh fish with a bit of flair. The choice is impressive, but is always seasonal so changes regularly,

and they rely on the area’s fishermen to supply top quality ingredients. Crabs and mussels come from Andy Frary in the town, lobsters are from Billy Ward, also in the town, while oysters are from Richard Loose in Brancaster. So-called land lovers are well catered for with meat coming from Arthur Howell’s in Wells and do look out for their platters - with a little bit of everything to try.

STRAIGHT FROM THE SEA WELLS CRAB HOUSE OFFERS US TWO OF THEIR FAVOURITE FISH RECIPES AS THIS ISSUE OF FEAST NORFOLK CELEBRATES THE REGION’S RICH SEAFOOD HERITAGE

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INGREDIENTS 4 plaice fillets; plain flour for dusting; 2 eggs; 100ml of milk; 100g of breadcrumbs with a pinch of chopped herbs stirred into them; 1 butternut squash; 15 new potatoes; 2 turnips, cut into bite size pieces, or 8 baby turnips; 2 golden beets, cut into bite size pieces, or 8 baby golden beets; 400g of kale, pulled into small pieces; 100g of baby spinach; knob of butter; lemon wedges to serve

METHOD Coat the plaice with the flour, dip in the egg and milk mix, then dredge with the herbed breadcrumbs. Set aside until needed. Peel, deseed and roughly cube the squash, then boil for about ten minutes until soft. Remove from the water and blend, adding as much of the cooking liquid as you need to make a smooth purée,then pour into a pan. Boil the new potatoes, turnip and beetroot until soft. Then cut into bite-sized pieces. Once cooked, drain and toss in a baking tray with hot oil, salt and pepper. Roast about fifteen minutes. While they are roasting, warm up the squash purée. Then fry the first plaice fillet on both sides, until the crumb is crisp and golden. Remove to a warm oven while you cook the other plaice in the same way. As you are finishing the last fillet, put the kale into boiling, salted water for two minutes, then remove to a pan with a knob of butter, some cracked pepper and some baby spinach. Remove the vegetables from the oven, arrange the purée, roast vegetables, wilted greens and plaice on the plates

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CRUMBED PLAICE WITH SQUASH PURÉE, TURNIP, KALE & NEW POTATOES [Serves 4

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Here are a COUPLE of RECIPES from their kitchen for you to try at home:

SERVES FOUR*

MUSSELS WITH SWEET POTATO GNOCCHI, MUSHROOMS & GOATS' CHEESE INGREDIENTS 3 sweet potatoes, baked; 2 egg yolks; plain flour; 400g of mussels; 300g of mushrooms; butter to fry; 200g of goats’ cheese; fresh herbs, finely chopped METHOD Scrape the flesh out of the sweet potato skins, weigh it and add the same weight of flour, plus the egg yolks, and knead to form a dough. Depending on how wet the potato is, you may need more flour. Roll the dough into little balls on a floured surface, flour the tines of a fork, and lightly flatten the gnocchi with it. Once all the dough is rolled out, place the gnocchi in a pot of boiling salted water. Once they float, remove to iced water with a slotted spoon. Once all the gnocchi is cooked, drained and cooled, leave them to dry on a towel. Add the gnocchi, mushrooms and butter to a frying pan, fry gently until they start to crisp on the outside. At the same time, steam the mussels in the white wine until they open, remove them and toss in with the cooked gnocchi, and mushrooms. Pour a little white wine from the cooking pan as well, to keep the gnocchi nice and moist. Place the gnocchi and mussels into bowls and dot the top with goats’ cheese, and sprinkle with a little fresh herbs

*Serves 4 as a starter or light lunch


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INGREDIENTS For the Potted Prawns 250g of frozen prawns, defrosted overnight in a sieve in the fridge until dry; 125g of unsalted butter; 1tsp of mace; 1/2tsp each of chilli flakes (crushed), mixed spice and ground black pepper For the Pickled Cucumber / of a cucumber, finely sliced; 2tsp of yellow mustard seeds; 20g of dill; 200ml of cider vinegar; 30g of caster sugar; a generous pinch of salt and a couple of grinds of black pepper

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POT IT!

LUCY BARTLETT HAS A SUPER QUICK RECIPE FOR A TASTY PRAWN DISH

Potted PRAWNS with Pickled CUCUMBER SE RV ES 2 AS A L I G H T LU N C H OR 4 AS A STA R T E R

THESE RECIPES are best made a day ahead and they both last a week in the fridge. They offer a remarkable return for your effort - you get a range of subtle flavours with very little work. The dishes complement each other as the sweetness and acidity of the cucumber cuts through the rich buttery spiced prawns. INGREDIENTS FOR COOKS is a family-run Suffolk-based business which supplies a wide variety of ingredients for both home and professional cooks. Visit www.ingredientsforcooks.co.uk

METHOD For the Potted Prawns 1. Melt the butter in a saucepan over a gentle heat. When just frothing, take off the heat and skim off the opaque layer 2. Put the prawns into a frying pan, add a little of the butter to stop them sticking and add the spices. Toss for a couple of minutes until the prawns and spices are well mixed and heated through 3. Spoon the prawns into a suitable pot - I use a Kilner jar, but you could use individual ramekin dishes or small glasses and gently press down with the back of a spoon 4. Pour over the butter, ensuring that the prawns are covered. You can always clarify a little more butter if necessary 5. Cover and refrigerate until needed. It lasts a week in the fridge and also freezes very well 6. Remove from the fridge 30 minutes before serving For the Pickled Cucumber 1. In a small Kilner or a jam jar with a lid, layer the cucumber with the dill and mustard seeds, finishing with a couple of grinds of black pepper 2. Mix the vinegar, sugar and salt and pour this over the cucumber 3. Ensure the top layer is submerged, add a little more vinegar if necessary and seal the jar Allow to mature for at least 24 hours before serving. Serve together on a toasted sourdough or a warm baguette

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SU FR E D N O M VE I N D AY 6 RY N E R . LU 3 0 N I G N - 8 HT C .4 H 5 12 P -2 M PM

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AFTERNOON TEA served daily from 2pm to 4.30pm

Daily Seafood Specials Including:

King Scallops, Mackerel, Tiger Prawns, Langoustine, Brancaster Mussels, Sheringham Lobster, Cromer Crab, Seabass, Lemon Sole, Atlantic Halibut, Turbot, Seabream, Scottish Salmon, Seatrout

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SHOPPING:

FISH

EATING MORE FISH? YOU’LL NEED THE RIGHT EQUIPMENT. HERE’S OUR SELECTION OF FISHY-THEMED GOODIES 06.

WHERE TO BUY 01. Lobster dish, £32, Not Another Bill, www.notanotherbill.com 02. Stellar Premium Nylon Fish Turner, £6.75, Bakers and Larners, Holt, www.bakersandlarners.co.uk 03. Kitchen Craft fish scaler, £4, Jarrold’s, www.jarrold.co.uk 04. Kaemingk fish serving board, £25, Debenhams, www.debenhams.com 05. Dunoon crab and lobster Argyll mug, £15, Kerry’s Home Furnishings, Lowestoft, www.kerrys.uk.com 06. Robert Welch fish eaters, set of 8, £50, John Lewis, www.johnlewis.com

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HARBOUR LIFE -

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IN THIS MONTH’S PHOTO ESSAY, KEIRON TOVELL VISITS SOUTHWOLD AND ITS BUSY WORKING HARBOUR WHERE FISHERMEN STILL LAND THEIR CATCH ON A DAILY BASIS

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OUTHWOLD is well known and much loved for its pier, lighthouse, wonderful sandy beaches, great shops and a certain brewing family! But its harbour, running alongside the River Blyth, is perhaps the beating heart of the place. It was a thriving spot prior to the First World War when silver darlings - herring were the main and hugely popular catch. Change has been slow and sympathetic. The track remains uneven and bumpy, wooden jetties, many showing their age, reach into the water and the local fishermen still land their catch each morning.


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A footbridge takes you over the water to Walberswick or you can enjoy a gentle row across the Blyth as the ferry service resumes over the Easter holidays. Workshops, repair yards and fishermen’s huts line the track, with the family-run Sole Bay Fish Company attracting many visitors to both its fishmonger’s and restaurant. It has gradually expanded over the past 15 years and now offers a huge selection of fish, with much caught from their own boat, Our Carroll II. At this time of year, you should look out for skate, Dover sole, plaice and cod.

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C O L U M N

HOW TO VOTE*

He’s in the running to win the 2018 TOURISM SUPE RSTAR AWARD. Our columnist Charlie Hodson , NORFOLK food champion , tells us more

GO CHARLIE!

I WAS SITTING ALONE, in the office, just before Christmas, when the email arrived. I thought it was a wind up, of course! And I couldn’t mention it to anyone for ages. I was nominated by someone - and I have no idea who and nobody will tell me - and then it went to VisitNorwich and on to VisitEngland and here we are now - I’m one of the 10 national finalists! I was so proud, and tearful, but don’t tell anyone, and I just wished my parents were around to see it. I’m not expecting to win as I just do my thing and I love what I do; I love Norfolk and I love food and am so passionate about our local producers. The other nine entrants are amazing so the competition is fierce.

THE COVETED accolade was set up seven years ago by Mirror Travel and VisitEngland and celebrates the unsung heroes of the staycation tourism industry. They are looking for people who far exceed the call of duty to ensure visitors have an amazing experience, whether it’s on a day trip or a holiday. Local tourist boards across the country submitted hundreds of nominations and a panel of expert judges has drawn up a shortlist of 10 candidates for a public vote. Being shortlisted and then going on to win Tourism Superstar has huge benefits not only for the destination but also for the individual and the business they represent. Last year’s win by Norwich’s Duane Dibartolomeo from The Grosvenor Fish Bar led to significant media coverage in The Mirror as well as a Norwich feature on BBC1’s The One Show. Melanie Cook, interim Head of Tourism at VisitNorwich says: ‘The VisitNorwich team is delighted to have a fifth shortlisted candidate from the Norwich area. With Charlie’s larger-than-life personality and all that he is passionate about, we believe he can go all the way to winning the 2018 title.’ The winner will be the individual who receives the most online votes by the general public. Voting is now open and closes at midnight on March 20. The winner will be announced at the close of English Tourism Week on March 25. VisitEngland has produced a video of the 10 finalists in their respective destinations, the first time they have done this. This new initiative not only gives voters an opportunity to see the finalists in their own environments but also gives a flavour of the areas they come from.

*HOW TO VOTE - visit www.mirror.co.uk Charlie is the head chef and general manager of the Fur and Feather, the tap house at Woodforde’s Brewery near Norwich. He is the founder of Charlie’s Food Heroes and is a regular presenter at several food festivals around the county.

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Sp Resta ecial Monda urant Weeks y March 12 to Sunday (ex 25 and Sa cluding Frida A specia turday nights y ) ls with 2 c easonal men u ours 3 cours es £18, es £23

strattons hotel

with self catering, restaurant, café deli and lifestyle/interiors shop boutique luxurious classic contemporary heart of norfolk award winning restaurant afternoon tea cocoes café deli self catering Luxury without sacrifice to the environment ash close swaffham norfolk pe37 7nh 01760 723845 enquiries@strattonshotel.com www.strattonshotel.com

Middle of nowhere, centre of everywhere!

Fresh, local and seasonal is our ethos here at the Saracen’s Head, so come and enjoy a delicious, locally sourced meal with us We are open 7 days a week, but do close in the afternoons. Early spring service times: Monday: 6.30-8pm; Tuesday to Saturday: 12-2pm & 6.30-8.30pm; Sunday Lunch: 12.30-2.30pm You are always best to make a booking. Call us on 01263 768909 or email info@saracenshead-norfolk.co.uk

www.saracenshead-norfolk.co.uk

Fresh, local and seasonal is our ethos here at the Saracens. Being in the middle of nowhere is the perfect excuse to come and enjoy a meal whilst you explore this wonderful part of North Norfolk. Our full menu is available every day, lunch and dinner and in addition we have our summer lunch menu from Monday to Saturday. Sunday lunches are very special and we offer the most delicious roast rump of Blickling reared beef. If it’s too far to travel for a meal, why not stay the night and make a quick break of it!

Summer Opening Times In July & August we will be open 7 days a week this summer Lunch orders will be taken from 12.00 to 2.30 Dinner from 6.30 to 9.00, except Sundays and Mondays 6.30 to 8.30

OPENING ON 9TH MARCH

THE WELLS CRAB HOUSE SEAFOOD RESTAURANT

TAKEAWAY CRABS & LOBSTER AVAILABLE FROM 10AM OPENING TIMES: SUN-THURS 10-5pm; FRI-SAT 10-8pm SERVING FOOD FROM 12 with Surf and Turf on Friday and Saturday CALL US: 01263 837359 OR 07999 959760 CROMER ROAD, WEST RUNTON, NORFOLK, NR27 9QA

www.rockybottoms.co.uk

38-40 Freeman street WELLS-NEXT-THE-SEA CALL US ON 01328 710456 WWW.WELLSCRABHOUSE.CO.UK


So

DANIEL GREEN

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B I G

I N T E R V I E W

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SWEET

THE BRITISH SUGAR FACTORY AT CANTLEY, NEAR ACLE, WAS THE FIRST SUGAR PROCESSING FACTORY IN THE UK. EMMA OUTTEN MEETS FACTORY MANAGER DANIEL GREEN AND TAKES A TOUR The history of the place is not lost on him. ‘As you walk around this factory there are still several parts of the 1912 infrastructure, steelwork and building that remain.’ It would probably be wise to point out that there have been millions of pounds worth of investment in the factory since then! To the rear of the factory, a mountain of beet is ready and waiting to be processed. First of all, the beet is washed, then the sugar is extracted, filtered and crystallised (presumably this is where Daniel’s chemical engineering degree comes in rather handy). ‘Over the past 15 years I’ve mainly worked on the technical elements of running a factory such as the sugar extraction process, and have worked on a variety of projects which improve that extraction process. I have also worked with some great people.’ There’s definitely a family feel to the factory: ‘Cantley has a long history of having several generations of people employed here together, so we currently have fathers and daughters who work alongside each other, as well as father and sons over the years. There are a lot of people here whose grandparents worked here so it’s quite special in that way. It’s a close knit workforce, although people do live further afield now,’ says Daniel, who lives in Dereham. SUGAR BEET

PERHAPS IT WAS a foregone conclusion that Daniel Green would end up working for British Sugar. After all, he grew up on a farm between King’s Lynn and Wisbech which grew sugar beet. ‘I guess I’ve always been quite keen on keeping my links to agriculture, so I when I finished my A Levels, I went to agricultural college. However, I only stayed there for eight weeks and then decided to do a chemical engineering degree,’ says Daniel. This was followed by a Master’s degree. ‘A friend worked for British Sugar, so I knew a bit about the business, and then I went on a course at the York factory - when it was open - and after that I applied for a job and started here at Cantley as a trainee graduate in 2003.’ In fact, the UK beet sugar industry all started on the banks of the River Yare, in Cantley, back in 1912, and the enduring partnership between agriculture and industry continues to this day. This site alone processes around 9000 tonnes of sugar beet a day (which can be converted into 1250 tonnes of crystal sugar that same day). Nowadays there are four advanced manufacturing plants: three are in East Anglia (Cantley, Wissington and Bury St Edmunds) and one is in the East Midlands. British Sugar is something of a home-grown success story, partnering with 3,500 growers in East Anglia and the East Midlands and supplying roughly half of the UK's sugar market. The 700 growers who supply the Cantley factory alone mainly come from Norfolk and Suffolk and the average distance between the farm and the plant is only 28 miles (the nearest farm is less than a mile away). With around 200,000 tonnes of sugar coming out of Cantley a year, it’s clearly a big operation in the Yare Valley, and yet Daniel says: ‘It’s surprising how many people in East Anglia don’t know we’re here.’ This is his second time round at Cantley – Daniel went on to do a variety of managerial roles at Wissington near Downham Market, before returning in 2012, as operations manager. ‘I arrived back just before the 100th year celebration and then moved into my current role as factory manager in 2016.’

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" processes around ...th is SI TE alone

90BE0ET0 suga" r

TONNES of

a day...

www.feastnorfolkmagazine.co.uk

At the end of it all, the sugar is delivered to customers in a variety of formats, for both industrial and retail markets. One of the most recognisable brands is Silver Spoon sugar, which can be found on the shelves of leading supermarkets. Does Daniel have a sweet tooth? ‘I would say I have a moderate amount of sugar in my diet and ensure I take plenty of exercise.’ He has two daughters, aged 11 and eight. ‘I wouldn’t say they eat too much sugar. They are both swimmers so their calorie intake is offset by the amount of swimming they do. If anyone wants to talk to me about sugar I’ll be sitting by the pool.’ These are interesting times for the sugar industry. Back in October, British Sugar became free from a quota system which had previously restricted the amount of sugar it could produce and sell. And Brexit could mean in the long term that food producers such as British Sugar will be able to go out and sell their goods on a global stage competitively. Daniel says: ‘I’m really keen to find more people like me who want to be in Norfolk and want to join British Sugar, either on a multi skilled apprenticeship scheme or as a graduate. I think there’s a huge amount of opportunity in our business.’

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B U S I N E S S

P R O F I L E

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THE CHOCOLATE FACToRY FAKENHAM-BASED CHOCOLATE MAKER KINNERTON IS FILLING UP OUR SHELVES WITH EASTER EGGS. WHAT DO WE KNOW ABOUT THEM?

When did it become a division of a German company? Kinnerton became part of the Zertus Group in 2012. How involved is Kinnerton in the local community and charities? As you can imagine, being a chocolate factory we get many requests for donations and we try to help as many local schools and charities with their fundraising as we can. Much of this is by way of a voucher which can be redeemed in our shop in Fakenham. If we are able, we also donate Easter Eggs and Advent calendars to various children’s charities. Our site also has a Charity of the Year – which this year is Reach for a Star in King’s Lynn. Over the last 11 months, our staff have been busy fundraising for this charity. We set ourselves an initial target of £2000 but it looks as though we are going to exceed this, which we are very excited about! We also work closely with local schools, offering work experience, and attend various career fairs and activities. We also regularly hold work events for the long term unemployed resulting in many being offered permanent jobs within the business. We understand Dominic Lowe has been MD for over a year now - how is he driving the business forward? Dominic took over as MD in November 2016, so has now been with us for almost 18 months. He bought with him a wealth of knowledge, having worked in many large food manufacturing companies. One thing Dominic was very keen to do was to keep the passion that all the staff here at Kinnerton have, we have real pride in what we do and the products

www.feastnorfolkmagazine.co.uk

that we make. What Dominic has done is to take us back to basics and put in a new management structure which means we now have a firm foundation to continue taking the business forward. Kinnerton prides itself on being nut safe - what lengths does the company go to in order to achieve this? We go to extraordinary lengths to maintain our Nut Safe promise; after all this can be a person’s life we are dealing with. Nuts are used in our factory but we implement stringent controls to ensure our Kinnerton products are safe for nut allergy sufferers. We spent more than £1m in 1999 to keep nuts out of our segregated and walled-off non nut factory. And then there are people! As you can imagine, controlling a factory of around 650 people and all their movements is a huge task to undertake. For starters, noone can bring nut or nut trace items on to the site. Yes, we have nuts in our nut manufacturing side, but no individual can bring nuts on to our site. Our staff, following nut training at induction, constantly receive refresher sessions and are alerted and warned of the problems of nut cross-contamination. When did the free from range develop? Nowadays eating Free From food can be a lifestyle choice rather than due to allergies, and our commitment is to offer real chocolate that is free from dairy, egg, gluten and nuts, that tastes delicious.

Can you tell us a bit about the sustainable chocolate foundation? From March 2016, all the cocoa used in Kinnerton chocolate has been sustainably sourced in support of the Cocoa Horizon Foundation which helps create thriving cocoa growing communities. Helping to train farmers, it enables them to grow cocoa sustainably and responsibly, increase yields and improve their family livelihood. By paying farmers a premium, it directly increases income so they can invest in their farms and communities.

www.kinnerton.com

What is the history of Kinnerton in Fakenham and how many people do you employ there? Kinnerton has existed since 1978, so this year is our 40th anniversary. We moved to Fakenham in 1988, so we have been here for 30 years and employ approximately 650 people, although this can increase significantly during peak seasons.

Is Kinnerton taking part in the North Norfolk Food and Drink Festival at Holkham again this year? We certainly hope so! Last year we attended both days and it was so busy. One of the things that surprised us was how few people knew about Kinnerton and what we do – we obviously need to make people more aware of the gem that is hiding in Norfolk. We understand Kinnerton was founded 40 years ago - what are your plans for this anniversary year? To celebrate this we have sponsored a GoGoHare as part of the counties Moongazing Trail for this summer. The hare will have pride of place in Fakenham's Market Square and we hope that it will bring lots of visitors to the town and that local businesses will be able to ‘hop’ on board with the event. At the moment we are keeping the name and the design of our hare a closely guarded secret and it is currently being decorated with our design by a local artist, Hannah Nelson. We are also looking at other ways in which we can celebrate with our staff and the local community.


SARA MATTHEWS is a qualified trainer, food consultant, recipe developer and food writer. Visit www.sarabynature.com

Sara By Nature -

F R E E

F R O M

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MAKES 18-20*

EASTER BISCUITS INGREDIENTS 100g of dairy free butter or hard margarine (I use Stork) - you can use soft margarine but using a hard margarine or vegan butter makes the dough firmer and easier to roll and cut; 50g of coconut sugar - you can use soft brown sugar if you prefer but I love the caramel flavour that the coconut sugar gives to biscuits; 1/4tsp of xanthan gum; 100g of ground almonds; 100g of rice flour, plus extra for dusting; 50g of raisins; 1/2tsp of ground cinnamon; a pinch of salt (I use Himalayan sea salt); 50g of dairy free chocolate

EASTER A ING K b

writer SARA Our resident free from dy for both a re s u g in ett g is S EW MATTH AGUS season EASTER and the ASPAR

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METHOD In a large mixing bowl, beat together the butter and sugar until soft, then add the xanthan gum and stir. Add the almonds, rice flour, cinnamon and salt and mix well. Then add the raisins and mix again until they are evenly distributed. Form into a ball with your hands, wrap in Cling Film and chill for at least 30 minutes. Pre-heat the oven to 180°C. Line a baking tray with parchment. Dust your work surface and roll out the dough, with your chosen biscuit cutter cut out your biscuits and transfer to your baking sheet. Repeat until all the dough is used then bake for 12-15 minutes until golden brown. Remove from oven, allow to cool in the tray for 5 minutes then transfer to a cooling rack. Place your chocolate in a bowl and melt over a pan of boiling water (making sure the bowl doesn’t touch the water) or melt in a microwave (do this in short bursts of 20 seconds so you do not overheat and burn the chocolate.) Drizzle the melted chocolate over the cooled biscuits. Allow to set then enjoy or give as a gift, tied up with a pretty Easter ribbon

Making these BIS CUITS is a terrific way to pass a wet AF TE RNOON with the children! You bake them and th en get to eat them! Perf ect

MORE RECIPES OVERLEAF

*depending on size of your biscuit cutter


SERVES FOUR*

Sara By Nature -

F R E E

F R O M

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This delicious RISOTT O is packed full of flavour and is a great DINNER DISH for all the family

COURGETTE, PEA & ARTICHOKE RISOTTO INGREDIENTS 3 red onions, chopped; 3 cloves of garlic, finely chopped; 400g of Arborio risotto rice; 1tsp of turmeric; 1tsp of smoked paprika; 1l of vegetable stock (I use Kallo low salt); 1-2tsp of coconut oil; 1tbsp of fresh rosemary, finely chopped; 150g of frozen peas; 1tbsp of fresh parsley, finely chopped; 1 can of artichoke hearts, drained and rinsed; 1 large courgette, thinly sliced lengthways; zest and juice of 1 lime

METHOD In a large flat cooking pan or wok add the coconut oil (you can use other oil if you prefer) and gently cook the onion and garlic on a medium heat until soft, about 3-4 minutes. Add the turmeric, paprika and rice, and stir well to coat everything in the spices. Add 800g of the hot stock and rosemary and bring to the boil, reduce the heat and gently simmer, stirring occasionally so the rice doesn’t stick. Cook for 15-18 minutes. If the stock is fully absorbed during cooking, add the rest of the stock a bit at a time, then add the peas and cook for a further 3-4 minutes, making

*as a main dish and 6 as light lunch

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sure the rice is tender. Stir in the lime juice and then remove from the heat. While the rice is cooking, heat up a griddle pan until it is very hot. Brush the pan with a little of the oil, add the courgette and artichoke hearts, griddle each side for a couple of minutes until golden marks appear. Do not stir the artichoke as it may fall apart. Depending on the size of your griddle pan, you may have to do this in batches. If you do not have a griddle pan you can do this under the grill. Place the cooked veg on top of the risotto rice, sprinkle with chopped parsley and lime zest, and serve with a green salad


ASPARAGUS, PEAR & CASHEW TOPPED TOASTIES INGREDIENTS 4 slices of seeded bread (I used B-Freed gluten free, egg-free bread but any dense brown seeded bread will work); 6 asparagus spears; 2 just ripe pears; juice of 1/2 a lemon; 2-3tbsp of cashew nut butter (you could use seed butter if you can’t have nuts); a handful of rocket; 1-2tsp of maple syrup; 1tbsp of pumpkin seeds; salt and pepper to taste

www.feastnorfolkmagazine.co.uk

SERVES FOUR

METHOD Place the pumpkin seeds onto a small baking tray and grill for a couple of minutes, turning them until they are lightly toasted. This only takes a couple of minutes. Put to one side. Bring a pan of water to the boil, add the asparagus and blanch until tender but still firm. Remove it, run under cold water then pat dry. Slice in half lengthways. Core and slice the pears lengthways, into at least six slices. Place in a bowl, add the lemon juice and toss to coat the pears. Season with salt and pepper. Lightly toast the bread. Spread each slice with cashew butter, top each toastie with a few slices of pear, 3 slices of asparagus, top with a drizzle with maple syrup and a sprinkle of pumpkin seeds, and serve with rocket. This dish is equally delicious served warm or cold

I just LOVE this recipe as it oozes freshness and is so EASY to prepare. And, best of all , our ASPARAGUS season is just around the corner!

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TRINE HAHNEMANN

A GREAT DANE

DANISH CHEF TRINE HAHNEMANN EXPLAINS A BIT MORE ABOUT HER COUNTRY’S FAVOURITE DISH, SMØRREBRØD, IN HER LATEST COOKBOOK, OPEN SANDWICHES


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C E L E B R I T Y

MMØRREBRØD can be literally translated as ‘butter on bread’, but it is much more than that. It is a Danish food culture at the heart of many homes and the basis of many Danes’ everyday eating. Trine Hahnemann has loved this way of eating since she was a small child, devouring these homemade delights on the beach with her grandfather. Featuring different smørrebrøds for every season and each mood, you can enjoy herring, duck with chicory and apple, and salted brisket with horseradish, on dark, cosy evenings in; or opt for prawns, soft leeks with eggs and vinaigrette in warmer weather, plus one or two can make a loving Sunday supper. There are delicious concoctions for the sweettoothed, too.

C O O K B O O K

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Waldorf Salad

Some classic SMØRREBRØD are borderline desserts. This recipe will often be served alongside other more SAVOURY open sandwiches INGREDIENTS 100g of green grapes; 1 celery stick; 1 head of chicory; 30g of walnuts; sea salt flakes and freshly ground black pepper; 3-4tbsp of full-fat crème fraîche; 1-2tbsp of lemon juice; 4 slices of rye bread, plus 1 slice of toasted rye bread; salted butter METHOD Halve the grapes and remove the seeds, if there are any. Cut the celery into thin slices on an angle. Cut the chicory into very thin slices. Chop the walnuts. Mix all together in a mixing bowl and season with salt and pepper. Gently fold in the crème fraîche and season with the lemon juice to taste. Place the rye bread slices on a worktop and spread the butter evenly on each slice. Divide the Waldorf salad between the slices. Crumble the toasted rye bread and place the rye crumbs on top

OPEN SANDWICHES

by Trine Hahnemann (Quadrille, £12.99)

MORE RECIPES OVERLEAF

www.feastnorfolkmagazine.co.uk

SERVES FOUR

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PHOTOGRAPHY BY COLUMBUS LETH

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C E L E B R I T Y

Salmon, Egg & Basil

I often serve OPEN SANDWICHES as a starter or snack with white wine before dinner. They are also great at TEATIME instead of finger sandwiches. Easy -to-do and tasty, SALMON is always a winner

C O O K B O O K

SERVES FOUR

INGREDIENTS 4 big slices of sourdough bread; salted butter; 8 lettuce leaves, or mustard greens; 8-12 slices of quick-cured salmon; 2 hard-boiled eggs; 1tbsp of chopped dill; sea salt flakes and freshly ground black pepper; 4 cherry tomatoes; 4 basil leaves METHOD Toast the sourdough, then spread each slice with a thin layer of salted butter, cut in half and place on a worktop. Lay a lettuce leaf on each slice of bread, followed by 1 or 2 slices of salmon, depending on their size, but erring on the side of generosity. Chop the eggs in a small mixing bowl and mix them with the dill, salt and pepper, then place on top of the salmon. Quarter the tomatoes and place on top of the eggs, then decorate each with a basil leaf

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Banana, Strawberry, Raspberry & Chocolate

I know this will be a surprise for many people: SMØRREBRØD with sweet and very simple toppings; rye bread with banana is very common. Less surprisingly, they are most CHILDREN’S FAVOURITES. [However, my very grown-up Serves husband often eats them, and still with great joy. He especially en joys PÅLÆGSCHOKOLADE (chocolate topping) if it is homemade, though it can be bought everywhere in Denmark, in dark and milk chocolate varieties. Here, the butter is even more important than usual, because it binds together the topping and the RYE BREAD]

[

[

2-4

INGREDIENTS 8 slices of rye bread; salted butter; 100g of strawberries; 2 bananas; 100g of raspberries; paper-thin chocolate pieces For the Paper-Thin Chocolate Pieces (makes 300g) 300g of dark (bittersweet) chocolate, 60 per cent cocoa solids

www.feastnorfolkmagazine.co.uk

METHOD Place the rye bread slices on a worktop and spread the butter evenly on each slice. Rinse and hull the strawberries and cut each in half or in quarters. Slice the bananas. Divide the strawberries, bananas, raspberries and chocolate pieces between the rye bread slices and serve For the Chocolate Pieces Finely chop the chocolate and melt two-thirds of it in a heatproof bowl suspended over simmering

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water (make sure the bowl does not touch the water), or a bain-marie. When it has melted and reached a temperature of 50°C, add the rest of the chopped chocolate. Mix well until all the chocolate has melted. Gently heat all the chocolate in the bainmarie until it reaches a temperature of 31°C. Now the chocolate is ready to use. Spread out the melted chocolate on a piece of baking parchment. Using a sharp knife, cut a pattern of pieces measuring about 7x5cm through the still-melted chocolate. Leave to cool and set before separating into pieces


Page Turners

Our regular round-up of new cookbooks takes us to Venice and Lebanon - and has something charming for younger readers, too

VENICE FOUR SEASONS OF HOME COOKING

GREAT OFFER

by Russell Norman

Jarrold price £20 RRP £25 Russell Norman, founder of the hugely popular Polpo collection of restaurants in London and Brighton, reveals the authentic culinary traditions and flavours of the Veneto from his rustic kitchen in a residential quarter of the city. He lovingly produces 130 dishes of simple, delicious recipes while giving a glimpse into Venetian culture, from hidden architectural gems, to the food merchants and growers who supply the city’s inhabitants. This is really a love letter to this remarkable city and yes, you’ll be booking a holiday there very soon!


Cookbooks NADIYA'S BAKE ME A STORY by Nadiya Hussain £1

FEASTS FROM THE MIDDLE EAST

GOOD FOOD FAMILY FREEZER MEALS

£20

£12.99

by Tony Kitous

by BBC Books

This colourful book is inspired by the souks of Lebanon and offers us 100 fragrant recipes from the founder of the Comptoir Libanais chain of restaurants which are popular throughout much of England. We haven’t got a branch (described as Pippa Middleton’s favourite restaurant) in Norfolk yet but there’s always hope! Slow-cooked shoulder of lamb, chicken and chickpea stew or fried red mullet with crisp bread and tahina are just some of the dishes to try. Expect beautiful, tempting photography and all you lovers of meze out there will be in your element.

World Book Day is March 1 which is a day for children to celebrate reading and get a £1 voucher to spend on books. Each year top children's authors write a £1 mini story which can be bought with the voucher. This year TV chef Nadiya Hussain is one of the authors taking part, and she has produced Bake Me A Story which very cleverly mixes up food and fairy stories. Look out for The Elves and the Chouxmaker!

What a good idea - a book of tasty freezer-friendly recipes to help you get through the week! It’s aimed at those who want to do a big cook on, say, a Sunday and get themselves sorted for busy work days. Recipes for reliable favourites such as lasagne, casseroles, veggie shepherd's pie and fishcakes are included, alongside information on defrosting and reheating times.

Don 't miss

DI AR Y DA TE S

March 13

JOIN CLARE MACKINTOSH AND RAC HEL ABBOTT in Jarrold’s book department as they discuss their latest psychological thrillers. Cla re has written Let Me Lie while Rachel has penned Com e A Little Closer, and both will get you thinking. Tick ets are £7.50 - see www.jarrold.co.uk for more.

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THE EXTRA MILE: DELICIOUS ALTERNATIVES TO MOTORWAY SERVICES

by Alastair Sawday £12.99 Best known for his Special Places to Stay guidebook series, Alastair Sawday provides a great guide to smart cafes and farm shops a hop, skip and jump away from the motorway for those with a nose for good food on the road and who don't mind heading off the beaten track to find something a bit more exciting. It is, most definitely, one for the glove box.


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B U T C H E R S

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TIME TO ROAST AS MOTHERING SUNDAY APPROACHES, HERE’S WHAT AYLSHAM-BASED COXFORDS BUTCHERS THINKS MAKES THE PERFECT ROAST

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LO O CA RD L ER DE S LIV O E VE RY R O £4 N 0

FIRST OF ALL you need quality ingredients, with locally sourced meat and vegetables. One of our favourite roasts is rib of beef; all of the beef at Coxfords comes from local farmer, Chris Blaxell of Antingham near North Walsham. It’s hung for a minimum of 28 days to bring out the flavour and we French trim our ribs for that extra special look at the dinner table. We recommend allowing 400 grams per person when buying ribs on the bone and a 6-8 lb joint will feed about 10 people. Cook it for 4-5 hours on gas mark 1 or 140°C. The best advice we can give you would be to buy a digital meat thermometer, if you haven’t already. This ensures you get the meat right every time. For medium rare, the internal temperature should reach 65°C and for medium, 70°C. A decent joint should need little or no seasoning, as the flavour is in the meat. Don’t forget you can make a delicious gravy from the juices by adding stock, onion, carrots and baby potatoes to the roasting tray while the meat cooks over a rack. Of course it’s not all about the meat, the vegetables are key, too - either home grown, or from your local farm shop. Personally we love our roast potatoes cooked in goose fat which gives a great taste and that all important crispness.

BUTCHERS • DELI • TAKEAWAY • HIGH WELFARE, FREE RANGE MEATS FROM LOCAL FARMS • • NORFOLK FOOD AND DRINK CHAMPIONS •

www.archersbutchers.com 177-179 Plumstead Road, Norwich

Tel 01603 434253

Coxfords Butchers

PROUDLY NORFOLK All o

f our prod is sourced lo uce cally

LOCALLY SOURCED, HIGH WELFARE ROASTING JOINTS, FREE RANGE POULTRY,

AWARD WINNING SAUSAGES, COLD MEATS, PIES, PASTIES & MORE

11 MARKET PLACE, AYLSHAM 01263 732280


E IT R U O V

Fin Pi Tas e We e Cit y e te our k Pop & -u W fine Wood alsin p! On ale- ford gham e’s r ic No 5th rwic h pie -10 h M s! a th Ma rket rch

FA

What’s tastier than slow roast Norfolk lamb?

Pork, lamb, beef or a delicious roast chicken? Come and chat to our butchers for brilliant Sunday roast ideas

Guild Street Walsingham NR22 6BU 01328 821877 Open 7 days

Farms Shop www.walsingham.co

A S PEC IALI ST I N F OOD PHOTOG R A PHY

Norfolk Lavender Lynn Road Heacham PE31 7JE 01485 570002 Open 7 days

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e ad m

GINGER C I DM INEGR

Din N

CO SOON

fresh meat & poultry

e Th LY R ich N E rw O o

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GE FACEBOOKDEPA TAILS FOR MORE

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WH ITE H OUSE FA R M SH O P, WROXH A M R D, N ORWIC H & BA KE RS & L A R N E RS, M A R KET PL AC E , H O LT

Our apples are grown, picked, pressed and fermented in Norwich, all from our orchard in Rackheath

We only stock the best beef, lamb, pork and poultry available PADDOCKS BUTCHERY & DELI STORES Church Farm, Norwich Road, Hethersett NR9 3AS 01603 812437 Paddock Farm Shop, Norwich Road, Mulbarton NR14 8JT 01508 578259

DOLLY PINK

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ELDER 24

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CATERING DIVISION Wood view Farm, Church Lane, Wicklewood, NR18 9QH, 01953 602470

www.thepaddocksbutchery.co.uk

PAUL-CORKY@HOTMAIL.COM

07926 144282/01603 891638

W W W. N OR FO LKR A I D E RC I D E R .CO.U K


FROM BEAN TO CUP Green Farm Coffee -

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Daniel Matthams of GREE N FARM COFFEE, based just outside Norwich, explains how COFFEE is produced

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There are also many variations and hybrids of these two processes throughout the coffee world, often depending upon the country where the processing takes place. So next time you buy your coffee have a look to see which processing method has been used and see if you can identify any differences in the flavours between the different processing methods. Here at Green Farm Coffee we mainly use washed coffees and we currently have a great dry processed Ethiopian coffee. So, if you’re looking for something a bit different with lots of acidity, this could be perfect for you.

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WE ARE ALL FAMILIAR with coffee, and most of us have a preference as to how we enjoy it. But how much do we really know about this incredibly complex product? Coffee is the seed of a cherry like fruit that grows on the Coffea plant. The fruit normally turns a dark red colour when it is ripe and ready for picking. Like most fruits, picking the coffee when it is ripe enables the best flavours to be extracted from the beans. However, coffee being coffee, it is never quite that simple. Unfortunately, coffee fruits do not all ripen simultaneously, meaning plants will need to be picked multiple times for the best results. The amount of coffee a plant produces varies greatly, with most providing approximately 500 grammes of coffee fruit each year. Whilst most countries still pick coffee traditionally by hand, Brazil, Northern Australia and others do use machines to mechanically pick the coffee cherries. Generally, coffee handpicked by well-trained pickers produces the highest quality coffee. After picking the coffee, there are a few different options as to how to process it ready for shipment. Each process will have a large impact upon the flavour and body of the coffee, for example, the exact same coffee processed in different ways will taste quite different. The oldest processing technique is the dry process, where coffee is left to dry in the fruit for around 7-10 days and turned regularly to prevent mould developing. Once dried the coffee is milled to remove the fruit and various other layers, finally revealing the green coffee beans. Dry processed coffees are generally quite acidic and fruity due to spending longer inside the fruit and absorbing more sugar. However, dry processing can produce more inconsistencies within the coffee compared to the washed process. The washed process is a newer procedure which has borrowed some stages from the wine making process. Firstly, coffee cherries are put into large tanks of water and washed. Their outer skin and most of their fruit flesh are then removed by a de-pulping machine and soaked and fermented in water for between 12 and 72 hours. Next, they are washed and left to dry in the sun or in a drying machine. Once dried the beans are milled and stored, ready to be exported. The washed process generally produces a higher grade of coffee, resulting in this method often being used for superior quality coffees. These usually command a greater price than dry processed coffees, though not always. However, the washed process requires much more infrastructure and uses large quantities of water.

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IN HIS REGULAR COLUMN, OUR WINE EXPERT STEVE HEARNDEN TELLS US WHAT TO DRINK THIS COMING MOTHERING SUNDAY

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URRENTLY the fashionable drink is gin, but many mums do like a good red wine. To my knowledge there is not any set food to eat for this special Sunday lunch – but a roast is standard perhaps? I have, in the past, written about lamb and beef so for change you cannot beat a good Norfolk-reared pig to produce a great roast meal. Whatever the cut, a wellcooked piece of pork cannot be beaten. I use the words 'wellcooked' reservedly as it is so easy to overcook pork. I would recommend a wine based on the Syrah grape. The Syrah does produce wine with a lot of fruit and - from the South West of France - a wine with a little spice too. La Part des Anges 2012 from Domaine la Grangette has a little Grenache in it, which will give a little more body to the wine. The aromas and taste of spiced black cherries are the main theme and this fruit will accompany pork. It is perfection in a bottle, and with a lingering finish it seems to lasts forever. This has been one of my favourite wines for

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years because I love the Syrah grape. On my visit last September, I tried the Domaines La Part du Diable 2008 which is 100 per cent Syrah – I would, of course, recommend this but I only have six bottles which I imported for myself, and so do not have sufficient for demand (but I might release a couple if pushed!). La Part des Anges retails at £15.30 per bottle, La Part du Diable at £16.50. I do have other Syrah based wines should you wish to try them – just give me a call. Now, as a change, I have decided not to suggest another food but stay with pork for my second wine. Pork is a very versatile meat and so I would offer my mum a white wine as an alternative, or perhaps as well as! The Sauvignon Blanc is a popular grape variety and is grown around the world. Some prefer the New World style but, as you may guess, I will stick with the Loire Valley in France. As I import wines from small domains in unusual areas of France I would gladly drink the Quincy 2012. This wine has classic Sauvignon Blanc aromas and taste - full of gooseberry, grapefruit and green apple. The acidity is balanced and it does linger in the mouth a while. The 'coolish' climate and the chalk soil make this a perfect dry wine. Perhaps not as full as its stylish neighbour, Sancerre, but a perfect light wine for luncheon. A snip at £12.65. • TASTEBUDS WINES, Norwich Road, Strumpshaw, opens by appointment. Steve is also holding a Wine and Dine Experience on April 7 at Barnham Broom, near Norwich Working with head chef James Conway, he is teaming French wine with food.


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A HOP-TASTIC & GIN-DULGENT SHOP! PICTURES BY ROB YEATMAN

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OUTHWOLD-BASED Adnams, one of the region’s best-known companies, has arrived with a bang in Norwich city centre with a shiny new shop which opened in the run-up to Christmas. With Jodie Sibley as manager, the shop is seen very much as a complement to the popular Unthank Road store. But, s, it focuses almost exclusively on explain Jodie Adnams products, showcasing their spirits, wines and beer. And it’s only when you’ve seen them out on display that you realise just how many there are these days! There are also plenty of added extras such as branded t-shirts, mugs, bottle openers and the like, and a smattering of other goodies such as Aspalls Cyder and Booja Booja chocolates on sale. Do look out for the Ghost Ship crisps made with Fairfields Farm and their beer chutney which is, believe me, delicious! The shop is very hands on, with a tasting bar right in the middle, and you are encouraged to pull up a stool and have a sip or two of whatever you fancy. ‘We always try and put something new out,’ says Jodie, adding: ‘We are all about getting people to taste, touch and smell what goes into their favourite Adnams products.’ You can try and identify the seven most popular botanicals that go into gin by sniffing various little jars, you can taste a selection of hops in the Hop Gallery and also sample three different malts, including a chocolate one, to see what suits your taste buds. There’s a lovely, buzzy feel to the store, with the staff only too happy to chat about the products, helping you perhaps select a wine to go with your meal that evening or choose a present for your mum as Mothering Sunday looms. I was very taken with the recommendations on what to add to your favourite glass of Prosecco. How about a splash of cassis or a drop of sloe gin? Sounds good, doesn’t it?!

ADNAMS has a new store in the heart of Norwich where you can not only buy plenty of goodies but also make your own gin. Sarah Hardy investigates Make Your Own Gin

A big part of the shop is the Make Your Own Gin experience which is a lot of fun. The re is a dedicated ‘laboratory’ where you can create your own, using one of the mini Portuguese copper stills. Lasting two and a half hours, the experience includes plenty of information about gin, its history, how it is produced and how you can create particula r flavours. You get to select the botanicals that you add and have to think of a name for you r tipple. Sarah’s Revenge came immediately to my mind! And you do, of course, get to take your 70c l bottle home with you. The experience is for up to four peo ple and costs £95 a head. It is available Fridays , Saturdays and Sundays.

Adnams App

A new Adnams App allows custom ers to click and collect the top 10 bestsellers acro ss beer, wine and spirits range from the store. Other features include exclusive offers, Rate My Taste, boo king for in-store events, a find your nearest pub that serves Adnams feature and a ‘chill timer’ feature.

Clubs

Adnams has wine, gin and beer club s, all of which offer special deals, events and othe r benefits. Check them out online!

Event March 28, 6-8pm - Adnams, Wes tlegate, Norwich A Taste of Adnams. £15. Hosted by Adnams and the Benjamin Foundation, you can tast e wine, beer and spirits, enjoy fizz and canapés and raise money.

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THE HEART OF

GLASS ANDY NEWMAN DISCOVERS THAT THE GLASS IN WHICH YOU SERVE YOUR WINE IS EVERY BIT AS IMPORTANT AS THE WINE ITSELF

3 WINES Andy has enjoyed this month:: Valpolicella Ripasso, Classico Superiore, 2014 (Aldi, £7.99) A bright spot in an otherwise disappointing tasting of Aldi’s flagship ‘Exquisite Collection’, its cherry and plum fruit flavours are complemented by slightly savoury notes and hints of bitter almonds. There are better Ripassos out there, but you can’t argue with this one at this price. Pouilly Fumé, Hubert Brochard, 2016 (Waitrose, £14.49) Textbook Sauvignon Blanc, with a nose combining grass, white peaches and minerality. The palate confirms all of these, with a lively acidity and complementary tastes of nettles and even mint. An illustration of why the Loire is still king when it comes to Sauvignon Blanc. The McNicol Shiraz, Mitchell, Clare Valley, Australia, 2006 (£18.99, Adnams) A big Aussie Shiraz with 14.5% alcohol, this offers power and concentration. However, the maturity also adds depth and complexity, with notes of black cherries, blackberries and dark plums, as well as dark chocolate and cedar. Definitely one for food.

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I AM SITTING in the cavernous Adelphi Suite in London’s Waldorf Hotel, along with several hundred others, staring at four huge, empty wine glasses and three plastic cups filled with wine, laid out in front of me. I am here for a wine tasting, which is nothing out of the ordinary, but the unusual factor here is that we are not really here to evaluate the wine, but instead the glassware which glistens with its high polish on the table before us. Leading the tasting is the dapper and affable Maximilian Riedel, and if you know anything about wine glasses, his surname will make it clear why we are here. Guests at my house often comment on the wellstocked and obsessively clean glass-fronted cupboard in my dining room. It is here that more than 100 separate wine glasses live, carefully hand washed without detergent, and delicately polished with a special lint-free cloth. This is my collection of Riedel wine glasses, and the most common question posed by visitors is: ‘why do you need so many?’ The answer lies not in aesthetics (although there is no denying that they are among the most beautiful things I own), but in science. For Riedel is a watchword for those who believe that to get the best out of any wine, it has to be served in exactly the right glass. Which is why so many wine enthusiasts have turned up to learn from the undisputed master of the craft: Maximilian Riedel. The four glasses in front of us are made from identical lead crystal, part of the company’s ‘Veritas’ range which boasts, according to Herr Riedel, ‘the best glasses a machine can make’. However, the glasses are very different in shape: a round bowl which tapers slightly in at the top, which is designed for oaked Chardonnay; a taller, narrower glass which has been made for Riesling; a round bowl which narrows to a more restricted opening, not unlike a brandy glass, which is for Old World Pinot Noir; and a large, tall, tapered glass which is designed for Cabernet Sauvignon. This is what Riedel is renowned for: designing glasses for specific grape varieties, allowing each individual wine to express itself fully on your palate. There are those who think this is just clever marketing. As ever with wine, the only way to know for sure is to taste for yourself. First up is a South African Chardonnay from Hamilton Russell Vineyards. Presented unceremoniously to us in a plastic cup, we are invited to pour equal quantities of it into the Chardonnay, Riesling and Pinot Noir glasses – and then to stick our noses in and judge for ourselves. In the Chardonnay glass, the wine’s pear and lime aromas are immediately obvious, along with a pleasing minerality and a secondary butterscotch note. It is complex and pleasing. This is a wine with an open nose, so it’s difficult to see how it can fail to speak from a different glass. On, then, to the Riesling glass, and it is an immediate revelation. The wine is dumb, delivering little but alcohol

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on the nose. Where has the fruit gone? Where are those lovely butterscotch/caramel aromas? From the Pinot Noir glass we smell the secondary notes, but the fruit is not there. It is staggering how the same wine (poured, don’t forget, from the same receptacle), can smell so different. The variation continues when we actually take a taste. The Chardonnay glass delivers big, mouth-filling fruit, with the secondary flavours building up, and lasting long after we have swallowed the wine. From the Riesling glass the wine tastes more acidic – the whole texture and taste of the wine has changed, drying out the palate and leaving little trace of anything after swallowing. From the Pinot Noir glass the wine tastes bitter, delivering only minerality. These are not subtle differences. If I had not poured it myself, I would not have believed it was the same wine in each glass. Riedel explains how the shape of the glass is designed to deliver the aromas and flavours of each individual grape to the part of the mouth which will deliver the best sensation. And then, another, astonishing test. We are instructed to pour the wine out of the Chardonnay glass, but leave it in the Riesling glass. After five minutes Riedel tells us to stick our noses in; staggeringly, although it is empty, the Chardonnay glass delivers so much more than the full Riesling glass. The process is repeated with a Pinot Noir from Oregon and a Chilean Cabernet Sauvignon. In both cases, the ‘correct’ glass delivers the full range of smell and taste sensations, while the ‘wrong’ glasses diminish the wine, either by reducing the fruit notes, or emphasising the alcohol or tannins. I have taken with me to the tasting four Riedel cynics, who believe that all of this is in my imagination - that I have become an easy target for the Riedel marketing. As we leave the Waldorf, they are all clutching boxes of Riedel glassware, new converts to the notion that the glass you serve your wine in can have a huge impact on how much you enjoy it.


MANGE ToUT NEVER MIND THE SIGHTS, ANDY NEWMAN IS ALL ABOUT THE RESTAURANTS AS HE ENJOYS A GASTRONOMIC TOUR OF PARIS

If you have a bottomless wallet, it is easy to eat well in any city, but to get the best foodie experience in Paris, like anywhere else, requires a bit of research and a list of bonnes adresses. The restaurant trade is as unstable as any and establishments open and close at an alarming rate, so it is always worth checking out what places foodie blogs are talking about at any given time. Assuming the long-established are surviving because of consistent high standards can reap wonder and disappointment in equal measure, as I found out on a recent trip to the city.

PARIS, THE CITY OF LOVE, capital of the most gastronomic nation on earth, and hence - in theory - the epicentre of foodie travel. And yet too many travellers in search of edible nirvana return from the city disappointed, having eaten in overpriced, mediocre restaurants, and having failed to find evidence of Paris’s epicurean reputation. Of course, it is possible to eat badly in most cities, but when it happens in Paris you feel more cheated because of the expectation, raised by the fact that the city boasts more Michelin stars than any apart from Tokyo, and is home to gastronomic temples such as Guy Savoy, Pierre Gagnaire and L’Arpège.

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establishment to take its place. We enjoyed a wonderful dinner at La Truffière in the Latin Quarter. Opened in 1984 and housed in a 17th century building, it is creating a strong reputation since chef Christophe Poard took over two years ago. With a cosy ground floor restaurant and a vaulted cellar dining room, the attraction here is the choice of seven course tasting menus, both great value (68€ and 99€), as well as a rather more expensive tasting menu at 180€ which features the truffle from which the restaurant takes its name. This is exciting, daring, modern cooking, every bit as satisfying as the eye-wateringly expensive meals served up in the three-star temples, and the reasonable prices mean you can afford to push the boat out when it comes to the wine choice – and with more than 3200 wines on the list, you won’t want for choice. Of course, you can’t spend all day eating, and the dedicated foodie will want to spend the hours between meals seeking out the best that Paris has to offer in food and drink retail therapy. When it comes to shopping for food in Paris, there is a huge variety of places to go, from the top-end foodie temples of Hédiard and Fauchon, where luxury items such as Périgord black truffles and foie gras are available to those with very deep pockets, through to neighbourhood markets where you will find locals buying rather more prosaic goods for everyday eating. Until the 1970s, the epicentre of Paris food was at Les Halles, but this, rather like London’s Covent Garden market, was swept away as part of the extensive redevelopment which saw the love-it-or-hate-it Pompidou Centre built north of the Seine. It’s not difficult to find authentic markets, though: the city is full of them, generally smaller covered markets which are designed for locals rather than tourists.

For more than 80 years, Allard, in the heart of SaintGermain-des Près on the left bank, has been one of the most sought after gastronomic addresses in the capital. Over that period it has stuck resolutely to its roots as an authentic gourmet bistro, with good produce and simplicity at its heart. The menu changes with the seasons, but always includes classics such as frogs legs, snails, Challand duck with olives, Sole Meunière and roast Bresse chicken, with seven ‘classics’ such as rabbit in mustard or veal kidneys rotating as dishes of the day. This is the kind of establishment you picture when you think of a long Parisian lunch: cosy tables in a series of small rooms, waiters in long aprons, proper French cooking and a wine list which is not just aimed at plutocrats. This is a restaurant whose longevity is built on consistent delivery. Not so another Paris institution I visited on the same trip, unfortunately. La Coupole in Montparnasse markets itself as the quintessential Paris brasserie. Undeniably atmospheric with its art deco interior dating from 1927, for many years this was a go-to booking every time I went to Paris. Sadly, it seems to be resting on its laurels, and is attracting mainly tourists now, trading on its past reputation rather than its food and service, both of which were mediocre. But for every Paris institution which has let standards slip, you will find a younger, more eager

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At L’Avant Comptoir there are dozens of wines sold by the glass, and accompanying them are small plates featuring the best of what is on offer in the market on the day. If you are more interested in tasting what’s on offer than buying to bring home, head for Paris’s oldest market, the Marché des Enfants Rouges on the edge of the Marais district. It’s a buzzing and maze-like mix of food stalls, noisily packed with people eating at communal tables, with a massive choice of cuisines on offer from Cajun to Japanese, as well as classic French fare. Finally, on the market front, if you are in the city at the weekend, head for rue Mouffetard in the 5th arrondissement, a road which is both a market street, lined with food shops, and a street market, with stalls

One of the best of them is the Marché Saint-Germain in the heart of the chic Left Bank. The grand, square stone building (with convenient car park underneath) reopened in 2016, a reproduction of the original 1813 building. Packed with fruit and vegetable stalls, a truly amazing artisan cheesemonger, fish stalls, butchers and everything else you would hope to find in a traditional French covered market, the exterior of the building is dotted with restaurants and bars where you can try much of the produce on offer for yourself. One of the best is L’Avant Comptoir du Marché, a sister establishment to the trendy (and queue-laden) Le Comptoir du Relais Saint-Germain round the corner, renowned as one of the best bistros in the city.

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selling fresh food. Saturday and Sunday mornings are when Parisians come to shop, and a great time to sit with a coffee and drink in the atmosphere of authentic Paris food culture. Of course, markets are about buying to eat while in the city, and that will be especially relevant if you have chosen to rent an apartment rather than stay in a hotel. But you will also want to bring some edible souvenirs home with you, and the best place in the city to head for these is the food hall at Bon Marché, the huge department store (which claims to have been the first department store in the world) which takes up two whole blocks where rue du Bac and rue de Sèvres meet in the 7th arrondissement. Grandly titled ‘La Grande Epicerie de Paris Rive Gauche’, the Bon Marché food hall is in fact two floors packed with a veritable cornucopia of edible treats, as well as an extensive wine cellar. With the right list of bonnes adresses, a trip to Paris can still be that gastronomic experience we all dream about. It is a city with a renewed confidence, buoyed by the Macron phenomenon, and by the prospect of hosting the Olympics in 2024; for the dedicated foodie, there has never been a better time to visit.

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ANDY’S ‘BONNES ADRESSES’

ALLARD, 43 rue St-André des Arts, 6th arrondissement LA TRUFFIÈRE, 4 rue Blainville, 5th arrondissement • L’AVANT COMPTOIR DU MARCHÉ, 14 rue Lobineau, 6th arrondissement • LE COMPTO IR DE RELAIS SAINT-GERMAIN, 9 Carrefour de l'Odéon, 6th arrondissement • FAUCHO N, 30 Place de la Madeleine, 8th arrondissement; open Mon-Sat • HÉDIARD, 21 Place de la Madeleine, 8th arrondissement; currently closed for refurbishment • MARCHÉ SAINT-GERMAIN, rue Lobineau, 6th arrondissement; open Tues-Sat and Sun morning • MARCHÉ DES ENFANTS ROUGES, 39 rue de Bretagne, 3rd arrondissement; open Tues-Sun • LA GRAND E EPICERIE DE PARIS RIVE GAUCHE AT BON MARCHÉ, 24 rue de Sèvres, 7th arrondissement; open every day •


Norfolkcoast holidaycottages

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to the coast‌

www.norfolkcoastholidaycottages.co.uk

Telephone: 01485 532896

A new, boutique coastal holiday agency offering very special Norfolk retreats for discerning visitors to enjoy.

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HUNSETT MILL

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HOLIDAY HERE!

OLD LIGHTHOUSE, HUNSTANTON

IT’S NEVER BEEN SO POPULAR TO HOLIDAY AT HOME, AND SELF CATERING IS A GREAT OPTION. HERE WE FIND OUT A BIT MORE ABOUT SOME OF THE LEADING COTTAGE COMPANIES OFFERING PROPERTIES IN OUR REGION

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www.barefootretreats.co.uk

¨We cover SNETTISHAM through to

BAREFOOT RETREATS

HOLT, with some signature propert ies a little further inland"

Who are you and what do you do? We are Barefoot Retreats, a luxury holiday letting company offering a comprehensive service, including property management and concierge, to our homeowner and guest clients. Owned and conceived by Emma Mason, formerly the longstanding director of The Hoste in Burnham Market, Barefoot Retreats represents Emma’s vision and nuance for the unique and the interesting. Tell us a little more about the company We were established in 2014, Barefoot Retreats is locally run and works within a growing luxury market that was previously underutilised. By transferring our hospitality experience, gained in luxury hotels and restaurants, we have been able to grow the company significantly over the last three years. What areas of Norfolk do you cover? We cover Snettisham through to Holt, with some signature properties a little further inland. Describe your signature property We love Salt Marsh House in Burnham Market. Sleeping 12 in five ensuite bedrooms, and a fabulous master suite, it offers a gym, a hot tub, a cinema room and wonderful outdoor areas for summer living. And you can take the dog! Why should people holiday in Norfolk? That’s easy - we have a great landscape, with an abundance of wildlife experiences available. It is family friendly, with plenty of good dining options and outstanding beaches. And the weather is great, too! What are your future plans? We plan to continue to grow at a sensible, sustainable rate, and take on more luxury properties. We also want to arrange more great tie-ins with local providers so that we can offer interesting concierge options.

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www.norfolkcoastholidaycottages.co.uk

Who are you and what do you do? We are Norfolk Coast Holiday Cottages and, as the name suggests, we operate a select number of high quality self-catering properties on the North Norfolk coast. Tell us a little about the company As a family-owned, local company, we think it’s important to create a home from home self-catering experience. Our sister properties, The Lodge at Old Hunstanton and Briarfields Hotel, Titchwell are nearby and offer fantastic places to eat out, relax and unwind.

OLD LIGHTHOUSE, HUNSTANTON

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NORFOLK COAST HOLIDAY COTTAGES

What areas of Norfolk do you cover? All of our properties are located in Hunstanton and Old Hunstanton, making them an ideal base to explore the North Norfolk coastline. Describe your signature property The Old Lighthouse in Hunstanton, which was refurbished at the end of 2016, is an incredible, iconic building to stay in. You can still climb the tower to the keeper’s lookout, and enjoy a luxurious stay with super comfortable rooms, Shaker-style kitchen and amazing views from the first floor dining and lounge areas. VISIT

TOOLMAKERS, SYDERSTONE

www.kettcountr ycottages.co.uk

KETTS COUNTRY COTTAGES

Who are you and what do you do? We are Kett Country Cottages, an established holiday letting agency which operates exclusively in Norfolk. We combine the best traditional values with the convenience of modern user friendly technology. Tell us a little about the company Kett was formed some 15 years ago and has grown to offer a comprehensive selection of properties across North Norfolk. We remain an independent, locally owned and managed business. Local knowledge is what sets us apart. What areas of Norfolk do you cover? Kett covers the coast from Heacham through to Winterton on Sea with a high density in popular Wells, as well as inland across beautiful rural Norfolk through Burnham Market, Walsingham, Holt, and Aylsham. Describe your signature property How about Toolmakers? A recently renovated traditional cottage in Syderstone, near Fakenham, which ticks all the boxes - it has plenty of bathrooms, a wood burner, a large enclosed garden, parking, Wi-Fi and is immaculate throughout.

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www.norfolkcottages.co.uk

NORFOLK COUNTRY COTTAGES

Who are you and what do you do? We are Norfolk Country Cottages, one of Norfolk’s leading independent holiday cottage agencies - family owned and run, fully-graded, truly local and offering 26 years of expertise, commitment and a huge passion for Norfolk. Tell us a little about the company Established by Richard and Lesley Ellis in 1992, we have grown to offer visitors a hand-selected portfolio of more than 500 beautiful holiday retreats throughout the county. Based in The Old Crab Shop in Holt, we strive for excellent customer service for both our guests and owners. What areas of Norfolk do you cover? Our holiday retreats are located in idyllic positions throughout the county - from the North Norfolk coast and mesmerising Norfolk Broads, to pretty rural villages and the historic city of Norwich. Visitors can stay in quaint fisherman’s cottages, grand barn conversions, Tudor masterpieces and modern waterside abodes. Describe your signature property I’m not sure we have one! We have many repeat visitors, and each time they choose a different type of property. However, if pushed, it would have to be the open-plan, red brick and flint barn conversions our county is so renowned for.


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NORFOLK HIDEAWAYS

www.norfolkhideaways.co.uk

Who are you and what do you do? Norfolk Hideaways market more than 375 self-catering coastal and country holiday cottages. Headed up by CEO, Helen Millin, the 16-strong team work out of three offices; their head office at the Big Blue Sky building in Wells, a satellite office in Staithe Street and a new premises in Burnham Market. There are plans to open up in the centre of Holt soon, too. Tell us a little about the company The company was formed in 2009 with just six properties on its books. In the space of nine years it has grown significantly and now provides a comprehensive marketed or managed service to its valued homeowners, whilst offering its guests a wide range of holiday cottages for short breaks or longer stays throughout the year. We love what we do and strive to make every stay at one of our cottages both special and memorable. What areas of Norfolk do you cover? Our properties stretch from Snettisham in the west to Walcott in the east and inland too. We also have properties in Thetford Forest and The Broads. Describe your signature property Our signature property must be Hunsett Mill, Stalham, a stunning conversion of a windmill, which was featured in Channel 4’s Grand Designs a few years back, but we have a huge selection of luxury coastal retreats, romantic love nests, familyfriendly properties, big celebration houses and gorgeous rural retreats, hidden deep in the beautiful Norfolk countryside. VISIT

ARMERIA B&B

www.armeria-wells.co.uk

Who are you and what do you do? My name is Kelly Dougal and I have run a B&B/self catering property in Wells for four years. Tell us a little about the company We offer four individual styled bedrooms that are available as superking or twins with sofabeds for children but I am afraid we do not accept pets. All are en suite, on the edge of town, boast stunning views, and there’s ample parking. Enjoy one of my heart warming breakfasts: fresh fruit, cereals, pastries and a choice of traditional full English, supplied by the award-winning butcher Arthur Howell, or salmon, smoked haddock or kippers. What areas of Norfolk do you cover? We are based in Wells, a gorgeous town in North Norfolk, which is also a great base for exploring the area. Describe your property and what makes it special We are friendly hosts and offer very relaxing accommodation and lots of little extra touches. Do check out our winter offers, too!


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ASK ROGER *

EACH MONTH ROGER HICKMAN, CHEF-PROPRIETOR OF NORWICH’S ROGER HICKMAN’S RESTAURANT, SHARES HIS TOP KITCHEN TIPS AND ANSWERS YOUR QUESTIONS ON ALL THINGS CULINARY

ROGER HICKMAN

www.rogerhickmansrestaurant.com

There are essentially four different types: Magimix-type food processors: the most powerful for really blitzing things. Go for one with an induction motor which is quieter and more powerful. Kenwood-type food mixers: forget trendy KitchenAids, if you want the best

VISIT

I only have room in my kitchen for one food mixer. Which type should I buy? The type of food mixer to choose will depend mainly on what you plan to do with it, and your budget. Unless you are planning to turn out industrial quantities of food, there is no need to spend a fortune. Many people are seduced by pastelshaded fashion accessories available in any colour to match your kitchen decor. As you might expect from a professional chef, function is far more important than looks in my book.

mixer, Kenwood is still the daddy. These are truly versatile, with an attachment available for just about everything. Stick blenders: good for making dressings, chopping herbs, making soups and for mixing small quantities. My one at home is a trusty Braun. Liquidisers/blenders: ideal for really blitzing food, making onion purée and even mayonnaise. ●

If I only had one food mixer in my kitchen, it would be a classic Kenwood Chef. What is the best steak to choose? I always go for rib-eye, because its fat content gives it the most flavour. Cuts like fillet steak are very tender, but they are too lean to have the depth of flavour you want in a steak. Two tips for cooking steak: first, season it just before you cook it. If you season it in advance, the salt will draw out all the moisture and it will be tough; if you season it after cooking, you will end up putting much more on. Second, resting your steak after cooking is vital, to allow the juices to draw back into the meat and turn it tender. You should rest it for at least half the time you have been cooking it – for rare steak, I rest it for the same time I have cooked it. This month’s top ingredient We are all looking forward to spring, but the downside of winter’s end is the finish of the game season – so now is the time for one last blast for venison. There are more than a dozen types of deer raised in Norfolk, and each has its advantages. For general use, roe deer is the best choice.

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ROGER HICKMAN'S

LOIN OF VENISON, BRAISED RED CABBAGE, CELERIAC PURÉE & ROASTED CELERIAC INGREDIENTS 800g of rolled loin of roe deer; 1 celeriac; butter; 50ml of milk; a splash of cream; a handful of coarsely chopped kale; 1/4 of a red cabbage; 1/2 of a Granny Smith apple; 2 dessertspoons of Demerara sugar; 1 star anise; 1 shallot; 150ml of red wine; 200ml of chicken stock METHOD Pan sear the venison in oil until covered, then roast in the oven at 180°C until the inside is at 42°C. Take out, rest, then cut into eight pieces, reserving the trimmings. Peel the celeriac and cut into 1cm dice, keeping the trimmings. Pan roast them in foaming butter, keeping them moving for 8-10 minutes, until golden brown. Meanwhile in a pan, cover the trimmings with milk and a splash of cream, season, and simmer for 20 minutes. Then blitz and pass through a sieve for the purée. Shred the cabbage and grate the apple. Cover with red wine and add the sugar and star anise. Bring to the boil, cover, and bake in the oven at 180°C for 20 minutes. Remove the star anise. Crisp the kale in oil in a pan until crisp, then dry on a clean J cloth, and season. Finally, fry the venison trimmings in a pan with the chopped shallot (and some garlic and thyme if you like). Deglaze with 150ml red wine until syrupy, then add the chicken stock and reduce until the whole is 200ml. Pass this through a sieve. Serve the rested venison on a plate with the celeriac, purée and a quenelle of red cabbage, scatter over some kale, and drizzle with the jus

*If you have a question for Roger, send it to sarah@feastnorfolkmagazine.co.uk


PUSHING THURNE MILL

THE

BOAT S

ENJOY A DAY TRIP ON THE NORFOLK BROADS ON A TRADITIONAL WOODEN CRUISER, THE JEWEL IN THE CROWN OF HERBERT WOODS’ FLEET. SARAH HARDY CLIMBS ON BOARD

ST BENET'S ABBEY

OUT

AILING UPSTREAM from Potter Heigham to South Walsham Broad, as the sun gently glistens off the water, is a glorious way to pass a few hours. The Broads, referred to as Britain’s Magical Waterland, are just that. And, at this time of year, they are so atmospheric, as everything is just starting to burst back into life after its winter slumbers. There are also those wonderfully evocative big skies to marvel at, too. Now there’s the chance to step back in time and take to the water in a fully restored 1927 wooden cruiser, the Spark of Light. It was built by Herbert Woods himself and is, indeed, a thing of beauty. There are two cabins,


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HERBERT WOODS can organise a picnic for you, working with BridgeStones of Potter to provide bespoke hampers packed with sandwiches, sausage rolls, scones, crisps, cakes and more. We particularly liked the Sandringham Apple Juice. The boat is available from 10am-4pm and costs £300.

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www.herbertwoods.co.uk

great venue for a corporate event, too. The boat can be decorated and you can order special cakes. It operates within a three-hour radius of Potter Heigham, HQ for Herbert Woods, so you have lovely spots like St Benet’s Abbey to visit or you can call in at Ludham for a beer! We cruised to South Walsham, passing Thurne Mill and lots of gorgeous waterside properties which we all, unashamedly, had a good nosey at! At South Walsham, there’s the chance to go ashore and explore a little, although we tucked into our picnic with gusto! Travelling by boat allows you reflect on life a little, to relax, ignore your mobile phone (apart from taking lots of lovely photos, of course) and soak up this most beautiful part of our county.

Picnics

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VISIT

plus the galley, and a viewing area, and there is plenty of deck room so you can soak up all those wonderful views and look out for wildlife. Spark of Light is well equipped with those vital mod cons, as well as plenty of original features. There are two loos, a fridge, a cooker, a sink, and masses of cutlery and crockery so you can create your own meals. There’s a pretty vintage tea set which adds to the nostalgic feel. I loved the books and maps provided, so you could find out more about the boat and track your journey, and I wish I’d remembered my binoculars so I could have scanned the countryside. The boat is available to hire for the day, complete with a skipper, so you can enjoy every minute of your trip without having to worry about a thing. And our skipper, Peter, was a mine of information about the boat and The Broads and answered all our questions with real enthusiasm! Spark of Life can take six people (no dogs) so it is perfect for a special celebration, such as a birthday party, or how about a team building session with a difference? It is certainly a

A B O U T


sAlAD dAYs ARE

COMiNG This month our kitchen gardener ELLEN MARY hastens spring with the help of quick growing SALAD LEAVES

LETTUCE

Spring is approaching, with daffodils blooming and more colour popping up in the garden. These gorgeous signs of spring definitely give us a boost after the winter months, as we start swapping winter warmers for lighter, salad dishes. As I am a big fan of easy growing, to fit with our busy lives, cut and come again salad is just so quick to grow, from sowing to harvest, and can be grown in the smallest of spaces, plus it’s a lovely taste of spring.

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Spring Vegetables

ELLEN MARY is a presenter, journalist and garden designer. You can contact her on social media or at www.ellenmarygardening.co.uk

G R O W

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MIXED LEAVES

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ELLEN MARY

There are many different types of salad leaves that can be grown all year, from chicory to cress and from lettuce to rocket. So a packet of mixed lettuce leaves is ideal to give you lots of different flavours in as little as 30 days. First cultivated in ancient Egypt BC, lettuce seeds were used to produce oil, until later (through breeding), the edible leaves became used for food. From the 18th century, the lettuce we now eat was used extensively in recipes. Whilst we know those leaves are full of moisture they also come with vitamin A and K, along with calcium and anti-inflammatory properties.

How to grow

GROW Sow seeds into pots or containers of multipurpose compost, or directly in raised beds if you have more space. After you sprinkle the seeds they will just need a very thin covering of compost. Make sure the soil is moist but not overwatered or you’ll wash the seeds away and increase the risk of diseases. They can be sown quite close together (about a finger width apart) as you are only harvesting the leaves so they don't need too much space. CARE Keep the seeds weed free and watered regularly to ensure more leaves are produced as you harvest. Damping off is a disease that happens if there are too many seeds sown too closely together without good ventilation. Mildew can develop if they aren’t kept in the right position, so keep your eye on the growing leaves and ensure good air circulation for a successful crop. HARVEST When you are ready to harvest the leaves, just cut off, about 2cm from the base, a few leaves from each plant. You should be able to harvest up to four cuts before it is time to replenish and re-sow, which is great value out of a packet of seeds, if you ask me!

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[Serves 4

RECIPE WITH ELLEN MARY

SPRING RAINBOW SALAD SHARING BOWL

[

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From crunching on freshly cut leaves straightaway to tossing them into a tasty bowl or adding your leaves as a side garnish, there are so many ways to use mixed leaves but there’s nothing like sharing , so why not create a colourf ul rainbow bowl of salad with your own dip and serve it up for friends with a main dish of your choice? We are aiming for colour so you can swap out any of these suggestions for other salads to compliment the bowl or make it as big as you like with even more colourf ul additions INGREDIENTS For the Salad A big handful of freshly picked lettuce leaves; 2 stalks of celery; 1 red pepper; 1 yellow pepper; 1 green pepper; 1/2 a cucumber; a pack of radishes; a handful of plum tomatoes; 2 carrots; 1/4 of a red cabbage; 1/2 a red onion For the Avocado Dip 2 avocados; 1 lime; 1/2 a white onion; a handful of coriander; edible flowers as a garnish You’ll need a large serving bowl with enough room to place each of the ingredients in groups to create a rainbow effect METHOD 1. Rinse the lettuce leaves and place them in the bowl together 2. Chop all of the ingredients into small pieces and keep them in individual piles 3. Place each group in the bowl, keeping similar colours apart and leaving a space in the middle to place your avocado dip 4. Chop the onion and coriander 5. Remove the skin and seed from the avocados and place in a bowl 6. Squeeze the lime juice into the bowl and mash in the chopped onion and coriander 7. Place the dip in the middle of the salad bowl and you are good to go 8. Add a few edible flowers as a garnish. Now that’s a rainbow in a bowl!


UNDER THE WEATHER

RACHEL BIRTWHISTLE

March proves a tricky month for decision making as Rachel Birtwhistle prepares for her second planting season down at the allotment

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Allotments -

G R O W

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I HAVE A CONFESSION to make: In the past whenever I initiated a conversation about weather, it would normally be because I had exhausted all other avenues of dialogue. The topic of ‘the weather’ always seems like a safe, last ditch chit-chat option, pre-empting any uncomfortable silences. That was the old, never-had-an-allotment-plot me. I can confirm that the new-and-improved-plot-holder me has never shown such interest/worry/rage/delight (delete according to the current climate) in the weather. March can be a fickle month, which is a shame because this is the start of the growing season, and at this time of year there is no greater ally or sworn enemy than the weather. This month is full of false starts and deliberations over whether to sow seeds directly into the plot, or to play it cool and indoor sow. Any sensible, rightminded person would do the latter, but the impatient grower, that is me, is sorely tempted to sow directly into the ground and hope the weather is on my side. ‘March - she comes in like a lion and goes out like a lamb,’ an allotmenteer says as he chuckles past me, scampering for shelter from an unpredicted rain shower. ‘Yes, you’re right there,’ I say in firm agreement, although I have absolutely no idea what that means. It transpires that when March starts, it’s still winter and by the end of the month spring has begun. Hurrah! If only it were that simple. Warm soil and light rain can provide the ideal climate for germinating crops, but late frosts and chilly weather can kill off young seedlings. Mad as a March Hare the climate maybe, but this schizophrenic month is designated seed sowing season so crack on we must.

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I decide to hedge my bets and do a little outdoor sowing as well as tray sowing indoors. Hardy crops - leeks, peas, broad beans and spinach - have a fighting chance outdoors this time of year, especially given the fact that my beds have been covered to try and keep in as much warmth as possible. These seeds will germinate in fairly low temperatures, but a sudden cold snap will be their downfall. I decide to go for it - worst case I can re-sow these seeds indoors and then plant out later on so it’s not all left to chance. Sowing seeds indoors is, on the face-of-it, plain sailing but this has, in the past, lulled me into a false sense of seedling security. It is a skill to know when to sow indoor seeds because timing it right for when the plants are ready to take outdoors depends entirely on the weather. If you leave seedlings indoors for too long they can become root-bound and don’t produce much crop, but planting them out prematurely can leave them at a disadvantage if the early spring weather turns chilly. March planting will always be a game of chance and we are never the boss at the allotment when so much is down to fate and fair weather. My allotment buddy on the plot next door wraps his young seedlings in fleece ready to protect them if bad weather is forecast. This seems sensible to me, after all who doesn’t want to be wrapped up warm on a chilly day? • Find out more about Rachel’s allotment by following her on twitter: @treatlikedirt


Chef's World -

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A DAY IN THE LIFE OF ANDREW JONES

Andrew Jones, chef patron of Farmyard in Norwich, shares his day with us

VISIT

www.farmyardrestaurant.com

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HE CHEFS ARRIVE at 8am so coffee is the first priority! ‘Mother’, otherwise known as the sourdough starter, was fed just before we left last night so she’s nice and lively in the morning. John gets the dough working; there is a recipe, but with only three ingredients (flour, water and salt), it’s mainly experience and judgement to get the right consistency. Meanwhile, the other chefs are setting up their sections for the day and waiting for deliveries. The veg man arrives first, followed by the butcher, and the fish man is always last. Sam checks the deliveries in, making sure everything that we ordered the night before has arrived and is up to scratch. Once everything’s been counted, prodded and signed for, it is pounced on by desperate chefs keen to start prepping. This is the key time in the kitchen’s day and dictates how smoothly service will go later. The few hours we have between produce arriving and the first guests arriving for lunch is when the bulk of the day’s work has to be done. People ask why we work such long hours, but it takes time to process these raw materials into ‘mise-en-place’, the component parts of a dish ready for service. We sit down at about 11am for more coffee, some breakfast and to go over bookings for the day. Ben updates the previous day’s menus with any changes, new dishes coming on and tweaks to existing dishes. We have

a quick debrief on last night’s service, then we set up for lunch. Lunch is less busy than dinner, but everybody eats at the same time so it’s just as intense. The pressure peaks quickly and the front of house team work the tables hard to try and smooth the flow of covers into the kitchen. Nobody wants to wait but if the kitchen gets slammed, everybody waits. As soon as our guests have gone, we clean down and reset the kitchen for dinner. The chefs recheck their sections and, if they have time, take a break. I’ve generally got a pile of admin to get through, so that’s my break. I like to speak to our suppliers, too, as I want to find out what’s coming into season, what’s finishing, if there’s anything new or interesting that we can have a play with or any deals to be done. Then it’s round two. We have four hours to feed three courses to 90 guests, between five chefs. And everything has to be spot on. This is where all the day’s hard work pays off. If your section is organised and full of well prepped, good quality mise-enplace, service is a real buzz, sending out plate after plate of great food to happy guests. If not, you will be in the sh*t all night long, struggling to keep up and not producing quality. It doesn’t matter how good a cook you are, if you’re not ready for service you’re definitely going down. • You can also keep upto-date with Andrew via his monthly newsletter subscribe online

"COFFEE

is the FIRST priority! "

www.feastnorfolkmagazine.co.uk

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Warning: contains Farmyard Language


JULIA Martin

www.feastnorfolkmagazine.co.uk

VISIT

www.purpleplumcatering.co.uk

PICTURE BY RJA PHOTOGRAPHY

HAVING BEEN mainly vegetarian for the last few years, it was a fun, yet daunting task to start on a vegan journey. I wanted to really get the food and the flavours, working on pairing different spices and herbs, and using totally different products. Through a lot of trial and error, I discovered the joys of vegan flavours and also how adaptable a vegan diet can really be. I am not a massive fan of replicating ‘meat’. My passion for local produce made me want to keep it simple to start with, watching and learning from friends, then jumping in and really going for it. There are so many amazing local producers in Norfolk that you can never run out of ideas - the possibilities are endless! I believe in working with wholesome, seasonal ingredients as often as possible. And if you’re wondering what happened to the eggs and dairy, I don’t bake with those. Recipes are always vegan, occasionally gluten free, and every once in a while, raw. With Easter just around the corner I thought it would be a good time to start practising my vegan baking! If you have ever made a vegan loaf from scratch, you know how important it is to get the yeast just right. If the water you use to activate the yeast is too warm, it can kill the yeast. Too cold and it won’t activate properly. No one likes dense, chewy bread! I absolutely love cinnamon. I add it to porridge instead of sugar and to my chai tea mix. I love using it in baking and have also incorporated it into savoury dishes where a sweet touch is needed. It pairs equally wonderfully with apples or aubergine. Once valued more highly than gold, cinnamon has long been used for its medicinal benefits, such as its anti-inflammatory and antibacterial properties. It is also believed to have blood sugar lowering effects and contains more antioxidants than garlic. Nigella seeds are another favourite of mine, always in the store cupboard ready to burst forth! In old Latin the spice was called panacea, meaning cure all. The enchanting capsules that store them, little purple and green striated lanterns protected by spiky foliage, are harvested before they burst, then dried and crushed. The seeds themselves have a slight onionlike smell, but they are not related to onions and actually have a mild peppery flavour when cooked. Use in chutneys, curries, yogurts and rice dishes. Sprinkle over bread and savoury biscuits before baking. Add to rice pilaf, together with cardamom, cumin and cinnamon, or to roast potatoes.

THE VEGAN WAY

In the first of her new series, JULI A MARTIN tells us that you don’t have to sa crifice great flavours when turning vegan

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P R O M O T I O N

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FOOD FOR HEALTH

FOOD IS VITAL TO GOOD HEALTH AND ONE NORWICH COMPANY HAS IT RIGHT AT THE HEART OF ITS BUSINESS. SARAH HARDY REPORTS

F

OOD IS AN ESSENTIAL - and should be an enjoyable - part of life, whatever your age or health. But, as you get older, suffer from ill health or struggle to cope on your own,

cooking tasty and nutritional meals can be a problem. A Norwich-based company, Able Community Care, which was set up in 1980, offers a vital lifeline. The Trowsebased firm was established by Angela Gifford who still remains in charge, and offers, amongst other services, 24-hour

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one-to-one care for people in their own homes. And this, as Angela points out, means that people get to enjoy home cooked meals and treats. ‘We expect all our live-in carers to be able to cook well,’ she says. ‘And obviously they can cook exactly what people fancy which does


Able Community Care ANGELA GIFFORD

ABLE COMMUNITY CARE is always looking for potential carers. They need to have one year’s experience, be fully security checked and they are all interviewed face-to-face.

ABLE COMMUNITY CARE has produced a cookbook, Able To Cook, which is packed with 100 tasty yet easy recipes. They have all been supplied by those involved with the company or who have connections with Norfolk and the line-up is impressive. It includes a bread and butter pudding from Dame Judi Dench, honey buns from Stephen Fry and a summer chicken salad from former PM John Major.

VISIT

ABLE TO COOK was produced for the company’s 30th anniversary and copies, at £8, are still available. www.feastnorfolkmagazine.co.uk

www.uk- care.com

mean a lot. They can cater for dietary requirements and ensure people are getting both enough to eat, and of a good quality.’ The company offers its long term, live-in care service throughout Britain and the Channel Islands, and in addition short term respite care and home from hospital care. Their clients range in age from 20 to 100. Angela says: ‘All our carers are trained and we provide further specific training as required. They become very much part of the family, and we work hard to pair people who get on well.’

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Another service provided by Able Community Care is holiday companionship. ‘If people want to return to a favourite childhood destination for a break or even take a cruise, we have people who can go with them. We had one lady who wanted to go to France to her grandson’s wedding, and we found a French-speaking carer!’ says Angela. ‘We are very flexible,’ she says. ‘We offer a bespoke service that works very well - people retain their independence, and get to stay in their own homes, too.’


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JOHN, BRIDGET & RUBY HEMMANT

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Proudly Norfol k

HEARD IT ON THE GRAPEVINE

Telephone 01508 333002

IN OUR LATEST PROUDLY NORFOLK COLUMN, WE MEET JOHN AND BRIDGET HEMMANT OF CHET AND WAVENEY VALLEY VINEYARD IN SOUTH NORFOLK VISIT

www.chetvineyard.co.uk

W

ho are you and what do you do? We are John and Bridget Hemmant and we are Chet and Waveney Valley Vineyard. John, the winemaker, is Norfolk born and bred and is the son of a Norfolk farmer from Sisland where his older brother Paul continues to farm. Bridget works in the NHS and also teaches at the UEA Medical School and they have a daughter Ruby, aged nine. Where are you based? Chet and Waveney Valley Vineyard is based in Bergh Apton in South Norfolk. The wines are made solely from Chet and Waveney grapes which travel less than a quarter of a mile from the vineyard to the winery to be crushed (or whole bunch pressed when making sparkling wine), pressed, fermented, bottled and finally labelled all on site. How big is the vineyard? It has five acres of established vines planted six years ago and another six acres were planted last year. There are another 10

www.feastnorfolkmagazine.co.uk

acres that the vineyard has acquired which will be planted over time, as we gradually expand. What grapes do you grow? As the UK is cooler than many other wine growing regions, we have planted vines that grow well in a cooler climate and can ripen with the limited sunshine hours that we have in East Anglia. Norfolk is a county with a maritime climate of sea breezes that help reduce fungal attack and a lower rainfall compared with the rest of the UK. The white grape varieties grown are Solaris, Phoenix (son of Bacchus, the so called grape of East Anglia), Bacchus, Schöenburger, and Seyval Blanc. The Phoenix and Seyval Blanc are used for the flagship Horatio sparkling wine, made by secondary fermentation in the bottle. Regent, a cool climate red grape, is also grown and is used for blending to make the pink sparkling wine, and the newly planted red grapes Pinot Noir and Pinot Meunier will also be used in the sparkling wine, going forward. How did you get started? John always worked on his dad’s farm and also read

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chemistry at the University of Keele. With this background, he saw wine production as the ideal match to his skills and experience. He first planted a vineyard on his father’s farm about 30 years ago and produced a sparkling wine which won a silver at the then East Anglian Vineyards Association. He moved away from Norfolk but returned 10 years ago when he married Bridget and planted a new vineyard in Bergh Apton. What do you produce? The main product is an English sparkling wine called Horatio. There is a pink version in which wine from the grape variety Regent is added. We also produce two still wines and a rosé wine. These are single varietal wines of Solaris, Schöenburger, and Regent. And we have a cider, Bergh Apton Wassail, too! Any future plans? We are applying for planning permission to build a new winery as we have outgrown the space currently available. We want to run more tours and tastings over the next year plus courses on viticulture (such as a pruning masterclass) and viniculture. We are also setting up a diploma which will be available for school leavers who may wish to take a gap year and get a qualification before moving onto university or college. Can we visit? Yes, we run regular tours and tastings by appointment. A selection of wines are offered with local cheese and Norfolk charcuterie as an accompaniment. Tours are £12 per person. Where can we buy your wine and cider? They can be bought online or from us in Bergh Apton. They are also available at Green Pastures Farm Shop in the village. How has Norfolk Food and Drink been able to help you? Through Norfolk Food and Drink we have discovered a great network of local producers with whom to share ideas and marketing initiatives. This column is supported by Norfolk Food & Drink and highlights its Proudly Norfolk members. For more details, visit www.norfolkfoodanddrink.com


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Feast Norfolk Magazine March 18 Issue 24  

Feast Norfolk is a fresh new monthly magazine dedicated to the thriving food and drink scene in Norfolk.

Feast Norfolk Magazine March 18 Issue 24  

Feast Norfolk is a fresh new monthly magazine dedicated to the thriving food and drink scene in Norfolk.

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