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SARAH HARDY, EDITOR sarah@feastnorfolkmagazine.co.uk

www.feastnorfolkmagazine.co.uk

SEARCH FOR US ON

Two Norwich eateries are reviewed - Debut Restaurant at City College, Norwich, where the students get to do it all for real, and the newish Tipsy Vegan, where the cocktails are a very welcome part of their offering! Don’t forget to enter our great competition to win dinner for four, with wine, at The Last Wine Bar in Norwich. And congratulations to Miriam from near Holt, who won an overnight stay and dinner at the Fritton Arms on the Somerleyton Estate, a competition featured in our October issue. • We are taking our annual Christmas break and are back with our February issue, thinking all things romantic. Expect it to hit the streets at the end of January - just as you get bored with all that dieting and have your first post Christmas pay cheque!

FEASTNORFOLKMAGAZINE.CO.UK

ELCOME to our festive issue which comes with our very best wishes for this special time of year. We have everything you might expect from your favourite foodie magazine to get you through Christmas, with plenty of seasonal recipes - many with that vital little twist! There are suggestions for a chocolate Xmas pud, turkey, potatoes, pheasant, Christmas cake - and more! Top Norfolk born chef Tom Aikens is interviewed by our deputy editor Emma Outten and shares his plans for next year with us (and a great mulled wine recipe) and our fun 12 Days of Christmas guide has lovely suggestions on how to spend your time, from sampling gin to a dip in the North Sea! We have included our favourite Wild Feast cocktail recipe, too, so have one for us! We suggest where to buy a hamper, always a popular present option; our What’s On guide has details of all the many and varied events taking place, and we visit the Fur and Feather at Woodbastwick, where columnist Charlie Hodson is now the executive head chef. This month’s foodie trail takes in Diss and Harleston, two market towns in the Waveney Valley, which are delightful at this time of year, with Diss staging a winter fayre on December 10.

SARAH HARDY

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Editor's Letter


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Planning your summer holiday next year? How about Turkey’s answer to the Italian Riviera, Kalkan, where it’s all about the meze

ABOUT US 03 Editor’s Letter 70 How to subscribe

22 Did you know that January is also known as Veganuary? Emma Outten and Sarah Hardy try the Tipsy Vegan in Norwich Lanes

WHAT’S ON 14 Keep up-to-date with all the events in our region over Christmas and the New Year 16 We suggest some very foodie 12 days of Christmas ideas to see you through the festive season ahead 18 Want to know what’s happening in the field of food and drink as the year draws to a close? Look no further than news and gossip

INTERVIEWS 27 Our Big Interview is with Michelin star winning head chef, Tom Aikens, who trained, where else, but City College Norwich?

FEATURES 06 We celebrate a Woodforde’s winter, following its rebranding, at its brewery tap, the Fur and Feather 50 Meet the new team at The Oaksmere near Diss, including head chef Lee Cooper 69 Swannington Farm to Fork has expanded its butchery to cater for increased demand. We find out what’s on offer this Christmas

COVER STORY

44 In our latest photo essay, photographer Keiron Tovell joins a shooting party on the Kelling Estate

EATING OUT 20 For fine dining with a training twist, Emma Outten tries the five-course tasting menu at Debut Restaurant, City College Norwich

04

REGULARS 25 The gadget and gizmo page is all about healthy living this month 32 Meet Bruce and Claire-Louise Crane, who run Looses Cookshop in Norwich in our Shop Front feature 52 Our chef Q&A meets Darren Pryer, executive chef at Sprowston Manor Marriott Hotel and Country Club, who loves all things Italian! 54 Free from recipe writer Sara Matthews offers us chestnut roast and more for Christmas 62 This month’s selection of new cookbooks sees many celebrities launching their new works, including Mary Berry and Gordon Ramsay 64 Enjoy our six of the best hampers as the big day approaches 90 Our Proudly Norfolk columns features a new Norwich pub this month, The Last Pub Standing on King Street


PICTURE BY DAVID GRIFFEN

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New column RECIPES 10 Charlie Hodson, Executive Head Chef at the Fur and Feather in Woodbastwick, serves up turkey with a twist this Christmas 31 Norfolk born and bred Tom Aikens offers up mince pies and mulled wine 35 Enjoy our ‘no wait’ Christmas cake recipe courtesy of Lucy Bartlett 51 Lee Cooper, head chef at The Oaksmere, near Diss, shares his recipe for pheasant Wellington with us 53 Darren Pryer of Sprowston Manor Marriott Hotel and Country Club prepares a stylish mackerel dish 59 Marcus Wareing, Masterchef: The Professionals judge, publishes his new cookbook, New Classics, and we have three recipes to try - grilled scallops, beef and ale pie and baked honeycomb puddings 87 It’s a chuck it all in the pan recipe from Ellen Mary as she shares her leftover turkey recipe with us DRINK 74 Andy Newman heads back to his heyday in the 1980s for his monthly wine column 76 Steve Hearnden looks forward to two great party dates - Hogmanay and Burns Night - and tells us what to drink

86 78 Lacons Brewery explains why some beers are best enjoyed seasonally COLUMNISTS 24 Daniel Matthams of Green Farm Coffee takes us on a bean to cup journey 39 Charlotte Gurney of White House Farm in Norwich looks back on an action-packed year 71 Charlie Hodson is fundraising for Norfolk swimmer Jessica-Jane Applegate - with the help of a sausage roll 77 Andrew Jones explains his no concept concept restaurant in Norwich, Farmyard TRAVEL 80 Planning your summer holiday next year? How about Turkey’s answer to the Italian Riviera, Kalkan, where it’s all about the meze GROW YOUR OWN 86 Kitchen gardener Ellen Mary tells us how to harvest Christmas potatoes 88 Rachel Birtwhistle reviews her first year as an allotment holder COMPETITION 84 Win a meal for four, with two bottles of wine, at The Last Wine Bar in Norwich

05

THE TEAM

Sarah Hardy, Editor sarah@feastnorfolkmagazine.co.uk Emma Outten, Deputy Editor emma@feastnorfolkmagazine.co.uk Scott Nicholson, Designer studio@feastnorfolkmagazine.co.uk Rachael Young Senior Account Manager | 07900 823731 rachael@feastnorfolkmagazine.co.uk Hannah McKinney Senior Account Manager | 07917 122829 hannah@feastnorfolkmagazine.co.uk

CONTRIBUTORS

Andy Newman, Ellen Mary, Rachel Birtwhistle, Sara Matthews, Steve Hearnden, Charlotte Gurney, Andrew Jones, Charlie Hodson, Lucy Bartlett, Daniel Matthams, Justin Wright, Keiron Tovell

PUBLISHED BY

FEAST NORFOLK MAGAZINE is published by Feast (Eastern) Limited - 21 Market Place, Dereham, Norfolk NR19 2AX

PRINTED BY

MICROPRESS, Fountain Way, Reydon Business Park, Reydon, Suffolk, 1P18 6DH


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OODFORDE’S BREWERY, based in Woodbastwick, in The Broads, really comes into its own in winter. The brewery’s open weekend, traditionally the first weekend of December, has become a firm fixture on the calendar, and gets bigger and better every year, with up to 5000 people visiting and making the most of the fact that the brewery will be open for free tours. This year it has been renamed as a Magical Christmas Market, with more than 30 food producers expected to attend. Meanwhile, the brewery shop will be full of hampers, Norfolk Nog Christmas Puddings, and seasonal brew Tinsel Toes. It’s a customer favourite released every year, but this year the ruby ale has been rebranded. In fact, Woodforde’s underwent a massive rebranding in early autumn. Under the directorship of Chief Executive James Hughes and Chief Operating Officer Nick Dolan, Norfolk’s biggest brewer has linked with the legacy and identity of Norfolk’s favourite son, and one of Britain’s greatest military heroes, Admiral Lord Horatio Nelson.

Y EA R FO R IT ’S B EE N A B IG A N D IT S WO O D FO R D E’ S E FU R A N D B R EW ER Y TA P, TH A S TW IC K, OODB FE ATH ER , IN W A JO R IT W H AT W H A M N D A N EW R EB R A N D IN G A D C H EF. EX EC U TI V E H EA OL K’S BIG HE AD S TO NO RF EM MA OU TT EN D OU T MO RE FIN TO Y ER EW BR

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WOODFORDE’S Magical Christmas Market takes place on December 2 and 3

www.feastnorfolkmagazine.co.uk

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THE WOODFORDE'S SITE

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James says: ‘The new branding this year has been a huge change for us. We launched in September at Norwich Castle Museum - where we sponsored the Nelson and Norfolk exhibition, complete with limited edition bottles of Nelson’s Revenge beer - and it has been very well received. We love Norfolk and we’ve taken on board Nelson’s values, particularly his famous quote ‘I am a Norfolk man and glory in being so’.’ The adjoining Fur and Feather pub has also seen a big change, in that it’s been acquired by Woodforde’s. James adds: ‘The other big step this year is that it is now in-house and our brewery tap, so this is a complete site now: with a brewery, a brewery shop, and a pub.’

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www.feastnorfolkmagazine.co.uk

sourced, as James says: ‘We use water from our own borehole and grain supplied by Crisp Malting, based out in Great Ryburgh.’ Wild Knight Vodka, Nelson’s Gold and Norfolk Gin are very much in evidence behind the bar (and also on the menu), plus last month there was a staff tasting of wines from local vineyards, and spirits from local distilleries – so watch this space. These days, Woodforde’s is much more visible as a brand, sponsoring events such as the inaugural Festive Food Fair at Holkham Hall this month, to give just one example. Then, in January, a team from Woodforde’s will accompany Archer’s Butchers, as they compete in the Great Sausage Roll Off, held at The Red Lion in Barnes, London, with the aim of returning to Norfolk victorious. Charlie, last year’s winner, says: ‘We’ve got a special ingredient going in from the brewery!’ By the end of this year, former head brewer Neil Bain will make his return to Woodforde’s. And there are exciting times ahead, as James says: ‘There will be extra investment in the brewery, with extra plant machinery, to keep up with supply and demand, with new staff as well. And you’ll start to see us more nationally.’ Sounds like Woodforde’s is about to become a British brewing hero. JAMES HUGHES AND NICK DOLAN

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RECIPES OVERLEAF

At the helm of the Fur and Feather is new Executive Head Chef, and Feast Norfolk’s very own columnist, Charlie Hodson. He sounds happy at his new home: ‘We’ve got an amazing brewery with amazing ale and then we have this beautiful pub that sits in front of it.’ The location, next to cows grazing in the fields, is ‘stunning on a wintry day.’ Just a 10-minute walk away from The Broads, it has been a destination pub for tourists for years. Although he makes the point: ‘We want it to be the hub of the village, like it used to be, as well.’ Besides, as he says: ‘It has to be a local pub, because we depend on locals in the winter.’ Charlie is a well-known Norfolk food hero, and in-house designer Adam Livingstone has drawn up two food maps, meaning diners know exactly where their food has come from, and has taken photos of the likes of Tim Allen and his pigs, Coxfords Butchers; Archer’s Butchers; The Fruit Pig Company, Candi’s Chutneys, and Crush Foods. ‘All the food comes from within a 32 mile radius,’ says Charlie, who adds: ‘There are three stages I need to develop: the food, the bar offering, and events. Firstly, there’s a completely new menu, offering “really good, local food, cooked and served simply. When Woodforde’s Brewery changed all its branding, we thought ‘we need to do it now’.’ The Christmas menu, available until December 23, offers mains such as Roast Norfolk Turkey from Norton Farms, Herb Roasted Norfolk Beef, and Baked Haddock (with Norfolk Saffron Hollandaise). There’s even cranberry ketchup, a collaboration between Charlie’s Food Heroes and Woodforde’s. Charlie says: ‘We want to make Christmas all about family, with no separate children’s menu – just smaller versions.’ And if you work in the hospitality industry and are unable to get time off before Christmas, celebrate in January instead, invites Charlie (there’ll even be a discount in it for you!). As for the bar, the Fur and Feather stocks the full range of Woodforde’s beers, which are just as locally


MORE RECIPES OVERLEAF

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PICTURES BY ADAM LIVINGSTONE


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[Serves 4

R E C I P E S

MARSALA RUBBED NORFOLK TURKEY WITH ALTERNATIVE CHRISTMAS TRIMMINGS (pictured left)

METHOD Rub the turkey breast joint with the spice mix and then brush with the rapeseed oil. Leave in the fridge overnight to let the flavour explode. Remove the turkey from the fridge, place in a roasting tray (remember to put a little water in the bottom of the tray), brush with more oil, cover with a piece of parchment and then foil; cook for approximately 1 hour and 15 minutes on 175ºC. Rest, slice and serve

Here are a couple of alternative seasonal trimmings:

HONEY GLAZED BACON SHARDS INGREDIENTS 4 slices of smoked streaky bacon; 2tsp of Norfolk honey; pinch of salt METHOD Stretch out the bacon, with the back of a knife, on a baking tray lined with parchment paper. Brush with honey and season. Place another tray on top and weigh it down, preferably with a brick wrapped in foil. Cook in oven for 35 minutes on 65ºC and then 10 minutes at 140ºC, remove from oven and store in an airtight container

www.feastnorfolkmagazine.co.uk

CHARLIE HODSON

INGREDIENTS 1.5-2kg Norfolk Bronze Turkey Breast Joint (from Morton’s Traditional Taste); A De Piff’s Marsala spice mix; 2-3tbsps of cold pressed rapeseed oil (from Crush Foods)

SPICED CHRISTMAS BEETROOT CHUTNEY INGREDIENTS 4 cooked beetroots, trimmed and finely diced; 1 red apple, diced with skin left on; 1/4 of a bunch of chopped flat parsley; 1/4 of a cup of brown sugar; 1 pinch of salt/pepper; 2tsp of honey; 1tbsp of lemon juice; 1tsp of rapeseed oil METHOD In a medium sized saucepan, heat the rapeseed oil and add in the onion to soften. Add in the apple to soften, as well as the beetroot, salt, pepper, honey, lemon, sugar and parsley. Cook through all the ingredients until the sugar dissolves. Remove from heat and fill a small-medium Kilner jar and serve

11


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[Serves 4

R E C I P E S

INGREDIENTS 4 cups of Arborio rice; 1 white onion, finely diced; 125ml of white wine; 2 large tbsp of St Swithins Cheese from Nortons Dairy; 2 pints of vegetable stock (GF); pinch of Maldon sea salt and cracked black pepper; 1 handful of chopped flat parsley, finely chopped; 2 cups of wild mushrooms, roughly separated between fingers (so as not to break the spores); 1tbsp of rapeseed oil

METHOD Heat the oil in a pan. Add half of the diced onion into the pan and leave to soften. Add the Arborio rice and lightly colour. Gently add the vegetable stock and let it simmer. In a separate pan, heat the oil. Add in the remaining onions and soften until brown. Add in the mushrooms and sautĂŠ. Add in the white wine. Add in the rice. Add in the parsley. Finish by running through the soft cheese with a fork. Serve in a warm bowl with a little herb oil and Nurtured in Norfolk baby chard

[Serves 4

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GLUTEN FREE NORFOLK WILD MUSHROOM AND NORTONS DAIRY ST SWITHINS RISOTTO

RECIPE WINTER BERRY PUDDING INGREDIENTS 12 slices of bread, crusts removed (you can use GF bread for GF version of this pudding); 4 cups of frozen winter berries; 1/4 cup of soft brown sugar; 1/4 of a vanilla pod; 1/4 of a lime (juiced); 1 cup of water METHOD Place the berries, sugar, water, vanilla pod and lime juice into a large pan and heat until the fruit softens and the sugar dissolves. Remove the fruit from the pan and drain away any excess liquid. Cut the bread into four long strips. Wearing food safety gloves (to avoid colour transfer), dip each strip of bread into the juice from the fruit. Using dariole moulds, line each one with bread and add the fruit to the middle of each mould. Fold over the remaining bread to make sure each pudding is sealed. Chill for 24 hours. Remove from the moulds and serve with your favourite ice-cream

www.feastnorfolkmagazine.co.uk

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A MEAL YOU CAN TRUST

CHRISTMAS MARKET

The Globe at Wells will play host to another Talk of Wells event, on December 11, featuring Lt Col Philip Neame, who fought in the Falklands War and has twice climbed Mount Everest. Diners will be able to enjoy a two-course menu with a glass of wine and £5 from every meal goes to the Wells Maltings Trust. Visit www.theglobeatwells.co.uk

Earsham Hall is holding a Christmas Market on November 28, when the courtyard will be open to stallholders with their gifts. The showrooms will also be open, along with the tearoom. More than 500 people attended last year. Visit www.earshamhallevents.co.uk

BLESS THE HAGGIS

LATE NIGHT SHOPPING TEA Horning WITHisFATHER CHRISTMAS holding a Late Night Shopping

Enjoy a traditional Scot’s evening in the Maids Head Hotel, in Tombland, Norwich, for Burns Night, on January 25. The themed evening includes a four-course Scottish meal with a dram of whisky and Scottish bagpiping to bless the haggis. You could even extend the party with an overnight stay. Visit www.maidsheadhotel.co.uk

The Place to on EatNovember restaurant30. at John Lewis Norwich event Shops taking part is the place to The be on December 12, as it offers a include Galley’s Deli; Horning Post Office chance for children andoffamilies enjoy aPreserves; very offering tastings NorfolktoGarden specialTavern Christmas with–Father Tickets Tastytea Meats whichChristmas. will be having for children food and boxWillow plus Father a BBQinclude on theagreen; The drink Staithe Christmas will present each childmarket; with a small gift. Tearooms - holding a craft and the Visit www.johnlewis.com/Norwich local Mace shop - holding a wine tasting. Plus

PICTURE BY RICHARD SHASHAMANE (NORWICHBLOG.COM)

expect plenty of mulled wine and mince pies! Call 01692 630833

DRINK AND JIVE The Piano Tearoom at Ketteringham Hall, near Wymondham, is playing host to local historian Mary Parker on January 6 and 20, who will be giving a free talk on the history of Ketteringham Hall and the Victorian ‘Orangery’ overlooking the lake (now the tea room, which offers afternoon tea, home-made cakes, tarts, pastries, organic ice cream and candy floss). Visit www.pianotearoom.co.uk

COOKERY S CH O O L

Get your festive party night off to a swing, in the great Banking Hall dance floor at OPEN Norwich on December 9, at Christmas Drink and Jive. As well as dancing to the sounds of Benoit Viellefon and his Orchestra, there will be music from the Drink 'N' Jive DJ's, a cocktail bar plus the main bar. Visit www.opennorwich.org.uk

BACK TO SCHOOL

Macarons & More’s first cookery school class for 2018 is An Introduction to Macaron Making on January 6. This handson session will help you perfect macaron shells and a variety of fillings. The team will cover macarons and fresh, fruit-filled Massive Macs. The day includes lunch, and you take home all that you bake! Visit www.macaronsandmore.com MRS TEMPLE'S CHEESE

TEAROOM TALK

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SAY CHEESE

Scolt Head Suppers presents An Evening with Mrs Temple and her cheeses at The White Horse Brancaster Staithe on December 5. Taste one of Norfolk’s best known and loved products including Wighton, Copys Cloud, Walsingham, Binham Blue and Gurney Gold – all handmade cheeses using milk from Mrs Temple’s own cows; and enjoy with a glass of wine or two. www.whitehorsebrancaster.co.uk


SIX COURSE TASTING MENU

Farmyard Restaurant in Norwich is offering a decadent six course tasting menu with an optional wine flight on December 31. They are taking bookings from 6.30pm until 8pm so you can dine with them before you see in the New Year. Vegetarian alternatives will be available. Visit www.farmyardrestaurant.com

FESTIVE FOOD FAIR

Feast your senses in The Lady Elizabeth Wing of Holkham Hall on December 16 and 17, when the first ever Festive Food Fair takes place. Stock up on ingredients for your own Christmas feast, or find plenty of treats for the food lovers on your gift list. Plus, there’s ‘It’s Not All About Turkey’ – a cookery theatre with a difference, hosted by Charlie’s Norfolk Food Heroes. Visit www.holkham.co.uk

FARMYARD

DOWN ON THE FARM

Jimmy’s Farm, near Ipswich, is holding a Christmas Fayre complete with Santa’s Grotto, on December 2 and 3, where there’ll be mulled cider, craft and local food stalls, hot food and plenty more! And you could always book a table for lunch in the Restaurant. Visit www.jimmysfarm.com

Have you got your party plans sorted out yet? Here are a few foodie ones to take you into the New Year and beyond, says Emma Outten

A VINTAGE CHRISTMAS

THEMED AFTERNOON TEA

Enjoy a Vintage Christmas at the Manor at Sprowston Manor Marriott Hotel and Country Club on December 16. Tickets include the 13-piece Jonathan Wyatt Band and Disco in the Norfolk Suite Marquee, a glass of fizz on arrival, and a four-course dinner. Visit www.marriott.co.uk

PARTY LIKE IT’S 1979

DIARY DATES

Take yourself back to the late 70s and enjoy a Studio 54 style New Year’s Eve party at The Rooftop Gardens in Norwich. There are two ticket options: either chill out on the rooftop terrace with a backbeat of disco, a glass of Taittinger champagne and canapés (then join in the disco in the restaurant) or book one of the restaurant lounge tables for your party near to the dance floor. Visit www.rooftopgardens.co.uk

Enjoy a special festive themed afternoon tea at Strattons Hotel on December 2, 9, 17 and 30. Then, in January, the Swaffham hotel is celebrating ‘Peter Rabbit the movie’ with an afternoon tea, including unlimited tea or coffee, a selection of finger sandwiches, scones with clotted cream and local jam as well as a selection of Jules’s homemade cakes themed to the classic Beatrix Potter story. Visit www.strattonshotel.com

LAST OF THE WINTER WINE

The last in the current series of wine dinners at the Swan at Lavenham Hotel & Spa will be held on January 26, when it teams up with world famous wine producer Michel Chapoutier sampling elegant wines from their vineyards in France, Portugal and Australia. The experience begins with an aperitif and canapés in the lounge, followed by a three-course dinner in the private dining room. Visit www.theswanatlavenham.co.uk

CHRISTMAS MARKET

King’s Lynn Christmas market will coincide with late night shopping on December 7. The market will focus on all things local and handmade and run throughout the town centre from 2pm to 8pm. There will also be music and street entertainment throughout the event. Visit www.discoverkingslynn.com

WHEN IN VEGAS

Netherton House Restaurant and Garden is throwing a Vegas Style New Year’s Eve Party on December 31. Enjoy a celebration drink on arrival and a full buffet, as well as games tables, and great prizes to be won. (Also, they are hosting Long Stratton’s Enchanted Winter Wonderland Charity Fundraiser on December 14). Visit www.nethertonhouse.co.uk

And don't forget... …that the Deepdale Christmas Market takes place from December 1 to 3. Visit www.deepdalechristmasmarket.co.uk

GO ON… TREAT YOURSELF! Oyster Cottage is a gorgeous old fisherman’s cottage just 100 yards from the harbour, nestled in a little loke in Wells-next-the-Sea. Lovingly and stylishly renovated, this cute-as-a-button bolthole features lime-washed beams and walls, stripped floorboards and oozes character inside and out. Snuggle down with your loved one in front of the log burner after a hearty meal in town, before planning some super days out along the coast. Prices for a 7-night stay start from just £447. Visit www.norfolkhideaways.co.uk Call 01485 211022


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ON THE SIXTH DAY

It’s time to get some fresh air. How about a trip to Horsey, walking to Winterton, and keeping your eye out for seals as they will be visiting our shores as usual. It’s only polite to call in at The FIsherman’s Return in Winterton. Have we ever mentioned their fish pie? Yes, please!

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ON THE NINTH DAY

Ever hired a bike at Thetford Forest? It is the best way to blow away those cobwebs. There are several cycle routes to choose from so you won’t get lost and, best of all, you can call in at the Elveden Food Hall afterwards and stock up on plenty of locally-made goodies, including their own label chutneys which are delicious

ON THE TWELFTH DAY

If you’re planning on taking to the ice, there’s Norwich Ice Rink and ‘Skate Yarmouth’ to choose from this year. Make sure you have a nice warming tipple afterwards - we like the hot buttered rum at The Plough in Norwich. And the Sweet Darling cocktail at Andover House in Yarmouth sounds rather tempting, too

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SEASON’S EATINGS HERE SARAH HARDY AND EMMA OUTTEN PRESENT THEIR FUN VERSION OF THE 12 DAYS OF CHRISTMAS. ALL INVOLVING FOOD AND DRINK - NATURALLY


New Year's Day

12 Days of Xmas -

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ON THE ELEVENTH DAY

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Taking the family to the pantomime Sleeping Beauty at Norwich Theatre Royal? Do remember to visit Kemp's Restaurant for a scrummy panto tea

Boxing Day ON THE THIRD DAY

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Hit the sales! And remember to take a well earned rest when you get to Jarrold’s by having a glass of wine at the new-look deli and wine bar

ON THE SECOND DAY

Make yourself our famous Wild Feast cocktail, courtesy of Norfolk-based Wild Knight Vodka:

XMAS D AY

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Enjoy Cromer fireworks on New Year’s Day at 5pm - a real Norfolk tradition. The town gets nice and busy but we love a bit of hustle and bustle. Try fish and chips at No 1 or enjoy a pint at the Red Lion

INGREDIENTS Norfolk Lemon Balm (small handful), muddled with 1/2 shot (12.5ml) of sugar syrup; pinch of Norfolk Mint, gently muddled together

ON THE FOURTH DAY

METHOD Fill a Boston cocktail shaker with ice and add a double shot (50ml) of Wild Knight English Vodka, stir gently. Add all the remaining ingredients into the shaker and stir until frosting occurs on the outside. Doublestrain into a chilled coupe martini glass. Add a grating of lemon zest to finish

ON THE FIFTH DAY

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ON THE EIGHTH DAY

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Get yourself into the kitchen and start cooking. Check out our back issues for a bit of what you fancy. We really enjoyed tackling Stoke Mill’s paella (Feb issue) and Sara Matthews’ hotpot from last month

ON THE TENTH DAY

Afternoon tea is simply a must at this time of year and you are spoilt for choice. We have plenty of favourites - Strattons in Swaffham have Julia Hetherton who just adores creating unusual delicacies while The Folly Tearoom in Holt is so very pretty, with a great line in teas

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ON THE FIRST DAY

The annual Hunstanton Christmas Day Swim is a joy - to watch. The brave (or plain daft) souls take to the waters at 11am but you might enjoy just watching them before retiring to a cosy coastal pub like The Lifeboat at nearby Thornham where you can call in for just a drink from noon to 1.30pm on the big day

www.feastnorfolkmagazine.co.uk

Take time out from all that festive fare with a trip to the Tamarind in Blofield, near Acle, for a spicy treat for your taste buds. Their monkfish bahaar is sublime. It’s fine Indian dining at its best

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ON THE SEVENTH DAY

Try at least one of the many Norfolk gins now available. From St Giles, Bullards, Pell and Co, Archangel, Black Shuck, Adnams Copper House and Artificer’s to the first - Norfolk Gin itself. Fever-Tree tonic is the recommended accompaniment, with plenty of ice, and then your choice of added extras. Ours is often a Martini - and we’re not joking

THE 12 DAYS OF CHRISTMAS begin on December 25 and run until January 5. They celebrate the Nativity of Jesus Christ


We are liking the sound of the newly renovated Weeping Willow, situated in Barrow, near Bury St Edmunds, which has been brought back to life by renowned florist Paula Pryke OBE and husband, top architect, Peter Romaniuk. What’s more, the newly appointed Head Chef, Nick Claxton-Webb, has worked across some of the most renowned restaurants in the region.

Ne w s & Gossip FUNDRAISING RECIPES Former hotel manager and member of Rotary Club of King's Lynn Trinity, John Thorpe, who runs Rotary Young Chef of the Year and Rotary Young Restaurant Server of the Year competitions locally, is now on a mission to organise a recipe book and raise money for various local charities. Any interested hoteliers/restaurateurs keen to be featured are urged to get in touch! Email thorpejohnp45@gmail.com

ROOM AT THE INN I was lucky enough to be one of the first people to try out one of the four stylishly refurbished en suite bedrooms at the Three Horseshoes in Warham (what was the Old Post Cottage B&B). The pub, which was always famous for its pies, reopened in the summer, so I happily sampled its three-cheese, spinach and apple pie (and a Woodforde’s) before bedding down for the night! Visit www.warhamhorseshoes.co.uk

NEW STORE

Visit www.adnams.co.uk

Visit www.theweepingwillow.co.uk

WEEPING WITH JOY

MORE GOOD NEWS

(picture below) Congratulations are in order yet again to Tuddenham Mill, as it has been chosen as one of the winners of The Good Hotel Guide Editor’s Choice 2018 award. Only a handful of hotels from the UK and Ireland were picked for the best Restaurant-with-Rooms award. Visit www.goodhotelguide.com and www.tuddenhammill.co.uk

It’s all go at Adnams: not only have they just opened a new store on Westlegate in Norwich, which has been described as an evolution of its retail concept, showcasing its new App, and Make Your Own Gin experience; the Suffolk brewer has also produced its own Adnams Tonic Water and Adnams Tonic Water Light, to accompany its range of award-winning gins and vodkas.

N EWS

R OU N D - U P As the year draws to a close, there are still plenty of openings (and reopenings) to report on, says Emma Outten 18


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GERS Charcuterie spec ialists, Marsh Pig are now taking bookings for a new course run ning in January and Febru ary of next year ca lled Beer & Bangers. It promi ses a fun and inform ative day, learning how to ma ke all natural real ale, plus designing and ma king your own Britis h bangers – all set in the magnificen t South Norfolk countrysid e at the Chet and Waveney Valley Vin eyard. Visit www.marsh pig.co.uk

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CAFE CULTURE A SERENDIPITOUS COLLABORATION (picture above) Recently launched Norfolk sausage company, Serendipity has just unveiled its first sausage range containing real ale, into the foodservice and events arena, with the support of multi-award winning Lacons Brewery. Serendipity manufactures three core lines - using three of Lacons permanent ales: British Legacy; Spicy Encore and Black Falcon - and will be on the shelves at Roys of Wroxham. Visit www.serendipitysausages.co.uk and www.lacons.co.uk

AND THE AWARD GOES TO... Congratulations to Chef Alex Firman, for achieving national recognition for his selection of Norfolk inspired recipes from the prestigious 2017 Observer Food Monthly Awards, after renovating a barn surrounded by a walled courtyard on the Hoveton Hall Estate to create Garden Kitchen Café. The café was named as the top place in Norfolk to eat quality food at under £15. Visit www.alexchef.co.uk

MASSAGE The Grove Cromer is teaming up with The Massage Hut from this month, to offer hotel guests and visitors holistic massage therapy seven days a week, in a tranquil wooden cabin surrounded by trees and birdsong! Owner, Christy Lewis-Phillips, is a Cromer resident with a young family who aims to build a business that connects with locals and visitors to the area. Visit www.the-massage-hut.co.uk

We’ve been hearing good things about Café Charlotte, a family-run business in the heart of Stalham, which is providing customers with quality, locally sourced produce: hot drinks come courtesy of Nelson & Norfolk Tea and Grey Seal Coffee, plus fruit and vegetables, ham and bacon, eggs and bread, are all made or grown in Norfolk. Well done to owners Steve and Clare Traynor. Café Charlotte can be found on Facebook.

JOINING FORCES FOR FOOD SAFETY Food producers, restaurants and bars might be interested to know that two district councils, Breckland, in Norfolk, and South Holland, in Lincolnshire, have joined forces to offer businesses environmental health consultancy services and a range of food, health and safety and licensing training courses, after creating the Environmental Health Training and Consultancy. Visit www.ehtc.co.uk

TAKE IT TO THE BRIDGE The Bridge at Wroxham, a long-standing pub eatery establishment, has undergone something of a reinvention since local businessman Mark Eames bought the property in 2016. Now, the American Restaurant is run by a family, for families, and specialises in American gourmet food with handmade ‘Bridge Burgers’ made from locally sourced meat. Visit www.thebridgewroxham.com

Ones we are watching...

There are lots of new openings that we plan to check out - Haggle in St Benedicts, Norwich, which is all about Turkish food, Al Dente in St Giles Street in Norwich, which is all about Italian food, The Queens Head in Wymondham, and Thetford Garden Centre now boasts The Lime Kiln Kitchen! Very best of luck to them all and we look forward to visiting.


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MAKING THEIR DEBUT

DEBUT RESTAURANT AT CITY COLLEGE NORWICH IS RUN BY THE INTERNATIONALLY RENOWNED HOTEL SCHOOL, WHICH MEANS DINERS CAN ENJOY GREAT FOOD PREPARED AND PRESENTED BY THE STARS OF TOMORROW. EMMA OUTTEN WENT ALONG TO HAVE A TASTE

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Debut Restaurant -

www.feastnorfolkmagazine.co.uk

h t t p : / / debut.ccn.ac.uk

EEING AS I have the pleasure of writing about City College Norwich each month, it was surely only a matter of time before I booked a table at Debut Restaurant. The fine dining restaurant, run by students and staff at the internationally renowned Hotel School, offers an altogether different dining option in the city. It’s open for lunch or an evening meal, and is a chance for diners to discover, first-hand the standards set by the catering and hospitality courses, aiming to set the bar as being one of the best restaurants you will find anywhere in Norfolk. We went on a Wednesday (it’s open for dinner from Tuesday to Thursday), to experience the five course Taster Menu. The dinners are prepared by the Advanced Craft students under the guidance of experienced chef lecturers, (the chef running the show is the inspirational James Phillippo) whilst the front of house is managed by experienced restaurant lecturers. The idea is, you arrive sometime between 7pm and 7.30pm, and enjoy the five-courses, all for £19.95 per person, so clearly good value for money at the outset. First impressions are that the attention to detail is really quite something here, with various wine glasses cutting a swathe across the tables, and so it seemed churlish not to have a glass of wine with our meal! The wine list has been created with the support of Adnams, and so I had a large glass of their Chilean Pinot Grigio (£5.50), whereas my partner had a large glass of Argentinian Escondido Malbec (£6). This is a fully licensed restaurant and, if you so wish, you can also go in for some arrivals drinks, such as a glass of Adnams Prosecco, to kick things off. Just as opening times can change due to curriculum demands, the menu doesn’t necessarily need to be taken as read. For example, instead of canapes, we enjoyed a splash of mushroom soup soaked up with warm bread rolls.

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The front of house staff all work hard – the bread tongs proved tricky for one of our waiters but the thing about dining at Debut is that you end up willing these young students on. The starter was hot smoked salmon for my partner, with curls of cucumber, marinated potatoes, and brown shrimps – all declared fully flavoursome by him. This is aspirational fine dining, a case of quality over quantity, and everything is beautifully presented. There’s always a vegetarian course available, so I opted for the tomato and mozzarella terrine, a vertiginous take on that classic Italian starter. The next course was a Pimm’s sorbet, which was refreshing on the palate and you could really taste the al fresco favourite. As for the main course, my partner had Ballotine of corn fed chicken, with braised chicken pie, glazed carrot and beetroot relish. The pie looked interesting, coming as it did in a teeny-weeny saucepan. I had a simple caramelised onion tart, but with those same tasty carrots, and a strident smearing of that beetroot relish across the plate. Now, I’m a fan of frangipane, so was pleased to see that I was getting an almond version for dessert, with poached peaches, and crème diplomat - this really hit the spot. Finally, our waitress came armed with a wooden tray of petit fours. Split into 12 sections, this prompted a bit of kid in a sweet shop moment for me. In fact, I’d happily have devoured one of each (there were honeycomb, white chocolate fudge, Turkish Delight, mint dark chocolate, rum truffles, strawberry mini meringues - need I go on?), but apparently the idea is you just choose three! However, my tasty trio was rather rich so I guess they know best. All-in-all, the Five Course Tasting Menu at Debut Restaurant is a real experience to savour, whilst the stars of tomorrow are getting some valuable experience under their belts. • The restaurant will be open until December 15, when it serve its final Christmas lunch, and then will reopen for business as usual on January 9.


N VISIT

www.t hetipsy vegan. co.uk

ORWICH’S FIRST VEGAN restaurant could certainly live up to its name, if you let it – as The Tipsy Vegan’s cocktails are as strong as you like and there’s not a morsel of meat in sight. It opened back in the summer in St Benedict's, where Umberto’s used to be, and what a great addition to this historic heart of the city. It’s the restaurant relative of Bia Kitchen, that street food vegan diner on Norwich Market which has proved popular over the last couple of years, with vegetarians, vegans and the v-curious alike. Both were founded by vegan entrepreneurs Cheryl and Michelle, who aim, in this latest venture, to offer an inspiring selection of vegan small bites and hearty meals along with a host of bespoke cocktails. Inside The Tipsy Vegan, there’s something of a speakeasy, prohibition style about the place, with jazz on the sound system and a dark and decadent colour-scheme. Wooden tables and chairs grace the restaurant area, plus there’s a cosy corner up behind the bar complete with wing backed armchairs. The Tipsy Vegan has gone to great lengths to champion local produce where possible, including sourcing its

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SEEING AS JANUARY IS KNOWN AS VEGANUARY THESE DAYS, EMMA OUTTEN (AND EDITOR SARAH HARDY) SIMPLY HAD TO TRY NORWICH’S FIRST VEGAN RESTAURANT, THE TIPSY VEGAN coffee from Grey Seal Coffee in North Norfolk, and championing locally grown fruit and vegetables. Local bottled beers comes from Ampersand Brew Co., a small batch brewery based in South Norfolk (and one we had never heard of so quite an achievement!), and Boudicca Brewing, based in Norwich. And on the spirits front, The English Whisky Co. makes an appearance. We were determined to try the cocktails, despite it being a midweek lunchtime. Now you might not know this, but various cocktail ingredients, including the actual spirits, are often not vegan, which is why they’ve masterminded some alternatives that are suitable for vegans, without compromising on taste.

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Portobello Mushroom Burger


The Tipsy Vegan -

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not real Parmesan?) and herb chips. She declared it very tasty and particularly liked the pesto. And who can resist ‘cheesy’ chips? For dessert, I had the Portobello Road Gin and Blueberry Cheesecake (just to continue the gin theme, you understand), whilst Sarah went for a Chocolate and Salted Caramel Tart served with vanilla ice cream, which got another thumbs up. It was slightly more chocolate than salted caramel but had a good buttery shortcrust pastry. The Tipsy Vegan has a fairly young vibe, although all ages (even us middleaged women) should feel welcome here, vegans and non-vegans alike – and if you happen to be the latter, you definitely won’t feel like you’re missing out on meat. The cocktail list is comprehensive, and I particularly liked the fact that the number of shot symbols beside each cocktail indicates to how strong each is going to be. We went for a couple of house cocktails, priced at £8: I had the Black Gin Smash, which was indeed black, thanks to the activated charcoal. It also contained house-infused beetroot gin, mint, lemon and ginger beer, with a speared slice of beetroot resting on top. Sarah liked the look of the Mary Pickford, with organic rum, pressed pineapple, and cherry (with a cherry on top). She could really taste the flavour of hers, from the pomegranate to the pineapple. There are also mocktails, at half the price, and guest cocktails, for a pound more than the house ones. The Tipsy Vegan’s friends at Knowhere Special Cocktail Bar in London have helped develop the menu which also includes updated classics such as: Whisky Sour, Summer Julep, and an Old Fashioned. www.feastnorfolkmagazine.co.uk

With our drinks well underway, it was time to turn our attentions to the food. The prices are very reasonable – we didn’t pay more than £10 for a main or more than a fiver for a dessert. But we were slightly confused about the menu: the mention of meat! We couldn’t quite get our proofreading heads around the fact there were no inverted commas around bacon, steak and ribs. Were we really in a vegan restaurant we were beginning to wonder? We were about to find out. I had the Tagliatelle Carbonara, which meant pasta in their in-house cashew nut cream sauce, with mushrooms, ‘bacon’ and peas. I would best describe the sauce as dense (that’ll be the ground cashew nuts) but it all went down a treat. Sarah had the Portobello Burger, involving Portobello mushroom, a toasted walnut and breadcrumb stuffing, wilted spinach, and sun-dried tomato pesto accompanied by Parmesan (presumably

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Gin and Blueberry Cheescake

MORsEL OF IN SIGHT

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Green Farm Coffee -

C O L U M N

IT'S ONLY COFFEE, RIGHT?

IN THE FIRST of a new series, Daniel Matthams of Green Farm Coffee gives you an insight into coffee's fascinating journey from bean to cup VISIT

www.greenfarmcoffee.co.uk

AS A SELF confessed coffee geek, I have been involved in the coffee industry since I was 15 years old, working in Australia and New Zealand, and visiting various coffee plantations in the world. Two years ago I moved from my native Devon to Norfolk and started working for Green Farm Coffee where I’m now brand manager. Here, our coffee roasters, baristas, engineers and trainers have one common goal: creating the perfect cup of coffee. We source, develop, roast and package all our own coffees in-house, giving us maximum control and guaranteeing high quality at every stage of production. We are extremely passionate and proud of our freshly roasted, artisan coffees and distribute them all over East Anglia. The last decade has seen an explosion in the popularity of coffee. Whether we drink it as a cappuccino, espresso, or pour over, for most of us it has become a staple part of our daily lives we would struggle to manage without. But how many of us really know what is in our cup and where it has come from?

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First of all, what actually is coffee? Coffee beans are actually seeds and come from the Coffea plant, native to Ethiopia. There are thousands of different species of the Coffea plant. However, only two, arabica and robusta, (Coffea canephora) are grown commercially in any great quantity. The coffee seeds/beans grow inside a grape-sized cherry which normally contains two beans in each. This means coffee beans will usually have a flat side. When the coffee cherry is ripe and ready to be picked, it will normally turn a dark red colour. By picking coffee at its optimum ripeness, flavours within the beans will be enhanced.

Where does coffee come from? Coffea is quite a fussy plant. Unfortunately, conditions in Norfolk are too cold and flat to grow coffee naturally, as coffee usually only grows between the tropics of Cancer and Capricorn, in an area commonly known as the Bean Belt. The origin and region where the coffee is grown and processed will largely impact upon the flavour and characteristics of the coffee. Often, coffees from certain origins will be associated with certain flavours - Kenyan coffees are often fruity, whereas Ethiopian coffees are often described as floral. You may be thinking that ‘fruity’ and ‘floral’ are not words usually associated with coffee but, trust me, you really can get these flavours from certain types of coffees. In fact, there are more than 1500 aromatic and flavour compounds in coffee, compared to approximately 200 for wine. Told you coffee was complicated! Still don’t believe me? This year we are very excited to announce our new Christmas coffee! The 100 per cent Sumatra Takengon Mandheling coffee is grown in the rich volcanic soils of Indonesia, and uses the traditional Giling Bajah (wet grinding) processing technique. In the cup, this coffee offers a hint of spiciness, chocolatey notes and subtle hints of nut. If you wish to indulge in a great coffee that offers something slightly different this Christmas, this could be perfect for you.

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JANUARY IS THE TIME FOR DIETS AND TRIPS TO THE GYM. HERE’S OUR CHOICE OF GADGETS AND GIZMOS TO HELP YOU GET AND KEEP FIT 05.

06. 04. Dear Charlie banana holder in chrome-plated zamak, by John Truex for Alessi, £75, www.alessi.com

WHERE TO BUY 02. After This We're Getting Pizza water bottle, £19.99, www.gettingpersonal.co.uk 03. Colourworks two in one salad servers, from £9.50, Bakers and Larners, Holt, www.bakersandlarners.co.uk 05. KitchenAid Artisan Magnetic blender, £549, Jarrold’s, www.jarrold.co.uk 06. Smeg retro juicer, £449.95, John Lewis, www.johnlewis.com


Giddy up to a cosy cottage for a break this Christmas and New Year

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04. THE NORFOLK FARMERS £49.00 A totally new product from St George’s, this is a very unique and special single grain whisky, made from 8 different grains 03.

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Find the perfect gift this Christmas at St. George’s Distillery


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I N T E R V I E W

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CRAo ZY CHEF

TOM AIKENS IS REGARDED AS ONE OF THE UK’S MOST ACCLAIMED AND INSPIRATIONAL CHEFS. HERE, THE FORMER CITY COLLEGE NORWICH STUDENT TELLS EMMA OUTTEN HOW HIS DO OR DIE ATTITUDE HAS SEEN HIM THROUGH

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J JUST BACK FROM DUBAI and about to jet off to Hong Kong, life has moved on a fair bit for Tom Aikens since growing up in Cringleford, Norwich, and picking fruit and veg in the back garden. The man who became the youngest British chef ever to be awarded two Michelin stars (aged just 26), has certainly had a remarkable career. And it all began on home turf. From the age of eight, Tom and his twin brother Rob were always helping their mother in the kitchen. It sounded rather idyllic, as he recalls: ‘I loved going into the garden, picking every vegetable that you can imagine and making something out of it.’ Having a father and grandfather both in the wine business was also an inspiration: in the late 70s/early 80s his grandfather ran the wine side of Colman’s of Norwich and, following that, his father started a wine shop, on Unthank Road in the city. From the age of 12, summer holidays would then be spent in France, (they even ended up converting a barn in the Auvergne). By the time he was at Hethersett High School, aged 13, Tom was seriously thinking about becoming a chef so he rang City College Norwich, and was pleased to learn that he only needed to pass an interview and a basic entrance exam. ‘I made sure that I got on the catering course and haven’t looked back. The teachers were very inspirational.’

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www.feastnorfolkmagazine.co.uk

Nowadays, there are Tom’s Kitchen sites across London, in Istanbul, and in Birmingham’s The Mailbox, which opened a year ago. Are there any more UK openings in the pipeline? ‘Possibly, but we haven’t got anything confirmed yet - watch this space,’ he says. And overseas, there’s The Pawn in Hong Kong, and Pots, Pans & Boards in Dubai. ‘It’s going very well,’ says Tom. And he’s set to open even more restaurants next year, ‘all in the Middle East.’ He adds: ‘I travel every three or four months, it’s not as if it takes up huge amount of my time. I’m on the phone every week, making sure they’re all okay - the chefs there have worked for me before so know exactly what I want.’ Tom lives in London with partner, Justine Dobbs-Higginson, and daughters, Violette, five, and Josephine, three, so these days he finds himself baking with his daughters in the kitchen at home. ‘They get stuck in! Even at a young age they’re mixing and making and sticking their fingers in where they shouldn’t be.’ As someone who doesn’t understand the meaning of the word ‘relax’, have his daughters forced him to chill out more? ‘It definitely helps, although they are a little bit crazy themselves, like their father.’ Outside

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of work, he has a passion for cycling and marathon running. ‘I find it very amusing when people say they don’t have any time to do exercise,’ says Tom, ‘I always make time.’ As much as he loves to travel abroad, he also loves coming back to East Anglia, to places such as Blakeney, where his father used to live, and Orford, where his cousins live. Rob lives in America these days although elder brother Mark is still based in Norfolk, running a farrier business. ‘We come up and go to the coast - now that I have kids, it’s nice to share that with them as well,’ says Tom, before adding: ‘There are some good restaurants in Norfolk. And in Norwich you’ve got Benedicts, which is a great restaurant.’ For personal reasons, he has been back home more often of late, explaining: ‘My mother sadly passed away recently.’ It doesn’t sound as though the 48-year-old makes long-term plans any more. ‘I just take every day as it comes and every year as it goes. I guess that’s the thing that’s changed since I was 16.’ When does he plan to start taking it easy? ‘Probably when I’m 75,’ says Tom. ‘I’ve always been very hard working and without hard work you never get anywhere in life. Nothing is handed to you on a platter.’

RECIPES OVERLEAF

He adds: ‘It was very much classical cooking but everything we did was very well executed and it gave you the basics of becoming a chef - it’s a great school for catering.’ However, it sounds as though Tom was only there by virtue of the fact his brother (who had also enrolled) had given a good interview, which then tightened Tom’s resolve to make his name within 10 years. He says: ‘I’m a bit bullish when it comes to doing things I say I’m going to do – I will do it. I’m kind of like ‘do or die’.’ Were two Michelin stars part of the plan? ‘I hadn’t realised I was going to do that - my aim was to get well known and, from that, I obviously did.’ His career has taken him to David Cavalier’s in Battersea, Pierre Koffmann’s La Tante Claire, Joel Robuchon in Paris, Gerard Boyer’s in Reims and Pied-à-Terre, to name a few. It was at the latter that Tom was awarded the Michelin stars, and he remained there for five years. Selfdescribed as a crazy, passionate chef, it’s been reported that Tom’s done the odd crazy thing in his time, including an alleged incident involving a hot palette knife. Does he have any regrets? ‘I definitely did lots of things I shouldn’t have done,’ says Tom, before describing himself back then as ‘young and dumb and foolish.’ He went on to open his eponymous restaurant, Tom Aikens, in Chelsea, in 2003 (which won a Michelin star and rising 2 star in 2009); Tom’s Kitchen in 2006, and Tom’s Place, in 2008. He hit the headlines after the latter, Britain’s first ethical fish restaurant shop, closed (‘The Chef Back from the Brink,’ heralded one broadsheet at that time).

PICTURE BY DAVID GRIFFEN

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Tom Aikens -

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PICTURE BY DAVID GRIFFEN

MULLED WINE

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[Serves 24

MINCE PIES INGREDIENTS For the mince pie mix 325g of cooking apples, peeled, cored and chopped; 115g of shredded suet; 150g of raisins; 115g of sultanas and currants; 115g of mixed candied peel; 150g of soft dark brown sugar; zest and juice of 1 lemon and orange; 30g of nibbed almonds; 2tsp of mixed spice; 1tsp of cinnamon; a large pinch of fresh grated nutmeg; 0.5g of ground ginger; 0.5g of salt; 4tbsp of brandy For the pastry 270g of all-purpose flour; 1.5g of salt; 140g of butter; 110g of caster or powdered sugar; 2 egg yolks; 1 whole egg; a few drops of vanilla essence

www.feastnorfolkmagazine.co.uk

INGREDIENTS 4.8 litres of red wine; 1200ml of water; 2 litres of orange juice, pressed; peeled zest from 12 oranges; 40g of cloves; 45g of juniper berries; 45g of star anise; 80g of cinnamon sticks; 250g of sliced fresh ginger; 1300g of brown sugar

a medium Place all these ingredients in a pan and place on minutes. heat then bring to a slow simmer, simmer for 10 in Turn off, cove r and infuse for 15 minutes then stra

METHOD For the mince pie mix Mix all the ingredients together, except the brandy, in a bowl and leave in a cool place for 12 hours to marinate. Place the mixture in a baking dish, cover with tin foil and bake for 2.5 to 3 hours at 140°C/225°F. Leave to cool stirring from time to time and then stir in the brandy. Spoon the cooled mixture into storage jars and cover with waxed discs and seal. This is then ready to use, however it’s best to leave it to mature for one month For the pastry Sieve the flour and salt, put into a stand mixer and place on a low to medium speed, then add the butter .Mix until crumb like, add the sugar then eggs and yolks, it will slowly come together. Refrigerate for 1 hour, roll out between two sheets of parchment to a 0.5cm thickness, then let it rest for 10 mins. Cut out 48 pieces with a round cutter, you need tops and bottoms to be medium and large. To assemble Make the mince pies in either small Yorkshire pudding moulds or tartlet cases, lightly grease and then flour, place in the pastry then the mince pie mix, then place on the lid, crimp the edges and bake at 180°C/375°F for about 10-15 minutes. Dust with icing sugar

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LET'S GET COOKING HAVE YOU DISCOVERED NORWICH’S LOOSES COOKSHOP YET? WHETHER YOU’RE A KEEN HOME COOK OR A PROFESSIONAL CHEF, THIS FAMILY-RUN EMPORIUM WILL GET YOUR CREATIVE JUICES FLOWING. SARAH HARDY STEPS INSIDE


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VISIT

LOOSES COOKSHOP usually opens Monday to Saturday but is opening Sundays in December - and late nights (until 7pm) on Thursdays. It offers a loyalty card see in store for details.

www.loosescookshop.co.uk

LOOSES COOKSHOP, tucked away in a pretty courtyard just off Norwich’s main shopping area, is something of a Mecca for us foodie lovers, as we do, of course, love to cook. And we love new and exciting gadgets and gizmos to help us on our way. The shop, now run by Claire-Louise and Bruce Crane, has two floors of loveliness where you’ll find anything from Christmas loo roll to the best carving knives around. And everything in between. It really is a place to take your time, browse and soak up the sheer variety of items on sale - the shop must boast the best choice of kitchen equipment in Norwich and the couple are very keen to stress the competitiveness of their prices. ‘We have to be,’ says Claire-Louise. So whether you fancy a new apron, a paella pan, weighing scales or a steamer, you will have several to choose from. There are edible goodies, too, with several local products such as Candi’s Chutneys stocked. The couple explain that, just like in fashion, there are food and drink trends which people like to follow. They attend numerous trade shows around the country and keep abreast of new products and developments. Claire-Louise says: ‘Gin is very popular at the moment, so we have a great selection of gifts to complement it. And it is the same with cocktails - we have shakers, strainers anything you might need.’ She also believes people are becoming more adventurous cooks at home, saying: ‘Many people have meat thermometers now, and are interested in more sophisticated pieces of equipment.’

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The shop, situated in old stables in Orford Yard, close to Marks and Spencer and Debenhams, has a gloriously bright glass atrium, and two areas of particular excellence. One is the Knife Room which is quite intriguing with all manner of cooking knives on sale. Looses runs a very popular knife sharpening and repair service - and Bruce is the nationally recommended ‘go to’ expert for most of the major knife manufacturers. And he also organises knife skills classes at the Richard Hughes Cookery School at the Assembly House in Norwich where he, and invited fellow experts, talk about the use and care of knives at home. The second area of expertise is the first floor cake room which would delight Mary Berry herself! From cake decorations to cake tins, from rolling pins to cookie cutters, there is everything a baker could want. And the shop’s party cake tin hire business is really helpful, meaning that you can rent a cake tin for, say, a special dinosaur birthday cake without having to fork out and buy it for just one use. There is also a personalised ribbon service, so you can have whatever message you like on whatever colour ribbon, making something very special for your celebration. And at this time of year, right as you enter the shop, is a wonderful Christmas table, packed with gift ideas for all ages. All are great fun - my eye caught napkins decorated with sprouts and Elvis Presley goggles for peeling onions. Now, who could resist them?! There is also plenty to help you get your Christmas lunch right, too, with roasting tins, gravy boats, carving sets and more. Bruce points out that the staff are always willing to help and advise, too. ‘We have daily training sessions and we like the staff to be out on the shop floor, chatting and helping. They create a friendly atmosphere.’ The shop has been going since 1791 (Bruce and Claire-Louise are the third generation) so they do know what they are doing - there really can’t be much that they don’t have but if there is something you want, say a particular Le Creuset pan in a certain colour, they will track it down for you. In fact, you sense the couple, who are devoted to their business, rather like a challenge! This seems both a fun shop and serious one - where those wanting a quirky gift can dig out something a bit different while the keen chef can seek out that vital piece of kit.


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IN THE FIRST of a new series, Lucy Bartlett of Ingredients for Cooks, offers us this foolproof Christmas cake recipe

ULTIMATE CHRISTMAS CAKE For a 23cm round or 20cm square cake

AT LAST - A CHRISTMAS CAKE THAT YOU CAN MAKE AND EAT ALMOST STRAIGHTAWAY!

INGREDIENTS FOR COOKS is a family-run Suffolk-based business which supplies a wide variety of ingredients for both home and professional cooks. Visit www.ingredientsforcooks.co.uk

www.feastnorfolkmagazine.co.uk

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INGREDIENTS 375g of currants; 325g of sultanas; 325g of raisins; 60g of mixed peel, chopped; 60g of glace cherries, halved; juice and zest of 1 orange; 1tbsp of treacle; 6tbsp of brandy; 275g of soft butter; 275g of soft brown sugar; 340g of plain flour; 1tsp of salt; 2tsp of mixed spice; 5 eggs; 60g of almonds, chopped (optional) METHOD The day before (or up to a fortnight before) you want to make the cake, put the fruit, treacle, orange juice and zest and brandy in a bowl, mix well, cover in cling film and leave to marinate. When you are ready to make the cake, line your tin with baking paper. Cream the butter and sugar. Sieve the flour and spice in a separate bowl. Add the eggs to the creamed butter and sugar, one at a time, alternating with flour mixture until it is all incorporated. Fold in the fruit, with all the juices, and the almonds. Spoon into a prepared tin and cook in a cool 130°C oven, then, after 1 hour, cover the cake with a sheet of baking parchment. The cake will take approximately 4 hours to cook. Once cool, you can marzipan and ice it or just eat it as it is. We often find that it is eaten before we can get around to icing it!


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Curriculum Programme Manager Joe Mulhall has this update: AS SEEN IN last month’s issue, November was the month when the School prepared for what is seen in the hospitality and catering industry as the busiest time of the year. Students have been practising and demonstrating their skills to enable them to cope with the Christmas rush and customer expectations. For example, to date we have produced more than 2000 portions of Christmas pudding, designed plans for our gingerbread houses, and cooked up a menu of treats to be enjoyed for the month ahead. We always look forward to the New Year as the spring term, January to Easter, is like the meat in the sandwich of the three terms, when students start to display some of their learning through assessment, by showcasing the quality of their practical work. I’d like to wish customers and students a really joyful and peaceful festive season and a happy, prosperous New Year from all of us at the Hotel School.

WANT TO KNOW WHAT REALLY GOES ON IN THE KITCHENS OF THE HOTEL SCHOOL AT CITY COLLEGE NORWICH? EMMA OUTTEN GOES ON A LEARNING WALK WITH CURRICULUM PROGRAMME MANAGER JOE MULHALL

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EARNING THE ART of professional cookery at City College is far more than a simple case of following a recipe up on the whiteboard. We’re standing in one of the kitchens in the Hotel School, and the smell of poached pear and mulled wine fills the air. Sixteen-year-old Jess Randall, a Level 2 Professional Cookery student, is put to the test: ‘So why are you poaching and not boiling the pears?’ asks Curriculum Programme Manager Joe Mulhall. It’s all part and parcel of the regular Learning Walks at City College. Joe explains the purpose of them: ‘They are an opportunity for us to really assess the quality of the teaching and the learning that’s going on for those students in those particular classes. ‘We go to the classrooms to talk to the students and it gives us managers a really clear picture of what is going on. ‘I always enjoy taking the opportunity to talk to the students about their learning experience and to ensure that they are in a learning environment appropriate for them and that they are challenged appropriately. For example, it may be that we are looking at industry standards in a hospitality and catering practical session, so that could mean seeing if a student is wearing the correct uniform.’ He adds: ‘It enables us to reflect and make quality improvements, as we our mission is to deliver outstanding quality for teaching and learning in our programmes.’ With the current emphasis on end of year exams, a lot more theory is embedded into these practical lessons - as well as English and maths, as a number of the students will be sitting GCSEs in both. Jess didn’t mind being put on the spot, or doing the theory, as she says: ‘It helps you think and remember - I’m more of a visual learner and so write things down step by step.’ It sounds as though the teachers don’t mind the Learning Walks either, with teacher Martin Smith saying: ‘The recipes are all up there on the whiteboard but the Learning Walks make sure that we evolve and that the students understand. ‘I question them every day, so hopefully, if Joe questions them as well, they won’t freeze! That’s what these technical certificates are all about: understanding and being able to recall knowledge at all times,’ he adds. Come exam time, 25 per cent of the mark will be related to recall and understanding.

In the next kitchen, the Professional Cookery Advanced Technical Diploma Level 3 students are producing banana bread for the cafe, but the lesson is about much more than that, as Sue Kesseck explains: ‘They are doing chemical aeration - it’s about saying ‘why put bicarbonate of soda in there and when does it react?’ If they were to answer an exam question about it they would need to talk about the science behind it.’ And she adds: ‘They are not just going out of the kitchen saying ‘we made banana bread’; they’ve gone out understanding and learning about technical terms, the equipment and the process. ‘It’s not just a cooking lesson - there’s a lot more to it than that. If we were just to say ‘look at the recipe on the board and off you go’, there’s no understanding. They are just following a process - it’s understanding the process that’s the difference. They can then begin to develop their creative side.’ Finally, over in the bakery, the Level 2 students are learning all about food safety and health and safety, with teacher Moira Hinde firing off questions about the Health and Safety At Work Act. Manual handling is another hot topic, as she explains: ‘They need to understand that when we’re baking things in here we have lots of hot trays - the rule is hot trays always go at the bottom so that they know they don’t grab it with their hands.’

VISIT

www .ccn

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WE WISH YOU A

CHARLOTTE & OLIVER GURNEY

White House Farm

MERRY CHRiSTMAS! CHARLOTTE GURNEY IS FULL OF FESTIVE CHEER AS SHE LOOKS BACK AT QUITE A YEAR AT THE FAMILY FARM Norwich's best destinations for retail and indulgence! Our hairdresser, beautician, gift shop, dance studio, ladies' clothing shop and children's nursery are all thriving one year on and it is wonderful to have them with us. Our greatest achievement, and where we have most pride, was our win at Battle of the Bangers: the Norfolk Sausage competition which asks the public to vote for their favourite sausage/butcher. No one was more amazed than us when the result was read out on a hot June day and it was the accolade we needed to firmly put Steve, our butcher, on the map. He has already had a glowing career of his own, but it was certainly a morale boost for Jack, our apprentice. Other highlights have included our brilliant Plant Fair, where BBC Norfolk Radio’s The Garden Party broadcast live from the event, interviewing all the gardening enthusiasts that listened intently in our courtyard. There have been many farmers' markets, a bumper Christmas Market last month, and our CBeebies appearance on the BBC - certainly a highlight for the team! We always strive to evolve and improve and have much planned for 2018, including a new menu. We've listened to feedback and hope we've created a special list of goodies to choose from, not to mention our daily array of cakes! We send goodwill to our customers, suppliers and beyond wishing everyone a very Happy Christmas and prosperous New Year! • Our next Farmers’ Market is on December 16. Entry and parking are FREE

CHRISTMAS TIME brings an extra aura of joviality to our farmshop and community at White House Farm. The team spirit is roaming through the different shops on the farm, the beautician, gift shop etc, and there was even a cheer for the farmer as he teetered at the top of his ladder putting up our slender Christmas tree. It was carefully chosen by three generations of Gurneys as we stood in the wood, looking up, wondering which one to go for, while Freekah the labrador bothered poor unsuspecting mice at the other end! It is, of course, the moment we catch up with customers who haven't been in for a while and we hear their Christmas plans and where they're taking their prize Norfolk turkey from our butcher, to enjoy the family celebrations. Some make it to Lincoln, some to Leicestershire and the odd one to Corfu! Wherever the end destination, our team of butchers wrap and pack each bird lovingly, carefully labelling them until their collection on Christmas Eve. It's community spirit at its finest and reminds me of the highlights of starting your own business and really knowing the people who shop with you from week to week. Likewise we'll be celebrating Christmas this month with our staff and it is the perfect moment to enjoy a glass or two and look back on the year that has passed and all our achievements. Sometimes, with a young family and an ever evolving business, it is easy to gloss over these golden milestones and December is a good moment for reflection. I am delighted to say we have had many new joiners this year and, due to our bustling cafe, we always tend to be creating new opportunities. Flashing back to the year of 2017, in January, we took the plunge and opened our converted farm units to shops and services. It was a great leap, asking other businesses to join our ride as we become one of

WHITE HOUSE FARM, WROXHAM ROAD, NORWICH TEL 01603 419357 OR VISIT WWW.NORWICH-PYO.CO.UK

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Season's

Greetings from Diss & Harleston

THE MARKET TOWNS OF DISS AND HARLESTON, CLOSE TO THE RIVER WAVENEY, PROVIDE A RICH HUNTING GROUND FOR FOOD AND DRINK LOVERS. SARAH HARDY EXPLORES

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ISS AND HARLESTON are thriving market towns set in ancient countryside, teeming with artisan producers. They hover on the boundary of Norfolk and Suffolk and are home to tearooms, pubs, delis and more the majority are independent, family-run businesses who equally support local producers. Diss, with its six acre mere, now boasts its Heritage Triangle, and it’s a pleasure to wander the streets and courtyards to see what you can find. Look out for Fredricks Fine Foods, where Juliette and John Atkinson run a great deli packed with breads, olives, antipasti, salads, wines, cakes, cheeses and more. They also offer an outside catering business - perfect for those canape parties you all have planned! Nearby is the Gluten Free Food Store, where you will find literally hundreds of products for those with intolerances. There are lovely hampers which are great Christmas presents, plus a comprehensive range of beers. Amandines Café, in a lovely converted Victorian redbrick warehouse, is the place for vegetarian and vegan food, and has been for almost 30 years, while a new Italian, Puccini’s, is set to open and we can’t wait to try it out!


WEAVERS WINE BAR AND EATING HOUSE

DISS MERE

THE CORN HALL

The Adnams Store, converted from an old skittle alley, holds regular events and there’s always something new to try - we love their Rye whisky, and the Broadside Xmas puds are delicious! The Apiary, a buzzing cake and coffee house, is run by Michael Chappell and Nicola Penny, who use their own honey in many of their yummy products. They serve Paddy and Scott’s coffee and also stock local products such as Peachey’s Preserves, plus they make up fabulous hampers and offer an outside catering service. For something a bit different but bursting with freshness and sheer flavour is the Japanese restaurant, Momiji. Run by husband and wife team, Taka and

www.feastnorfolkmagazine.co.uk

FREDRICKS FINE FOODS

On Market Hill is the Diss institution which is Weavers Wine Bar and Eating House - the place to go for sophisticated dishes. William Bavin has been at stove since 1987 so knows what he’s doing, just as Katrina, his partner, is confident front of house. The fixed-price menu makes good use of local produce and Weavers has its own kitchen garden so you won’t get fresher veg! Other places that caught my eye included Diss Ironworks - who wouldn’t want one of their wonderful ranges? And Rooms With A View is full of quirky pieces for the home - I spotted Emma Bridgewater treats on offer. And there’s a full interior design service. The Corn Hall, a glorious Grade II listed building, is the place for culture vultures - and also good food and drink, as Fredricks runs its cafe and Grain beers are also available. Comics, poets, movies, classical music and more take place and this month sees the panto, Aladdin - oh yes it does! Harleston, on the old coaching route from London to Great Yarmouth, also has masses of charm, with an abundance of historic buildings. The 15th century coaching inn, JD Young, is a fine example of the town’s noble past and is still a warm and welcoming hotel. Expect comfy interiors, plenty of choice and a friendly welcome. The nearby 19th century Corn Exchange is now home to an antique and vintage centre, Cornucopia, where the Parlour Tea Rooms offer refreshments after you’ve browsed the two jam-packed floors. The Rustic Catering Company opened a Fine Foods Store in May where you can order a sandwich, their soup of the day or grab a piece of cake. Add in plenty of fresh fruit and veg, typical deli products, an outside catering business and gorgeous hampers, too.They also have a Waffles and Shakes Café nearby, for those of you with a sweet tooth.

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R A MUST FO

CHRISTMAS CANAPÉS


Independent, family run restaurant housed in a 15th Century timber framed building in the market town of Diss. Enjoy relaxed friendly service and locally sourced, seasonal ingredients cooked with care.

BOOK NOW FOR CHRISTMAS

Authentic Japanes e Cuis ine Open Tuesday to Saturday from 6pm

Weavers Wine Bar & Eating House, Market Hill, Diss IP22 4JZ T: 01379 642411 | www.weaversdiss.com

Juliette at

FREDRICKS F I N E F O O D S

THE CHERRY TREE, 74 LONDON RD, HARLESTON, NORFOLK IP20 9BZ T 01379 852288

The Oaksmere - A stunning new dining experience within a unique setting.

A taste of Christmas 9am-12pm Tuesday 9am-4pm Wednesday to Saturday Norfolk House Courtyard, St. Nicholas Street, Diss, IP22 4LB 01379 652 594 info@fredricksfinefoods.com www.fredricksfinefoods.com Outside catering is our speciality

After extensive investment The Oaksmere is fully open again with a brand new restaurant, lounge and private function rooms.

Enjoy deliciously different dining in a unique setting on the Norfolk and Suffolk border serving locally sourced, top quality ingredients, much from our own butcher’s and kitchen garden. Now taking reservations for this stunning new restaurant, bar and boutique hotel on 01379 873940 or online at theoaksmere.com Also recruiting for various exciting roles within our team. The Oaksmere, Rectory Road, Brome. Eye, Suffolk IP23 8AJ

01379 873940

theoaksmere.com


HARLESTON EAST OF ENGLAND CO-OP

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Charlotte Nakamoto, there is real attention to detail here so it’s no wonder that it’s a firm favourite with many. A set menu makes it easy for all, there’s a Sushi Week once a month that sounds fun and how does baby squid tempura sound? Yes please! Finally, the newish East of England Co-op is another great supporter of local producers so you’ll find everyone from Hillfarm Oils to Aspalls Cyder - plus all your everyday essentials. The surrounding villages are just as interesting. For a start, there’s the immediately impressive Oaksmere Hotel, with its 10 bedrooms and four suites, ultra jazzy cocktail bar and highly contemporary restaurant. Although you might find me in the original bar, with its beams, open fire and huge gin collection. Head chef Lee Cooper promises ‘surprising’ puddings - what girl could want more?! And what about the 13th century Old Kings Head Brockdish? Twixt Diss and Harleston? It is such a beautifully done place, with three separate areas, all catering for different times of the day and needs. My eye was taken by the dining area with its rather grand chandelier, and the menu has an enticing Italian slant. You can also enjoy a latte and cake in the morning - with the hound welcome, too. Add in lots of local artwork for sale and regular music events and this is a pub at the heart of the community.

MOMIJI JAPANESE RESTAURANT

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Sushi week every month

HARLESTON HIGH STREET

REGULAR EVENTS

Diary Dates

ADNAMS STORE IN HARLESTON

The Burston Crown, near Diss, is a place for a good time, with lots DEC 2 - Harleston of live music and again masses of Christmas Lights atmosphere. Bev and Steve Kembery Switch On, 3-6pm run this 16th century pub with plenty DEC 10 - St Nicholas of passion and recently won South Winter Fayre Norfolk Council’s community pub of Heritage Triangle, the year for villages with a population Diss, 11-4pm of 551-1100 people. With the Thinking Men performing on New Year’s Eve and a really good choice of local beers on offer, it sounds like just the place to be. Don’t miss Grain Brewery, situated in prime barleygrowing countryside at Alburgh. Set up in 2006, the South Farm site boasts a shop, and the brewery itself, complete with taproom, holds regular open days when you can get up close and personal with all those lovely beers. The next one is December 16. And the family-run Harleston Cider Company, which has been going since 2010, produces CAMRA-winning ciders, vinegars and rubs. Master cider maker Ken Woolley uses East Anglian apples and regular open days are held at the Palgrave site. The next one is also on December 16. And keep your eye out for Alburgh Luxury Ice Cream which has many stockists in the area. Lovingly made by husband and wife team Lucie and Steve Morran on a farm in the village, they use creamy milk from a herd of Guernsey cows to produce rich and deeply satisfying treats whose flavours include honeycomb, stem ginger and the ultra decadent luxury Belgian chocolate.

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WITH THE PARTRIDGE SEASON WELL UNDERWAY, PHOTOGRAPHER KEIRON TOVELL JOINS A SHOOTING PARTY ON THE KELLING ESTATE IN NORTH NORFOLK IN OUR LATEST PHOTO ESSAY


VISIT

www.kelling- estate.co.uk www.pheasanthotelnorfolk.co.uk


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PICTURES BY KEIRON TOVELL

IT WAS DESIGNED to be the finest sporting estate in Norfolk and nowadays boasts a hotel which really knows how to put a field to fork ethos into practice. The 2100-acre Kelling Estate, between Holt and the North Norfolk coast, has a Grade II listed hall built for entertaining shooting, and has been owned by the Widdowson family since 2008. On average, a shoot takes place once a week during the season, usually involving family and friends, and the game goes straight to The Pheasant Hotel, which was acquired by the Estate in 2012.


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PICTURES BY KEIRON TOVELL

Following a complete refurbishment, the hotel reopened in 2013 and now has 30 en suite double bedrooms, two dining rooms, and a bar lounge. The estate owners’ daughter and Hotel Manager, Hayley Robertson, is a keen supporter of limiting food miles and promoting local food, so expect to find partridge, pheasant, and pigeon dishes in various dishes. And any game left over goes to local game dealer CH & EI Bambridge & Sons, explains Estate Manager James Holliday, who is passionate about promoting the link between local farming, tourism and food.


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www.theoaksmere.com

THE GLORIOUS OAKSMERE, set deep in the Waveney Valley, is gearing up for its first Christmas - and has a new management team in place. Owner Fraser Duffin is delighted to introduce his new general manager Gus Gallagher who comes from the Terence Conran boutique hotel, The Boundary, in London’s trendy Shoreditch, so brings more than a splash of capital glamour and years of experience, too. Gus is keen to share his love of The Oaksmere which seems to have almost taken his breath away! ‘From the moment you arrive, with that wonderful drive taking you to the hotel, you know you are somewhere very special,’ he says.

PICTURES BY STUART COX

THE OAKSMERE, A BOUTIQUE HOTEL ON THE NORFOLK/ SUFFOLK BORDER, HAS A NEW HEAD CHEF WHO IS ALL SET FOR THE FESTIVE SEASON AND BEYOND, SAYS SARAH HARDY

The hotel is a Grade II listed Tudor and Victorian building, set in 17 acres of parkland, and has been lovingly restored to now include a highly atmospheric pub and a new restaurant, which can extend onto the terrace, to sit 100. An open pass allows diners to see into the kitchen where Bertha, a British-made oven which burns wood from the estate, has pride of place. Gus continues: ‘We have 10 bedrooms and four suites, two private dining rooms and a cocktail bar, so we can cater for all events, from weddings to corporate functions. But we see fresh, seasonal food as being at the heart of everything.’ He is joined by Lee Cooper as head chef who is just as passionate about the hotel, especially the food he serves. ‘Why wouldn’t I use the wonderful larder right here on our doorstep?’ he says. ‘We are so well

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positioned, in the heart of so much farmland, and also near the coast.’ Indeed, much of the beef comes from Andrew West of Warren Hills Farm whose fields are literally nextdoor, and Lee is a big fan of Blythburgh Free Range Pork. Meat is butchered at the hotel’s own on site butchery. And he quite rightly points out the hotel’s beautiful walled garden, which is being transformed into a very productive spot to provide fruit, vegetables and herbs for his various dishes. ‘I know I am lucky to just walk outside and have so much produce to choose from,’ he says. Lee, who used to work at the Ickworth, a hotel at the National Trust property near Bury St Edmunds, is also brimming over with plans for the party season, including a festive afternoon tea, and beyond. How does al fresco dining in the kitchen garden sound once the better weather arrives? And there are plans for cookery demonstrations, too.


PHEASANT WELLINGTON

The Oaksmere -

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LEE COOPER

Here’s one of Lee’s recipes to try at home, maybe on New Year ’s Eve

INGREDIENTS 2 pheasant breasts; 200g of chicken liver pâté; 2 shallots, finely diced; half a pack of button mushrooms; 4 slices of prosciutto; half a pack of ready made puff pastry METHOD Chop the mushrooms finely and sauté in a little butter until cooked and dry. Set aside to cool. Chop the shallots finely and sauté in a little butter until cooked and dry. Set aside to cool. Flash fry the pheasant breasts in a little very hot oil to sear the outside. Set aside to cool. Wrap the pheasant breast in prosciutto. Roll the pastry 4mm thick into 2 rectangles. Place a rectangle on a sheet of cling film. Coat the pheasant breasts with pâté. Mix the shallots with the mushrooms and place some mushroom mixture on the pastry. Put the coated pheasant breast on top. Using the cling film, roll the pastry and seal around the mixture. Make a hole in the top and decorate with spare pastry. Bake in a Gas Mark 7 oven for 5 minutes then reduce to Gas Mark 5 for another 20 to 30 minutes. I serve mine with some savoy cabbage and steeped prunes and a little game jus, but some roasted root vegetables, mash and gravy wouldn’t be a stranger on this plate

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Where were you before? Before coming here I was the Executive Chef at the Olympic Lagoon Resort in Ayia Napa, Cyprus, and Executive Sous Chef, at St Kitts Marriott Resort and The Royal Beach Casino in the Caribbean. Before that I worked for Marriott in the UK, including

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Sp

or

How long have you been there? I’ve only been here one month! I came back to the UK, from Cyprus, at the beginning of October.

MY LIFE ON A PLATE

st row on M

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ho are you and where do you work? My name is Darren Pryer and I’m the Executive Chef at Sprowston Manor Marriott Hotel and Country Club.

DARR EN PRYE R, executive Chef at Sprowston Manor Marriott Hotel and Country Club, has just landed in Norfolk, having worked in hotels around the world VISIT

www.m arriott .co.uk


Who has inspired you? It has to be my first Head Chef at The Strathdon Hotel, Paul Davey, who taught me all the basics that stand the test of time. I was only 16 and straight out of school whereas he was ex-army and very strict - but also very passionate! Back then, there was a lot more training on the job and we made everything in-house – it was a very good place to work from a learning point of view. What is your favourite ingredient? Anything Italian! They don’t seem to have the same food fads as we do here in England – for example, they’ve got their pasta and you don’t mess about with pasta. They stick to what they know and are good at it. Some people may think that’s boring but I like it, that and the idea of the whole family getting round the table and eating and drinking wine together. Plus the Italians don’t do dishes if they are out of season. Got a favourite gadget? It may not surprise you to know it’s my pasta machine which is still in the loft in my house in Chepstow which I rented out when I worked abroad! I will either have to get it over here or buy a new one! What is your signature dish at this time of year? Seared Mackerel Fillet, Beetroot Gnocchi, Chestnut and Rocket Pesto, because it’s very seasonal – a nice, wintry, hearty dish – and Italian! A lot of chefs like to work

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For the gnocchi: 500g of potatoes, peeled; 250g of cooked beetroot (50g, diced small, to be kept aside for presentation); 1 lemon, juiced (plus zest, to taste); 150g of plain flour; 1 egg; salt and pepper

For the pesto: 1 large bag of ready washed rocket leaves (leaving a small amount back for garnish, and to toss in the gnocchi); 50g of peeled roasted chestnuts; 50g of grated Parmigiano Reggiano; garlic, to taste; extra virgin olive oil, to loosen the sauce; salt and pepper METHOD For the gnocchi: Boil the potatoes until soft. Drain and mash well. Allow to cool. Purée the beetroot and lemon juice in a Nutri Mix blender until smooth. Combine all ingredients in a mixing bowl and mix well. Transfer to a floured surface and knead well then roll in long tubes (the width of sausages but as long as possible), cut into small bite size pieces and place on a floured tray. Refrigerate until required For the mackerel: Ensure that the fillets have had all small pin bones removed from along the centre of the fillet using fish tweezers. On the skin side, make 5-6 light cuts across the fish to assist the cooking process. Ensure that they are not cut too deep For the pesto: Place all the ingredients, bar the olive oil, into your chosen blender. When the ingredients are puréed, slowly add the olive oil until the desired consistency of your pesto. Taste and correct seasoning, if required When ready to cook: Have a pan of boiling, salted water ready on your stove. Heat up a nonstick pan at the same time. Throw the gnocchi into the boiling water. When the gnocchi rise to the top they are cooked. Rub a small amount of oil onto the skin side of the fillet and place fish, skin side down, into the hot pan. Push the fillets down so all of the fish skin gets cooked. After about 3-4 minutes, turn over the fish and turn off the heat, as the residual heat will be sufficient to cook the fish. Strain the now cooked gnocchi. Fry a little in a pre-heated pan, with a small amount of hot oil, so that the individual dumplings become crispy. Add the diced beetroot and chopped rocket. Season as required, turnover, and repeat process. Place the gnocchi in the centre of your chosen large plate or deep pasta bowl. Place the fillet of fish on top of the gnocchi, skin side up. Drizzle the pesto around the side of the gnocchi and garnish with some fresh rocket. Serve

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with fish: it’s that thing of getting a whole fish in and seeing it end up on a plate looking something quite different is quite rewarding. What do you like doing when you're not cooking? Watching football (I support Notts County, although not for the success!), eating out and travelling. I’m lucky enough to have travelled all over the world, with work, and have also been to lots of different countries outside of work. I enjoy trying all the food, wherever I go. Where do you like to eat out in the region? As I’ve only just arrived, I’m still trying to find out where the best places to go are, and am open to suggestions! One place I’ve walked past a number of times, and like the look of, is the Maids Head Hotel in Norwich, so that’s one to try. What would you be doing if you were not a chef? I’ve absolutely no idea, as I’ve been doing this since I was 16 and I’m now 43! I would have liked to have been a footballer but that fell by the wayside and there’s always a need for a chef. What's your foodie prediction for the year ahead? Can I say that Sprowston Manor is going to become the place for great food in 2018? I’m still finding my feet but soon I will be looking at all the local ingredients here in Norfolk.

DARREN PRYER

Where did you train? I trained at The Strathdon Hotel, in Nottingham, where I’m from, back in 1990, and then the Nottingham Moat House Hotel, before moving to London in 1996.

Seared Mackerel, Crispy Beetroot Gnocchi, Chestnut & Rocket Pesto INGREDIENTS Serves 5 5 fillets of mackerel

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at the Hotel and Country Club in Chepstow, which is similar to Sprowston Manor; for Jolly hotels, in Italy, which were similar to the 4-star Marriott hotels; and before that Hilton hotels in London. I get around a bit!


Sara By Nature -

R E C I P E S

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ROASTING ON AN OPEN FIRE OUR REGULAR FREE FROM RECIPE WRITER SARA MATTHEWS OFFERS US CHESTNUT ROAST AND CHRISTMAS PUD! SARA MATTHEWS is a qualified trainer, food consultant, recipe developer and food writer. Visit www.sarabynature.com

INGREDIENTS 4 slices of gluten free bread (I used Bfreed brown seeded as this also adds to the texture and flavour); 1tbsp of rapeseed oil; 1 large onion, finely chopped; 100g of chestnut mushrooms, finely chopped; 2 cloves of garlic, crushed; 400g tin of butter beans, drained and rinsed; 180g of chestnuts, chopped (I used prepacked, Merchant Gourmet whole chestnut which are found in most supermarkets); 60g of dried cranberries; 2 heaped tbsp of pine nuts, roughly chopped; 1tbsp of chopped fresh thyme; 1tbsp of chopped fresh rosemary; 2tbsp of plain soya yogurt; 150ml of vegetable stock; salt and pepper to taste

CHESTNUT ROAST WITH PINE NUTS, MUSHROOMS AND CRANBERRIES

[

[Serves 6-8

This is a delicious twist on a nut roast peppered with little red jewels of sweetness from the cranberries. Fabulous served hot with Christmas dinner or served cold as part of a Boxing Day lunch

ANOTHER RECIPE OVERLEAF

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METHOD Pre-heat the oven to 180ยบC, gas mark 4. Grease a loaf tin. In a frying pan, heat the oil and add the onion and mushrooms and cook on a low heat to soften for 5 minutes, then add the crushed garlic and cook for a further 2-3 minutes. In a food processor, pulse the bread to make fine breadcrumbs. Make the vegetable stock and add the cranberries and set aside for a few minutes to allow the cranberries to plump up a little. In a large bowl, mash the drained butter beans, then add the chopped chestnuts, bread crumbs, herbs, yogurt, plus the stock with cranberries, and mix; add the mushroom mixture and stir to combine. Season to taste. Transfer the mixture to your prepared loaf tin and press down and smooth the top. Cover with foil and bake in pre-heated oven for 11/4 hours, remove from oven, remove foil and then bake for a further 10 minutes. When cooked leave to stand for 10-15 minutes before serving


CHRISTMAS PUDDING WITH CHOCOLATE [Serves 4-6

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I love Christmas pudding, but my children love chocolate pudding, so this is a compromise. It takes a bit of preparation, soaking the fruit overnight, but is an easy pudding that can be made weeks in advance INGREDIENTS 130g of glacé cherries, chopped in half; 60g of raisins; 100g of dates, chopped; 30g of currants; 50g of sultanas; 50g of cranberries; zest and juice of a large orange; 5tbsp of rapeseed oil; 4tbsp of water; 2tbsp of brandy (or cherry brandy or spiced rum), or 2 extra tbsp of water, to be alcoholfree; 1tbsp of date syrup; 50g of plain chocolate, grated; 100g of gluten free bread flour (I used Doves Farm brown bread flour); 1tbsp of cocoa powder (you can also use cacao powder); 2tsp of mixed spice

METHOD Place all the fruit in a bowl, along with the orange zest and juice, water, brandy and date syrup, stir to combine, cover and leave to stand overnight to allow the fruit to plump up and absorb the liquid. The next day, grate in the plain chocolate, add the mixed spices, oil and flour, and mix with the fruit mix. Stir to combine (this is quite a sticky mixture). Grease the sides of a 1 litre pudding basin, transfer the mixture to the basin and press down and flatten. Cover the mix with two circles of baking parchment, then cover the bowl with silver foil, and secure with string around the rim. Place the pudding in a large saucepan, half fill with boiling water, cover with lid and simmer gently for 4 hours. Keep an eye on it and top up with water as it gets low to maintain the water level in the saucepan. Remove from the water and allow to cool. Remove the foil and parchment and replace with new before storing until needed. To serve, simmer the pudding for an hour, then turn out onto your serving dish. Garnish with dark fruits or leave plain and serve with custard or ice-cream

Charity Calendar

Sara has put together a 2018 calendar which is now available. Packed with 12 gluten-free, plant-based recipes, it costs £10, including a £2 donation to local food banks and gifted food services, gifting food that is safe to eat and free from for those following restricted diets. Visit her website for more.

www.feastnorfolkmagazine.co.uk

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KINGS ARMS

FREEHOUSE • FLEGGBURGH

Restaurant & Country Pub

XMAS BOOKINGS now being taken

strattons hotel

See our website for the menu

with self catering, restaurant and café deli

boutique luxurious classic contemporary heart of norfolk award winning restaurant afternoon tea cocoes café deli self catering Luxury without sacrifice to the environment ash close swaffham norfolk pe37 7nh 01760 723845 enquiries@strattonshotel.com www.strattonshotel.com Fine Dining & Bar Meals

Events Room Weddings & Functions

Large Outdoor Eating Area & Kids Play Area

Real Local Ales & Speciality Beers & Wines

HomeGrown Fruit & Veg

The Kings Arms, Main Rd, Fleggburgh, Gt Yarmouth NR29 3AG T: 01493 368333 www.kingsarmsfleggburgh.com

17510_RN_Ads_Portrait_Cols_PRINT_Layout 1 12/10/2017 17:38 Page 1

K R O O O F BW O N

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HAVE A FEAST THIS CHRISTMAS

THE WELLS CRAB HOUSE SEAFOOD RESTAURANT

SEASONAL L UN C H E S FRO M £ 1 7 .9 5 F EST IV E N I G H T S FROM £20.95 CH R IST M AS AFT E R N OO N T E A £ 1 5 Get together and indulge with family, friends or work colleagues at this special time of year at Norfolk’s premier golf club. All food is locally sourced and all prices are per person.

CHRISTMAS PARTIES

PARTIES WELCOME

Available 1st-23rd (excluding 19th December as we are closed). Pre-order and deposit required.

2 courses for £16.50 or 3 courses for £20.00

Please note: We close for our Winter Break on Jan 5th & reopen the evening of Feb 2nd

BOOK NOW 01603 429928 www.royalnorwichgolfclub.co.uk Royal Norwich, Drayton High Road, Hellesdon, Norwich, NR6 5AH

38-40 Freeman street WELLS-NEXT-THE-SEA CALL US ON 01328 710456 WWW.WELLSCRABHOUSE.CO.UK


Sara By Nature -

R E C I P E S

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GLUTEN FREE & VEGAN

Makes 4 small or 3 medium

PANNACOTTA

This delicious Pannacotta recipe uses coconut cream to make it dairy free, and agar flakes, a gelling agent made from sea vegetables often used in Japanese cuisine, to thicken

INGREDIENTS 400ml can of full fat coconut milk (before you use, shake to mix the fats, cream and water); 11/2tsp of agar flakes or agar powder; 3tbsp of agave syrup (you could replace this with a mild flavoured honey if you prefer but reduce to 2tbsp); 1 vanilla pod, opened and seeds removed (or 1/2tsp vanilla bean paste) METHOD In a large saucepan, add the coconut milk, agave syrup, vanilla and agar flakes, stir and leave for 10 minutes. Bring the mix to a boil, turn down and gently simmer for 10-15 minutes (if using powder this may only take 5-10 minutes), stirring occasionally until the agar has dissolved. Remove from the heat, allow to cool for a couple of minutes, then pour into your moulds. If you are using ramekins and wish to turn out the Pannacotta before serving, make sure you lightly grease the ramekins. This dessert also looks lovely served in glasses. Place into the fridge to allow the Pannacotta to set for about 2 hours. Serve with fruit (I love it served with passion fruit, but serve with what you love best - rhubarb and ginger is a gorgeous combination you may want to try).

www.feastnorfolkmagazine.co.uk

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MASTERCHEF: THE PROFESSIONALS PRESENTER MARCUS WAREING LAUNCHES HIS NEW COOKBOOK, NEW CLASSICS, JUST IN TIME FOR ALL THAT CHRISTMAS ENTERTAINING!

NE W CL ASSICS

is published by HarperCollins at £20

PICTURES BY JONATHAN GREGSON

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C E L E B R I T Y

C O O K B O O K

OW A HOUSEHOLD NAME, Marcus Wareing learnt his skills the hard way - as a protegé of the original Mr Nasty: Gordon Ramsay. Originally from Lancashire and with a dad in the fruit and potato wholesale trade, Marcus trained at Southport College (gaining a City and Guilds) before moving to London at the tender age of 18. Working under the likes of Anton Edelmann and Albert Roux, and hooking up with Ramsay, saw him involved in numerous leading restaurants such as the Savoy Grill and Petrus. He gained many awards and Michelin stars along the way, as well as rather spectacularly falling out with Ramsay, and now has three restaurants in London - Marcus at the Berkeley, Tredwells in Seven Dials and The Sir Gilbert Scott at St Pancras. In his late 40s, he is married with three children, and considered by his peers to be somewhat of a workaholic perfectionist - like many chefs! He has written several cookbooks over the years and New Classics is his seventh publication. With chapters comprising From The Farm, Sea, Garden and Store Cupboard, these are recipes that will soon become much loved classics, to be brought out again and again. The Gilbert Scott’s and Tredwells’ Chantelle Nicholson, who’s worked alongside Marcus for the last 14 years, once again joins him as co-author. Marcus says: ‘I am immensely proud of what has been created with New Classics. I truly believe this is my best cookbook yet; the product of all of the recipes I have been refining over the past two decades.’

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[Serves 4

GRILLED SCALLOPS

WITH GREEN CHILLI AND CORIANDER SALSA, PEACH AND BUTTERMILK

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Preparation time: 10 minutes, plus 6 hours straining Cooking time: less than 5 minutes INGREDIENTS 120ml of buttermilk; 1tbsp of vegetable oil; 12 medium or 6 large scallops, roe removed; 1 ripe peach, halved and cut into 3mm-thick slices; Sea salt and freshly ground black pepper; coriander cress or small coriander leaves, to serve For the green chilli and coriander salsa Grated zest and juice of 1 lime; 1 garlic clove, finely grated; small green chilli, deseeded and roughly chopped; 1tbsp of rice wine vinegar METHOD Put the buttermilk in a sieve lined with a piece of muslin cloth and place the sieve over a bowl. Put the sieve and bowl in the fridge for 6 hours. Scrape the strained buttermilk out of the muslin cloth, put it into a clean bowl and whisk it. To make the salsa, blend all the ingredients together in a small food processor, or in a jug or bowl with a stick blender, until smooth. Season to taste with sea salt and pepper. Heat the vegetable oil in a large frying pan over high heat. Season the scallops. When the oil in the pan is almost smoking, place the scallops in the pan, one by one, in a clockwise configuration. As soon as you have put the last scallop in the pan, start turning the first scallop over, then continue one by one in the same clockwise direction. They will be done after about a minute or so on each side. Remove from the pan. To serve, divide the salsa between 4 plates then arrange the scallops and peach slices on top. Add a dollop of the strained buttermilk and sprinkle over the coriander cress or coriander leaves

MORE RECIPES OVERLEAF


WITH CHORIZO

Preparation time: 40 minutes Cooking time: around 3 hours 30 minutes INGREDIENTS 4tbsp of vegetable oil; 4tbsp of plain flour; 11/2tsp of table salt; freshly ground black pepper; 800g of braising steak, cut into 2cm chunks; 200g of small shallots, peeled; 2tbsp of tomato purée; 2 garlic cloves, grated; 1/4 bunch of thyme, tied together with string; 2 bay leaves; 150g of cooking chorizo, skin removed and diced into 1cm chunks; 200ml of ale; 600ml of beef stock; 1tsp of sweet smoked paprika; 320g sheet ready-rolled allbutter puff pastry; 2tbsp of finely chopped flatleaf parsley; 2tbsp of finely chopped coriander; 2 egg yolks, beaten

www.feastnorfolkmagazine.co.uk

[Serves 4-6

[

BEEF & ALE PIE

METHOD Preheat the oven to 140°C. Heat 2 tablespoons of the vegetable oil in a large, ovenproof casserole dish over high heat. Mix the flour, 1 teaspoon of the salt and a pinch of black pepper together, then toss the steak in the flour and shake off any excess. When the oil is hot, add a batch of the steak and fry until well browned. Remove the steak and set it aside, brown the remaining beef, then remove it and set it aside with the rest. Add the remaining 2 tablespoons of vegetable oil to the casserole over medium-high heat, add the shallots and remaining 1/2 teaspoon of the salt and fry until golden, then add the tomato purée, garlic, thyme and bay leaves and cook for a further 3 minutes. Add the chorizo and cook for a further 3 minutes. Add the ale to the pan and bring to a simmer, scraping the bottom of the dish with a wooden spoon to maximise flavour. When the alcohol has reduced to a syrup, add the beef stock and paprika. Simmer over medium-high heat for 15 minutes to reduce the liquid then return the beef to the pan. Stir well, cover and place in the oven for 2 hours. Meanwhile, roll out the puff pastry to fit a pie dish around 24cm in diameter, with a 1cm overhang. Place back in the fridge on a baking sheet for 30 minutes to rest. Remove the casserole from the oven and increase the oven temperature to 180°C. Remove the thyme and bay leaves from the dish then gently stir in the chopped parsley and coriander. Spoon the casserole mixture into the pie dish. Brush the edges of the chilled puff pastry with the egg yolk and cover the pie dish, pressing the pastry into the edge of the pie dish to seal. Cut a hole in the centre of the pastry then brush all over with the egg yolk. Place the pie back in the oven for 25-30 minutes until the pastry is a deep golden colour

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C E L E B R I T Y

C O O K B O O K

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INGREDIENTS 75g of butter, plus extra for greasing; 40g of caster sugar, plus 1tbsp extra; 2 eggs; 40g of golden syrup; 100g of plain flour; 1tsp of baking powder; 2 40g chocolate-covered honeycomb bars, roughly chopped; cocoa powder, to dust; crème fraîche or ice cream, to serve METHOD Lightly butter four ramekins and sprinkle them evenly with the tablespoon of sugar. Put the eggs and 40g of caster sugar in a mixing bowl and whisk on high speed until light and fluffy. Melt the 75g of butter with the golden syrup in a pan then stir it into the eggs and sugar, and fold in the flour and baking powder. Put a large spoonful of the pudding mixture into the bottom of the ramekins. Sprinkle the crushed honeycomb on top. Finish by spooning the remaining pudding mix over the honeycomb. Smooth over the surface with a palette knife. Sit the ramekins on a baking tray and bake for around 15 minutes, until the puddings puff up and become golden. Remove from the oven and leave the puddings to rest for 1-2 minutes, then dust with cocoa powder and serve with a spoonful of crème fraîche or ice cream

[

[Serves 4

BAKED HONEYCOMB PUDDINGS Preparation time: 10 minutes Cooking time: 15 minutes

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Ready, Steady, COOK! Celebrity cookbooks dominate our new releases this month, with the doyenne of British cooking, Mary Berry, leading the charge

COMING SOON

BRITAIN'S BEST COOK by Mary Berry ÂŁ26

Hurrah! Mary Berry is back on our TV screens with a fresh new series called Britain’s Best Cook. With Mary as judge and Claudia Winkleman as presenter, the eight-part series sees 10 cooks compete for the title. This cook book accompanies the series and includes 120 new, dependably foolproof, recipes so even more complex dishes can be achieved, such as roast pork with traditional apple sauce or French onion soup. All are presented in a straightforward fashion, with plenty of helpful tips. This is a perfect gift for all keen and/or aspiring home cooks.


Cookbooks

LOSE WEIGHT FOR GOOD

by Tom Kerridge £20

THE 28 DAY ALCOHOL FREE CHALLENGE by Andy Ramage and Ruari Fairbairns

GORDON RAMSAY'S ULTIMATE FIT FOOD by Gordon Ramsay

Michelin-starred chef Tom Kerridge knows how to lose weight having lost an incredible 11 stone over the past four years by following a low calorie diet. Published to tie-in with his new television series, Tom demonstrates how to adopt a healthy approach to eating to lose weight for good.

£25

£12.99

An alcohol detox sounds daunting but Andy Ramage and Ruari Fairbairns show that it can be done. They began their website One Year No Beer to connect like-minded people who, for one reason or another, wanted to take a break from alcohol. Andy and Ruari cover the potential challenges this brings such as having fun at parties, resisting the appeals of friends to 'just have one' and how to make the most of all the benefits of being sober.

Whether you're training for a triathlon or something a little less ambitious, Michelin-starred chef Gordon Ramsay shares his method for eating well. Divided into three sections for three slightly different health objectives: Healthy, for general well-being; Lean, for healthy weight loss and Fit, to energise pre- and post workout , each offers breakfast, lunch, supper, sides and snack combinations.

Don 't miss

JOLLY GOOD FOOD: A CHILDREN'S COOKBOOK INSPIRED BY THE STORIES OF ENID BLYTON by Allegra McEvedy £14.99

DI AR Y DA TE S

December 10

TANYA BURR is signing copies of her new book, Tanya's Christmas, on December 10 from 10am at Jarrold’s. Tickets are £16.99, whi ch includes a copy of the book, and are availabl e from Customer Services, floor 2, or online at ww w.jarrold.co.uk.

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For those who always dreamt of having picnics with the Famous Five, midnight feasts with the Mallory Towers girls or party teas with the Folk from the Faraway Tree, you can! This book contains several rather good recipes by top chef and TV Junior Bake Off judge Allegra McEvedy, with story tasters from the Blyton books too. A great stocking filler!


P R O M O T I O N

01.

HAPPY HAMPERS

03.

MAKE SURE CHRISTMAS IS ALL WRAPPED UP THIS YEAR, BY GIVING THE FOODIE IN YOUR LIFE THE GIFT OF A HAMPER. IF IT’S PACKED WITH NORFOLK PRODUCE, SO MUCH THE BETTER, SAYS EMMA OUTTEN 1. EARSHAM STREET DELI, BUNGAY The team at Earsham Street Deli believes in keeping the busy festive build-up as stress free as possible, and offers tailor-made hampers. They have something to suit every taste, including those who are ‘hard to buy for’ or those who love local products; or else they have something for the chef in the family, or something just for pure indulgence. You can leave it to them to create something bespoke just for you, or pop in and select your own hamper then leave them to present your selection in one of their beautiful wicker baskets, all wrapped and tied with jute ribbon. If you can’t make a visit, please do send them an email or give them a call – they can even arrange mail order. Visit www.earshamstreetdeli.co.uk or call 01986 894754

so a food and drink hamper should be on your festive shopping list. The team has carefully curated gift hampers to suit any budget, from specialised hampers to more general fare, or you can even create your own hamper full of a loved one’s favourite treats. Top hampers this year include Made Norfolk In A Box (£27.50); the Gin And Pop gift box hamper (£45) and the Chocoholic’s Gift Box (£15). Visit www.jarrold.co.uk or call 01603 660661

02.

2. JARROLD’S, NORWICH Perfect for the foodie in your life, a food and drink hamper from the Deli and Wine Bar, on the lower ground floor, makes a delightful gift this Christmas. Even if you don’t know a dedicated foodie, there is sure to be something from the Deli that will appeal to any personality,

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3. SCRUMMY PIG, WROXHAM BARNS Proudly Norfolk shop Scrummy Pig, run by Jewelene Fish (under the watchful eye of parents Mike and Samantha), supplies hampers all year round. Customers can choose to have their hamper pre-packed and boxed, or presented open and gift wrapped


with a bow. Jewelene says: ‘We pride ourselves on providing what the customer wants, so we tend not to have readymade hampers; it’s very much a bespoke service. For example, take our £39 hamper: should a customer not want, say, Candi’s Onion Crier Marmalade and prefer one of her other products instead, it's a simple swap which has no cost impact. Most of our customers simply pick up a basket, select from the shelves what they want in it and we pack or wrap it for them there and then or for an agreed collection date.’ Visit www.scrummypig.co.uk or call 01603 783211 4. BAKERS AND LARNERS, HOLT Bakers and Larners is proud to present - new for Christmas 2017 its exclusive Local Luxuries hamper. Featuring the region’s finest produce, from the award-winning Winbirri vineyards, to Woodforde’s, Candi’s Chutney, Norfolk Garden Preserves, Kettle Chips, and many more, the seasonal feast provides a true taste of Norfolk. For customers looking to make their hamper

04.

truly unique, the independent department store is happy to accommodate any bespoke requirements. Each hamper can be accompanied with a B&L greeting card and personal message upon request. The Local Luxuries hamper is one of 26 available this season. Visit www.bakersandlarners.co.uk or call 01263 712244 5. GREEN PASTURES NURSERY, BERGH APTON Green Pastures Plant Centre and Farm Shop has a variety of readymade hampers this Christmas, not least The 05. Norfolk Hamper, which is available in three sizes and reflects the fact that the farm shop specialises in local produce. Goodies include jams, pickles, marmalade, honey, chocolate, cookies, pickles, oils, dressings, sauces, wine, beer or cider and much more. Or else there’s The Chocolate Lover’s Hamper (with most of the chocolates sourced locally from some of the region’s most innovative producers, including truffles from Booja Booja); a Gluten Free Hamper; a Bird Lover’s Hamper; a Mum’s Hamper; a Dad’s Hamper and a Norfolk Ale Selection Hamper. The 06.

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team is also happy to offer a hamper delivery service and a bespoke hamper making service. Visit www.greenpasturesnursery.co.uk or call 01508 480848 6. TUSCAN FARM SHOP, BURNHAM MARKET Tuscan winegrower Wanda Djebbar’s Tuscan Farm shop in Burnham Market is showcasing Tuscany with their own grown wine, olive oil and other artisan produce in seasonal hampers. Truffled Pecorino cheese from the farm neighbouring Wanda’s vineyard features in the Truffle Treat, paired with pure truffle paste and some truffle honey. Dramatic, tasty, black squid ink pasta from Pisa features in the Sea Savoury hamper, along with squid ink sauce. Both invite some fresh Norfolk seafood on board! The (recycled) Tomato Tin is a cook/grow combo with speciality olive paste, tomatoes and pasta to cook, and the tin and basil seeds are perfect for your kitchen window sill. Montalcino red wine Homagium makes a fine bespoke gift complemented by their Ribusuoli Single Estate olive oil or artisan charcuterie and fine Pecorino cheeses. Seasonal speciality sweet treats such as panforte, ricciarelli or chestnuts in chocolate and alcohol will not disappoint. Visit www.tuscanfarmshop.com or call 01328 730856


www.peeles-blackturkeys.co.uk

Order online NOW - they’re going fast!

fresh meat & poultry PEELE’S NORFOLK BLACK TURKEYS Rookery Farm, Thuxton, Norwich, Norfolk NR9 4QJ

A FINE SELECTION OF FESTIVE & NEW YEA R MEA

01362 850237

TS AVAILABLE

We only stock the best beef, lamb, pork and poultry available PADDOCKS BUTCHERY & DELI STORES Church Farm, Norwich Road, Hethersett NR9 3AS 01603 812437 Paddock Farm Shop, Norwich Road, Mulbarton NR14 8JT 01508 578259

CATERING DIVISION Wood view Farm, Church Lane, Wicklewood, NR18 9QH, 01953 602470

www.thepaddocksbutchery.co.uk

Friends Over?

Coming

Lazy

DAY?

177-179 PLUMSTEAD ROAD, NORWICH NR1 4AB www.archersbutchers.com Tel 01603 434253


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B U T C H E R S

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A BIRD IN THE HAND THE COUNTRYSIDE ALLIANCE USES ITS GAME TO EAT CAMPAIGN TO GET US ALL EATING VENISON, PARTRIDGE, PHEASANT AND MORE. FIND OUT WHY YOU SHOULD

G

ame is wild, natural and free range with a distinctive flavour making it a great alternative to beef, pork, lamb and chicken. And, as it's low in cholesterol and high in protein, game is one of the healthiest meats available today. For example, venison, with its brilliant taste and extra lean meat, is perfect for anyone on a low fat diet. As the popularity of game meat is growing with cooks and chefs alike, supplies are becoming widely available, so keep a look out for the tempting selection of ready-tocook game at your local butcher or in the supermarket. Although the game season is quite short, more and more frozen meat is available for all year round convenience so favourite recipes can be stored in the freezer for future use.

FIVE REASONS TO EAT GAME: 1. Game is wild, natural and freerange. Your butcher should be able to tell you the provenance, so don’t be afraid to ask which estate it has come from. It could be very local to your area. 2. Game is available from many butchers in a variety of cuts during the season. From ovenready whole partridges and pheasant, to portions such as pheasant breasts, venison fillets, diced venison and even sausages! So you are sure to find something to suit the family. 3. Game is easy to cook, in a number of ways. With a variety of cuts comes a variety of recipes you just need your imagination

4. Game meat is generally hung for less time now for a more delicate flavour. It is also incredibly versatile and makes a tasty change from other meats. Venison is a great substitute in most recipes for beef. Next time you make a casserole or pie try using diced venison. Similarly pheasant is a great alternative to chicken in most dishes as is rabbit. 5. Game is good for you. Venison is high in protein, low in saturated fatty acids and contains higher levels of iron than any other red meat. Pheasant and partridge contain a high level of iron, protein, vitamin B(6) and selenium, which helps to protect cells from damage caused by free radicals*.

ROAST PARTRIDGE WITH [Serves SAVOY CABBAGE AND PANCETTA Preparation time - 30 minutes, cooking time - 30 minutes

As we celebrate this special time of year, here’s a roast partridge recipe from Keith Charlish of The Paddocks

*Leatherhead Food International Research 2006.

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[

FOR ILLUSTRATION PURPOSES ONLY

INGREDIENTS 4 partridges; 4 sprigs of thyme; 12 slices of pancetta; 2tbsp of virgin olive oil; 125ml of Port; 1 savoy cabbage; 1 garlic clove, sliced; 1 carrot, finely chopped; half an onion, finely chopped; small celery stick, finely chopped; 150g of cooked chestnuts, roughly chopped; 500ml of chicken stock; salt and black pepper

4

METHOD Preheat the oven to 180°C or 160°C fan, gas mark 4. Stuff the thyme sprig into each partridge, wrap 3 slices of pancetta round each and tie in place. Heat a tbsp of oil in a large oven proof pan and fry the partridges until golden all over. Turn the partridges breast down and transfer the pan to the oven to roast for 6 minutes. Turn the birds over, add the Port to the pan, then roast for further 6 minutes or until the juices run clear. Remove from the oven to rest for 5 minutes. While the partridges are roasting, blanch the savoy cabbage in a saucepan of boiling salted water for 7 mins or until tender then drain well. Heat the remaining oil in a pan and fry the garlic, add the chopped vegetables and chestnuts and cook for 4 to 5 minutes. Add the cabbage and stock. Bring to a simmer, then cook over a low heat, stirring, for 10 minutes or until the stock has reduced and the cabbage becomes slightly caramelised. Season.Spoon the cabbage onto warm plates, place the partridge on top and drizzle over the roasting juices.


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Christmas is coming!

We are ready to take your Christmas orders! Pick up our Christmas brochure in store or order online

TRADITIONAL FAMILY-OWNED & RUN BUTCHER SHOP

Supplying meat, sourced directly from local farms, ensuring quality and traceability. award winning handmade pies & pastries from Clarke’s Farm Kitchen, Hevingham 73 MARKET PLACE, SWAFFHAM PE37 7AQ 01760 721791 SHOP@IMPSONBUTCHERS.CO.UK

Coxfords Butchers

Guild Street Walsingham NR22 6BU 01328 821877 Open 7 days

Farms Shop www.walsingham.co

Norfolk Lavender Lynn Road Heacham PE31 7JE 01485 570002 Open 7 days

@walsinghamfarmshop @walsingfarmshop +walsinghamfarmsshop @walsinghamfarmsshop

PROUDLY NORFOLK All of our produce is sourced locally

FAMILY OWNED

SINCE 1987

RISTMAS AT CH

COXFORDS

Pop in and and see us to discuss your Turkey & Game, Geese, Duck, Pigs in Blankets & Hamper orders

NowtakingChristmasorders 11 MARKET PLACE, AYLSHAM T: 01263 732280

closely with the best local farmers to ensure our meat exceeds expectation! Working

CHRISTMAS & NEW YEAR

Fine selection of Festive and New Year meats available. All from local suppliers

B U T C H E RY

Superior quality flavoursome meats, all locally sourced and fully traceable, for our loyal customers and catering businesses

FA R M K I T C H E N

A delicious range of award-winning meat pies, ready meals, and indulgent sweet and savoury treats, all made on site LOW L A N E FA R M , HEV I NGH A M , NORW ICH N R 10 5QY 01603 75 4 233 SHOP@CL A R K E SBU T CHERY.C O.UK


Swannington Farm to Fork -

P R O M O T I O N

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FARM TO FORK A NORFOLK PIG PRODUCER HAS EXPANDED ITS BUTCHERY TO CATER FOR INCREASED DEMAND. LAURA POTTER EXPLAINS WHAT’S ON OFFER AT THEIR FARM SHOPS THIS CHRISTMAS

GS in blankets " Thousands ofs PI of TURKEYS pass and hundred through their doors."

GREAT GROVE FREE RANGE TURKEY

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SWANNINGTON FARM TO FORK, is a farm shop at the family-run farm at Swannington, visit ww.swanningtonfarmtofork.co.uk

For festive parties and Boxing Day lunches, there are some enticing new offerings. The Festive Banger is a Christmas sausage with a difference - think the best bits of Christmas dinner in a sausage! This year’s Christmas gammon is beautifully marinated in fennel, cloves, cinnamon and star anise to give a subtle seasonal hint with a brown sugar glaze. For something different on Boxing Day, the Swannington Raised Game Pie is deliciously infused with Madeira wine, smoked Swannington bacon and thyme, whilst the venison offering features warming orange and redcurrant flavours. All these new delights are available to sample, alongside traditional favourites, at a Christmas Fair at Farm to Fork and Fish in Horstead on December 2 from 10am to 2pm. There will also be an opportunity to try Great Grove turkeys, both bronze and white, to help you decide which to choose. And there’s mulled wine!

FARM TO FORK AND FISH is a deli, fishmonger and farm shop, in Horstead, visit www.farmtoforktofish.co.uk

PIG PRODUCER Swannington Farm to Fork, based at a 360-acre farm near Reepham, has invested £200,000 in its business, making its butchery three times the size. A year in the making, the expansion has been carefully researched and one of its key features is a specifically designed hanging room to allow longer hanging, plus increased efficiency and airflow around the carcass. The expansion has been built with a greater capacity for wholesale, private butchery and retail orders in mind. The farm, run by Rob and Helen Mutimer, has two retail outlets where you can buy their meats and an impressive range of goodies - a farm shop at the Swannington site, plus a deli, fishmonger and farm shop at nearby Horstead, run with family friends, Nicola and Matthew Colchester. The shops are ready for the busy Christmas period as thousands of pigs in blankets and hundreds of turkeys pass through their doors. Fantastic Great Grove free range turkeys, which are slowly grown in Norfolk woodlands, are available as whole turkeys, crowns and breast roasts, while another popular choice is 28-day aged fore rib of beef. Not only does it taste amazing, it makes a spectacular centrepiece to any Christmas table.


Middle of nowhere, centre of everywhere!

Fresh, local and seasonal is our ethos here at the Saracen’s Head, so come and enjoy a delicious, locally sourced meal with us See us featured in the Norfolk Table Cookbook We are open 7 days a week, but do close in the afternoons. Lunch orders will be taken from 12-2pm Mon to Sat and 12.30-2.30pm on Sundays. Dinner from 6.30-8.30pm Tues to Sat and 6.30-8pm Sunday and Monday. Our opening times may change on Sunday evenings and Monday Lunchtimes in the winter. You are always best to make a booking. Call us on 01263 768909 or email info@saracenshead-norfolk.co.uk

www.saracenshead-norfolk.co.uk

Fresh, local and seasonal is our ethos here at the Saracens. Being in the middle of nowhere is the perfect excuse to come and enjoy a meal whilst you explore this wonderful part of North Norfolk. Our full menu is available every day, lunch and dinner and in addition we have our summer lunch menu from Monday to Saturday. Sunday lunches are very special and we offer the most delicious roast rump of Blickling reared beef. If it’s too far to travel for a meal, why not stay the night and make a quick break of it!

Summer Opening Times In July & August we will be open 7 days a week this summer T H E G I N T R A P Lunch INN orders will be taken from 12.00 to 2.30 to 9.00, except Sundays and Mondays 6.30 to 8.30 is a traditional and Dinner cosy from 17th6.30 century

coaching inn. Serving delicious homemade fare & offering luxurious rooms. Open from 11:30am to late daily

J O I N U S O N 8 TH & 1 5 TH D E C E M B E R FOR A THREE COURSE MEAL AND LIVE MUSIC IN THE BAR

JUST £30PP

CHRISTMAS EVE Live music from the Fried Pirates, mulled wine and roasted chestnuts

NEW YEAR’S EVE 70s fever party with delicious buffet and music throughout the night - £15 a ticket

NOW BOOKIN FO G XMAS R D LUNCHAY

6 High Street, Ringstead, Hunstanton, Norfolk PE36 5JU 01485 525264 www.thegintrapinn.co.uk


Charlie Hodson C O L U M N

THE JESS

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NORFOLK FOOD HERO CHARLIE HODSON IS HELPING TO RAISE FUNDS FOR GORLESTON SWIMMER JESSICA-JANE APPLEGATE BY CREATING A SAUSAGE ROLL TO SELL.

CHARLIE & JESSICA-JANE

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HE EXPLAINS ALL

VISIT

MBE, from Gorleston, near Great Yarmouth. She is working really hard to reach the Tokyo Games in 2020, and already has one gold, two silver and one bronze paralympic medals. Jess swims freestyle, backstroke and butterfly, and has lost a lot of her funding so needs as much help financially as we can manage to keep training to a high level. We want to raise awareness about her and as much money as possible - we plan to sell the sausage rolls at Archer's, Walsingham Farms Shops, and I’d like to use them in the Fur and Feather at Woodbastwick, near Acle, where I’m currently executive head chef. We’re keeping the actual ingredients secret but, yes, it would be true to say that there could well be a drop of Woodforde’s beer involved! It is a great evening, which is open to the public, and free to watch. Use #rolloff on Twitter to enjoy the banter and keep informed!

PICTURES BY SIMON WILKINSON (SWPIX.COM)

www.jessicajaneapplegate.com

THOSE OF YOU who know me will know that I love sausage rolls - but only those created with Norfolk ingredients. Last year saw me win a national competition, The Great Sausage Roll Off, with my sausage roll, From Norfolk With Love, created with lots of local ingredients such as oil from Crush Foods, and Candi’s Chutneys, and meat from Archer's Butchers in Norwich. The competition is held at The Red Lion in Barnes, a gastropub in west London, where Claire and Angus look after us very well. There are usually about 15-20 entries, including some very well known names; there’s a team of celebrity judges, and Melissa Cole, beer sommelier and food writer, is the host. This year we are returning on January 24 with a Jamie Archer recipe and we’ve called it The Jess - in honour of paralympic swimmer Jessica-Jane Applegate

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JUSTIN WRIGHT

Lovewell Blake -

C O L U M N

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LIGHT AT THE END OF THE TUNNEL

JUSTIN WRIGHT, OF LOVEWELL BLAKE’S SPECIALIST FOOD AND DRINK TEAM, SEES REASON FOR CAUTIOUS OPTIMISM AS WE MOVE INTO A NEW YEAR

VISIT

www.lovewell-blake.co.uk

AS 2017 DRAWS to a close, it seems hard to be optimistic about the situation that the food and drink sector finds itself in. The UK’s top 150 food businesses have reported a 0.8 per cent drop in revenue and, perhaps more worryingly, decreases in capital investment. Every part of the food and drink industry, from agriculture to the restaurant trade, has faced huge cost pressures, with the introduction of, and steady rise in, the National Living Wage, auto enrolment, soaring business rates and pressure on input costs caused by the post-referendum slump in the value of sterling. Meanwhile, many have seen the migrant workforce on which so much of the sector relies become increasingly jittery due to uncertainty over what will happen post-Brexit, while consumer confidence has taken a knock for much the same reasons. At a recent business briefing in Norwich, we were told that because of all this, businesses are increasingly starting to look inwards, trying to ensure that they trim the fat, enhance productivity, looking critically at how things are done, and generally make more of themselves. Looking at those tiny aspects within a business can add up. Whilst this introspection is driven by intense economic pressure, it may well be that it is also the beginning of a route out of the pessimism. The UK as a whole needs to find a way of boosting our doggedly

lagging productivity levels; the food and drink sector is not immune from this. Although times are undoubtedly challenging, I see some reasons for optimism as we move into 2018. The inflationary pressures created by the fall in the pound will start to work their way out of the system, and sterling’s continuing weakness will boost those businesses looking to export. Whatever happens at the Brexit negotiations, a picture of how the post-Brexit world is going to look one way or the other - will have to emerge in 2018. We may not like what we see but, at least the uncertainty that we see in so much of our economy will start to dissipate. Also, whilst the mainstream big players in the food market are suffering, those smaller producers who have found a niche continue to do well. It is these artisan producers who are contributing to the continued strength of Brand UK in the export market. I hope that 2018 will be the year in which we finally see a glimmer of light at the end of the tunnel, as a level of much-needed certainty starts to return, allowing us to take advantage of the infrastructure as a trading nation that we still have in food and drink. As we sit down to our Norfolk Black turkey on Christmas Day, we can reflect that quality will always have a market – and quality is something we do so well in Norfolk. Above all else, it will be this that will give me that greater sense of optimism in the New Year.

DISCLAIMER: Please note this article is provided for your information only. Whilst every effort has been made to ensure its accuracy, information contained herein may not be comprehensive and you should not act upon it without seeking professional advice.

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A TASTE FOR THE UNEXPECTED RACHAEL YOUNG SIPS AND SLURPS HER WAY THROUGH A WINE PAIRING EVENT IN NORTH NORFOLK VISIT

www.briarfieldshotelnorfolk.co.uk, www.petergrahamwines.com AND www.hatchmansfield.com

SOMETIMES IGNORANCE IS BLISS. What I know about wine leaves me feeling I could do better, especially when you consider I was married to a wine seller for a good few years! I’ve not been to a wine tasting event for quite some time and, with Briarfields in Titchwell hosting, I was keen to learn more. Joined by a friend, we both breathed a sigh of relief as we arrived in our room, not just because it had a vaulted ceiling and freestanding bath, but also because, somehow, Briarfields makes you feel so relaxed. After a quick freshen up, we headed to the restaurant to join the rest of the party. With a theme of New versus Old, the five-course dinner comprised a delicious French onion soup, hake with moules marinière, duck a l’orange and chocolate delice. Each was paired with two wines from Briarfields’ wine merchant, Louisa Turner of Peter Graham Wines. Our host, Simon Evetts, of Hatch Mansfield, talked through what was drunk without making me feel out of my depth. Simon also had some fascinating facts to share, too. For instance, did you know that across the globe 32 billion bottles of wine a year are

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consumed? And the top per head consumer? Andorra. The UK comes in at a measly 29th. I thought I would prefer Old World all the way, my favoured style coming from France or Italy. I liked the French Quincy Le Rimonet and Côtes du Rhône Blanc Colombo et Fille more than the New World Sauvignon Blanc for example. But Simon demonstrated that you can benefit from an open mind when it comes to wine. The Cleefs Classic Chenin Blanc from South Africa and Australian Signature Aurelia Pinot Noir Chardonnay NV were both firm favourites of mine on the night. I now know that I don’t like a honeyed wine, or anything too grassy; I prefer something light, fresh and crisp, be that Old or New World. Well done to Simon for sharing his passion for wine without alienating his audience, and demonstrating that even a little wine knowledge goes a long way to help you choose your perfect bottle.


heyday s i h n i Y AND

THE DECADE WHICH SHAPED WHAT IS IN OUR GLASSES TODAY:

THE 1980S ANDY NEWMAN CELEBRATES THE DECADE WHICH SAW MOMENTOUS CHANGE BOTH FOR HIMSELF AND FOR THE WORLD OF WINE

s Three wine Andy has is en joyed th month

01.

Château Musar, Bekaa Valley, Lebanon, 2006 (Majestic, £22.49 as part of a mixed case of six bottles) 2006 once again saw the vintage made in a war zone, this is a third each of cabernet Sauvignon, Cinsault and Carignan. Aged for longer than usual – the wine was only released for sale in 2014 – it has the dry complexity of a mature claret, combined with blueberries and red cherries.

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Volnay Premier Cru En Chevret, Louis Latour, 2011 (Waitrose, £47.50) Decent Burgundy is never cheap, and this is no exception – but it is beautifully balanced, with a wonderfully complex Pinot Noir nose, and a lovely structure bringing together fruit, acidity and tannin. Wait for Waitrose’s periodic 25% off weekends and it becomes a steal.


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W I N E

THEY SAY THAT nostalgia isn’t what it used to be, and yet we all like wallowing in our past, particularly periods which marked big changes in our own lives the decades in which we came of age, got married or started a family. For me, the mid-1980s was a golden period, not least because that is when I moved to Norfolk from Hampshire, to take up a place at UEA. As part of that course, I spent a year living in France, and it was there that I discovered wine, something which would become a lifelong passion. I was taken right back to the decade of shoulder pads, yuppies and striking miners last month, when I enjoyed a memorable dinner accompanied by a raft of wines from the 1980s. I was at the wonderful Le Channel restaurant in Calais, a family-run establishment whose patron spends every waking hour buying up top-quality wine en primeur, and then storing them in the restaurant’s cavernous cellars before offering it to discerning winelovers at prices which make you weep, for the right reason: in general they are cheaper served to you in the restaurant than you could buy them retail in the UK. Every year, six of us from Norwich travel to Calais to drink the very best bottles from our formative years. This year they included a wonderfully fresh Leon Beyer Sélection de Grains Nobles Riesling 1983 from Alsace (perfect with pan-fried escalope of foie gras); Château l’Angelus 1985 (arguably the best St-Emilion you can drink at the moment, and a great foil for riz de veau); a Taylors 1985 vintage port; and a Château Lafaurie-Peyraguey 1985 Sauternes (just one step down from d’Yquem). Not everything that came out the 1980s can put such a smile on your face. But our impressive wine list that night reminded me that this was a vintage decade for reasons other than the fact that this is when I entered adulthood.

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The 1980s were a real turning point for wine. It was the decade when the New World suddenly found its feet, stealing considerable market share from a complacent Old World which thought it had a divine right to dominance of the wine world. That shattered complacency led – eventually – to big changes in Europe as well, as ‘flying winemakers’ from the southern hemisphere arrived to show just what could be done in the Old World with new and innovative wine-making techniques. Some of these innovations were less than successful, but they did force a European viticulture, which hadn’t changed much since the 19th century, to realise that the introduction of modern ways of thinking, of technology and of new ideas would not signal the end of the world. Alongside all this, the decade produced the best run of stunning vintages in living memory: 1982 was exceptional (in Bordeaux at least); 1983 was only not regarded as exceptional because of what had come before; then, two years later came two more outstanding consecutive vintages, 1985 and 1986. The decade ended with a trio of amazing vintages, culminating in the 1990, which was a 10-out-of-10 year across pretty much the whole of Europe. To top it all, because of the lack of a meaningful domestic wine-producing industry in the UK, coupled with our open-mindedness about trying the new, the 1980s saw Britain become the epicentre of the wine trade. This wasn’t just at the pinnacle of the market, although we did receive more than our fair share of the world’s finest wines. Rather more important was the increasing democratisation of wine in this country. This was the decade that saw supermarkets up their game, making decent quality wines – and in some cases fine wines – accessible to all. In 2015 it was reported that wine had overtaken beer as Britain’s favourite drink, and it was 30 years ago that this switch started to happen. Thanks to the influx of New World producers, you no longer needed deep pockets to enjoy something half-decent in your glass, and a new wave of wine writers such as Oz Clarke were there to remove the mystery from wine. It may sound as though I am viewing the past through rosé-tinted spectacles, but I really believe that what happened to wine in the 1980s is the reason that we enjoy such a huge choice from all over the world today.

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Muscadet Sur lie, Domaine du Verger (Bijou Bottles, £11.95) Made from vines grown on sand and gravel, which impart a minerally and even slightly salty note. Yeast, white flowers and lime on the nose, and a smooth, buttery palate – creamier than your average Muscadet.


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WHAT’S GOOD FOR THE GOOSE... IN HIS REGULAR COLUMN, OUR WINE EXPERT STEVE HEARNDEN TELLS US WHAT TO DRINK AT HOGMANAY AND BURNS NIGHT VISIT

www.tastebudswines.co.uk climate are major contributors to the quality of this wine which is worth every penny at £12.95 per bottle. After Hogmanay the next important date in the Scottish calendar is Burns Night. Haggis and scotch are almost compulsory but the rest of the menu changed for me from year to year. Dunlop cheese from Ayrshire frequently featured - a hard cheese with a taste of cream and butter, but with a strong taste. I have gone out of my comfort zone and shipped some Portuguese wine and so the PQW Reserva DOC 2013 red would be good to go with the Dunlop. It has berries and jam on the aromas with a long and fresh aftertaste. It is 13.5% alcohol and the perfect finish to the meal. The wine is produced from the Touriga Nacional grape in the Dao region of Portugal, not too far from the famous Port region. Fairly high temperatures help mature the grapes and this year (2017) has been particularly hot which has continued into October, too. The scenery along the Douro river is stunning, with the vines growing on terraces high above. The Touriga Nacional is quite happy up here! With some barrel age, too, the final wine is soft and strong. We have it at an introductory price of £11.90 per bottle.

MUCH IS WRITTEN about Christmas but the New Year (Hogmanay in Scotland) is left a little in the cold. I married a Scot and so December 31 became an important date. So much so that, 50 years ago, the Scots worked on December 26 and took January 1 as a Bank holiday. Nowadays, a lot of people take the whole week and more off work! First footing after midnight was a regular feature in my life along with getting to bed just before dawn and waking just before lunch. Dinner was always roast goose. Now this wonderful bird is much loved but not quite so popular which is a shame as I have the perfect wine Reuilly 2013. In this little town, just south of Sancerre, north of St Pourcain and east of Quincy, you can find a superb white wine produced from the Sauvignon Blanc grape. Dry, fresh and crisp, it cuts through the goose fat so brilliantly. The gooseberry and grapefruit aromas blend to perfection. Slightly softer and richer than its neighbours, this white wine is outstanding. Monsieur Poitier also makes a rosé from the Pinot Gris and a red from the Pinot Noir. He does not normally export the rosé but did just for me. Having sold out, I need to go back to him, cap in hand, to see if I can have some more! The chalk soil and the cool Please note that Strumpshaw Post wines from Tastebuds just give us

Office is now closed and to purchase call and we will make an appointment.

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Chef's World -

C O L U M N

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THE NO CONCEPT CONCEPT

ANDREW JONES

Chef patron Andrew Jones of Farmyard in Norwich attempts to define what his restaurant is all about. Just don’t mention garnishes to him

the produce. Our pork collar dish uses a combination of smoking, low-temperature sous-vide and charcoal grilling to transform an otherwise humble, bistro cut of meat into a gastronomic delight. Of course, we start with fantastic pork, but it takes a lot more time and effort than cooking a lobster. This is when I’d drop bistronomy into the conversation, which is applying gastronomic techniques to a bistro style setting. So, they would say: ‘So you’re going to be cheap then?’ I’d say: ‘Who wants to eat cheap food? We want to offer a great value experience.’ Great wine and service are just as important as the food. Having the right team and getting the tone of the service right has more of an impact on our guests’ experience than the food. If the service is bad our guests won’t come back. We also (ahem) work very hard on the wine list to make sure that every bottle not just tastes great but offers great value. I don’t like drinking cheap wine, but I do love discovering a belter of a bottle that I’ve never heard of at a cracking price. So, it is a bit tricky to define what Farmyard is. It doesn’t fit neatly into a concept. The only concept we have is to work as hard as we can, to make sure all our guests want to come back time and time again because they love what we do. But that’s a bit long winded, so let’s stick with bistronomy. • You can also keep upBELTER to-date with Andrew via his monthly newsletter - subscribe online VISIT

www.farmyardrestaurant.com

B

EFORE WE OPENED and I was telling everyone and anyone about the restaurant, I was always stumped by the one question people always asked: ‘What’s your concept?’ I was never able to answer with a pithy one liner like ‘Vietnamese street food meets fish and chips fusion,’ because there isn’t a concept at Farmyard. People would ask: ‘are you locally sourced?’ I would say yes, but then add: ‘but we don’t source locally for the sake of it.’ The main driver is quality. There’s a world of difference between using a local supplier and a local producer. Shopping at a supermarket is using a local supplier. I want to be able to go and see the people we buy from, and get to touch and smell the produce. I believe very strongly in supporting local producers because I want to use the best produce in my kitchen. Then they would say: ‘So it’s fine dining?’ and I’d say: ‘No.’ It’s not about multi-course, tasting menus of little food on big plates. The dishes we serve are straightforward presentations featuring a central ingredient with a couple of supporting elements. We don’t L I KE do garnishes. There’s a lot of work behind the simplicity of the final dishes. Any spare time in the kitchen is spent trying to strip the dishes back to their bare essentials, to get to a purer expression of the central ingredient, not adding fussy garnishes to cover it up. a We do use fine dining techniques, like sous-vide, to get the best out of

" Idrdinkon'ting C HEAP but

, e wIin do LOVE discovering "

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ON THE DARK SIDE IN OUR REGULAR BEER COLUMN, GREAT YARMOUTH-BASED BREWERY LACONS TELLS US WHY BEER STYLES ARE OFTEN SEASONAL VISIT

www.lacons.co.uk

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OU MAY HAVE felt the frustration – you find a new beer you absolutely love, then next time you’re out, you hunt for it again only to be unsuccessful. Why is this? Why are beers sometimes only available on a seasonal basis? Back in the ‘old days’ of brewing, before temperature controlled cellars, beers were brewed as and when the season was best for ingredients and maturation. It was nearly impossible to ‘lager’ (from the German, ‘lagern’, to store) beers in the hot summer months, plus new barley was harvested in autumn and beer could be brewed then stored safely during the colder months. That meant that lighter beers, which took less time to ferment, were left for brewing in the warmer

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months, with the remaining barley that had survived the winter. Technology may have moved on, but our tastes have not evolved as much. If you think about it, warmer weather does tend to make us reach for the lighter flavours and aromas of pale ales or even lagers. And there’s certainly something undeniably comforting about sitting in front of a roaring fire on a cold, dark night with a pint of dark, rich beer. So with longer nights and chillier weather, you will start to notice a wider variety of dark beers in your local. By dark beer we don’t just mean stouts and porters, which are slightly different in style (if you had ever wondered).


Lacons -

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Porter originated in the early 18th century, its name coming from London porters who needed the nourishment for their manual labour jobs. The style was a medium-bodied dark beer which had a lot of malty flavours, balanced by hops. •

• The strongest versions of these were called ‘stout porters’, or ‘stouts’ for short. When companies such as Guinness and Murphy’s became household names, many people assumed the creamy, complex beer style was simply a stout.

• So what is the difference now? Some say porters use malted barley and stouts are primarily made from unmalted roasted barley, which is where the coffee flavour most people associate with stout comes from. But this isn’t the case for all brewers, and each brewer has their own style, so there is no exact definition between the two.

OTHER NEWS FROM LACONS We have just launched an online shop where you can find a range of Lacons merchandise available for the very first time. Besides beer, you can also enjoy our exclusive range of hoodies, t-shirts, bottle openers and much more! You can find the shop at www.lacons.co.uk/shop • Don’t forget you can follow us on social media or sign up to our newsletter to stay informed: www.lacons.co.uk/newsletter

Another (often) dark style of ale is old ale, which was first brewed in the 18th century and is currently seeing a return to popularity. The longer a beer is aged, the stronger it is and the more complex the flavours, and old ale is aged for months or even years in casks to bring out intricate malt, spice and fruit flavours. We launched Lacons Old Ale in early November, which is a dark, malty reincarnation of an original recipe from 1963 – enjoyed by many, we hope, in the warmth of their local pub. Next month is the turn of our famous Christmas special, Saint Nick’s, which is a dark copper glowing bitter with spiced orange notes and a satisfying floral finish. In the winter season we are also looking to recreate heritage recipes, Oatmeal Stout and Extra Stout, and there’s also our extremely popular aged Old Ale, Old Nogg, which you can keep an eye out for.

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Festive favourite


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Kalkan T R A V E L

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A TAST E OF

DESCRIBED AS THE TURKISH VERSION OF THE ITALIAN RIVIERA, K ALK AN IN THE ANTALYA PROVINCE HAS AN ABUNDANCE OF ROOFTOP RESTAURANTS AND BARS, ALL AIMED AT THE DISCERNING DINER AND DRINKER. EMMA OUTTEN WAS DETERMINED TO MAKE THE MOST OF THE MEZE

t

Turkey is a nation straddling eastern Europe and western Asia, with cultural connections to the ancient Greek, Persian, Roman, Byzantine and Ottoman empires, whereas the cuisine of Antalya Province benefits from its location nestled between the Taurus Mountains and the Mediterranean Sea, and the coastal settlement of Kalkan certainly benefits from the characteristics of the latter. Once an Ottoman Greek and Turkish fishing village, Kalkan is now largely devoted to high-end tourism, and is famous for its whitewashed houses, descending to the sea, and its brightly coloured bougainvillea, not to mention its excellent rooftop restaurants and bars. It has not been touched by mass tourism (although I was surprised at the number of friends who went all misty eyed at the mere mention of it!).

HE CLUE AS TO what I would mainly be eating during my week in Turkey, was contained in greenhouse after greenhouse, in field after field, on the way from Dalaman Airport through Antalya Province: tomatoes, and tonnes of them. Hardly surprising, really, when Turkey ranks third in the world in tomato yield, and Antalya Province, alone, is the major provider of tomatoes year round. Little did I know I was about to savour some of the sweetest tomatoes in the world, morning, noon and night, for the next week!

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FACTFILE We flew from London Stansted Airport to Dalaman Airport via Thomas Cook Airlines (www.thomascookairlines.com), and stayed at the Hotel Pirat (www.hotelpirat.net). Transfers can be organised through www.addatours.com • To find out more about the Falcon Boat Trip visit www.kalkanboattrip.com • To find out more about the spa at the Patara Prince Hotel and Resort visit www.pataraprince.com • Botanik Garden Bar, Marina Restaurant, and Fener Café can all be found on Facebook

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We were staying in the Hotel Pirat, something of a landmark hotel in Kalkan, as it is in a prime location overlooking the marina. It’s aimed at the independent traveller and locals tend to outnumber foreign tourists. The buffet-style restaurant was a great base for sampling the cuisine, and, first things first: a Turkish breakfast means cheese, and lots of it! Feta, ‘yellow’ cheese, and a strong flavoured cheese called Izmir Tulum, to mention a few; plus black and green olives; eggs, particularly in omelettes; and lots of fresh vegetables, especially those aforementioned tomatoes. Oh, and I particularly liked starting the day with a cube or two of Turkish Delight. One of the most popular activities in Kalkan is the boat trips afforded by the many and varied pleasure boats in the marina, all setting off mid-morning. There’s a boat to suit all tastes, from the traditional Sea Bella Junior all the way up to the exclusive Falcon, captained by Mehmet, and which visits Kalkan’s many surrounding coves and bays, including Kaputas beach (where

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the road above twists around the cliff face), and Gerenlik Beach (where you can have a mud-bath). On such trips, lunch is always provided, when creative cooks serve up five to seven Turkish (or at least Mediterranean) dishes, plus there’s apple tea and cake, mid-afternoon. Or, if you can stand the heat, the once a week market is a must. The food stalls were something to behold: with all manner of spices and teas on display. Another must-do activity, if you really want to experience the culture, is a Turkish bath or hamam, so we headed across the bay to Patara Prince Hotel and Resort. The modern day experience is inherited from the Ottoman period, involving a traditional exfoliation with a special silk glove followed by a relaxing olive oil soap foam massage. Afterwards we enjoyed more of that apple tea and an amazing view of the sea. Plus the Patara Prince has an al a carte restaurant down by the waterfront which has a real Mediterranean flavour. Back in Kalkan, our favourite lunch venue turned out to the Fener (or Lighthouse) Café - described as the closest thing Kalkan has to a tea garden, it’s in great location, overlooking the beach and the little lighthouse. I was on a mission to make the most of the meze on offer, as it’s so typically Turkish, and tends to be eaten with every meal - choose around three or four or choose one as a side dish with your main meal. And my favourite, I decided, was a traditional ottoman meze platter served up at The Marina Restaurant, just below the Pirat Hotel, as it was made up of haydari (a yoghurt dip), courgette fritters, stuffed vine leaves, red beans, aubergine (with tomato sauce), hummus and spicy tomato salad. The restaurant also offers the popular traditional Turkish take on pizza called pide, all freshly baked in the stone oven (the main difference is that it’s oblong and does not have the tomato paste base).


VISIT

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Competition

WIN A MEAL FOR FOUR THIS MONTH FEAST NORFOLK HAS TEAMED UP WITH THE LAST WINE BAR IN NORWICH TO OFFER ONE LUCKY READER THE CHANCE TO WIN A MEAL FOR FOUR - WITH WINE, OF COURSE

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HE LAST WINE Bar in Norwich holds special memories for many of us. An unpretentious yet trendy place, it has been quietly serving up fab food and superlative wines since 1990. Situated in a former Victorian shoe factory in one of the city’s historic quarters near Norwich Playhouse, plenty of original features remain to create an eclectic sort of place. Run by James Sawrey-Cookson and Ecky Limon, one of whom is nearly always present, there are three separate areas to enjoy: the buzzy bar, downstairs with its more intimate

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HOW TO ENTER

To enter our competition to win a meal for four, plus two bottles of house wine, simply answer the following question:

Name the two men who run The Last Wine Bar in Norwich Send your answer, plus your name, address and a daytime telephone number, to competitions@ feastnorfolkmagazine.co.uk. You can also enter by liking and sharing the competition on our Facebook page. Ts & Cs: The prize is a meal for four with wine (two bottles, up to the value of £30 per bottle) to be taken in January or February 2018, lunch or dinner, but excluding Valentine’s Day, February 14 2018, and Saturday evenings. Normal Feast Norfolk competition rules apply and the editor’s decision is final. The competition is open to people aged 18 and above. It runs until December 31 2017 when a winner will be selected at random.

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booths and a more formal dining room opposite. Food is under the direction of Iain McCarten (formerly of the renowned Firedoor in Sydney), with a threecourse set menu for £30, a bar menu and an à la carte menu. Local, seasonal produce features strongly, with the Last cheesecake (vanilla with a caramel salt) having its own cult following. And, not surprisingly, the wine list will get you drooling, with an comprehensive and well considered choice available. As well as the food and wine, the longevity of the Last is down to its friendly, welcoming atmosphere. The relaxed ambience has inspired a loyal following across more than 27 years; Norwich without 'The Last' is unthinkable.


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Kalkan T R A V E L

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KAPUTAS BEACH

I found it easy to eat vegetarian food all week, although more meaty offerings on the menu, included a mixed grill of meatballs, sirloin beef, Adana kebab (a spicy kebab made with minced lamb and flavoured with spices), plus lamb and chicken shish kebabs. Drinks-wise, the heat during high summer meant it wise to go a bit easy on the alcohol, but that’s not to say I didn’t enjoy a dry white wine called Angora, with its distinctive character of the ‘Sultaniye’ grape; a local aperitif called Acibadem almond liqueur, and the local beer, Efes Pilsen. Then, on our last night, we treated ourselves to cocktails at the new Botanik Garden Bar up in the old town, complete with a treehouse, where they use herbs grown on site to produce drinks. This jewel of a resort in the Antalya Province certainly knows how to do provenance.

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CHRISTMAS POTATOES

Ellen Mary is a presenter, journalist and garden designer. You can contact her on social media or at www.ellenmarygardening.co.uk

As Christmas lunch is served with all of the trimmings, it just wouldn’t be the same without delicious roast potatoes. Even better if you’ve grown them yourself and harvested them just before cooking. Yes, even in December! Potatoes are low in calories and full of vitamins C and B6, along with having phytonutrients with antioxidant activity. Whilst they are starchy, they do have health benefits so throw caution to the wind, roast them up in beef dripping and enjoy every single bite of a very traditional Christmas vegetable.

a WiNTEr T S E HaRV

THIS MONTH our kitchen gardener Ellen Mary sings the praises

of a POTATO you can harvest just before Christmas lunch


Winter Vegetables -

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ELLEN MARY

RECIPE WITH ELLEN MAR Y

LEFTOVER TURKEY WITH POTATO CURRY Christmas pot atoes will be

POTATO ‘SWIFT’

It seems that potatoes were discovered in South America and later brought to the UK via Spain from Peru. Cheap and easy to grow, they were the go to food for the poor until Queen Victoria decided to try some mashed for her Christmas lunch. Of course, the potato famine in the 1840s left thousands starving and emigrating from Ireland, where the biggest food source was the potato. Whilst it is a little harder to grow potatoes for Christmas, it’s perfectly achievable with a faster growing variety such as Swift, and all the more reason to celebrate when you dish them up.

How to grow

GROW They will need to be planted in warm soil, so the best way to grow them is to use sacks or grow bags where you can stand them in a sheltered spot. A greenhouse is ideal but equally a porch, or sheltered and frost free patio, will do the trick. Plant tubers in August on a layer of compost, cover over with an equal layer and earth up as the foliage grows. If you grow them outside, you may need to use straw to protect the growing tubers from frosts. CARE Keep the soil watered and ideally feed with a fertiliser. Wherever you are growing them, they do need to be protected from the frost. Keep earthing up until almost at the top of the grow bag and when the foliage dies down, remove it and leave the potatoes in the compost until needed. HARVEST The easy bit! Tip them out or fork them up gently. Be careful not to slice into the tubers but if you are growing in a bag, tip it up, give it a shake and watch those delicious new potatoes tumble out, ready to be cooked for Christmas.

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sma ller than those harvested in the summer but Swift are full of flavour and, whilst they may not lend themselves too well to mash, they are great boiled with some but ter and herbs or roasted with the Christmas turkey. Sinc e ever yone seems to have their own roasted pot ato recipe, I’ve gone for a tast y alternative for Boxing Day. INGREDIENTS Leftover turkey, stripped into pieces; 6 Swift potatoes (you cou ld even use leftover roasted potatoes ); a splash of olive oil; 1 medium onion, chopped into large pieces; 2 cloves of chopped garlic; 1tsp each of cumin and turmeric; 2tbs p of yellow curry powder; 1 can of coconut milk; 100ml of water with a cube of chicken stock dissolved METHOD If you are using new potatoes, coo k them in a pan of boiling water with a little salt. Put a splash of oil in another pan and gently cook the onion for about 3 to 4 minutes to soften. Add in the chopped garlic and cook for another minute. Sprinkle all of the spices and stir well so the onion and garlic is covered. Pour in the water with the dissolved chicken stock and stir well. Add in the coconut milk and mix well. Strain and then pop the boiled potatoes and your leftover turkey into the spicy mix and leav e to simmer for about 10 minutes. Serve with slice of lemon and som e rice, or just on its own!

[

[Serves 4


Allotments -

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FROM FiELD TO FORK: A YEAR SPENT PLOTTING

Rachel Birtwhistle reminisces on her first season as an allotmenteer and acknowledges the trials and tribulations that happened along the way I PROBABLY SHOULD tell you that the best time of year to be at the allotment is when it's harvest time, when you gather up the hard-earned produce and scoff until the thought of another courgette brings you out in a cold sweat. However, on a chilly winter’s morning when the ground is coated in light frost and the air filled with bonfire smoke, an allotment is atmospheric beyond belief. On a day like this there is nowhere else I would rather be - but over the course of the year it certainly hasn’t always felt that way. On more than one occasion I have had a love/hate relationship with my plot. Back in the winter last year, I dug 125 square metres of soil by hand on some kind of crazed cathartic mission, only to see the weeds return 10-fold while I wasn’t looking. I nurtured and planted more than 50 bean plants with such care and attention and, in return, they callously died. I took a two-week holiday in the summer and returned to mutant veg I had to ashamedly

compost. Other low points include being caught having a wee behind my compost heap, and serving fists full of weeds with my spinach as I didn’t know the difference. Guilt, and the acceptance of it, is one thing I have had to come to terms with while being a plot holder. Some of my allotment buddies tend to their plots daily, but this is a commitment I haven’t been able to make and my plot, sensing my weakness, became adept at emotional blackmail. There cannot be many people who sit through a Year 1 assembly, adoringly watching their child, thinking: ‘I should be netting the cabbages as the pigeons will be eating them. Why does this song have so many verses?’ I mistakenly thought I was in charge at the allotment but instead I was at the beck and call of a fruit and veg dictatorship. I watered, I gathered, I batch cooked and froze, I became vegetarian for about three months and then after all that, I mourned the glut when it ceased. I felt like a traitor

in the veg aisle at the supermarket. I have lost count of the number of times I have served fruit and veg with the accompanying sentence ‘they don’t taste as good as mine’ and then, more recently, the angst I go through when I have to say ‘no, I didn’t grow that.’ A new year at the allotment presents new opportunities, new discoveries and hopefully an improved ratio of success versus failure on the planting front. It’s also a time to reflect on the year I’m leaving behind. Growing fruit and veg for my family has been immensely satisfying in the truest sense of the word, but none of this would have been possible without the sage advice I have received along the way. I had not anticipated the camaraderie of having an allotment plot nor the generosity and kindness of fellow plot holders. Heartfelt thanks for all the encouragement I have received both in person and via twitter – it really has made my year! • Follow Rachel’s allotment adventures on twitter @treatlikedirt

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Proudly Norfol k C O L U M N

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responsible for the award winning on-board restaurant services of the old Norwich based Anglia Railways and ONE, that some people might remember.

DARREN FENNAH

Tell us what we can expect We have invested very heavily in both the renovation work and our team. We want our customers to feel the sense of history and authenticity in the building and in everything that we do. Our bar manager is one of the best in the business and our chef, Andrew Days, has 30 years’ experience working all around the world, from Europe to India, Phuket and Penang. The Last Pub Standing is somewhere we hope you pop in for a drink and are then seduced to stay for more drinks and some really different and delicious food, whether that’s a casual bar snack or a three course meal. In keeping with our ethical sourcing for the business as a whole, there is a really strong focus on locally sourced produce.

STANDING PROUD

DARREN FENNAH OWNS THE NEW LAST PUB STANDING IN NORWICH WHICH HE HOPES WILL OFFER AUTHENTIC STREET FOOD IN HISTORIC SURROUNDINGS VISIT

www.lastpubstanding.co.uk

Who are you and what do you do? I’m Darren Fennah, owner and general manager of the historic Last Pub Standing in Norwich, a new gastro pub offering authentic global street cuisine. Where is the pub and when will it open? The Last Pub Standing is on King Street and is so named because it is, quite literally, the last pub still standing on King Street, a road that once boasted no less than 58 pubs. We opened on November 20 and will be open everyday from 11am, with takeaway coffee and pastries available from 7.30am, Monday to Friday. What made you choose this particular pub and location? We had been actively looking for a suitable project to take on for more

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than a year. We fell in love with the history behind the pub and the central location, which is easily accessible, yet slightly tucked away. We hear it has a noble history? There is a fascinating history behind both the building and King Street as a whole, not least that the premises was built during the 17th century on a site that was originally part of a Greyfriars priory - and that the building itself was once a nuns' residence. What is your background? I was head of catering at the UEA from 2013 to April of this year, when I left to start the Last Pub Standing project. Prior to that I held a number of senior manager roles in customer services, hospitality and catering for several different rail operators. I was

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Is a restaurant an essential part of what you are offering? Absolutely. We have a restaurant with private dining areas on the first floor and will be offering authentic global street cuisine. We want people to soak up the ambience of the pub, and being able to eat great food on the premises with friends and family is a really important part of our offering. How has Norfolk Food and Drink been able to help you? Although we are new to Proudly Norfolk, we were really keen from the start to be part of this unique initiative that celebrates our county’s fantastic food and drink industry. We are absolutely passionate about serving local food and drink, so it’s great to be part of an organisation that helps us to tell our customers that! We are really delighted to be recognised as the first official Proudly Norfolk pub. Anything more planned? We have an exciting Christmas menu and will be selling tickets for our New Year’s Eve party. We will also be introducing a brunch menu in the New Year. This column is supported by Norfolk Food & Drink and highlights its Proudly Norfolk members. For more details, visit www.norfolkfoodanddrink.com


y n n Da MEET

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Feast Norfolk Magazine Dec17/Jan18 Issue 22  

Feast Norfolk is a fresh new monthly magazine dedicated to the thriving food and drink scene in Norfolk.

Feast Norfolk Magazine Dec17/Jan18 Issue 22  

Feast Norfolk is a fresh new monthly magazine dedicated to the thriving food and drink scene in Norfolk.

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