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RECIPES

RACK OF LAMB,

TIME FOR TEA

MACKEREL, BRO WNIES

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FEASTNORFOLKMAGAZINE.CO.UK

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WELCOME TO OUR OCTOBER ISSUE where we indulge in a spot of afternoon tea, which has grown and grown in popularity in recent years. We bring you a selection of places to visit and a few recipes to try out at home, too. We also report on the winners of the chocolate cake competition at the North Norfolk Food and Drink Festival at Holkham which was a really enjoyable weekend last month, where it was great to meet so many of you! This issue also sees Mark Nicholls interview Peter Mitchell, the new managing director of the Holkham Estate, while Emma Outten looks at the growing trend of low alcoholic and no alcohol drinks as a major festival takes place this month. We meet Ben Handley, chef patron at two leading North Norfolk pubs, and catch up with the good folks at Brasted’s, one of the county’s best known restaurants. Our eating out reviews include the rather swanky Ivy Brasserie in the city, and Andy Newman enjoys a tour of the whisky distillery in Breckland. We travel to the beautiful island of Crete with its abundance of fresh fruit and veg for our regular travel report and also call in at Letheringham Watermill in the gorgeous Suffolk countryside where dogs are the VIPs! It is a terrific place. Add in all our usual columnists, our regular photo essay, and our popular What’s On guide and news and gossip spreads and there is plenty to keep you occupied. October sees two popular foodie events, HarFest at Norwich Cathedral (October 6) and Porkstock at the Norfolk Showground (October 13) and we will be at both so do come and say hello. Finally, don’t forget to enter our competition to win lunch for two, with wine, at Farmyard in Norwich, while the winner of the July/August competition, a trip to Pensthorpe Natural Park, was Janet of Ringstead in West Norfolk. Many congratulations. Next month, we have our traditional Christmas gift guide which I know you all enjoy, and we will be talking turkey, too - nothing new there, I know!

SARAH HARDY, EDITOR sarah@feastnorfolkmagazine.co.uk www.feastnorfolkmagazine.co.uk

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HABOUR OF CHANIA, CRETE

Sarah Hardy visits a family-run hotel on Crete where the Greek diet oozes health and vitality

ABOUT US 05 Editor’s Letter WHAT’S ON 14 Trying to find out what’s happening in our part of the region? Look no further… 17 Meet the winners of our chocolate cake competition at the North Norfolk Food and Drink Festival at Holkham 18 Our usual news and gossip spread covers all bases FEATURES 28 Mark Nicholls meets Peter Mitchell, the managing director of the Holkham Estate 30 Our Big Issue this month raises a glass to the rise of low and no alcohol drinking

COVER STORY

23 Tea time: Make time for afternoon tea with our recipes and suggestions on where to indulge

REGULARS 9 This month’s Spotlight shines on award-winning catering and events company, Brasted’s 25 If you love afternoon tea, you’ll love our gadget and gizmo selections 39 Hotel School students at City College have a big day ahead: catering for the Higher Education Graduation Ceremony at Norwich Cathedral

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40 Our chef Q&A features chef patron Ben Handley from The Duck Inn and the Hunworth Bell, both in North Norfolk 44 This month’s photo essay meets artisan baker Ed Clark from Pastonacre Bakery in Cley-next-the-Sea 60 Our business profile meets Jon and Sarah Hemming of the Wood Fired Food Co in West Norfolk 62 This month’s selection of cookbooks offers us two Italian-inspired ones, including one from bubbly Gino D’Acampo 94 Norwich-based Gnaw Chocolate is our latest Proudly Norfolk column EATING OUT 33 Sarah Hardy puts on her LBD and heads to The Ivy Brasserie, Norwich’s latest restaurant opening 36 Emma Outten takes her mum out for afternoon tea at Hamptons at the Barn, Bawdeswell, in mid Norfolk COLUMNISTS 51 Andrew Jones of Farmyard in Norwich and The Dial House in Reepham tells us about his sweet tooth 57 Julia Martin discusses her journey towards going vegan


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53 65 Dan Matthams of Green Farm Coffee gives you the lowdown on the perfect cup of coffee 67 Roger Hickman answers your culinary queries and offers a mallard and blackberry recipe to try 69 Small business owner Elaine Reilly writes that success is all in the planning and taking a holiday 75 Front of house with Rachael Parke RECIPES 13 Chris Busby of Brasted’s shares recipes for rack of lamb and a strawberry and white chocolate parfait 43 Ben Handley, from The Duck Inn and the Hunworth Bell, uses apples in his mackerel dish 53 Lucy Bartlett has a tasty tagine for us to try this month 54 Sara Matthews, our free from writer, has her version of carbonara - plus brownies! 91 Ellen Mary offers us a spicy salsa dip which is perfect with tortilla chips and beer DRINK 70 Andy Newman enjoys a tour of St George’s Distillery in Breckland

72 Phil Halls from Grain Brewery in the Waveney Valley urges us all to seek out a beer festival. Sound advice! 76 Andy Newman reckons the savvy wine drinkers among us don’t follow fashion 78 Enjoy two autumnal cocktails using Norfolk Gin 79 Steve Hearnden has his eye on a wine to enjoy with game dishes this month GROW YOUR OWN 90 Kitchen gardener Ellen Mary is getting hot under the collar as she tells us about chilli peppers 92 Our allotmenteer Rachel Birtwhistle and her son are tucking into sweetcorn this month

THE TEAM

Sarah Hardy, Editor sarah@feastnorfolkmagazine.co.uk Emma Outten, Deputy Editor emma@feastnorfolkmagazine.co.uk Hanneke Lambert, Designer studio@feastnorfolkmagazine.co.uk Rachael Young Senior Account Manager | 07900 823731 rachael@feastnorfolkmagazine.co.uk Diane Green Brand Manager | 07988 867483 diane@feastnorfolkmagazine.co.uk

TRAVEL 81 Our staycation feature is a dog friendly watermill in Suffolk which Sarah Hardy just loved! 84 This month’s travel pages take us to Crete for a healthy Med diet - and a stay at a gorgeous familyrun hotel

CONTRIBUTORS

COMPETITION 80 Win lunch for two, with wine, at Farmyard, in Norwich Lanes

PUBLISHED BY

Andy Newman, Mark Nicholls, Ellen Mary, Rachel Birtwhistle, Andrew Jones, Roger Hickman, Elaine Reilly, Steve Hearnden, Julia Martin, Phil Halls, Sara Matthews, Lucy Bartlett, Dan Matthams, Rachael Parke

FEAST NORFOLK MAGAZINE is published by Feast (Eastern) Limited - 21 Market Place, Dereham, Norfolk NR19 2AX

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ALL THE RIGHT

INGREDIENTS BRASTED’S, THE MULTI AWARD-WINNING CATERING AND EVENTS COMPANY, IS MORE THAN THE SUM OF ITS PARTS. EMMA OUTTEN FINDS OUT MORE

www.feastnorfolkmagazine.co.uk

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VISIT

www.brasteds.co.uk

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HERE WILL BE some people out there who only know of Brasted’s as a fine dining restaurant. And there will be others who only know of it as wedding venue or a boutique B&B. But the truth is, it is much more than that. Brasted’s is a multi awardwinning catering and events company, based in Framingham Pigot, four miles outside of Norwich. True, it all began as a restaurant, on St Andrews Hill, Norwich, 34 years ago, before moving to Manor Farm Barns in 1999 to concentrate on offering a high-quality venue devoted to weddings, conferences and parties. However, Brasted’s Restaurant re-opened in 2004 and was then extensively refurbished in 2015, although it still retains the painting of that late great bon viveur, John Brasted (or JB as he was generally known) and the infamous Brasted’s piano – always waiting to be played. These days the 2 AA Rosette restaurant is billed as the ultimate dining experience, promising dining perfection from the moment you sit down on one of the sofas in the reception area to the minute you leave, clutching your gift of homemade brownies – as if you have any room left! Senior Event Manager Rebecca Smith says: ‘We’ve always tried to give people an experience, rather than a meal out – we pride ourselves on the service we offer, as well as the food.’


S P O T L I G H T

MANAGING DIRECTOR NICK MILLS AND EXECUTIVE CHEF CHRIS ‘BUZZ’ BUSBY

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The à la carte menu changes on a seasonal basis, offering locally sourced ingredients and produce. Although Rebecca makes the point: ‘We change the canapés, amuse bouche and pre-desserts week by week, so there’s always something new for guests to try.’ The restaurant is open Thursday and Friday lunchtime, and Thursday, Friday and Saturday evening, although Brasted’s is not just about the fine food at the end of the week. Boutique B&B Brasted’s Lodge (formerly Manor Farm House) opened in 2009, and offers six 5 AA star rooms. Inside, there’s a cosy snug (complete with honesty bar). ‘It’s like a home from home,’ says Rebecca, who adds: ‘All the rooms have a little story behind them.’ There’s The Beach Hut, Lady Jane’s (named after the Squire’s wife, Jane Du Brow); JB’s; Robin’s Nest (named after local landowner Robin Key); The Playroom; and Squire’s Retreat (named after Ben Du Brow). More recently, Brasted’s has branched out beyond the borders of the private village and now exclusively runs events at Langley Abbey, Somerleyton Hall and, most recently, the International Aviation Academy in Norwich. Then there’s the corporate catering, working with some of East Anglia’s biggest companies, providing on and off-site catering and events. ‘Pretty much any event you can imagine, we can do,’ says Rebecca. And there is no question that Brasted’s is a specialist in outside catering, having catered for dignitaries and private parties, as well as the Royal Family, including The Queen. When it comes to weddings, Brasted’s is widely considered to be the wedding specialist in Norfolk. Where once there was a marquee, nowadays there is a purpose built, fully flexible space, seating up to 140, with integrated bar, dance floor and terrace.

As for awards, ‘we’ve won a few,’ says Rebecca. In the Norfolk Food and Drink Awards, Executive Chef Chris ‘Buzz’ Busby has won Chef of the Year and Managing Director Nick Mills has won Outstanding Achievement. Brasted’s has also won Outstanding Front of House/ Customer Service on more than one occasion and Best Restaurant for three years. It was also winner of the Community Impact Award at the EDP Business awards and winner of Best Restaurant at The Moveable Feast an impressive 14 times. If all that wasn’t enough, Brasted’s is responsible for catering for some of the county’s best loved and best known events, for example, the Presidents' and Vice Presidents’ Enclosure at the Royal Norfolk Show (for the last 20 years, no less) and the VIPs at Old Buckenham Air Show. Out in the wider community, Nick is a patron and on the Board of Norfolk Food and Drink; Brasted’s hosts Dining in the Dark for the Norfolk & Norwich Association for the Blind, the fish and chip supper in aid of Caister Lifeboat, and, coming up in December, the annual Christmas Carol Feast for the Salvation Army. Nick is one of the committee integral to the Moveable Feast, and Buzz is a judge for Passion to Inspire. Their work has been reflected in their Community Impact Award of 2015. And, Rebecca adds: ‘Nick and Buzz are really amazing to work for; they are not just bosses - they are mentors.’ It turns out that Brasted’s is the ultimate ‘one stop shop’, offering all the right ingredients when it comes to catering and events. So if asked to pinpoint that success on just one thing, Rebecca believes it is ‘the people. It is definitely the inspirational young team, combined with the experience Nick and Buzz bring, that pulls it all together and creates that Brasted’s magic.’ What’s more, Rebecca says: ‘There’s always something new going on. It’s a really exciting time as we are constantly evolving and expanding, so what we want to do is make sure people know everything about Brasted’s which is, after all, the sum of all its parts.’

RECIPES OVERLEAF

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STRAWBERRY AND WHITE CHOCOLATE PARFAIT Wild Strawberry Jelly, Elderflower Mascarpone, Almond Sponge and Strawberry Sherbet

METHOD For the Strawberry and White Chocolate Parfait 1. Start by placing the egg whites in the mixer and mix on a high speed, put the sugar and water into a heavy bottomed pan and boil up to 116 degrees. 2. Once it has reached the required temperature, add to the whisked egg whites, whisking until cooled 3. Melt the white chocolate and then add to the egg whites 4. Take the fruit purèe and reduce by half, soak the gelatine and then add to the warm fruit purèe and allow to cool to room temperature 5. Now add your meringue mixture and fruit purèe together, then fold in the lightly whipped cream 6. Set into moulds and chill. For the Wild Strawberry Jelly 7. Place all the ingredients into a bowl and set over a pan of boiling water, leave for 15 minutes and the strawberries will breakdown 8. Pass the strawberry liquid through a fine sieve, add the gelatine and chill. For the Elderflower Mascarpone 8. Place the mascarpone into a bowl, add the elderflower cordial, scrape the vanilla seeds into the bowl and mix together. For the Canister Almond Sponge 9. Place the egg whites and yolks into a bowl, sift in the flour, sugar and almonds, whisk together and then rest for 5 minutes 10. Place the batter into a cream whipper and charge 3 times with the gas 11. Oil your plastic cups then fill half way. Place in the microwave for 30 seconds (depending on its power setting). For the Strawberry Sherbet 12. Place all the ingredients into a food processor and blend to a smooth powder. Store in an airtight container before serving. To plate each dish, you can try to recreate the photo’s design by placing the components on your plate in the same position. Or you can have a go at your own take of how the dish should look!

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SERVES

INGREDIENTS TWELVE For the Strawberry and White Chocolate Parfait 55g of egg whites; 110g of caster sugar; 27g of water; 500ml of strawberry purèe; 2.5 sheets of leaf gelatine; 150ml of double cream; 50g of white chocolate For the Wild Strawberry Jelly 250g of fresh wild strawberries; 200ml of water; 100g of caster sugar; 2 sheets of leaf gelatine; 1 vanilla pod For the Elderflower Mascarpone 100g of mascarpone; 15ml of elderflower cordial; 1 vanilla pod; 20g of icing sugar For the Canister Almond Sponge 125g of egg whites; 80g of egg yolks; 80g of flour; 80g of caster sugar; 25g of ground almonds For the Strawberry Sherbet 20g of dried strawberries; 1/4tbsp of citric acid; 1tbsp of bicarbonate of soda; 60g of sifted icing sugar


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RACK OF NEW SEASON CHURCH FARM LAMB with Pink Fir Hasselback Potatoes, Artichoke Purée and a Wild Garlic and Bean fricassée INGREDIENTS 7-bone rack of lamb For the Pink Fir Hasselback Potatoes 4 large Pink Fir potatoes; 4tbsp of either melted butter, olive oil, duck fat, bacon fat, or coconut oil (or a combination of each); salt & pepper For the Artichoke Purée 200g of Jerusalem artichoke; 1 onion; 20g of butter; 1 garlic clove; 100ml of double cream; 50ml of vegetable stock For the Wild Garlic & Bean Fricassèe 5 leaves of wild garlic; 50g of petit pois; 50g of broad beans; 5 asparagus tips; 10g of spring cabbage; 10g of kale; 1 sprig of sprouting broccoli; butter

www.feastnorfolkmagazine.co.uk

R E C I P E

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METHOD For the lamb 1. Take a 7-bone rack of lamb, cut down the rib bones, trim away the fat and sinew and scrape the bones clean - this is called French trimmed 2. Turn the rack over, so the ribs are facing down, and score the top of the flesh in one direction then in the opposite direction to create a diamond pattern 3. Pre heat a frying pan with a little oil, but not too much, as the lamb will release its own cooking juices, seal the lamb on all sides, giving it a good colour, and pop into a preheated oven at 190°C 190ºC for 15 minutes 4. Once cooked, give it a least 15 minutes resting time before serving For the Pink Fir Hasselback Potatoes 5. Preheat oven to 220ºC, wash and dry the potatoes, then cut slits into the potatoes, leaving the bottom intact 6. Brush potatoes with the fat

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and sprinkle with salt and pepper 7. Bake for 30 minutes and brush again with the fat, then bake for another 30-40 minutes until the edges are crispy

For the Artichoke Purée 8 . Place the onion into a pan with the butter, add the garlic and artichoke and cook until soft, then pour in your vegetable stock and simmer for 10 minutes or until liquid has disappeared 9. Add your double cream and reduce, then place it into your liquidiser, sieve and serve For the Wild Garlic and Bean Fricassèe 10. Place some butter into a pan with your spring cabbage and lightly fry, blanch your asparagus tips in hot water, repeat with the broccoli, then add your peas, broad beans, kale and wild garlic. Lightly cook, season and serve


OKTOBERFEST

After last year’s sell out, Oktoberfest is returning to OPEN Norwich from October 11 to 13! Once again, the iconic building will be transformed into a German themed Bierkeller. Complete with authentic Bavarian beer, food and entertainment, this promises to be one of the biggest annual celebrations in the city. Visit www.opennorwich.org.uk

SCIENCE FESTIVAL

Norwich Science Festival, now in its third year, takes place from October 19 to 27. This year’s foodie events include: Bakineering in Space with Andrew Smyth (Great British Bake Off); Health Benefits of Dark Chocolate, Green Tea and Broccoli; and Dinner with a Difference - an evening of delicious food and diverting facts in the company of two scientists and a chef; DNA Detectives: DNA Extraction from Bananas; Is There More to Food Than Taste and Flavour and Discovering Our Forgotten Senses. Visit www.norwichfestivalweek.co.uk

PROGRESSIVE DINNER

The White Lion Hotel in Aldeburgh is co-hosting the Suffolk coastal town’s Progressive Dinner on October 10 where diners can enjoy each course at a separate restaurant. The evening starts with drinks and canapés and includes courses at both the White Lion and Brudenell hotels, as well as various eateries around the town. Visit www.whitelion.co.uk.

CREAM TEA

Fairhaven Woodland and Water Garden, near South Walsham, is offering an Autumn Ramble and Cream Tea on October 3 and 10. There will be a guided tour of the autumnal garden with Ian Guest, Head Gardener. And at the end there is a cream tea with homemade scones, jam and clotted cream and a pot of tea or cup of coffee. Visit www.fairhavengarden.co.uk

WHAT 'S ON

tHIS

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MUSSEL FESTIVAL

The White Horse in Brancaster Staithe will be holding a Mussel Festival on October 26. Brancaster Staithe mussels are the village speciality: big, juicy succulent mussels as fresh as you’ll get – and will be served five ways. Plus there will be a pop up bar and live music all day. Visit www.whitehorsebrancaster.co.uk

MEAL AND MUSIC

Award-winning jazz vocalist, Georgia Mancio, returns to The Hoste in Burnham Market with a quartet of acclaimed musicians to celebrate the joyous music and spirit of Brazil’s Bossa Nova, on October 26. This latest Hoste of Music evening includes, as ever, a first class three-course meal. Visit www.thehoste.com

APPLE DAY

Drove Orchards in Thornham is holding its annual Apple Day on October 14. Enjoy a day with all the family and browse stalls from Norfolk producers. Plus there will be PYO apples, plums and pears. Visit www.droveorchards.com


AYLSHAM FOOD FESTIVAL

Aylsham Food Festival takes place from October 5 to 7. Presented by Slow Food Aylsham, the ever-popular threeday event returns with a packed weekend of old favourites and family entertainment. And this year, the Festival headliner will be one of Norfolk’s most celebrated chefs, Richard Hughes, launching the festival at Aylsham High School on the Friday. Other highlights include the Banana Ukulele Band! Visit www.slowfoodaylsham.org.uk

TRICK OR TWEET

Enjoy a naturally spooky day out this October halfterm at Trick or Tweet at Pensthorpe Natural Park, near Fakenham, from October 18 to 28. This Halloween-themed extravaganza is packed with spooky craft-making activities and a creepycrawly trail weaving through the ancient woodlands and wetlands of the reserve. Visit www.pensthorpe.com

DIARY DATES

HARVEST FESTIVAL

Free one-day autumn fayre, HarFest, in association with Woodforde’s Brewery, comes to Norwich Cathedral on October 6. Upper Close Green will be full of family-friendly activities and live entertainment throughout the day. And the Cloisters will be transformed into a farmers’ market where you can taste and buy from the very best in local food, drink and craft producers. Visit www.rnaa.org.uk

THERE’S PLENTY TO SAVOUR THIS MONTH, PARTICULARLY IF YOU LIKE BEER, SAYS EMMA OUTTEN

BEER FESTIVAL

Norwich Beer Festival runs from October 22 to 27 in The Halls, otherwise known as St Andrews and Blackfriars Halls. This year, organisers will be launching a new bar showcasing more than 40 beers never before featured at the festival. And the 2018 charity of the Norwich & Norfolk CAMRA Branch is Headway, Norfolk and Waveney’s brain injury charity. Visit www.norwichcamra.org.uk

PUMPKIN DAY

Organic farm Riverford is hosting its annual pumpkin day on October 27. Riverford is located on Sacrewell Farm, Cambs, and delivers organic produce to hundreds of customers throughout Norfolk every week. At the family friendly event you will be able to pick your pumpkin from the field and carve it ready for Halloween. Visit www.riverford.co.uk

AND DON't FORGET... …Porkstock takes place at the Norfolk Showground on October 13, with a free, family-friendly programme during the day and a ticketed Evening Knees Up. We will be there! Visit www.porkstock.co.uk ...Norfolk Restaurant Week takes place from October 29 to November 9 and includes Norwich Restaurant Week, of which Feast Norfolk is a media partner. Visit www.norfolkrestaurantweek.co.uk

STAY AT A GRAND DESIGN BY THE SEA… If you are a fan of modern architecture, innovative design and pared back cool interiors – then this fabulous beach house is the one for you. Combine that with a one-minute walk to a truly stunning beach on Norfolk’s east coast, and you have hit nirvana. Nestled beside the sand dunes of Waxham Beach, not far from Norwich, Shangri-La sprang to life from what was a typical beach-side ‘shack’ and has been re-interpreted into this stunning, contemporary, low-key, environmentally-aware holiday property. Sleeping 6 in 3 bedrooms, Shangri-La is available from £918 for a 3-night break.

Visit www.norfolkhideaways.co.uk Call 01328 887658 Email enquiries@norfolkhideaways.co.uk www.feastnorfolkmagazine.co.uk

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in association with

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MENUS NOW ONLINE EACH PARTICIPATING RESTAURANT OFFERS A FIXED PRICE MENU OR

Restaurant Week menus will be offered Monday - Friday, excluding weekends. With over 80 restaurants to choose from, we hope you will take the opportunity to sample restaurants you have always wanted to try and even visit again.

www.norfolkrestaurantweek.co.uk

ENJOY A PINT OF NORTH NORFOLK

Saturday 6th October

10am to 4pm, norwich cathedral close

FARMERS MARKET The very best Norfolk food, drink and craft producers MR MAWKIN’S FARM Meet sheep, kid goats, Jelly the Jersey and many more…

LOCALLY BREWED Craft Ales & Lagers Available throughout Norfolk in all good pubs, hotels, shops, delis and restaurants.

moongazerale

norfolkbrewhouse.co.uk

NorfolkBrewhouse

CHILDREN’S ACTIVITIES Face painting, pumpkin carving, fun and games LIVE ENTERTAINMENT TRACTOR AND COMBINE HARVESTERS Smile for the camera!

Join the fun at RNAA.ORG.UK


CAKE CHAMPS

W I N N E R S

MEET THE WINNERS OF OUR CHOCOLATE CAKE COMPETITION, HELD AS PART OF THE NORTH NORFOLK FOOD AND DRINK FESTIVAL. SARAH HARDY REPORTS ESTHER’S AMAZING

Chocolate Scribble Cake

THE SECOND ANNUAL CHOCOLATE CAKE COMPETITION, sponsored by Kinnerton UK, the Fakenham-based chocolate manufacturer, did not fail to disappoint! Held as part of the hugely popular two-day North Norfolk Food and Drink Festival at the start of September in the walled garden at Holkham, there were two separate competitions. One, on Saturday, for adults and one, on Sunday, for children aged 14 and under. Standards were very high and there was much creativity in evidence. The only rule was that cakes had to feature chocolate in some shape or form and we saw everything from traditional chocolate logs to coffee cakes with a swirl of white chocolate icing. Judges included members of the festival committee, cookery theatre host Mary Kemp, Feast Norfolk magazine staff and representatives from Kinnerton UK. The winner of the adult category, with a show stopping chocolate scribble cake, was Esther Pike from Gayton, near King’s Lynn. Esther, who works for Norfolk County Council’s education department and is married with one son, is a keen Great British Bake Off fan and was inspired by both her mother and grandmother. The chocolate cake was made from her own recipe, the cream cheese white chocolate ganache came from instructions in a magazine and this was her first attempt at making a chocolate collar. Wow! The junior category was won by 10-year-old Flynn Culley-Barber of Blofield, near Norwich. His Raspberry and Chocolate Two-Tiered Cake, with Raspberry Jam and Dark Chocolate Ganache wowed the judges as it was also decorated with handmade raspberry macarons. Head Judge Mary Kemp loved the sparkly raspberries on top and said that overall the cake had a ‘wonderful childlike quality’. Both winners received fabulous KitchenAid mixers, courtesy of Kinnerton UK, and a golden ticket, which is a rare chance to look about the Kinnerton factory in Fakenham which doesn't normally open to the public. There were chocolate prizes for all runners up.

www.feastnorfolkmagazine.co.uk

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[serves 20

RECIPE For the sponge 375g of butter; 585g of sugar; 5 eggs; 21/2 tsp of vanilla essence; 500ml of milk; 10tbsp of cocoa powder; 1tsp of baking powder; 500g of self raising flour For the frosting 300ml double cream; 400g white chocolate; 300g of full fat soft cheese METHOD 1. Mix all the ingredients together. Pour into 6 tins (3 big and 3 small). Cook at 150°C for around 20 minutes. Then cool For the frosting 2. Heat the double cream, then add the white chocolate. Stir and cool 3. Beat 300g of full fat soft cheese, add the cold ganache, mix well and cool. This may take 30 minutes or longer in fridge 4. Layer the cakes with the white chocolate cream cheese frosting, and assemble, covering the sides and top of the cake

CHOCOLATE WORK 1. Measure and cut pieces of greaseproof paper to the size of the collars you will need to fit around each cake and blow up one balloon 2. Melt 2 bars of dark chocolate (it will look best if you are able to temper it) and then place the mixture in a piping bag. Use the chocolate to ‘scribble’ over the length of the paper for the collars and over the end of the balloon for the bowl 3. When the scribbles on the greaseproof paper have set, but are still movable (approximately 20 minutes), place the collars around the edge of the cake and when the chocolate is solid, gently remove the paper. The chocolate bowl should be left until fully set before bursting the balloon 4. Place your chocolate scribble bowl on the top of the cake and then fill with fruit

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PHOTOGRAPHS TAKEN BY POLLYTHORPEPHOTOGRAPHY AT THE CROWN HOTEL, WELLS

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A BIGGER BUCKET The Bucket List, which started out as a trailer serving buckets of chips with homemade toppings on Overstrand Beach, is expanding! Not only has it opened a shop in Hamilton Road, Cromer, over the summer, you can also find it at Castle Mall Gardens, from Wednesdays to Sundays, and there’s more to come, according to Nathan Boon. It can still be found at Overstrand (weekends only) and Holt Country Park. Find The Bucket List on Facebook

GOOD STUFF

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R OU N D - U P Autumn may mean shorter days but we’re never short on news stories for you to digest, says Emma Outten ALL GIN THE PLANNING Award-winning gin distillery Bullards has submitted a planning application to change the use of Crystal House on Cattle Market Street in Norwich from retail to light industrial use, installing a distillery to help the firm quadruple its gin production. A second phase of planning is in the pipeline for 2019 that will see the site become a tourist attraction and destination, offering tours and tastings plus a bar and restaurant. Visit www.bullardsspirits.co.uk

Congratulations to all the Norfolk entries in The Good Food Guide 2019. They include Morston Hall, named in the UK’s top 50 best restaurants in The Good Food Guide 2019 and scoring seven points; Benedicts in Norwich, which scored six; the Old Bank Bistro in Snettisham for being named the Good Food Guide’s Best Local Restaurant 2018 for the whole of Britain; and to the Rose & Crown in Snettisham, which has also been included. Meanwhile, the Bank House in King’s Lynn has been named in the Top 10 UK Town Pubs for the fourth year running in the Good Pub Guide 2019. Visit www.morstonhall.com www.theoldbankbistro.co.uk www.thebankhouse.co.uk www.roseandcrownsnettisham.co.uk

NEW FOODIE FACES We couldn’t help but notice a couple of new faces at the North Norfolk Food and Drink Festival last month: Laurie of Bespoke Cheesecake Company, based in King’s Lynn, produces cheesecakes cups in delicious flavours such as Orange & Ginger and Reese’s Peanut Butter; whereas Keren Bigman, of Le Digestif, has started producing naturally fermented sauerkraut in lots of different creative fusion flavours. Find her products at Creake Abbey Farmers’ Market, Bayfield Farmers’ Markets (Glandford), as well as The Green Grocers in Norwich. Visit www.bespokecheesecakecreations.co.uk and email info.ledigestif@gmail.com

BRILLIANT BISTRO MORE MACARONS! Macarons & More, based in the Royal Arcade in Norwich, has just opened a second outlet inside intu Chapelfield. The award winning French macarons and patisseries by former MasterChef contestant Tim Kinnaird can be found in a kiosk on the Upper Mall on the bridge between Pandora and Office. Visit www.macaronsandmore.com

Bravo to seasonal British food champion, Market Bistro in King’s Lynn, one of only two Norfolk restaurants to be featured in ‘Truth, Love & Clean Cutlery’, a comprehensive guide to the world’s finest food experiences curated by 57 food writers. This includes restaurant critic of The Times, Giles Coren, editor of the UK version of the guide. Market Bistro is run by Lucy and Richard Golding. Visit www.marketbistro.co.uk


News & Gossip JOINING FORCES This autumn sees Louis’ Deli in Upper St Giles Norwich Lanes a local institution for more than 20 years - become Louis’, a café by day and Les Garrigues by night, as two independent businesses join forces. Les Garrigues, formerly based in St John Maddermarket, offers French wines from natural vineyards. Visit www.louisdeli.co.uk

VEGAN VENTURE The family behind Namaste, the two Indian vegetarian restaurants in Opie Street and Queens Road, Norwich, has just opened the Namaste Hut, the first exclusively vegetarian and vegan outlet on the UEA campus. It will be open to faculty, students and the general public and is located in The Enterprise Centre – more commonly known as the Thatched Building opposite the Sports Park! Visit www.namasteindiannorwich.com

FESTIVE FOOD Dare we start mentioning Christmas? Following the success of Holkham’s inaugural Festive Food Fair, a delicious collection of food and drink from the best of local and regional producers will be back for 2018 (on December 15 and 16, in fact), offering a truly magical Christmas food event, in The Lady Elizabeth Wing. Visit www.holkham.co.uk

BIG BROTH Centrepoint, the leading youth homelessness charity, will bring the nation together this autumn to create the first ever Soupathon. The charity’s Big Broth will turn the nation into Souper Troupers, with the aim of more than 3,000 soup parties being held across the country in homes, offices and community spaces on and around November 2. Visit www.centrepoint.org.uk/bigbroth

ONLINE FARMERS MARKET Fair play to The Norfolk Deli in Hunstanton for launching Norfolk’s Online Farmers’ Market. As owner Mark Kacary says: ‘With the wealth of produce grown, made, brewed, distilled, fermented and preserved in Norfolk, it made sense to us to take what we do in the shop onto the internet through our website and to offer customers the opportunity to visit a virtual farmers’ market and to keep themselves stocked with their new found favourite items throughout the year.’ Visit www.norfolk-deli.co.uk

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GREAT TASTE Norfolk did well in the recent Great Taste Awards. For example, Old Rectory Preserves in Carleton Rode was awarded Two Stars for both its Mandarin Lime Blossom Honey Marmalade and Blood Orange & Passionfruit Marmalade. Meanwhile, BoojaBooja, the free from Norfolk food producer based in Brooke, was awarded two Great Taste awards by judges, for its organic Caramel Pecan Praline Dairy Free Ice Cream and for its Almond Salted Caramel Organic Dairy Free Chocolate Truffles. Visit www.oldrectorypreserves.com and www.boojabooja.com


THE CIRCUS

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FOR FURTHER INFORMATION OR TO BOOK:

Call: 01603 218724 Email: deliascanarycatering.co.uk


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Offering a delicious menu of wood fired pizza, fresh pasta and salads, along with an extensive list of wines which are also available to take home from the Deli and Wine Shop.

Neauw rant

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LONDON STREET, NORWICH 01603 660661 JARROLD.CO.UK


Briarfields -

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TIME FOR TEA

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THERE’S ALWAYS TIME FOR A REWARDING CUPPA AND CAKE AFTER AN ENERGISING AUTUMN WALK ON THE COAST, AND AT BRIARFIELDS HOTEL, TITCHWELL, THE TEA AND TREATS ARE DEFINITELY WORTH STOPPING FOR AFTERNOON TEAS have become something of a Norfolk phenomenon, popping up on menus across the county, so when you hit the North Norfolk coast it’s good to know where to head for a self-indulgent treat or celebratory three-tier extravaganza of confection. Briarfields, nestled on the A149 between RSPB Titchwell and the Royal West Norfolk Golf Club at Brancaster, is an idyllic spot to enjoy gorgeous freshly baked scones – with homemade jam and clotted cream, of course – along with plenty of perfectly proportioned and flavour-packed cakes and desserts. For good measure there’s also a fine selection of finger sandwiches, including traditional cucumber and Briarfields’ own-smoked salmon. Although a good old-fashioned tea is always available, treat yourself to Briarfields’ Posh Afternoon Tea, served from 2.305.30pm. You can even add a glass of fizz for added pleasure, so go on, reward yourself in style. For a taster, try this recipe from Briarfields’ chefs. Briarfields Main Road Titchwell Hunstanton Norfolk PE31 8BB Tel: 01485 210742 Email: info@briarfieldshotelnorfolk.co.uk

BRIARFIELDS’ LEMON AND POPPY SEED CAKE INGREDIENTS 200g of icing sugar; 11/2tbsp of poppy seeds; 260g of self-raising flour; 1tsp of baking powder; 1/2tsp of baking soda; pinch of salt; zest and juice of 2 lemons; 110g of butter; 2 eggs; 240g yoghurt

METHOD 1. Grease and line a loaf tin. Pre-heat the oven to 150°C fan oven 2. Using a mixer, cream sugar and butter until light and fluffy 3. Add lemon zest 4. Add egg and yoghurt to the butter mix and fold in 5. Sift all dry ingredients into mix and fold in 6. Pour into loaf tin and bake for 35-40 minutes on middle shelf 6. When cool, glaze with icing sugar, adding lemon juice to taste VISIT

www.briarfieldshotelnorfolk.co.uk

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afternoon delight AFTERNOON TEAS ARE ONE OF OUR FINEST TRADITIONS, AND NOWADAYS THEY EVEN HAVE THEIR OWN SPECIAL THEMES. EMMA OUTTEN POURS OVER THE QUINTESSENTIALLY BRITISH MEAL! They can also be inspired by books (an Alice in Wonderland style Mad Hatter’s Tea Party is a classic example, although Harry Potter and Peter Rabbit are two more recent themes). Presentation is key, of course, whether that be a vintage three tiered cake stand or a more modern slate and wood stand. As we come into autumn, taking tea in the afternoon is particularly enjoyable, whether you’re sitting in a cosy tearoom or in front of a log fire. And don’t forget you can always add some sparkle by enjoying a glass of Prosecco with yours!

WHETHER ENJOYED in a country house hotel, or as a home baked treat, we British just can’t seem to get enough of afternoon tea, that winning combination of savoury and sweet treats, accompanied by a good oldfashioned cuppa. And it’s not just hotels, tea rooms and restaurants which offer the mid-afternoon meal nowadays. One of the nicest afternoon teas I’ve had recently was in a garden centre cafe! From upmarket brasseries to the pub down the road, there’s definitely a market for it. Afternoon Tea is a tea-related ritual, introduced in Britain in the early 1840s - it evolved as a mini meal to stem the hunger and anticipation of an evening meal at 8pm. Tea consumption had increased dramatically during the early 19th century and it was around this time that Anna, the 7th Duchess of Bedford, is said to have complained of ‘having that sinking feeling’ during the late afternoon. At the time it was usual for people to take only two main meals a day: breakfast and dinner. The solution for the Duchess was a pot a tea and a light snack, taken privately in her boudoir during the afternoon. These days afternoon tea has evolved into a meal composed of sandwiches (usually cut into 'fingers'), scones with clotted cream and jam, sweet pastries and cakes (although scones were not a common feature of early afternoon tea and were only introduced in the 20th century). And it can be served anytime between midday and 5pm in some places. A more recent trend is the sheer variety of afternoon tea themes. A popular one is afternoon tea with chocoholics in mind, or else one with just grown-ups in mind (think salmon vodka gravadlax finger sandwiches and work your way up the tiers from there). And this month we are sure to see the odd Halloween-themed one pop up somewhere.

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Join us for Afternoon Tea or celebrate a birthday, baby shower or a special occasion! Served Daily (booking essential) £14.95 or £18.95 with Prosecco

FARM SHOP | BUTCHERS | RESTAURANT | FUNCTION HIRE

34 Prince of Wales Road, Cromer, Norfolk NR27 9HS

www.hattersteashop.co.uk 01263 512340

We offer a full tea at £14.95 per person | half tea at £7.95 per person served between 2.30 and 4.30, unless booked advance (price includes tea and coffee | booking in advance advisable)

Back to the Garden, Letheringsett, Holt, North Norfolk. NR25 7JJ

The Maids Head Hotel Historic and beautifully appointed 4 star Hotel in the heart of Norwich, offering the finest in hospitality 2 AA Rosette WinePress Restaurant • Contemporary Bedrooms • Versatile Meeting and Event Rooms Stunning Weddings • Festive Parties Traditional Afternoon Tea served daily from 12.00 - 5.00pm

20 Tombland, Norwich NR3 1LB Complimentary car parking available for all guests 01603 209955 • sales@maidsheadhotel.co.uk • www.maidsheadhotel.co.uk


02. 01. 06.

SHOPPING:

TEA

04.

WHO DOESN’T ENJOY A SPOT OF AFTERNOON TEA? ESPECIALLY WHEN IT’S SERVED ON BEAUTIFUL PIECES LIKE THESE!

WHERE TO BUY 03. 01. Kitchencraft two-tier cake stand, £28.25, The Kitchenary, Taverham Craft Centre, Norwich, www.kitchenary.co.uk 02. Emma Bridgewater Pink Pansy teacup and saucer, £34.95, Bakers and Larners, Holt, www.bakersandlarners.co.uk 03. London cake tin, £17.99. Roys of Wroxham, visit www.roys.co.uk 04. Elephant teapot, £17.50, John Lewis, Norwich, www.johnlewis.co.uk 05. Sara Miller for Portmeirion, set of four pastry forks, £21, Jarrold’s, www.jarrold.co.uk 06. Pip Studio floral pink cake tray, £20, Daisy Park, www.daisypark.co.uk

PROBABLY NORFOLK’S LARGEST INDEPENDENT COOKSHOP

We also stock an extensive range of home brewing equipment

The Kitchenary PROBABLY NORFOLK’S LARGEST INDEPENDENT COOKSHOP

Open 7 days a week

EE ng FR rki Pa

The Kitchenary

05.

16 Taverham Craft Centre

(just behind Taverham Garden Centre)

Fir Covert Road, Taverham Norfolk NR8 6HT Tel: 01603 261932 www.kitchenary.co.uk


s o g r a M ´ L O U N G E

Join us for

AFTERNOON tea*

The Jerry - savoury snacks

The Margo - Sweet Treats

Posh Tea £13.95 per person Tipsy Tea £16.95 per person 01493 653885 | 58 BELLS ROAD, GORLESTON-ON-SEA, NORFOLK

SU FR E D N O M VE I N D AY 6 RY N E R . LU 3 0 N I G N - 8 HT C .4 H 5 12 P -2 M PM

*available on Friday & Saturday from 3.30pm to 5pm. Must book 24 hours in advance. £5 deposit per person

Beechwood Hotel & Restaurant 2 0 C R O M E R R OA D, N O R T H WA L S H A M , N O R F O L K N R 2 8 0 H D W W W. B E E C H W O O D - H O T E L . C O . U K

TEL: 01692 403231

JOIN US FOR AFTERNOON TEA

Spoil yourself with a traditional Sunday lunch PREPARED WITH FRESH LOCAL PRODUCE expertly prepared by our brigade of chefs, complemented by a well balanced wine list. The Beechwood offers an intimate bar and inviting Dining Room, creating a relaxing atmosphere conducive to the enjoyment of good food and fine wines A LITTLE TEASER FROM THE SUNDAY LUNCH MENU

WALSINGHAM CHEESE TART • GRESSINGHAM DUCK LEG BON BONS • PAN SEARED SEA TROUT GLOUCESTER OLD SPOT ROAST PORK • ROAST RIB OF BEEF • SELECTION OF DESSERTS

N TO O PE E NT S ID S E R N ON A N D E NTS D I R ES


Strattons

DELI • RESTAURANT • SELF CATERING • HOTEL -

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AWAR WINN D ING

INDULGE IN AFTERNOON TEA

ENJOY A SCRUMPTIOUS AFTERNOON TEA AT STRATTONS, A FAMILY-RUN BOUTIQUE HOTEL, TUCKED AWAY IN SWAFFHAM OCTOBER AT STRATTONS: Halloween themed traditional afternoon tea at £16.50pp, available pre-booked daily

• 

Norfolk restaurant week 2 courses £18 / 3 courses £23 from 29th Oct – 9th Nov (excludes Saturday nights)

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NOVEMBER AT STRATTONS:

Extra special festive themed traditional afternoon tea at £20.50pp on Saturday 1st, Saturday 8th, Saturday 15th & Saturday 29th

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Festive special set price menu Sunday to Thursday nights 2 courses £20 / 3 courses £25

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New Year Eve bottomless brunch club Monday 31st 10am – 2pm £26pp

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Special New Year’s Eve dinner Monday 31st

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Ash Close, Swaffham PE37 7NH Telephone 01760 723845 enquiries@strattonshotel.com www.strattonshotel.com

www.feastnorfolkmagazine.co.uk

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JULES HETHERTON'S

[makes 12

FRUI T SC ON ES

INGREDIENTS 400g of self-raising flour; 75g of butter, at room temperature; 75g of cast er sugar; large pinch of salt; 90g of raisins; 300ml of milk; a little extra flour for knea ding and rolling out the dough METHOD Pre-heat oven to 220°C . Sift the flour into a bowl and rub in the butter. Stir in the sugar, salt and raisins. Using a knife mix in the milk a little bit at a time. Flour your hand s and knead the mixture into a soft doug h, adding a little more milk if the mixture feels dry. Roll the dough out on a floured surface to the required thickness and using a past ry cutter cut out your scones. Place the scon es on a buttered baking tray, dust with a little extra flour and bake for 12-15 minutes.

www.strattonshotel.com

Norfolk restaurant week 2 courses £18 / 3 courses £23 from 29th Oct – 9th Nov (excludes Saturday nights)

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Christmas themed traditional afternoon tea at £16.50pp, available pre-booked daily (excluding Saturdays)

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VISIT

Beauty & the Beast themed traditional afternoon tea at £16.50pp, available pre-booked daily

• 

DECEMBER AT STRATTONS:


HEADING UP HOLKHAM PETER MITCHELL

PETER MITCHELL SPEAKS TO MARK NICHOLLS ABOUT THE JOYS AND CHALLENGES OF BECOMING MANAGING DIRECTOR OF THE HOLKHAM ESTATE UPLIFTING; that’s the sensation Peter Mitchell feels as he drives through the gates of Holkham Park to work every morning. Seeing the park pan out before him, the estate buildings and the focal point of the 18th century Palladian-style Holkham Hall ahead, underlines the privilege of running the Estate as managing director. Overseeing 15-20 separate rural businesses under the Holkham brand, working with a team of 280 and still learning more every day, it is a fresh and invigorating challenge after 14 years as managing director at Jarrold’s in Norwich. He likens the move to transiting from the pivotal job at one Norfolk institution to another, with each role having the responsibility of sustaining tradition, innovation and advance at its core. Is there such a vast difference between the two, I ask, as we sip coffee in the Courtyard Café at Holkham? ‘It’s a lovely mix,’ he replies. ‘About two thirds of what I do is familiar - in a visitor-facing business with the elements of customer service, events, branding, marketing, leading teams and motivation. The other third is entirely new.’ He’s talking about farming, gamekeeping, and maintaining the Holkham National Nature Reserve - aspects of ‘the business’ at Holkham that are led by career specialists with years of experience and expertise under their belts. Peter took up the post in March with the summer events programme and activities already planned for 2018. Although he wasn’t giving much away, you sense that his eye is already on 2019.

‘I saw this move as an opportunity to become part of a destination business,’ he continues. ‘It is an inspiring place to work and when you come through the gates and make your way into Holkham Park, it is truly uplifting. ‘There are very diverse businesses here, connected by geography and brand identity, and my role is to join them together in a way that is worth more than the sum of their parts to help define where the estate is going over the next 10-15 years.’ Working closely with Lord Leicester, his realm of responsibility is the visitor and leisure aspect of the grounds, the six-acre walled garden, events and activities, and halls tours, along with the Beach and Courtyard cafes and the Victoria Inn, with its bar, restaurants and 20 rooms. Land management is a critical aspect of his brief, of which property, farming and the nature reserve stretching down from the main road across marshes to Holkham beach are the major components. ‘It is a large estate of 25,000 acres. We farm about 7000 acres ourselves, with 14,000 acres farmed by tenants. We grow salad potatoes - which is our speciality - winter and spring barley, oilseed rape, maize and wheat on a six-year rotation,’ he adds, reminding me that Holkham is where one of the great agrarian advances was invented, with Thomas William Coke, the 1st Earl of Leicester and better known as Coke of Norfolk, pioneering the principle of crop rotation farming 200 years ago. What he also emphasises is how each aspect of the business dovetails and interacts with those around it, notably with the showcase Field to Fork exhibition near the Courtyard café.


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While ancient tractors stand outside, within is a modern, innovative and interactive display reflecting the history of farming at Holkham and what is offered from the estate today. ‘It explains the processes and the connection between what we grow on the farm to what goes onto the plate, helping children and families to understand that side of the history of the estate.’ That synergy between the elements of the Holkham estate continues in the cafes and restaurants. Produce from the walled garden underpins seasonal dishes, while the estate’s Belted Galloways herd – cattle suited to grazing on the salt marshes – produces beef cuts for the Victoria’s chefs. Deer from the Park also provide venison. The walled garden, undergoing a restoration, is a gem, growing fruit, vegetables and flowers, with a vineyard and events space for outdoor films and theatres. Holkham Hall is open three days a week for people to visit the hall itself, with stunning state rooms and artworks, but is still very much home for Lord Leicester and his family. Will there be any major changes to the way the estate is run? Not in the foreseeable future, suggests Peter, who is married to Sarah with three children and lives in North Norfolk. The events will evolve, the popular pop concerts - such as the appearance of Lionel Richie in June - will continue, and the facilities will develop, such as the addition of The Lookout café and toilets along Lady Anne’s Drive down toward the beach.

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‘The estate is in very good shape with a great team of people,’ emphasises Peter, who away from work, enjoys cycling, swimming and spending time on his boat off Blakeney. ‘My predecessor was very successful in developing the estate over the eight years that he ran it, working with Lord Leicester. We had a good programme in place for 2018 and I have enjoyed watching the team deliver on that so there has been no urgency to make changes. ‘There will be challenges…like all visitor businesses, we are trying to develop what we can offer and attract more people.’ Logistically, it can be demanding, such as when the car parks and cafes are full on a hot summer day, hosting 11,000 fans for a concert or 1300 triathlon competitors while staging outdoor cinema and theatre events. And the demands - and barometers of success - vary from one part of the estate to another. While the prolonged summer sunshine brought in the visitors, it saw the farm teams anxiously looking for rain to provide much-needed water for the crops on the fields. ‘Related to that, we have the challenge of balancing the impact of visitors on wildlife as the designated body responsible for the Holkham National Nature Reserve,’ he continues. ‘It is complex and complicated, with the different habitats.’ Bringing these diverse aspects together, maintaining and sustaining Holkham as a business, keeping the 300,000 people who visit the estate and hall every year happy, and managing the array of rural businesses centred on one of the great houses of the realm, is a job that Peter is clearly relishing over the years ahead. VISIT

www.holkham.co.uk

www.feastnorfolkmagazine.co.uk

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IS DRINKING BECOMING A NON-EVENT?

I

WITH A FESTIVAL DEDICATED TO LOW AND NO ALCOHOL DRINKS TAKING PLACE IN SCOTLAND THIS MONTH, EMMA OUTTEN LOOKS AT HOW WE ARE EMBRACING SUCH MINDFUL DRINKING IN THIS REGION accounts for 30 per cent of the brewery's overall sales and makes up 10 per cent of the low/no alcohol beer market. Since Without® hit the market, rival breweries have launched into this sector in their droves, as the growing consumer demand for low and zero alcohol beer heats up. ‘The success of Without® has been beyond our expectations,’ says CEO Steve Magnall. ‘We knew when we were developing it that the British drinks market was in dire need of a decent, flavoursome and full-bodied zero alcohol beer, but we never expected take up or demand to be so high. We currently can’t make and bottle enough of it!’ With around 25 per cent of British adults not drinking alcohol for lifestyle, health or religious reasons, as well as increased Government pressure to reduce drink driving limits, there has never been a better time to produce alcohol-free beer. At the start of the summer, Adnams launched a new alcohol free version of its best-selling beer Ghost Ship Pale Ale (a year or so earlier the Suffolk-based brewer and distiller had already released a new lower alcohol version of its popular Sole Star beer, reducing the abv to 0.9 per cent). Although it’s relatively early days, Sarah Fisk of Adnams says the latest launch is already proving to be successful. But where is the demand coming from? ‘I don’t have any firm data on who is buying the product, but we know anecdotally that millennials are driving the growth in the low and no alcohol category. This is generally through a choice to have a healthier lifestyle, spend less and a general change in consumer habits.’ She adds: ‘The choice of a low alcohol product is being well received by those who wish to go out midweek and still enjoy the pub experience without the associated after effects of drinking alcohol. It is still a relatively small section of the market, but the fastest growing.

T APPEARS THAT THE DEMAND for low and no alcohol drinks is not going to dry up anytime soon. There’s even a festival dedicated to the stuff, the Mindful Drink Festival, which is set to take place in Glasgow this month. It’s sponsored by Heineken 0.0, and organised by mindful drinking movement, Club Soda UK, which has gone to the trouble of providing a guide to the best pubs and bars for mindful drinkers all over the UK (home in on their map and the likes of The Fox at Lyng, The Lodge at Tuddenham and Dunston Hall Hotel pop up). When it comes to alcohol free beer, this region has had its own part to play in leading the way. Two years ago St Peter's Brewery, based near Bungay, launched the world's first 0.0 per cent alcohol craft beer, Without® Original, which propelled the Suffolk-based brewery to huge growth. The three-product-strong Without® brand (which includes Original, Gold and Organic), now

SEEDLIP, THE WORLD’S FIRST DISTILLED NON-ALCOHOLIC SPIRIT

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Drinking Habits -

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‘We currently have a unique product in the UK due to way in which Ghost Ship Alcohol Free is produced, which is why we believe we are seeing such a high demand for it. Ghost ship Alcohol Free is a full flavoured ale but without the alcohol, allowing consumers to enjoy the benefits of a 0.5 per cent beer but without having to compromise on taste.’ Her comments on our changing drinking habits are backed up by Mintel’s latest flagship British Lifestyles report. According to Mintel, around a quarter of UK adults (26 per cent) reduced their spending on alcoholic beverages bought to drink at home last year. Notably, this figure rises to 34 per cent of 25-34 year-olds, among the key consumers of alcoholic drinks. Health and saving money are the key reasons that consumers give for cutting back on alcohol. It’s not just alcohol free beer that’s taking the drinks market by storm. Seedlip, the world’s first distilled non-alcoholic spirit, is served in some of the world’s best cocktail bars, Michelin starred restaurants and luxury hotels.

Closer to home, Seedlip’s herbal Garden 108 and aromatic Spice 94 are served at both Warwick St Social in Norwich and The Wildebeest in Stoke Holy Cross, where they’re proving to be very popular with customers. Chef Patron Daniel Smith comments: ‘We have noticed a growing trend amongst our diners to ‘banish the booze’ and have seen how an alcohol-free meal is no longer just for designated drivers, mums-to-be or non-drinkers.’ And he adds: ‘We’ve been busy trying out some delicious cocktails around these distilled spirits which offer a premium yet grown-up drink of choice with out those unwanted side effects ‘the morning after the night before’.’ The Hero in Burnham Overy Staithe also stocks Seedlip, as well as Ghost Ship Alcohol Free. Chef Proprietor Harry Farrow is a big supporter of these products and says: ‘It’s great to find a non-alcoholic product which satisfies the quench for a longer drink, and it’s great with Fever-Tree mixers. We are seeing more and more demand for non-alcoholic drinks which differ from the usual high sugar alternatives. This has been met by us stocking Adnams non-alcoholic Ghost Ship on draft at The Anchor, Morston. It’s an incredible product and great for drivers who still want a few pints with their friends. We have also been making our own cordials using great plums from Burnham Market.’ The way things are heading, we can expect to see more launches of these low and no alcohol drinks in the not so distant future. When asked if the Woodbastwickbased Woodforde’s Brewery had any plans to tap into the market, Head of Marketing Judi-Mae Alderton, replies: ‘It’s part of our product development programme, as it’s definitely something we are looking into.’

A ' WE HAVE NOTICED

NGST O M A D N E R T G N I GROW OUR DINERS TO

' E Z O O B E H T H S ‘BANI

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BOTTOMS UP! CELEBRATE NYE IN STYLE BY THE COAST Join us at our glamorous black-tie event at The Swan, Southwold. The evening begins with canapés and a live jazz and acoustic band, before a five-course menu perfectly paired with Adnams award-winning wines, beers and spirits. Two-night bed & breakfast stays, including our New Year’s Eve Celebration, from £780 for two people.

SELLING FAST, SO BOOK NOW! T: 01502 722186 E: theswan@adnams.co.uk W: theswansouthwold.co.uk/NYE SWANSOUTHWOLD *Full details including terms and conditions available at theswansouthwold.co.uk/NYE


SASSY DINING THE LATEST DYNAMIC RESTAURANT OPENING IN NORWICH IS THE IVY BRASSERIE. SARAH HARDY JOINS THE CROWDS TO CHECK IT OUT

VISIT

www.t heivynorwich.com


T

HINK OF THE IVY and you think of glamorous London dining; all celebrities, the paparazzi and more. Well, a little bit of this stardust has arrived in Norwich, with the opening of The Ivy Brasserie in the former Gap clothing store on London Street. It’s a tremendous building, once a bank, and the brasserie makes the most of original features, and has then added some! Think marble flooring, an onyx bar, leather banquettes, and bronze artefacts, all set within the brasserie’s signature green palette. The artwork is bold, to say the least. There are two dining levels, with a great stone spiral staircase taking you to the first floor. And almost 150 diners can be accommodated. So, the setting is splendid. And the staff are very much on the money. In sharp suits, with bow ties, the service is spot on, being both friendly and efficient. The brasserie bosses are keen to stress that they offer all day dining, in a relaxed environment and you can certainly pop in for breakfast, elevenses, lunch, afternoon tea and, of course, a full-on dinner. Brunch is a popular option.

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www.t heivynorwich.com

We sashayed through to our table, nestling in a corner with again more great views across the dining room. And yes, there are crisp white tablecloths and ultra shiny silver cutlery. I started with wasabi prawns and salt and pepper squid, which came with a wasabi mayo and miso sauce. As with all the dishes, it was beautifully presented, in a silver bowl, and tasted as good as it looked. Sir tried the apple and Stilton salad which was tangy and crispy, with hazelnuts and celery. Next I opted for an eight ounce sirloin steak, cooked medium, with a green peppercorn sauce. None of those onions rings, mushrooms and tomatoes here, just a terrific steak, which my knife glided through! I added a tomato and basil salad and some olive oil mash which, together with the sourdough bread (with some very yummy salted butter), was a goodly spread! He had a monkfish and prawn Keralan curry, with jasmine rice, coconut yoghurt, coriander and sweet potato crisps which was another hit, with a bit of a bite. Desserts were the highlight as we selected ones which had a little bit of drama to them. The chocolate bombe with vanilla ice and a hot salted caramel sauce melted enticingly, and my apple tart was flambéed with Calvados at the table with a real sense of theatre. Naturally, both dishes were devoured pretty quickly! We selected an easy drinking Spanish white,Verdejo, and rounded off the meal with peppermint tea, served, with a final flourish, in large silver teapots. Such elegance! For my money, the brasserie is a fun dining destination; somewhere you can dress up for, and there’s a happy atmosphere which is catching. And it is great to see such a beautiful building singing again.

VISIT

I dined with my better half and it felt like quite an occasion as, dressed up, we sat at that glitzy onyx bar, sipping our drinks, and, of course, having a good nosey round who else was in. Well, it is Norwich, after all. It’s an exciting drinks offering, with plenty of cocktails, quirky soft options and a good selection of beers and lagers - plus plenty of spirits. I spotted Woodforde’s beers and Boadicea Gin from West Norfolk so opted for a Iceni Martini which had more than a kick to it and set me up nicely for the evening! Himself had a bottle of Scotland’s Old Engine Oil, which was thick and very rich! The menu is straightforward, with plenty of choice. It’s modern British cuisine, with firm favourites such as shepherd’s pie, grilled fish, chicken Milanese (briochecrumbed chicken breast with a fried egg) and slowed cooked lamb shoulder alongside slightly more ambitious offerings like grilled whole lobster.


Cake A and more

FTERNOON TEA follows a pretty similar format wherever you go: three tiers of sweet and savoury treats? Tick. Pot of tea? Tick. But they can also differ greatly. Go to some tearooms, and it can be a very fancy (not to mention pricey) affair. Or go somewhere slightly off the beaten track that doesn’t make a big song and dance about its Afternoon Tea offering and you can come away feeling more than satisfied. This is exactly what happened when my mum and I drove half an hour outside of Norwich to Hamptons @ The Barn, in Bawdeswell, which is on the way to Fakenham. My mum liked the sound of it before she even got there. ‘It sounds posh,’ she remarked, clearly thinking of that legendary cluster of wealthy enclaves on Long Island! We arrived to find there was plenty of parking available, and an attractive terrace for those autumnal sunny days – the olive trees bordering it caught my mum’s eye on the way in. Hamptons is a lovely L-shaped barn conversion, comprising a retail and a restaurant area. With fairy lights strung around the beams of the vaulted ceiling, and green and white gingham seat cushions, the restaurant is certainly a pretty place to while away an hour or two. It costs £12.95 for a traditional Afternoon Tea with a pot of tea of your choice (or £17.95 if you fancy a glass of Champagne). We had good old fashioned English breakfast tea (but could have had Earl Grey, Darjeeling, fruit or herbal, or, dare I say, coffee) and the teapot came wearing a cute knitted tea cosy.

EMMA OUTTEN'S MUM IS IMPRESSED BY AFTERNOON TEA IN MID NORFOLK WHERE THE CHEESE STRAWS AND BAKEWELL TART DELIGHT

www.feastnorfolkmagazine.co.uk

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HAMPTONS -

E A T I N G

“... I CAME OUT WEARING A SCARF I DIDN’T KNOW I NEEDED JUST A FEW MOMENTS EARLIER!“ VISIT

www.hamptonsatthebarn.co.uk

When the three tiered cake stand arrived, my mum’s face was a picture. Hamptons is all about home-cooked rustic fare, so on the bottom layer were cheese straws, sausage rolls and four finger sandwiches each: home roasted gammon, brie and cranberry, free range egg mayonnaise and smoked salmon with cream cheese, plus some salad stuff (cucumber, lettuce and tomato) interspersed to make you feel vaguely healthy! My mum went straight for the cheese straws and declared, with some excitement, that they were still warm. The middle layer consisted of cheese and fruit scones, straight from the vintage Aga, with little pots of butter, jam and cream, whereas the top layer always has two cakes of the day – when we went it was rocky road and Bakewell tart – I love Bakewell tart and this didn’t disappoint. There was a smattering of fresh berries on top, which made for a nice final flourish. Three tiers, and three cups of tea, later, and I must say that afternoon tea at Hamptons @ The Barn is really rather splendid. It certainly went down a treat with my mum, so much so she wants to go back for her birthday. It’s becoming a popular place for celebrations, as apparently a group of 40 were due in the Sunday after we went. However, if the thought of afternoon tea is overwhelming, Hamptons does offer just cream tea, or nibbles such as a cheese and biscuit platter, to fill the gap between lunch and dinner. Afterwards, we went in for a spot of retail therapy. The shop offers all manner of gifts, homeware and fashions and I came out wearing a scarf I didn’t know I needed just a few moments earlier! We took home a doggy bag for my daughter (there’s only so many sandwiches, scones and cakes I can eat in one sitting). After what seemed like only seconds, there were a few crumbs left in the bottom of the bag – which just about says it all! • Afternoon tea at Hamptons @ The Barn takes place from 2.30pm to 4.30pm.

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THE ANCHOR INN, The Street, Morston, Norfolk NR25 7AA | morstonanchor@gmail.com


C I T Y

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THIS MONTH SEES HUNDREDS OF CITY COLLEGE HIGHER EDUCATION STUDENTS GRADUATE AT NORWICH CATHEDRAL, AND IT WILL ALSO BE THE FIRST BIG EVENT OF THE YEAR FOR THE HOSPITALITY AND CATERING STUDENTS AS EMMA OUTTEN FINDS OUT

THE GRADUATES VISIT

www.ccn.ac.uk

A TEAM OF HOSPITALITY AND CATERING STUDENTS at the Hotel School, City College Norwich, will head to Norwich Cathedral this month, when around 500 Higher Education students celebrate their graduation success. The Higher Education Graduation Ceremony takes place on October 20, and involves two ceremonies, one in the morning and one in the afternoon, and two drinks receptions in a marquee on the South Lawn - for the graduates, their friends and family, teaching staff and local VIPs. The day before, students back at the Hotel School will be busy prepping for the big event. Although some of the food will be prepared in advance, much of it will be cooked to order in front of the guests, in the middle of the marquee. Mark Bradly, Catering Operations Manager, explains: ‘There will be a team of students who will work in pods, which we built ourselves, complete with ovens and cooking tops, and we will do two sittings.’ There will be a meat section, a fish section, a vegetarian section and a dessert section. Mark describes it as ‘like a little fun fair of different styles of food,’ something that goes down well with guests. As for the students, he adds: ‘it gives them a different experience and embeds in them the reason why they are there: to celebrate the achievements of the Higher Education students. It’s a long day but a really good experience.’

Following this month’s graduation ceremony, Mark, who has been at the college for the past 17 years, will be looking ahead to the festive season. ‘We’ve got Christmas coming up in Debut Restaurant so we’ll be looking to make thousands of mince pies! ‘It’s a quite challenging first part of the academic year, but we give the students the best experience possible.’ Looking even further ahead, he and Debut Restaurant Head Chef James Phillippo are looking forward to welcoming back top Norfolk chefs for the takeover dinners. During the last academic year, students learned alongside the likes of Daniel Smith and Richard Hughes. Mark says: ‘We brought in a lot of chefs, to try and inspire our students and that’s what we want to do again this year.’ They also plan to welcome back Wells-based butcher Arthur Howell and chef Chris Coubrough, to demonstrate to students exactly why a fillet steak costs as much as it does. As with all these events, Mark says: ‘It gives students a firm grounding to meet their curriculum requirements but it also gives them a rounded experience.’

JOE MULHALL, HEAD OF HOSPITALITY , CATERING, TOURISM AND ASPIRE, HAS THIS UPDATE: ‘We’re getting to know our students through our induction process, and teaching and learning is well underway here in hospitality and catering. We have a new cohort of students who we are going to inspire and develop to reach their potential this year. As usual, we’ve got a wellplanned curriculum programme to enable our students to participate in learning and achieve their personal goals and work in this amazing industry. We will continue to work with employer groups as well as other stakeholders who contribute to the success of our students here at City College. As for the graduatio n ceremony coming up this month at Norwich Cathedra l – how lucky are we at City College to have such an amazing setting to celebrate the success of our high er education students across the college and especially our students in Hospitality Management?’

www.feastnorfolkmagazine.co.uk

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MARK BRADY

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Who are you and where do you work? My name is Ben Handley and my wife, Sarah, and I own The Duck Inn in the village of Stanhoe, near Burnham Market, and The Hunworth Bell, near Holt. How long have you been there? We will have been at The Duck for six years on Valentine’s Day 2019 and we opened The Hunworth Bell in the summer of 2017. Where were you before? Previously, I was at Briarfields in Titchwell, The White Horse in Brancaster Staithe, and I also worked as souschef at Ruby Ruby in Melbourne, Australia. I like a kitchen with a view!

MY LIFE ON A PLATE Chef Ben Handley, who runs two popular foodie pubs in North Norfolk, tells us about his culinary pedigree and about a certain football dream

www.hunworthbell.co.uk

BEN HANDLEY

VISIT

What is your favourite ingredient? My favourite ingredients include Holkham Estate pure breed beef from Arthur Howell as well as local mutton and hogget. Being in Norfolk, we all look forward to the mussel season, and Clive Houlder provides with amazing mushrooms - his recent haul of ceps and fairy ring mushrooms (mousseron) were stunning. We also have herb gardens at both pubs which provide us with a wide range of herbs to use throughout the year.

www.duckinn.co.uk

Who has inspired you? A recent trip to Barcelona, meeting Ferran Adria of El Bulli who gave us the most sincere and awe inspiring talk at the Estrella Damm old brewery before giving us a guided tour of El Barri, was terrific. Also the new restaurant, Cornerstone, by Tom Brown in Hackney Wick looks incredible. Inspirational chefs include Tom Kerridge and Anthony Bourdain.

VISIT

Where did you train? Mostly on the job! I was brought up with my brother Sam and sister Kate at my parent’s former pub, The Lifeboat in Thornham, and spent a lot of time in the kitchen there. I also attended City College in Norwich to study cookery but I found it was a long way to travel once a week for a beer!


What do you like doing when you are not cooking? That doesn’t happen very often! When it does I love spending time with Sarah and the children and taking our dog, Boomer, out in the gorgeous area around our home. And I love to travel, losing myself in local markets.

Got a favourite gadget? My team – they are a machine!! We couldn’t achieve anything without them all. What is your signature dish at the time of year? We are doing a gorgeous dish with Holkham Estate venison which we pair with damson and carrot. We are making carrot crisps, fondant and a really intense purée and we finish the dish with cocoa and rosemary. It is so rich and indulgent and perfect for this time of year. The mackerel dish we are sharing on these pages is also lovely at this time of year, with flavours of onion, apple and cinnamon which are warming and evocative of dark evenings.

www.feastnorfolkmagazine.co.uk

What would you be doing if you were not a chef? I’d be playing football for Man Utd. What's your foodie prediction for 2019? I think we are having a return to more conventional cooking as people are starting to understand more about their food and where it comes from. With rising food costs, people are becoming more resourceful and I think we will see a rise in self-sufficiency and a lot more emphasis on fresh, local, sustainable produce.

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RECIPE OVERLEAF

Where do you like to eat out in the region? It’s hard to find time but we hear amazing things about the guys at North Street in Burnham Market, Benedict’s in Norwich and The Old Bank in Snettisham. The problem is they are so good they are always fully booked! Kevin at The Neptune in Old Hunstanton is always doing great things as well so I would love to go there soon.


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Keep up to date by joining us on social media and sign up to our mailing list www.norfolkrestaurantweek.co.uk/norwich

NORWICH RESTAURANT WEEK IS PART OF NORFOLK RESTAURANT WEEK


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BEN HANDLEY 'S

METHOD 1. Start by making the onion and cinnamon purée. In a medium sized, heavy bottomed saucepan, melt the butter and gently cook the chopped onions, cinnamon and bay leaf. Season slightly with the salt and pepper. 2. Continue to cook on a very low heat with the pan covered, with either a lid or Cling Film so as to not let any moisture escape. You are looking for the onions to be very tender but not caramelised. If the heat becomes too much add a splash of water and continue cooking. 3. For the apple, cut the flesh away from the core into four pieces. Trim each piece into neat rectangular shapes then into even sized dice. Place into a dry, non stick frying pan in a single layer and ‘burn’ on a very high heat. Do not be tempted to move the diced apple, we want just one side scorched. 4. When they are scorched transfer to the apple juice and cider mix in a small jar. 5. When the onions are really tender and sweet remove the cinnamon stick and bay leaf. Add a squeeze of fresh lemon juice and blend the mix in a food processor until silky smooth. 6. Keep warm until ready to serve. 7. When you are ready to serve, season the prepared mackerel fillets with salt and white pepper on both sides and gently dress with olive oil. 8. Heat a large, non stick frying pan and place the fillets skin side down. 9. When the skin side is nicely seared and caramelised add a squeeze of lemon juice and the butter and gently turn the mackerel fillets. Turn the heat right down and continue to baste the fish with the foaming butter for 30 seconds - one minute. 10. Remove from the pan and drain on kitchen paper. 11. Serve the dish by spooning a generous amount of onion purée onto a plate, top with mackerel then finish with a scattering of scorched apple.

SEARED FILLETS OF MACKEREL WITH onion and cinnamon puré e, burnt apple

[Serves 4

INGREDIENTS 2 mackerel, filleted and pin boned; olive oil; 25g of unsalted butter; 125g of unsalted butter; 6 medium sized onions, peeled and roughly chopped; 1 cinnamon stick; 1 bay leaf; salt and freshly ground white pepper; 2 granny smith apples, peeled into acidulated water; 100ml of fresh apple juice; 25ml of cider vinegar www.feastnorfolkmagazine.co.uk

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PICTURES BY RICHARD CHAMBURY

THIS MONTH’S PHOTO ESSAY CAPTURES ED CLARK IN HIS NORTH NORFOLK BAKERY


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PICTURES BY RICHARD CHAMBURY

www.pastonacre.com

ART DEALER ED CLARK moved to North Norfolk four years ago with wife Harriet, and their four children, to pursue the Good Life. Whilst transforming a former pub into a much loved home in pretty Cley-next-the-Sea, he was given a jar of starter - the vital starting point for sourdough bread - by a friend and was suddenly hooked. Now he runs the artisan bakery Pastonacre from a flint-walled barn in the village centre, and supplies the area’s delis and shops, plus a growing number of restaurants and pubs. He is adamant that he only wants to make slowlyfermented, naturally-leavened ‘real bread’, using only organic locally-milled flour, water and salt. ‘It is how great bread has been made for millennia,’ he says. ‘So much bread these days is full of unnecessary additives and flavourings. I wanted to keep it simple, and make something that is flavoursome, nutritious and, in this age of gluten intolerance, wonderfully digestible.’


SERVING LOCAL BUSINES SES FOR OVE R 40 YEARS

Fruit, vegetables, dairy & more delivered to your BUSINESS including bespoke, hand-prepared vegetables

www.eastersofnorwich.com 156-158 NORTHUMBERLAND ST, NORWICH, NORFOLK, NR2 4EE TEL: 01603 622890


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Ed bakes small batches of sourdough daily before delivering it in the distinctive blue Pastonacre packaging, still warm; the bakery’s sprouted rye loaf and delightfullysticky cinnamon buns are building up a loyal following, too.

www.pastonacre.com

PICTURES BY RICHARD CHAMBURY

VISIT

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CHEF 'S WORLD -

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THE SWEETEST THING

ANDREW JONES

Andrew Jones of Farmyard in Norwich and The Dial House in Reepham is all about healthy puddings this month

VISIT

www.farmyardrestaurant.com AND www.thedialhouse.org.uk

I LOVE DESSERTS, all of them. From classic French patisseries constructed from light buttery pastry, to a simple affogato with a rich vanilla ice-cream and great espresso. The thing that all these treats at the end of a meal have in common are sugar, cream and pastry. Which, although delicious, are exactly the things that a growing number of people are cutting from their diets, either through choice or necessity. There is a growing demand from our guests to offer choices that are acceptable to those with dietary requirements, and we are in the business of giving people what they want, after all. Desserts, or ‘pastry’ as we call it in the business, are more scientific than most of what we do in the kitchen. Sugar, fat and gluten play really specific roles in pastry work so it’s not quite as simple as substituting out butter, flour and refined white sugar, because what you replace it with won’t necessarily work in the same way. More often than not it’s a case of starting from scratch to get the result you’re after or completely rethinking what a dessert is. We still want to give our guests a delicious treat at the end of their meal without relying on cream, butter, sugar and flour so we have to get a little more imaginative when our options are limited.

At The Dial House, our new pastry chef Zoe has already got the cake trolley rocking, and is busy revamping our afternoon teas and, not that I like to put too much pressure on our chefs, the next thing I’ll be asking her to look at is some interesting gluten and dairy free alternatives. We already have gluten free scones available but that is really just a starting point. At Farmyard our gluten and dairy free BBQ pineapple and coconut parfait dessert is making lots of people happy. The reason it works so well is because it is delicious in its own right rather than trying to be something else. The next thing we will be tackling is low sugar options. At both sites we are going to be introducing a reduced or low sugar dessert that doesn’t sacrifice the treat factor. Because without treats where would we be?

IVE OUR G O T T N A W "WE STILL ICIOUS TREAT AT EL GUESTS A D EIR MEAL WITHOUT TH THE END OF CREAM, BUTTER, RELYING ON ND FLOUR " SUGAR A

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You can also keep up-to-date with Andrew via his monthly newsletter - Farmyard Confidential subscribe online


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A REAL

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INGREDIENTS

CROWD PLEASER THIS MONTH LUCY BARTLETT CONTINUES HER SERIES OF EASY PEASY DISHES WITH THIS TASTY TAGINE

FOR THE TAGINE 12 skinless, boneless chicken thighs, quartered; 3 cloves of garlic; 1tsp of ground cumin; 1tsp of ground coriander; 1tsp of ground cinnamon; 1tsp of cayenne pepper; 1tsp of chilli flakes; 1tsp of paprika; 1tsp of ground ginger; 1tsp of Maldon salt; 4 tbsp of olive oil; 4 onions, finely chopped; 2 x 454g tins of chopped tomatoes, drained; 30g of flat leaf parsley (stalks only finely chopped at this stage - the leaves are used later); 30g of fresh coriander (stalks only finely chopped at this stage - the leaves are used later) FOR THE FINAL PUTTING TOGETHER 150g of trimmed green beans, cut in half; the leaves of the parsley and coriander, chopped

CHICKEN AND GREEN BEAN TAGINE

METHOD

(SE RV ES 8)

I LOVE this recipe as it gives such an impressive return for your effort! It is brilliant for feeding a crowd, as it can be made well ahead of time, and freezes well but is so quick to make that it is great for a midweek supper.

INGREDIENTS FOR COOKS is a family-run Suffolk-based business which supplies a wide variety of ingredients for both home and professional cooks. Visit www.ingredientsforcooks.co.uk

www.feastnorfolkmagazine.co.uk

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1. Heat the oil and soften the onions in the oil until translucent and then add the ground spices and garlic. Stir gently for a couple of minutes before adding the chicken pieces 2. Stir well to ensure the chicken is well coated in the spice mixture and keep stirring until the chicken is sealed 3. Then add the strained chopped tomatoes – straining the tomatoes stops the sauce becoming soup 4. Allow to simmer gently for 15 minutes, then add the chopped parsley and coriander stalks 5. Simmer for a further 5 minutes. At this point you can either serve straight away or refrigerate/freeze until required 6. Before you serve, add the halved green beans to the hot tagine for 2 minutes and stir through. Sprinkle with the chopped parsley and coriander leaves just before serving. Delicious with couscous.


om e.c

tur yna

w w w. s a r a b VISIT

SARA MATTHEWS is a qualified trainer, food consultant, recipe developer and food writer

GUILT-FREE

TREAT

OUR FREE FROM RECIPE WRITER SARA MATTHEWS HAS ANOTHER TWO DISHES FOR US THIS MONTH, INCLUDING A SURPRISINGLY GLUTEN FREE CARBONARA

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Sara By Nature -

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Carbonara with Smoky Sticky Maple Mushrooms A traditional carbonara is made with eggs, bacon, cheese and pasta so couldn’t be more gluten and vegan unfriendly. I love carbonara so was determined to develop a recipe that tasted good, was healthy and ticked all the boxes.

SERVES 4

METHOD Mix and combine all the mushroom ingredients together, apart from the mushrooms! Then add the mushrooms, stir to coat them all and leave to marinate for 30 minutes In a large pan on a medium heat, add the marinated mushrooms, reserving the juice, and sauté. As the liquid disappears, add more of the marinade until it has all been used up and the mushrooms are cooked. The mushrooms will release liquid at first, but this will soon cook off. Once cooked, transfer to a plate and keep for serving In a large pan, cook the pasta according to the packet instructions, drain, rinse and set aside While the pasta is cooking, sauté the onion and garlic for the sauce in a large pan until the onion turns translucent (about 5 minutes). Once cooked, add this to a food processor along with the other sauce ingredients. Blend until you have a smooth sauce. Transfer this to a pan and heat through on a medium heat, add the frozen peas. Cook for 5 minutes. Then add the pasta and gently stir to coat and combine all the ingredients Serve, topped with some of the mushrooms and a little lemon zest If you have it, top with vegan Parmesan cheese

INGREDIENTS 350g of gluten free spaghetti (or pasta of your choice); 100g of frozen peas; zest of 1 lemon For the sauce 300g carton of silken tofu, drained; 1 large onion, chopped; 3 cloves of garlic, crushed; 11/2tbsp of dried nutritional yeast; 3/4 tsp of black salt (Kala Namak powder) - this salt gives the eggy flavour but if you do not have this the recipe works well without; good grind of black pepper For the mushrooms 1tbsp of tamari (gluten free soya sauce); 1tbsp of liquid smoke; 1tbsp of maple syrup; 1tsp of smoked paprika; 100g of mushrooms, sliced

Chocolate and Blueberry Sweet Potato Brownies [Serves 16 -2 0 ]

INGREDIENTS 2 medium sweet potatoes; 75g of ground almonds; 110g of rice flour; 8 Medjool dates or dried dates, softened in warm water for 10 minutes and drained; 2 ripe bananas, peeled; 100g of blueberries (raspberries also work well); 4tbsp of raw cacao or cocoa powder; 3tbsp of maple syrup; 1tsp of gluten free baking powder; 1tsp of vanilla bean paste or vanilla extract METHOD Preheat the oven to 180ºC/gas mark 4 Peel and roughly chop the sweet potatoes and boil until soft, about 10 minutes. In a food processor, add the bananas, dates and blend until smooth, add the cooked potato, cocoa powder, maple syrup, vanilla and blend Transfer to a bowl, add the flour, baking powder and almonds, stir to combine thoroughly, then add the berries and mix to combine Empty the mixture into a parchment lined baking tray, smooth the batter with a spatula Bake for 30 minutes. Cool before cutting.

www.feastnorfolkmagazine.co.uk

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Y A W N A G E THE V Julia Martin discusses her journey towards veganism

JULIA RUNS A NORWICH BASED CATERING AND EVENTS COMPANY WHICH SPECIALISES IN LOCALLY SOURCED VEGAN AND VEGETARIAN FOOD

www.feastnorfolkmagazine.co.uk

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www.purpleplumcatering.co.uk

planned my meals with enough time and consideration. And while I do want to project the most positive image of veganism as being attractive and achievable, rather than as impossibly finicky or depriving, I must admit that, when deciding to go vegan, it can sometimes be a frustrating and confusing experience, trying to figure out which foods are safe to eat and which contain hidden animal ingredients. Often, before making the transition to veganism, we have no idea what is in the food we eat, and it can seem like an impossible task to read through labels with ingredients we didn’t know existed. To start with, look out for a vegan label on the food packaging. Many supermarkets and household food brands are now opting to mark their products as being vegan, which means going shopping has never been easier when there are time constraints or a meal needs to be quickly put together. And, finally, living as vegans in a non-vegan world does present all manner of scenarios in which our convictions are challenged, and we’re routinely faced with dilemmas about how to promote veganism to other people. Is the best way to navigate these situations to always stick to our principles? I would suggest not. My view is that, while I’m certainly not going to eat a beef burger just to keep the peace, there are times when we should perhaps consider compromising our moral position and/ or softening our rules a little if doing so would have a better overall outcome for animals than rigidly being ‘right’. To me this is being pragmatic in my approach.

VISIT

IF, FOR WHATEVER REASON, you are choosing a vegan diet, it’s important to know exactly what your decision can do to your body. While you’re likely to notice many positive changes (research shows a plant-based diet can help with cardiovascular health), it’s also important to be aware of the risks that a lack of some key nutrients will have on the body. B12, a nutrient that helps keep the body’s nerve and blood cells healthy and helps make DNA, found in fish, eggs, poultry and cheese, and protein, needed for muscle mass and hair, skin and nails, are essential to health and wellbeing so you need to ensure your diet continues to provide the correct amount of them. Planning your meals is a big part of keeping on top of your intake of the right mixture of minerals and vitamins, paying special attention to particular ones you need at different stages of your life. For example, teenage girls need iron, and iron from vegetarian sources is harder to absorb than from animal sources so care is needed. Taking vitamin C can help as it aids iron absorption. I’m a committed veggie now, and only after I have made sure that I can make every meal delicious and nutritionally sound will I move over to being a full time vegan. There are many meat substitutes out there that are tasty, protein heavy and rich in some nutrients, but I just don’t want to reach for them when I have not

JULIA Martin


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Harissa pork & pumpkin pilaf [ S e r ve s 4

INGREDIENTS 4 pork loin medallions, cut into 1.5cm cubes (or 12 pork fillet medallions or 4 loin steaks, fat removed); 2tbsp of harissa paste; finely grated zest and juice of 1 lemon; 1tbsp of olive oil; 1 onion, sliced; 1 red pepper, deseeded and diced; 400g of diced pumpkin or butternut squash; small knob of butter; 250g of basmati rice, rinsed; 500ml of hot vegetable stock; salt and black pepper

NORFOLK PORK IS ONE OF THE COUNTY’S GEMS AND THIRD-GENERATION DERSINGHAM FAMILY BUTCHER DAVID PRIOR HAS A RECIPE TO WARM THINGS UP THIS AUTUMN BEAUTIFUL NORFOLK PORK is a joy to cook and eat succulent and packed full of flavour. At EH Prior we love working with Tim Allen’s South Creake-raised Duroc pietrain cross animals. High quality meat will always shine and a resplendent roast is a gorgeous way to enjoy a loin cut or slow-roasted shoulder, but this tasty dish from LovePork, which supports English pig farmers, is both seasonal and simple.

1. Mix 1 tbsp of the harissa paste with 2 tbsp of the lemon juice and a good grind of black pepper in a bowl. Add the pork and stir to coat. Set aside 2. Heat the oil in a shallow casserole dish or a large non-stick pan with a tight-fitting lid. Add the onions, pepper and pumpkin or butternut squash. Fry gently on a medium heat for 3 minutes with the lid on until softened, but not browned 3. Remove the lid and turn up the heat. Cook for 2–3 minutes, stirring occasionally until the vegetables have coloured a little 4. Add the butter, stir in the rice and remaining harissa paste, cook for 2 minutes. Pour over the stock, season with a little salt and pepper and stir 5. Bring to the boil, reduce the heat to low and cover tightly with the lid. Cook for 10 minutes. Gently stir the pork into the rice. Cover and return to the heat 6. Cook for a further 8 minutes or until all the stock has been absorbed and the pork, rice and vegetables are tender. Remove from the heat and leave to stand for a few minutes. Stir in the lemon zest and remaining juice and some of the parsley. Fluff up the rice with a fork 7. Divide between four bowls and garnish with the remaining parsley and 25g of toasted flaked almonds. Serve with a dollop of low fat plain Greek yoghurt.

Beautiful game!

Fresh, high quality meat Homemade ready meals Hot pies, baked daily Local produce and drinks Self service hog roasts Strictly seasonal, ask for fresh game at our butchery, and our tasty venison pies enriched with Woodforde’s Norfolk Nog dark ale, from the deli

Visit our store at: St Nicholas’ Court, Dersingham, Norfolk PE31 6GZ Guild Street Walsingham NR22 6BU 01328 821877 Open 7 days

Farms Shop www.walsingham.co

Norfolk Lavender Lynn Road Heacham PE31 7JE 01485 570002 Open 7 days

tel: 01485 542589 www.ehpriorandsons.co.uk


BUTCHERS • deli • takeaway fresh meat & poultry

HIGH WELFARE,FREE RANGE MEATS FROM LOCAL FARMS DELCIOUS STUFFED ROLLED PORK LOIN

We only stock the best beef, lamb, pork and poultry available PADDOCKS BUTCHERY & DELI STORES Church Farm, Norwich Road, Hethersett NR9 3AS 01603 812437 Paddock Farm Shop, Norwich Road, Mulbarton NR14 8JT 01508 578259

CATERING DIVISION Wood view Farm, Church Lane, Wicklewood, NR18 9QH, 01953 602470

www.thepaddocksbutchery.co.uk

177-179 Plumstead Road, Norwich

Tel 01603 434253 www.archersbutchers.com

LARGE SELECTION OF QUALITY FISH

HOWARD & SON

LARGE SELECTION OF FROZEN SEAFOOD & PRAWNS

est. 1889

BRANCASTER MUSSELS & OYSTERS

FISHMONGERS GAME & MEATS

LOCAL WILD GAME OVEN READY OR BREASTS, PHEASANT, PARTRIDGE, MALLARD, WOOD PIGEON

LO P YA ICK L U TO TY P A DA CA Y R D

NORFOLK FOOD AND DRINK CHAMPIONS

VARIED SELECTION OF HOT & COLD SMOKED FISH PLATTERS MADE TO ORDER

HOMEMADE SAUSAGES AND LOCAL SMOKED BACON

FREE RANGE DUCKS AND CHICKENS LOCAL VENISON

We are a FAMILY RUN business serving RETAIL & ALL CATERING TRADES 17 FYE BRIDGE STREET NORWICH NR3 1LJ

GRESSINGHAM DUCK SEASONAL POULTRY SPECIALITY FOODS NOW TAKING CHRISTMAS ORDERS

RETAIL DELIVERIES (T&C’S APPLY ). OPEN TUESDAY TO SATURDAY. HAVE YOU FOUND US YET?

01603 624928 FISHMONGERSNORWICH.COM SALES@FISHMONGERSNORWICH.COM

TUES – FRI 8AM –3PM SAT 7AM –1PM FIND OUR CAR PARK IN FISHERGATE


The Wood Fired Food Co, based in Dersingham, takes its sourdough pizzas all over East Anglia and beyond. One half of the husband and wife team, Jon Hemming, answers our questions

JON HEMMING

ON FIRE!


Wood Fired Food Co -

B U S I N E S S

Tell us about your business – is it a family affair? The Wood Fired Food Co is a mobile business which specialises in sourdough pizzas cooked at 450°C degrees in under 90 seconds. It’s owned by myself and my wife, Sarah - although we couldn’t have done this without the support of both sets of parents. From day one they have backed us and when we’re working my mum and dad look after our three-year-old daughter

P R O F I L E

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What's your most popular pizza? The beauty of pizzas is the ability to showcase what’s in season and what new ingredients we’ve discovered, on our weekly specials. It is great to chat with Danni of From The Earth, an organic cooperative grower group based in west Norfolk, about what’s looking good that week and building the menu around that. After the simplistic beauty of the Margherita, our ‘Pepper Pig’ is the most popular pizza: Marsh Pig oak smoked chorizo, Palermo red peppers and chilli oil. We also do a Meat, Heat and Sweet which consists of salami, chilli, and mozzarella and finished with Norfolk honey

When did you start? We started the business in late 2016, three months after we moved to Norfolk from Leicestershire Where are you based - and why? We fell in love with Norfolk because of its natural beauty, as well as its array of small artisan producers – we’d been coming on holiday here for many years. After a fairly extensive house search, we found Dersingham, a village we didn’t know but were immediately attracted to. We’ve been here since September 2016 and couldn’t think of a place we’d rather live (we burn wood from the Royal Sandringham Estate, less than a mile from home)

Where can we find you? When not catering for weddings and private events we can be found at: • Deepdale Backpackers and Camping in Burnham Deepdale on a Friday night • Riverford Pumpkin Day – October 27 (Sacrewell Farm) • Ely Farmers Market, Craft Market and Sunday Market How do Italians rate your pizzas?! We served a large Italian family a couple of weeks ago. One of them could speak English so she was translating for the rest. They were so animated in their compliments, it was very nice. When we first started the business, an Italian told us that our pizzas were just like those in his home city of Naples

What did you do before and what made you 'take the plunge’? I was a Chartered Accountant and Sarah was a Reflexologist. We wanted to work with food; something we’d been interested in for many years

VISIT

www.thewoodfiredfoodco.co.uk

Tell us about your ingredients Our dough contains only three ingredients: flour, water and sea salt - we use the age-old technique of raising the dough using a sourdough culture, and our dough ferments from as little as 36 hours up to 80 hours. I’ve made sourdough bread for years, and great bread, topped with the best ingredients, was what I wanted our pizzas to be. Sourcing ingredients from the best producers is very important. Marsh Pig, based in Claxton, is always on the menu. The olive oil used on the pizzas comes from a small family farm in Abruzzo, Italy. We’re going to visit Alessio and his family in October to see the olive harvest – it’s the nicest olive oil we’ve found and is available in the UK from Cucina Di William (cucinadiwilliam.co.uk). It really is important that we find the best quality of all the ingredients we use, from the flour and the sea salt in our dough, to the meats, vegetables and cheeses we put on it We hear you are a popular choice for wedding receptions? We cater for a lot of weddings, from evening pizza buffets to full wedding catering and we love it. We also do a lot of corporate events - our latest was at Riverford Organics

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Cookbooks

Buon Appetito A couple of stunning Italian cookbooks head up the list of new releases this month

GINO'S ITALIAN ADRIATIC ESCAPE

TOP CHOICE

Gino D'Acampo Jarrold price ÂŁ20

Gino, the popular Italian chef, explores the picturesque east coast of Italy from Veneto to Puglia, showcasing recipes from his travels in his next TV series and this book. The recipes include ones for pasta, seafood, meat dishes and vegetarian options, whether you are catering for meals or a simple supper for one. This is a well laid out book, with beautiful photography and it showcases less well known parts of Italy which are simply stunning. Add in recipes for Venetian doughnuts and cherry and amaretto tart, and you have a divine combination!

Discover Jarrold BOOK DEPARTMENT Plus Chapters Coffee Bar - the perfect place to take a few moments out of your shopping or to sit and relax with friends. With over 30,000 book titles we’re proud to be a (deliberately) old-fashioned independent bookseller and are completely focused on bringing our customers the very best range and service we can.

UPCOMING BOOK & AUTHOR EVENTS

jarrold.co.uk/events LONDON ST. NORWICH 01603 660661


STAR BUY

VEGETABLES ALL'ITALIANA

by Anna Del Conte Jarrold price £20

Italian born food writer Anna Del Conte, a real favourite with both Nigella Lawson and Delia Smith, puts vegetables in the spotlight with her latest cookbook. Organised in A-Z order from aglio to zucchina, there is a mix of her classic recipes as well as more adventurous ones such as panzanella, parmigiana di melanzane, fiori di zucca fritti and beetroot or pumpkin gnocchi. This is an elegant book, with more than a touch of Italian flair!

MOWGLI STREET FOOD by Nisha Katona Jarrold price £26

STRUDEL, NOODLES & DUMPLINGS by Anja Dunk

Jarrold price £20 RRP £26 There are more than 200 recipes in Anja’s celebration of Germany's varied culinary heritage. From recipes such as whole-wheat buttermilk waffles to caraway roast pork and cabbage, quince and apple slaw, she easily proves there is more to German food than bratwurst and Black Forest gateau.

Former barrister Nisha Katona opened the first Mowgli restaurant in 2004 in Liverpool to offer authentic Indian Street food, rather than a stereotype curry, and the type of food Indians really do eat at home. The book came out earlier this year and is being very well received. Expect herb and spiceenriched dishes aplenty.

Do n' t mi ss

CHRISTMAS WITH GOOD HOUSEKEEPING Jarrold price £18.99

DI AR Y DA TE S

OCTOBER 31, 6:30pm

AN EVENING WITH JODI PICOULT OPEN, BANK PLAIN, NORWICH

This evening celebrates the rele ase of her new novel, A Spark of Light. Tickets, which incl ude a signed copy of the book, are £16.99 available online or from customer services.

If your resolution is to be organised this Christmas, here is an essential companion from Good Housekeeping to see you right for the festive season. Its 140 recipes are tried and tested, with tips for get-togethers, advice for getting ahead and how to rejuvenate leftovers. It is extremely well presented, with clear, practical instructions to recipes which are foolproof. Be assured!


Muse Restaurant at The Cliff Hotel, Cliff Hill, Gorleston-On-Sea, NR31 6DH 01493 738484 www.muserestaurant.co.uk Starter Braised Pig Cheeks Served with bramley apple emulsion and toasted panettone Smoked Salmon Served with roast pickled vegetables, crostini and dill sour cream Soup of the Day Roasted Squash (v) Served with root vegetables, walnut and goat’s cheese curd

Dessert Christmas Pudding Served with brandy sauce Chocolate Crème Brulee Served with traditional shortbread

Main Two Bird Roast Turkey and pheasant bound together served with roast potatoes, goose neck stuffed with sage and onion stuffing, boudin wrapped in streaky bacon and vintage port jus

Gingerbread, Caramel and Pear Trifle Served with champagne cream A Selection of English & French Cheeses Served with crackers, chutney and black grapes

Cranberry, Brie & Chestnut Wellington (v) Served with roast potatoes and vegetarian gravy Pan Fried Salmon Served with mash potato with pancetta and crushed sprouts and hollandaise sauce

THE WELLS CRAB HOUSE SEAFOOD RESTAURANT

2 courses £18 | 3 courses £22 Available 1st - 23rd December

Bayfield Catering offers a passion for local ingredients, varied menu options for a variety of events and lots of experience and talent in the kitchen. B O O K N O W F O R P R I VAT E C H R I S T M A S A N D N E W Y E A R PA R T I E S W E D D I N G S D I N N E R

PA R T I E S

B U F F E T S S H O O T I N G

PA R T I E S

C A N A P E S C U P C A K E S

38-40 Freeman street WELLS-NEXT-THE-SEA CALL US ON 01328 710456 WWW.WELLSCRABHOUSE.CO.UK

Visit www.bayfieldcatering.co.uk to see sample menus and testimonals T: 01263 741497 E: info@bayfieldcatering.co.uk


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SPILLING THE BEANS

www.greenfarmcoffee.co.uk

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Generally, the grind will depend on the amount of pressure, brew time and the type of filter. Most brewing techniques use what is known as a medium grind, with exceptions being finer grinds like espresso and Turkish coffee and coarser grinds like cafetière and cold brew. For example to make espresso coffee we use a very fine grind as the water is forced through at a very high pressure. In contrast, when brewing with a cafetière, we use a much coarser grind and leave the coffee to brew for a much longer time. These different grinds and brews allow us to extract different flavours from the coffee, as well as changing the body/mouth feel of the coffee. As a result, the same coffee made as an espresso, filter or cafetière can be quite different. My third and final tip is to buy a set of digital scales. This might sound a bit excessive, but you can purchase a set relatively cheaply and it will greatly assist you with your coffee brewing. When we make coffee we normally work to a recipe or brew ratio that will state the amount of ground coffee needed, as well as the amount of water. For example, a traditional Italian espresso recipe is 1 part coffee to 2 parts water. This means if we put 9g of coffee into our espresso machine we want to obtain 18ml of liquid coffee in our cup. Luckily 1ml is roughly 1g so we can weigh the liquid to achieve our recipe. Each different brewing technique should have a recommended recipe or brew ratio to help you achieve the best flavour from your coffee using that piece of equipment. Once you find a recipe that you are happy with, the scales allow you to replicate it again and again.

VISIT

IN THE BREWING PROCESS we transform coffee from its bean form into the different styles of coffee we have become familiar with and love today. Brewing coffee can be achieved through various methods and techniques, all of which have their own advantages and disadvantages. Here, I provide some tips to help you to improve and create a consistent cup of coffee. Before we even start looking at our coffee and equipment, we first need to examine one of the most important and most forgotten ingredients in brewing coffee; water. When brewing a black coffee more than 98 per cent of what is actually in the cup is water. So if our water doesn’t taste great, we are going to find it very difficult to make a great tasting cup of coffee. This is especially relevant in Norfolk as we have very hard water that is not ideal for brewing coffee. Unfortunately, brewing coffee using very hard water often produces flat, dull and chalky flavours within our cup. As a result, I would always recommend brewing with filtered water as this will help you to achieve more flavour from your coffee. My second tip is about grinding your coffee. If possible, always grind coffee fresh as once it has been ground coffee goes stale very quickly. Then, it is important to use different grind settings for different brewing methods as these methods are designed to extract different flavours and aromas from the coffee.

Daniel M at the fasci thams provides a n to cup, a ating coffee jou n insight into s well as r some help ney from bean your cup ful o f c o f fe e taste e tips to make ven bett er


B D &B DI EA ST N LS AY NE AV CA R, AI TI LA O BL N E

ut 1 18/05/2016 10:00 Page 1

Special Events & Christmas Treats at

WELLS-NEXT-THE-SEA

ANNUAL TRAFALGAR DAY DINNER Historical Talk followed by The Shantymen 21st October BRAZIL’S BOSSA NOVA WITH GEORGIA MANCIO Dinner, Music & Dancing 26th October THE FREDDIE HALL BAND Dinner, Music & Dancing 16th November

CHRISTMAS LIGHTS Mulled Wine & Mince Pies 17th November FESTIVE EVENINGS

(suitable for groups all sizes)

Superb seasonal 3-course Dinner and all the trimmings 24th Nov – 23rd Dec JAZZ AT THE MOVIES Dinner, Music & Dancing 7th December

01328 738777 • reception@thehoste.com • www.thehoste.com

FINE ALES | LOCALLY SOURCED INGREDIENTS | DOGS WELCOME

We do great Christmas Parties! Bring your friends or team and we will help you celebrate.

Christmas Day join us for a glass of Champagne T BEAROnbefore TO LEAVE WELLS? enjoying a traditional four-course lunch on the beautiful North Norfolk coast. HEN WHY NOT STAY... On New Year’s Eve come and indulge in our

fabulous seven-course set menu with complimentary fizz to usher the new year in from 7pm ‘til late.

Inn and Spicer’s House on The Buttlands, Wells-next-the-Sea, NorfolkThe NR23 1EUHead Queens *Find out more at www.theglobeatwells.co.uk/christmas 2 Bridewell Street Tel: 01328 710206 www.theglobeatwells.co.uk

Wymondham NR18 0AR

The Buttlands, Wells-next-the-Sea NR23 1EU T: 01328 710206 E: hello@theglobeatwells.co.uk

Mon - Thurs 11am - 11pm Fri - Sat 11am -11.30pm Sundays - 11am - 9pm

Tel: 01953 423 308 www.queensheadnorfolk.co.uk


C O L U M N

ASK ROGER *

QUEStION & ANSWER

ROGER HICKMAN'S

MAGRET OF MALLARD WITH CELERIAC AND BLACKBERRY

EACH MONTH ROGER HICKMAN, CHEFPROPRIETOR OF THE AWARD-WINNING ROGER HICKMAN’S RESTAURANT, SHARES HIS TOP KITCHEN TIPS AND ANSWERS YOUR QUESTIONS ON ALL THINGS CULINARY

ROGER HICKMAN

www.rogerhickmansrestaurant.com

What tips can you give for cooking game? In general game is drier than farmed meat, so you need to make sure you don’t let it dry out during cooking. For game birds, larding – covering the breast meat in strips of bacon during cooking – is the best way to do this. Marinating is another good way to boost the moisture. More than any other meat, it is important not to overcook game, as it will become dry and tough. Fruit is an excellent partner to game meat, because its acidity cuts through the richness of the meat’s flavour. Most game is in season during the autumn and winter months, so choose your fruit accordingly. Blackberries, which I have used in this month’s recipe, seem a natural partner.

INGREDIENTS

VISIT

W

hy are game birds hung before cooking? Aging most meats improves the flavour by allowing the natural enzymes to break down the tissue, which also allows excess water to evaporate, which intensifies the flavour. Traditional country wisdom said that game birds should be hung until they were ‘high’ – in other words they had started to rot. This is an acquired taste and probably not for many people, but there is little doubt that game birds which have been hung for a moderate period taste better, caramelise better in the pan (because of the lower water content), and express the ‘true’ flavour of game better.

[Serves 4

3 mallard breasts an extra piece of piece of duck (ask your butcher) 1 celeriac 50ml of white wine vinegar a punnet of blackberries

50g plus a pinch of caster sugar milk double cream 200ml of chicken stock hazelnut oil

METHOD Score the skin of the mallard breasts and then fry in a hot, dry pan, skin side down, until the skin is golden. Turn over, and place in an oven at 180°C for two or three minutes. Remove from the oven, place on a cooling rack and rest, skin side up Peel the celeriac and dice three-quarters of it into 1cm cubes. Roast these in a little butter and oil in a pan until each side is coloured – this should take about eight minutes. Slice the remaining celeriac with a mandolin and cut into disks. Bring 100ml water, 50ml vinegar and 50g sugar to the boil, remove from the heat and add the celeriac disks. Once the liquid is cool, the disks will be lightly pickled Take the celeriac trimmings and put in a saucepan. Just cover with a mixture of milk and cream. Bring to the boil and simmer for 15 minutes, until the celeriac is completely mushy. Blitz the whole lot in a food processor, and then pass through a fine sieve to give a smooth purèe. You may need to add a little water at the blitzing stage if the mixture is too stiff Halve 12 blackberries and set aside. Put the rest in a pan with enough water to just cover them. Add a pinch of sugar, a pinch of salt and a splash of cream, bring to the boil and simmer gently for five minutes. Blitz and pass to create the blackberry purèe. Allow to cool completely Reduce the chicken stock by about two-thirds to give an unctuous jus, then add a splash of hazelnut oil. Crisp the duck skin in the oven at 140°C for an hour; then cool and break into small shards To serve, slice the mallard breasts and divide between four plates. Smear the celeriac purèe on the pate and add the roasted celeriac cubes and the pickled celeriac. Dot the plate with the blackberry purèe, and decorate with the blackberry halves. Spoon over the jus, and sprinkle on the duck skin shards

*If you have a question for Roger, send it to sarah@feastnorfolkmagazine.co.uk

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01603 01603764567 764567 Call Calltoday todayfor forfree free brochures brochures Food Foodisisone oneofofthe thepleasures pleasuresininlife. life.Fresh Freshfood, food,what whatI Ifancy fancytotoeat, eat,the thepleasurable pleasurable Freshly prepared food, dishes that take your fancy, seasonal delights and the wonderful sight expectation expectationofofthe thefood foodchosen, chosen,the theaccompanying accompanyingsides, sides,the therelishes relishesand andthe thesite siteof ofthe the and smell of your chosen meal all add to the highly enjoyable and social side of eating. prepared prepareddish dishall alladd addtotothe theexperience. experience. Thosewho of usneed who need amay little extra help oftenof miss outmobility, on the chance of going out to lunch orafor People People who need care care mayhave havelost lostsome some oftheir their mobility, the theopportunity opportunity toto spend spend afew few a cool drink at a neighbour pub or a coffee and cake at a favourite cafe. hours hoursaway awayfrom fromtheir theirhome. home.Lost Lostopportunities opportunitiestotogo gototolunch lunchinina anearby nearbyrestaurant, restaurant,toto have have adrink drink inin a alocal local pub pub or orjust just totohave have coffee coffee and anda aslice slice ofofcake cake inin a alocal local cafe. cafe. Butaby having live-in care, you can regain your independence and start to once again enjoy regular trips to restaurants and you get to choose what you eat for supper! Live-in Live-incare careworkers workersoffer offerall allthese theseopportunities. opportunities.

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MUSTARD COFFEE BAR -

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all in the D FO O planning GO

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ELAINE REILLY

SMALL BUSINESS OWNER ELAINE REILLY TELLS US HOW IT’S GOOD TO HAVE A BREAK OVER THE SUMMER - SO SHE CAN PLAN FOR THE AUTUMN!

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stout. It’s delicious! You can find my recipe for it in the Norfolk Cookbook, I do urge you to give it a try, as it’s a big favourite with customers and my family. In Germany they also have a traditional beer cake made with a crumbly Streusel topping which is well worth a try if you are feeling adventurous as it has a lovely light texture. I would say that we are quite adventurous with ingredients in our baking, whether it be cardamom or lovely local lavender. It’s good to give traditional recipes a modern twist. If you’ve ever tried Chef’s amazing scones you know that also can apply even to those! Going out for afternoon tea is such a treat and always feels special. My daughter and I like to get out and enjoy whenever we can. Our favourite in the city is St Giles Hotel where the staff look after everyone so well. If you are travelling a bit further afield then we would recommend The Grove in ww Cromer or The Dial House w. m at Reepham. us ta October is a special month for us as a family as my mother celebrates her 87th birthday. No doubt she will want a birthday cake but woe betide me if I don’t make it to her liking! • Mustard Coffee Bar, Bridewell Alley, Norwich, opens Monday to Saturday, 8am-5.30pm

rd

HOPE YOU have all enjoyed the marvellous long, hot summer and have had the opportunity to enjoy some of our Norfolk coastline and gardens. As I write this I am sitting in a little cottage in Millers Dale in the heart of the Peak District enjoying some R&R. Running a small business means I often find I am bogged down in the day to day minutiae and don’t take enough time to look at the bigger picture of where and how to steer the business. Breaks like this are invaluable to clear your head and plan the coming months. Planning is an essential part of a small business, whether it’s managing cash flow or rotas. There are such small margins in all areas that errors can be costly. A break helps you plan and look forward to the coming months. October sees the beer festival come to the city. Being so near to the festival, we are on hand to supply coffee and sustenance between the day and evening sessions. It’s a suitably jolly occasion and brings a whole new set of visitors to the Lanes. Beer, though, isn’t just a great drink (I’m a bit of a real ale fan myself), but it’s also a great ingredient. My Norfolk stout cake is pretty well known locally. It’s a twist on a traditional Guinness cake, using a good local


O

NE OF THE LYNCHPINS of the Scottish tourism industry is the attraction of being able to visit whisky distilleries (and, of course, taste their wares). But you don’t have to travel north of the border to experience such a treat; in fact, it’s available here in Norfolk, just off the A11 near Attleborough. St George’s Distillery at Roudham is home to the English Whisky Company. English whisky, you may be thinking, is that a thing? Well, for over a century it wasn’t, but, thanks to the vision of one Norfolk man, something of a whisky renaissance is taking place in England. The Nelstrop family has been in farming since 1335, first in Yorkshire, then in Lincolnshire and more recently in our own county. Born right at the end of the war, James Nelstrop was one of the most dynamic members of that long agricultural dynasty. A yearning to broaden his horizons saw him travel around the world, to Australia and Russia, before finally settling in East Anglia, where he turned a wornout vegetable farm on the fens into the first whole Countryside Stewardships Scheme farm for organic sheep and cattle.

ANDY NEWMAN ENJOYS A TOUR OF NORFOLK’S ONLY WHISKY DISTILLERY, ST GEORGE’S

Inside ThE

Distillery


St George’s Distillery -

W H I S K Y

The one hour St George’s Tour takes place on the hour between 10am and 4pm, seven days a week, and costs £10, which includes a £5 voucher to spend on English Whisky in the shop. Two course lunches plus a tour are also available at £24.95, with foodie options including fish and chips and chocolate brownies. There are two other tours available: the World Whisky Tour, a two hour journey of discovery which includes an in-depth look at the distillery followed by a one hour tasting of whiskies from around the world; and the Distiller’s Tour, another two hour experience which includes an hour tasting of the whole range of whiskies produced at St George’s Distillery.

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www.englishwhisky.co.uk

www.feastnorfolkmagazine.co.uk

St George’s Distillery was the first English whisky to be launched for 100 years back in 2006; now there are more than a dozen English distilleries, so Norfolk has led the way to an English whisky renaissance. VISIT

A man like that doesn’t approach retirement with a longing to put his feet up, and, sure enough, James had a plan. With his son Andrew, he decided to follow a subject close to his heart, and reinvigorate whisky production, which had stopped in England more than a century previously. This isn’t as extraordinary as it might sound. With the best barley in the world grown in Norfolk, and with the pure water of the Breckland aquifer, Norfolk is an ideal place for a whisky distillery. Serendipity then played a part, as the new venture found Iain Henderson, a distiller of some note from Laphroaig, who was himself retiring but not quite ready for his pipe and slippers. And so the first 29 barrels of English whisky were produced in 2006, and the English Whisky Company was born. Sadly, James passed away in 2014, and Iain finally retired (again), and so the baton has now passed to James’ son Andrew and chief whisky maker David Fitt, a former Greene King brewer who was trained by Iain before he hung up his distiller’s apron. Realising the interest that English whisky would stir, the decision was made early to build a visitor centre, and it is here that, as well as being able to buy the full range of more than a dozen different whiskies made on the site, visitors have the chance to see for themselves how they are made – and, of course, have a taste. I joined a one hour ‘St George’s Tour’, where visitors get to go onto the distilling floor itself, as well as the warehouse, full of 3000 oak casks and with a heady atmosphere caused by the ‘Angels’ Share’ – the four or five percent or so which evaporates from each barrel as it matures. What strikes you is that this is very much an artisan operation. The whisky is batch made by hand, with no computers, then filled into casks and left to mature until the distiller considers it to be perfect. These processes have as much a bearing on the finished product as the three main ingredients (barley, water and yeast). The copper of the still and, in particular the character of the cask, shape the flavour of the finished product hugely. The tour ends with a tasting of some of the range, in our case a fascinating comparison of the ‘Original’ single malt which is aged in bourbon casks, and the ‘Smokey’, a peated single malt which starts with a little peat and then releases what is described as a ‘smoke bomb.'

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FESTIVAL FEVER PHIL HALLS OF GRAIN BREWERY, IN THE WAVENEY VALLEY, URGES YOU TO SEEK OUT A BEER FESTIVAL THIS AUTUMN

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VISIT

www.grainbrewer y.co.uk

the crumbling St Laurence’s church under tall vaulted ceilings, showcasing just some of the Norfolk and Suffolk breweries who are sticking their necks out with riskier beers such as sours, lagers, eye-wateringly hoppy ones, alongside some out of town brewers with the same ethos. It gave the punters a chance to speak to the people who brewed the beers, to share their passions and pains, and to try something new and different. Yes, it had its fair share of hipsters chilling to the cool vibes whilst sat on pallets, but I was pleased to see all ages and types there, some venturing to a beer festival for their first time. A very nice woman came up to me apologetically at Grain Fest this year, our annual beer and music festival at the brewery, and said: ‘Sorry, but I don’t like beer.’ I’ve heard this before, and, after a few tasters of this and that at the bar, she was back for another glass of our wheat beer before you could say: ‘Weihenstephaner’. Beer festivals are good like that. If you like beer, you should go along. If you don’t like beer, you should go along. So here’s my recipe for a good beer festival. A diverse and carefully selected range of beer styles, served at its best, with plenty of information available about the beers and brewers, or even better, someone who knows their stuff to answer any questions. Talking just beer can get a bit dull, so some good music, food and entertainment helps. Family friendly when possible to show youngsters that good beer isn’t about getting drunk, and, as ever, friendly staff and clean toilets are a must. Keep an eye on social media, your local paper, and make sure you stick a beer festival somewhere in your diary this autumn - there are some great ones out there if you look around a bit.

WE ARE NOW ENTERING THE SEASON OF BEER FESTIVALS. Certainly they pop up throughout the year, but nothing partners quite so well with a beer festival as autumn. I did a quick Google before I put pen to paper, and the opening line of the UK Beer Festival entry for Wikipedia reads: ‘British beer festivals focus on draught real ale, although bottled beers and cider are often included’. How very dull, and from my experience, about five years out of date. Now, you have probably noticed that pubs and beer are experiencing both turmoil and exciting times at the moment. Habits are changing, pubs are changing, and this has forced creativity and innovation to reinvent tired pubs, and new beers to entice people away from their delivered supermarket beers, social media and Netflix - and back into the pubs. This same injection of reinvention needs to happen and is happening in the beer festival scene too. Beer festivals come in many shapes and sizes. The first CAMRA Great British Beer Festival began in September of 1975, soon to be followed by localised ale festivals popping up in a drive to keep alive a dying tradition of ‘drinkable local beer’, and they continue to be a great annual event. However, some of the best I’ve been to are often run by social and sports clubs, or village pubs, and the common ingredient is usually an excitement for beer, encouraging quality over quantity. I have just unloaded the Grain bar after a weekend at the Norwich Beer Mash Up. This beer festival was held in

DATE FOR THE DIARY Norwich Beer Festival takes place from October 22 to 27 at The Halls. Visit www. norwichcamra.org.uk

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C O L U M N

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ON THE FRONT LINE

RACHAEL PARKE

Our new columnist Rachael Parke of Season in Wells wants to hear it for front of house staff - not just the chef!

www.feastnorfolkmagazine.co.uk

LESSON 1 Service is pleasing, it’s about making people happy and feeling good

LESSON 2 A genuine smile. Although under pressure and working long hours, when welcoming a new face or a returning guest, you should automatically have the emotional compulsion to smile

LESSON 3 Staff should be able to recognise and react quickly to the ever changing need of who they are serving to ensure they create a wonderful experience

LESSON 4 Pleasing leads to profit. Excellent service creates repeat business. It is powerful, productive and essential for business growth

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www.s easoni nwells .co.uk

I LOVE CHEFS. I have been married to one for 17 years. With their creativity, crisp white jackets, capability to work under immense pressure and working ridiculously long hours producing delicious dishes, what’s not to admire about a great chef? But hey! What about us? Over the next few months I am going to share my life in the industry as a front of house professional - the good times, the challenging times, the abuse, the new friendships and laughter but, most importantly, what inspires me to put on my make up, smile and create memories for the thousands of customers that I both enjoy and endure. I hope to inspire the next generation of front of house individuals and highlight that we are vital to the sustainability of restaurants, hotels and pubs and need to be as equally recognised as the chefs. So, without further ado, chefs step aside for front of house to have their moment as I gather views and the secrets of front of house comrades across our region and beyond. First - Masciaga. It’s no secret that I have stalked this amazing ‘master of service’ for years. Apart from my husband, Diego Masciaga is the only man that makes me blush when I am greeted by him and he makes me feel like I am the only person in the room, a real skill when I am usually surrounded by at least another 40 guests! My first encounter with him was eating at the Waterside Inn in Bray. Of course the wine flowed and the taster menu was exceptional, but watching the way he orchestrated the restaurant floor was inspirational and all I needed to ensure that I applied this fresh encouragement, respect and learning back in Norfolk. Since our meeting, I am often heard using one of his quotes in my interviews and at staff training sessions: ‘If the customer has had to ask for it, then we have failed.’

VISIT

From Diego and his book, Lessons from the Master of Customer Service, I have learnt these valuable lessons which I believe enhance customer experience:


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W I N E

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SWIMMING AGAINST THE TIDE

Soave surrounded by vineyards

ANDY NEWMAN ADVISES THE SAVVY WINE DRINKER TO IGNORE FASHION


THREE WINES ANDY HAS ENJOYED tHIS MONtH: Co-op Chablis 2017 THROUGHOUT THE HISTORY OF WINE, it Over the summer I spent three very (East of England Co-op, £12.99) has been subject to the vicissitudes of happy weeks in the Veneto region of Italy. An own-label Chablis made by the fashion. From the ‘pints of port’ of the Stretching inland from Venice, this is a respected family firm of JM Brocard, 18th century to the Queen Victorialand of fertile plains, where cereal crops this has an appealing mix of citrus and driven mania for Hock in the 19th dominate, and of gently undulating hills minerality, with a good acidity which is century, there have always been which are ideal for cultivating grapes. the hallmark of Chablis. Simple enough, certain wines which are in vogue More wine is grown in this region than but easy drinking and good value. - and, therefore, others which are out anywhere else in Italy apart from Puglia and of fashion. Sicily, and it is home to two of my favourite Co-op Fairtrade Malbec 2016 In recent years we have seen this wines, both of which were once much more (East of England Co-op, £6.99) Grown at high altitude in the Famatina happen at a much faster pace. The popular in the UK than they are now: Soave Valley of Argentina, this barrel-aged Chardonnay fixation of the early 1990s and Valpolicella. Malbec is bursting with plum, cherry gave way to the rise of ‘blush’ wines, Both these names are object lessons in and jam aromas. On the palate it offers which in turn were overtaken by Pinot what can happen when a wine becomes pleasing tannins, and a good balance. A Grigio. Today, the Prosecco craze still fashionable. Meeting soaring demand good wine for that Friday evening steak. shows no sign of fading, although it meant chasing quantity over quality, and surely will when the next big thing as a result people fell out of love with both Valpolicella Ripasso Villa Borghetti 2016 comes along. of them. It took a bit of time, but both then (Majestic, £11.99 as part of a mixed All of this is great news for those realised the route back to prosperity was to case of six bottles) involved in selling wine, and, for a find the quality again. Made right in the heart of the Valpolicella Classico region by Famigla Pasqua, this period at least, the producers in the Tellingly, both wines rely on resolutely wine is pumped over the pomace from trendy regions. But, for the wine untrendy native grape varieties that few the production of the Estate’s Amarone, drinker, it inevitably leads to inflated drinkers would be able to identify. The adding a richness and depth to the prices, and then a drop in quality as Garganega, which is the backbone of Soave, fine cherry, blueberry and sweet spice careful winemaking is sacrificed in is, provided yields are kept in check, redolent flavours. A big wine with big flavours, and order to keep up with demand. of lemon and almonds, and can yield wines at this price, a steal. The savvy drinker will see the of real character with wood ageing. obvious: if in-vogue wines are suffering Top makers like Pieropan and Anselmi from price and quality issues, then are producing really fine quality wines it stands to reason that amongst the which, whilst not cheap, certainly offer untrendy ones you will find bargains. stunning value. The region’s winemakers Following the herd might help you fit in at parties, but have expanded their repertoire by reviving sweet Recioto swimming against the tide means you will be drinking di Soave; Pieropan’s Le Colombare Recioto would be one of better wines for less money. And it’s always fun to be the my desert island wines. maverick, anyway. Meanwhile over in Valpolicella, quality is still very I have written before in these pages about how the variable, but there are plenty of decent wines finding their resolutely unfashionable world of sherry offers some of way back onto the UK’s shelves. The star grape here is the biggest bargains in the wine world. Still tainted with Corvina, with Rondinella and Molinara in the mix as well. the ‘decanter full of sweet, sticky liquid on grandmother’s The blockbuster and expensive Amarone di Valpolicella sideboard’ image, those charged with promoting sherry have has always been around at the top end of things, but the struggled to get across the wonderful, fresh, diverse drink real value is to be found in the rarer Valpolicella Ripasso, that offers arguably better value than any other wine. a technique which sees the unpressed skins of Amarone But there are plenty of other wines which have fallen out wines, once they have finished their fermentation, added to of favour for no other reason than our ridiculous quest to be the wine to add extra flavour, alcohol and character. chic and up-to-the-minute. Neither Soave nor Valpolicella sits in any top 10 chart of Often it’s only when you visit a wine region that you find fashionable wines. For me that’s a good thing, because it yourself wondering why more people aren’t branching out means that whilst it takes a little more effort to find them, and trying something new - or, indeed, something which the quality and the value are worth it. And anyway, who used to be popular and isn’t any more. wants to be a slave to fashion?

Home of award winning wine www.eastofengland.coop/store-finder

www.feastnorfolkmagazine.co.uk

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GIN O'CLOCK JONATHAN REDDING OF NORFOLK GIN SHARES TWO OF HIS FAVOURITE COCKTAIL RECIPES WITH US VISIT

www.norfolkgin.co.uk

NORFOLK GIN was the county’s first artisan gin, produced in former army major Jonathan Redding’s Norwich kitchen four years ago. Now you’ll find Jonathan whizzing to leading hotels, pubs, restaurants, farm shops and the like in Ginnevere, his electric car, delivering his gin in its distinctive ceramic bottles. With seven botanicals, including juniper, cardamom and coriander, it is 39 per cent proof and produced in small batches, with Jonathan still sticking on all those labels by hand! Here he suggests two cocktail recipes which capture the changing seasons.

T he Bee ’s Knees Cocktail

A Bramble Norfolk Gin Cocktail

SERVES ON E

The original bramble cocktail was created in Soho in the 1980s. It is a modern classic which should be made in a pitcher to share. The herbaceous tones of Norfolk Gin combine with the sharp lemon, sweet blackberries and elderflower cordial to create a refreshing, sweet yet tart cocktail. INGREDIENTS: 2 measures of Norfolk Gin; Handful of fresh or frozen blackberries; 1 measure of fresh lemon juice; 2 measures of elderflower cordial; optional creme de mure (Blackberry liquor); chilled soda water Garnish: Fresh mint METHOD: Gently muddle the blackberries with the Norfolk Gin, lemon juice and elderflower cordial in a glass with 3-4 pieces of ice. Top up with chilled soda water. Drizzle with creme de mure. Garnish with mint.

es 1 [SeArvsimple and refreshing cocktail with a bright, crisp flavour - one for gentle sipping

The Bee's Knees is a Prohibition Era cocktail made with gin, fresh lemon juice, and honey. The name comes from the period’s slang and means, The Best! It is easy to make, with just four ingredients INGREDIENTS 2 measures of Norfolk Gin; 1 measure of fresh lemon juice; 1 measure of lime cordial; 2tsp of your favourite runny honey Garnish: Lemon and lime twist METHOD Add all the ingredients plus ice to a shaker. Shake well, strain, pour into a chilled cocktail glass. Garnish with twist of lemon or lime www.feastnorfolkmagazine.co.uk

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F O O D

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FAIR GAME

OUR WINE EXPERT STEVE HEARNDEN IS LOOKING FORWARD TO SITTING BY HIS NEW WOODBURNER, GLASS OF WINE IN HAND, THIS MONTH!

HAVING ENJOYED a very hot and sunny summer, we are about to turn our thoughts 1 to shorter days and a colder climate. I love the sun and heat but, having had a woodburner installed, I must confess I am looking forward to sitting by it and keeping warm with a glass of wine in hand. And so what do we eat and drink? Game has come into season and last year I mentioned grouse but let us come more local and check out pheasant. Wine wise it’s very similar - ideally Bordeaux Red but soon after this is published I will have a delivery of Beaujolais wines. I wrote about the Beaujolais Blanc earlier in the year but I am shipping in a fantastic 1 Morgon AOP Le Py 2014. The Gamay grape produces a light red wine normally with a purple edge and has a strong bouquet of black cherries and summer fruits. This wine has aged well and will last for another few years, kept in the right conditions. Beaujolais Nouveau is, as the title says, a new wine and is light and very drinkable, but with age the Le Py has character and depth but with the fruits still dominating. This is a bargain at £13 a bottle but will not be available until the end of the month.

I think, purely because of the drinking temperature, white wines for the next six months tend to take a back seat but I recently tasted a Viognier and thought how great it was. A few years ago this wine was the fashionable one to drink, but more recently we have preferred slightly more acidic wines. With its strong aromas of peach and apricots with a little spice, the 2 Domaine la Bouysse Viognier 2017 is perfect. It has a good depth of colour with a very slight green tinge. The taste has strong peach and apricot fruits with a hint of lychees. A little residual sugar rests on the tip of the tongue before 2 the spice and fruits come to the fore. It has light and balanced acidity which can bode well for the dishes you can eat with it. It’s a wine which would accompany chicken or turkey with a mushroom sauce or vegetables with a light creamy, perhaps cheesy, sauce poured over them. This wine is in stock and can be purchased from £10.50 per bottle. Sometimes if the wine has been stored in slightly different temperatures it can throw off sediment in the form of tartrate crystals. These do not affect the wine in any way; but can look pretty or awful depending on your point of view. Just don't eat them!

TASTEBUDS WINES, Norwich Road, Strumpshaw, opens by appointment. Visit www.tastebudswines.co.uk

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C O M P E T I T I O N

CHANCE TO

WIN

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WIN - LUNCH IN THE LANES! THIS MONTH WE HAVE TEAMED UP WITH FARMYARD IN NORWICH TO OFFER ONE LUCKY READER THE CHANCE TO WIN LUNCH FOR TWO - WITH WINE

www.farmyardrestaurant.com

www.feastnorfolkmagazine.co.uk

Where is Farm yard situated? Send your answ er, plu

VISIT

FARMYARD, a popular restaurant in the Norwich Lanes, is run by Andrew Jones and his wife, Hannah. It opened last year and has gained quite a following, with people loving its bistronomy philosophy - where a relaxed bistro experience meets top quality produce and the vibrant flavours usually found in fine dining restaurants. Executive chef Andrew worked in London for many years with the likes of Richard Corrigan, before returning home to Norfolk and opening his own signature restaurant in St Benedict’s Street. He is a self confessed lover of the region’s produce, and so in October you will find plenty of mussels, root vegetables, squashes and game on the menu. Much is cooked in Bertha, a British-built charcoal oven, so has that wonderful smokey taste. The restaurant’s wine list is comprehensive, with a good smattering from Flint Vineyard, near Bungay, and several Norfolk gins such as Bullards, are available, too. This is a fun eating place with a buzzy vibe and you can keep your eyes on the chefs at work as it has an open kitchen, meaning you can see the skill and hard work they put into each meal.

How to enter:

Simply answer the following qu estion:

s your name, ad telephone numb dress and a da er to competitio ytime ns@feastnorfol You can also en kmagazine.co.uk ter by liking and . sharing the comp Facebook page etition on our . The prize is lun ch for two peop house wine. It is le, wi valid from Nove th a bottle of mber 12 2018 un 2018. Normal Fe til De ast Norfolk comp etition rules apply cember 7 decision is final. The and the editor’s above. The closin competition is open to people aged 18 and g date is Octob er 31, 2018 when selected at ran a winner will be dom.

Farmyard opens Tuesday to Thursday, noon until 9pm, and Fridays and Saturdays, from noon until 10pm.

• 

Don’t miss Andrew’s monthly column on page 51 where he writes about healthy desserts. Surely an oxymoron?!

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Letheringham Mill

www.feastnorfolkmagazine.co.uk

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www.letheringhammill.co.uk

TAKING THE DOG ON HOLIDAY CAN MEAN SUBSTANDARD ACCOMMODATION. BUT NOT AT LETHERINGHAM MILL IN DEEPEST SUFFOLK, DISCOVERS SARAH HARDY

VISIT

SECRET SUFFOLK


Letheringham Mill

S

UFFOLK IS A GLORIOUS COUNTY, blessed with a terrific coastline and gentle, unspoilt countryside. There are countless pretty villages to explore, all packed with oodles of history; castles to wander around, footpaths to stroll along and cakes to eat! It is a laid back sort of place and perfect for a few days break. While many head to the honeypot areas on the Heritage Coast, I love the inland towns and villages where there are plenty of great pubs, farm shops, delis and amazing gardens to discover - all set in a rich historical setting. We were lucky to find Letheringham Mill, five star self catering accommodation near Framlingham. There are four properties (two two-bedroom units and two one-bedroom units) in this beautifully restored 18th century watermill. It has been a labour of love for owners Jacqui and Richard Gooding who have lavished an incredible amount of care and attention on the site. They live in the actual mill house and have converted the stables, hayloft and part of the old mill itself into luxurious holiday lets. There are seven acres to explore, with the River Deben running through the land. It is hard to picture a more idyllic setting - cattle graze on adjoining fields - and the

gardens themselves are a riot of colour, with much dense planting and some fine specimen plants. Seats are carefully positioned so you can sit awhile and there are two areas with fire pits where you can toast marshmallows or more. We were based in the old stables, with two bedrooms and one bathroom. The two storey house shares a fabulous deck with two other properties and this was just the place to be, especially with the comfy sun loungers to enjoy. The properties (and I have to admit I had a sneaky little look in them all) are equipped to a very high standard, with granite worktops, dishwashers, washer/dryers, flat screen TVs, power showers and so on. The decor is fresh, with a muted colour scheme, and our property had a very funky grey leather sofa, complete with two reclining seats which caused much fun.

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VISIT

www.letheringhammill.co.uk

Richard and Jacqui are the proud owners of two dogs, both labradoodles, Teddy and Amber, and consequently your four-legged friends are more than welcome so our party included Bella, the rather barky border collie, and Buddy, the more mature golden doodle. Both had the time of their lives - they had their own welcome pack, with blankets, toys and treats - plus access to all that wonderful land. Bella could simply not resist have twice daily dips in the mill pond. While the mill is a perfect place to just stay and enjoy the views and fresh air, there are plenty of great places to visit, all within about a 10-mile radius. We checked out Framlingham, looking for Ed Sheeran, of course, and the castle; we got thoroughly rained on in Orford but again loved the castle and simply pottering around, admiring the pretty cottages and quay; and we loved the slightly desolate Shingle Beach, where all manner of unusual coastal vegetation grows. Woodbridge was a favourite with us all, as we walked along the River Deben from nearby Melton, all the way into the town (and back again). It’s a real foodie hub, with plenty of great places like The Crown Hotel and The Table, and the town’s deli is a goodie, too. Aldeburgh, Snape Maltings, and Wickham Market are all close by, and Ipswich itself is under half an hour away if you need a fix of urban life. But our favourite trip was the 10-minute walk into the next village, Easton.There’s a lovely stroll, along the side of a little stream, to the 16th century White Horse pub which is at the centre of this quiet village, next to the church. It’s a great find, with an interesting menu, bursting with local produce. My wild sea bass had a touch of the Orient about it and was delicious! Our visitors’ book revealed numerous repeat guests and I’ve got my eye on the Riverside, a newly converted one bedroom property in the mill building. It’s simply stunning - luxurious, with parts of the original mill machinery, like the wheel, on show. And yet more of those views over the river and the undulating pasture land.


Crete -

T R A V E L

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PLOT TO PLATE

IN CRETE

THE GREEK DIET OOZES HEALTH AND VITALITY, SAYS SARAH HARDY AS SHE VISITS A FAMILY-RUN HOTEL ON CRETE WHERE THE GARDEN BRIMS OVER WITH PRODUCE SERVED IN THE RESTAURANT

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HABOUR OF CHANIA, CRETE

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E STROLLED in a beautifully kept organic garden, under a scorching sun, picking melons, peppers, figs, tomatoes, aubergines, courgettes and never ending herbs, including the island’s own brand of oregano, dittany. Then we took up base camp in the kitchen and saw these fresh as a daisy ingredients put to good use for our lunch! And, not unsurprisingly, the dishes brimmed with flavour. The Mistral is a small, family run independent hotel in the west of Crete - about half an hour on the bus from Chania. Just for solo travellers, it’s in the small village of Maleme and faces the sea, with olive groves filling the hillside behind.


CRETE -

T R A V E L

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FOOD IS CENTR AL T O AL L THAT IS DONE A T THE

M I S T R AL

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CRETE T R A V E L

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MAMA KATERINA

CRETAN BOUREKI

YOGHURT WITH HONEY AND NUTS SNAILS

They run several great trips, with groups of up to about eight heading off in the hotel’s minibus so it is all very easy, with a door-to-door service. I enjoyed a visit to the far west, to a remote beach called Falasarna, which gives Holkham a run for its money. We then travelled another 20 minutes to Sfinari, a tiny fishing village where we tucked into courses and courses of fish, including cuttlefish, and their special fisherman’s soup, kakavia, under the shade of tamarisk trees - with plenty of local wine, too.

www.singlesincrete.com

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THYME HONEY

VISIT

Run by the tireless Vassilis, who is part of the Slow Food movement, they do things their way, which is the traditional way. His mother, Katerina, is still in charge in the kitchen and uses traditional recipes to produce delicious salads, bakes, dips, stews and more - they produce their own olive oil, which says it all. So food is central to all that is done at the Mistral, bringing guests together for a communal dinner at 8pm, six nights a week. You are given a night off on Sundays to explore the area’s local bars and restaurants! It’s a set meal, with numerous courses, and is heavily vegetarian, thanks to the splendours from that rather special garden. But you’ll also find a few favourites like moussaka, stuffed tomatoes and dishes made with horta - wild greens - and locally made goats’ milk cheese. I particularly enjoyed the stuffed courgette flowers which were as pretty as they were tasty, and the boureki - layers of potato, courgette, cheese, herbs and a bit of Ouzo! Less to my taste were the snails, once a staple of the Cretan diet. Breakfasts are just as good, with masses of thyme honey, freshly baked breads, fruit, freshly squeezed orange juice and malotira, Cretan herbal mountain tea, which is very fragrant. Crete, and my word can Vassilis tell you all about its rich history, is a diverse island, with a noble heritage. The west is perhaps more ‘real’ to use a phrase beloved by reality TV viewers, and The Mistral is well-placed to explore its beaches, historical monuments, harbours and more.

BREAKFASTS A RE JUST AS GOOD WITH MAS SES OF

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Middle of nowhere, centre of everywhere! Fresh, local and seasonal is our ethos here at the Saracen’s Head, so come and enjoy a delicious, locally sourced meal with us We are open 7 days a week, but do close in the afternoons. Lunch: Mon-Sat 12-2pm; Sun 12.30-2.30pm Evenings: Tues-Sat 6.30-8.30pm; Sun-Mon 6-8pm

TAKEAWAY CRABS & LOBSTER AVAILABLE FROM 10AM

You are always best to make a booking. Call us on 01263 768909 or email info@saracenshead-norfolk.co.uk

OPENING TIMES: SUN-THURS 10-5pm; FRI-SAT 10-8pm SERVING FOOD FROM 12 with Surf and Turf on Friday and Saturday CALL US: 01263 837359 OR 07999 959760 CROMER ROAD, WEST RUNTON, NORFOLK, NR27 9QA

www.rockybottoms.co.uk

www.saracenshead-norfolk.co.uk

Fresh, local and seasonal is our ethos here at the Saracens. Being in the middle of nowhere is the perfect excuse to come and enjoy a meal whilst you explore this wonderful part of North Norfolk. Our full menu is available every day, lunch and dinner and in addition we have our summer lunch menu from Monday to Saturday. Sunday lunches are very special and we offer the most delicious roast rump of Blickling reared beef. If it’s too far to travel for a meal, why not stay the night and make a quick break of it!

Summer Opening Times In July & August we will be open 7 days a week this summer Lunch orders will be taken from 12.00 to 2.30 Dinner from 6.30 to 9.00, except Sundays and Mondays 6.30 to 8.30

Exploring Norfolk? Be our guest. norfolkcottages.co.uk 01263 715779

holidays@norfolkcottages.co.uk

Feast Norfolk NCC Jan Ad 2015 195w x130hmm AW.indd 12

06/07/2018 10:12


CRETE T R A V E L

Other trips run to the Samaria Gorge, Knossos and over the White Mountains to Loutro but the hotel does keep calling you back. With two pools, plenty of sunbathing areas, and a lovely al fresco bar area, with comfy sofas to simply relax in, it is an attractive spot. And there are no families or children to disturb this tranquillity. Bedrooms are all doubles, with balconies and trendy bathrooms, too - many offering both baths and power showers. Mention must go to the olive-based toiletries which I really loved as the shampoo worked wonders with my frizzy, sun-streaked hair! And while the hotel, which has just over 30 bedrooms, does draw you under its spell and makes it hard to leave that poolside, the village is certainly worth a trip or two. There are plenty of shops, including an artisan food one, and a decent pottery one, while the local church is full on Greek Orthodox. There are also several bars, with The Wave being a popular choice for hotel guests as it is right on the beach so you can enjoy a post lunch dip in the Med. The bus stops right outside the hotel so you can whizz along the coast road, stopping off at various beaches, bays, and seaside villages. Or stay on for stunning Chania, surely one of the prettiest towns in the Med. There is much to see, with the Venetian harbour and its waterside restaurants and bars the place to round off your sight seeing with a frappe or something stronger!

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SOLO TRAVEL The Mistral was conceived with solo travellers in mind, more than 25 years ago, and Vassilis is still passionate about providing a safe yet sophisticated hotel for those who want to holiday alone.

FALASARNA BEACH

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PRICES START FROM 920 Euro for a week, half board and not including flights. Discounts of 15 per cent are available for stays of 14 nights or more.

www.feastnorfolkmagazine.co.uk

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SFINARI SHORELINEFISH RESTAURANT

For a start there is no single supplement. And you are met and taken back to the airport by private minibus. Many guests do ‘buddy up’ and great friendships are formed, with people joining in as much or as little as they like. These trips are a great way of meeting people and are well organised and thought out.


feel the heat Our kitchen gardenER Ellen Mary tells us how to add a bit of hot stuff to our lIVes - with the help of chilli peppers!

Chilli pepper Habanero AGM

IT’S HARD TO BELIEVE that chillies were unheard of to most of the world until Christopher Columbus discovered the New World in 1492. They originated in Mexico with domestic use recorded back in 5000 BC, and until long after the Middle Ages, almost all of the world’s pepper travelled from India. If you wonder what that hot, burning pain is after eating a hot chilli, it’s caused by a compound called Capsaicin (which is where the American name, ‘Capsicum’ derives from). It triggers our pain receptors and actually warns us that something possibly dangerous has just occurred! So watch out, because habanero peppers are hot!


Hot Stuff

ELLEN MARY is a presenter, journalist and garden designer. You can contact her on social media or at www.ellenmarygardening.co.uk

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ELLEN MARY

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IF YOU REALLY want to flavour your dishes, there are so many different varieties of chilli pepper to grow at home that you can take your pick! From hot and spicy to sweet and juicy - chilli peppers are easy to grow outside, in a greenhouse or on a kitchen windowsill. At this time of year, especially if you have some growing under cover, you can pick fresh chillies into autumn, and make some warming salsa, jams or pop in a stir fry dish

How to grow

SOW Sow seeds inside from late in the winter all the way through to mid spring by filling a small pot with seed compost and adding a few seeds on top. Ideally cover over with a thin layer of vermiculite but a light sprinkling of compost will work as well. If you’re growing on a windowsill, cover over with a clear freezer bag and pop an elastic band around the pot to hold it in place. After they’ve germinated, remove the bag and stand the seedlings on a sunny windowsill. CARE As the seeds grow, thin the seedlings out and pot them on into bigger pots with multi purpose compost, always ensuring to water, especially in dry weather. You can pinch off the top growing tips when they reach about 25 to 30cm to encourage them to branch outwards which can result in more chilli peppers. They will need support so pop a cane in the pot for support early on. HARVEST Depending on when you started sowing, you can harvest chilli peppers from summertime all the way through to October. Just snip them off with some secateurs and keep on harvesting so your plant keeps on producing more.

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RECIPE WITH ELLEN MARY

HABANERO SALSA AND TORTILLA CHIPS Cooking with hot habaneros takes a bit of prep - to save yourself from feeling the burn, Wear gloves and remember that a little goes a very long way! If you can keep it in check, the flavour and heat of this very hot pepper is just awesome with a beer INGREDIENTS 1 can of diced tomatoes 1 small red onion, chopped finely Small handful of freshly chopped coriander 1-2 habanero peppers (start with one), chopped 1 large sweet red pepper, chopped 1tsp of cumin 1 garlic clove, finely chopped Bag of tortilla chips Salt and pepper to taste METHOD 1. Put the diced tomatoes, red onion, coriander, red pepper and one habanero pepper, cumin and garlic into food processor 2. Pulse the ingredients until they are mixed but still rough 3. Add salt and pepper then taste. If you want more heat, gradually add in a small piece of habanero at a time, pulse again and taste 4. Scoop into a bowl and cool in the fridge for about an hour before serving. 5. Add to a dish with tortilla chips, enjoy a beer and see who can handle the heat!


RACHEL BIRTWHISTLE

LIFE IS SWEET AT THE ALLOTMENT Juggling family life with an allotment is not always easy, but one crop in particular gets the thumbs up for Rachel Birtwhistle as she finds out in her second year on the plot


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KNOW QUITE A FEW PEOPLE who take their children and grandchildren to their allotment and who manage to stay there for more than five minutes without being repeatedly asked: ‘When are we going home?’ (with a mouth full of freshly picked raspberries, I might add). Don’t get me wrong, my son is not a fussy, no-veg-eater, quite the opposite, but the constant watering and weeding is not his idea of a fun ‘five minutes’ - and when I say five minutes I definitely mean an hour! Having said all this, I can heartedly claim to have nailed it in terms of sparking a little grow-yourown enthusiasm with certain tried-and-tested crops. Broad beans, strawberries, raspberries and tomatoes have been big hits. But one crop in particular has been extremely well received and has proved to be the gift that keeps on giving sweet corn. Sweet corn, I think, has a bit of an unfair reputation for being a bit tricky to grow, but children love corn on the cob, so it's worth persevering. I am also a big fan of any crop where I can extend the growing season, and this is a great example. Early varieties of sweet corn will yield their first cobs in late July or early August, while the season comes to a close with late-developing types in October. One of my allotment friends told me that there is a saying about sweet corn. ‘Always walk to the plants to harvest your cobs and then run back with them’. This is because freshness is everything with this crop. So much so that one of my concerned allotment buddies harvested and froze some of my cobs for me as they were worried I hadn’t picked them!

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While a sprint to the kitchen may be a little extreme, it is a fact that the high sugar levels in sweet corn begin changing to starch within hours of picking. That’s why grow-your-own sweet corn is far superior to shop-bought versions (if I do say so myself!). Harvesting this crop is a bit of an art form. Wait until the cobs' hairy tassels (or beards as my son refers to them) turn brown and start to wilt. At this point, it’s time to do a little sneaky unwrapping. Peel back the protective layers and inspect the corn by giving one of the kernels a little squeeze. If a clear liquid oozes out then you need to hold your horses, but if milky in consistency then it’s time to pick your crop. This year has been a great summer for sweet corn on the allotment as I’ve mostly had two cobs per plant but fear not if you have just the one. At the request of my seven-year-old, I have stored a few husks to make ‘popcorn’. Not only is corn on the cob a huge hit in our house, but its status was elevated to an entirely new level upon the discovery that we could experiment and make it into popcorn. It’s not quite the same as actual popping corn, but it is still lots of fun! A little later in the month we can test a few kernels to see whether they pop in hot oil (this should only take a minute). After that the kernels are a doddle to store in an airtight container. Home grown sweet/popping corn - now surely that is a fun five minutes straight from the allotment (real time!). • Find out what Rachel is doing this month on the allotment via twitter: @treatlikedirt


Proudly Norfolk -

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www.gnawchocolate.co.uk MATT LEGON

GNAWFOLK CHOCOLATE GNAW CHOCOLATE TELLS US HOW THE NORWICH CHOCOLATIERS ARE CONSTANTLY coming up WITH FUN AND INNOVATIVE PRODUCTS Who are you and what do you do? We are Matt and Teri Legon and when we couldn’t source quality chocolate products for our sweet shop in Norwich, we decided to make our own! We embarked on a mission to bring the fun back into chocolate; and the Gnaw chocolate brand launched in 2011 Where are you based? And how many people do you employ? Our team of 30 handcraft the chocolate at our factory near the Norwich Livestock market. There has been significant investment in the team recently, ensuring that the correct people are in place to take the business forward. This has included doubling factory hours to meet increasing demand Tell us about what you produce? Every one of our artisan chocolates is carefully handcrafted in our Norfolk

kitchens with locally sourced ingredients, natural flavours, and no added nasties! The brand has gone from strength to strength. In 2017, Gnaw launched their second range, Brooke & Amble – a range of single origin premium chocolate bars; 2018 saw the launch of a new range of chocolate bars with a healthy twist - an innovation in the chocolate marketplace. We have also just launched our liqueur Hot Chocolate Shot range: Irish cream, Amaretto and Coffee Liqueur. Where can we buy your products? You can grab Gnaw treats in Sainsbury’s superstores, Debenhams, Notcutts and Dobbies garden centres, and Picturehouse cinemas, such as Norwich’s Cinema City – along with many small independent shops, coffee shops, delis and farm shops across the UK. Gnaw now exports to more than

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20 countries, including France, the USA, Morocco, South Africa and China What's the best seller - and what's the most unusual flavour you create? Our Salted Caramel and Peanut Butter bars fly off the shelves. We are also seeing a rise in popularity of the dark bars - we recently launched a 72 per cent cocoa dark chocolate range: Toasted Coconut and Raspberry Crisp. Our quirkiest flavour? Maybe the added zingy-kick of Chilli & Lime, the bite of Crystallised Ginger and the creamy Banana-caramel sweetness of Banoffee Pie Any future plans? Of course, but that would be telling. Our new Product Development Team is constantly trialing new flavours and developing our quirky new bar. Recent growth in demand from those with food intolerances, those making consumption lifestyle choices such as veganism and the demand for healthier options led to the development of Gnaw’s new bite-sized chocolate and granola bars. These are made with 35 per cent healthy ingredients. How green is your company? We take great pride in ensuring we're an ethical company.; all Gnaw packaging is recyclable and all energy used in the Gnaw factory and offices is from 100 per cent renewable energy. Our cocoa is sourced from small plantations, ensuring there is a good working practice How has Norfolk Food and Drink been able to help you? We are proudly a Norfolk producer and we always will be. Being involved with the ever-growing Norfolk Food and Drink community of quality local producers is great – we have collaborated with others such as Crush Foods, who supply all our granola for our latest ‘healthier’ chocolate range This column is supported by Norfolk Food & Drink and highlights its Proudly Norfolk members. For more details, visit www.norfolkfoodanddrink.com


The new Audi Q8 Experience a new standard in style, driving dynamics and technology The new Audi Q8 is here, and it’s a breakthrough of epic proportions. But, there’s more to it than just size. Beneath the sloping, coupé-like roofline, there’s room to accommodate 5 passengers in opulent luxury, and advanced Audi intelligence all round.

Arrange a test drive Norwich Audi Meridian Way Norwich NR7 0TA 01603 709200 www.robinsonsaudi.co.uk Official fuel consumption figures for the new Audi Q8 50 TDI quattro 8-speed tiptronic in mpg (l/100km) from: Urban 38.7 (7.3), Extra Urban 43.5 (6.5), Combined 41.5 (6.8). CO2 emissions: 178g/km. This vehicle is a WLTP (Worldwide Harmonised Light-Duty Vehicles Test Procedure) type approved vehicle.

More information is available at www.audi.co.uk/about-audi/wltp.com However, in line with Government guidance, to facilitate comparison between different models from different manufacturers and to accommodate the full transition to this new testing regime, we have displayed the NEDC figures. These NEDC figures are the values for this vehicle used in registration and taxation documentation until further notice from the UK authorities. These NEDC figures have been derived from WLTP testing, and may not be equivalent to NEDC figures from NEDC testing, so comparisons may be unreliable. Fuel consumption and efficiency figures are provided for comparative purposes only and may not reflect ‘real world’ driving results. Choice of wheels and other options may affect fuel consumption and emissions data.


The T-Roc. From £169 per month. £2,000 towards your deposit when purchased on Solutions PCP.^

Solutions Personal Contract Plan* representative example subject to 10,000 miles per annum for a T-Roc S 1.0TSI 6-speed manual Duration

48 months

47 monthly payments of

£169

Deposit contribution

£2,000

Customer deposit

£3,653.62

Retail cash price

£18,955

Optional final payment

£7,582.50

Option to purchase fee

£10

Total amount payable

£19,189.12

Total amount of credit

£13,301.38

Representative APR

5.4%

Rate of interest (fixed)

5.4%

Excess mileage charge

4.8p per mile

Robinsons Volkswagen (Norwich) Heigham Street, Norwich, NR2 4LX Telephone: 01603 612111 www.robinsonsvolkswagen.co.uk

Representative

5.4% APR

Find us on:

/VolkswagenRobinsons

@Robinsons_VW

Robinsons Volkswagen is a broker and not a lender and can introduce you to a limited number of lenders, who may pay us for introducing you to them. *At the end of the agreement there are three options: i) pay the optional final payment and own the vehicle; ii) return the vehicle: subject to excess mileage and fair wear and tear, charges may apply; or iii) replace: part exchange the vehicle. ^Available when purchased on Solutions PCP. With Solutions Personal Contract Plan. 18s+. Subject to availability and status. T&Cs apply. Offer available when ordered by 30th September, 2018 and delivered by 31st December, 2018. Indemnities may be required. Offer not

in conjunction with any other offer and may be varied or withdrawn at any time. Accurate at time of publication August 2018. Freepost Volkswagen Financial Services. Standard

EU Test figures for comparative purposes and may not reflect real driving results. Official fuel consumption figures for the T-Roc range in mpg (litres/100km): urban 33.2 (8.5) – 47.1 (6.0); extra urban 48.7 (5.8) – 62.8 (4.5); combined 41.5 (6.8) – 56.5 (5.0). Combined CO2 emissions 117–155g/km.

Profile for Feast Norfolk Magazine

Feast Norfolk Magazine October 18 Issue 30  

Feast Norfolk is a fresh monthly magazine dedicated to the thriving food and drink scene in Norfolk.

Feast Norfolk Magazine October 18 Issue 30  

Feast Norfolk is a fresh monthly magazine dedicated to the thriving food and drink scene in Norfolk.

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