Food Drink & Franchise - November 2014

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w w w.fdf wor ld.c om

Nove mbe r 2014

Creativity meets Collaboration Arby’s New King’s Hawaiian BBQ Brisket Sandwich

Increasing your Supply Chain Security

Putting the sizzle back in bacon

The Rise of the Discount Supermarket

TOP10: Sustainable Brand Acquisitions



EDITOR’S COMMENT

Creativity and Innovation T O K E E P Y O U R B U S I N E S S growing, it’s essential to keep

your business fresh. If you allow your products and practices to grow stagnant, you may wake up one day to find that young and hungry businesses with bright new ideas are passing you by. Finding that innovation within your business doesn’t necessarily mean reinventing the wheel. It can be as simple as finding a new application for an existing partnership, like Arby’s teamwork with King’s Hawaiian on a new brisket sandwich, or it can mean freshening up familiar products with better production equipment or improved processes. For retail businesses, it can be as simple as taking a closer look at what your consumers are looking for in terms of pricing and selection and making an effort to meet their shifting interests. As we enter November, we’re almost at the end of the year – and the beginning of a new one. So read on, enjoy, and start thinking about how you can make some innovative changes of your own for 2015.

Sasha Orman Editor Sasha.Orman@wdmgroup.com

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CONTENTS

Features

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Supply Chain Increasing your Supply Chain Security

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Production Putting the sizzle back in bacon

TOP 10

Sustainable Brand Acquisitions

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Franchising

Creativity Meets Collaboration in Arby’s New King’s Hawaiian BBQ Brisket Sandwich

Retail The Rise of the Discount Supermarket

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CONTENTS

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orporacion San C Diego

50

The Pancake Parlour

80

Compañía de Galletas Pozuelo DCR, S.A.

Company Profiles AUSTRALIA 50 The Pancake Parlour

AMERICA LATINA 58 Altamar Foods Corp

92 SAC

68 Corporacion San Diego 80 Compañía de Galletas Pozuelo DCR, S.A. 92 SAC 100 Team Foods 7


PRODUCTION

Putting the SIZZLE back in bacon Cooking bacon in a spiral convection oven provides compelling advantages over linear microwave ovens, creating products that look and taste like they were pan-fried at home W r i t t e n b y : C A R LO C H A T M A N


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PRODUCTION THE WORLD’S APPETITE for bacon seems insatiable. It’s hard to believe that this versatile favorite, featured in sandwiches, sauces, stews, condiments and myriad of other food items, was at one time mainly a breakfast side dish. Internationally, the burgeoning demand for sliced bacon began several years ago, when it became highly popular as a sandwich item in the U.K. The challenge of producing the rapidly growing volume was at that time met by continuous cooking in linear convection ovens. As the demand of bacon continued to expand, processors soon adopted the linear microwave oven as a newer, faster technology for processing in high volumes. Although it had some drawbacks in terms of the taste and

“I believe the spiral oven produces a superior product, in terms of bacon flavor, appearance and aroma – more like a home-cooked product” – Bartosz Psiuch, Director of Food Processing Equipment Distributor Alimp (Mysłowice, Poland)

appearance of finished products, this system produced the required volume, and has remained prevalent until now. Those taste and appearance drawbacks - as well as sizable capital investments, space requirements, and energy consumption - are encouraging many processors to look beyond the linear microwave oven to a more economical system that produces bacon (and other products) that looks and tastes as natural and delicious as pan-fried bacon – the spiral convection oven. A Savory Solution “I believe the spiral oven produces a

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PUTTING THE SIZZLE BACK IN BACON

Micro Spiral Oven

superior product, in terms of bacon flavor, appearance and aroma – more like a home-cooked product,” says Bartosz Psiuch, director of food processing equipment distributor Alimp (Mysłowice, Poland). “Spiral oven technology features many controls that enable operators to regulate various parameters that affect how the product will be finished,” Psiuch adds. “This allows you to cook bacon or a wide variety

of other products in ways that really appeal to your customers’ tastes.” “Taste and appearance were deciding factors in the purchase of our spiral oven. Both are important to the people who purchase our products,” says Martin Croteau, plant manager at Olymel (Saint-Hyacinthe, Québec). Olymel produces bacon as well as a variety of other cooked and sliced meats, including gourmet products and the Smart Nature 11


PRODUCTION brand of healthful, natural foods. In November of 2012 the company purchased a spiral oven from Unitherm Food Systems to cook bacon bits, pizza toppings and flaked bacon. Spiral ovens convey food upward by continuous conveyor belt that travel in multiple, circular tiers within a single oven enclosure. As bacon products cycle upward through the spiral oven, fat is rendered from the ascending meat and is dispersed onto the bacon on the lower belt tiers. In

Unitherm’s “Mini” sized equipment allows for high-volume production capacities of 500-800 kg/hr in a minimal footprint 12

November 2014

this manner, the bacon is basted and cooked in its own juices, providing the taste, aroma and appearance of a traditional, pan-fried product. Notably, bacon cooked in microwave ovens is often flat and dull in color, whereas the spiral oven produces wavy, natural-looking slices. “Many microwave ovens have a hold-down belt that prevents bacon strips from rolling up,” explains Adam Cowherd, vice president of sales at Unitherm. “The spiral oven


PUTTING THE SIZZLE BACK IN BACON

“The spiral oven is designed so that the finished product is not flat, but instead has a natural, home-cooked appearance” – Adam Cowherd, Vice President of Sales at Unitherm

is designed so that the finished product is not flat, but instead has a natural, home-cooked appearance.” The spiral oven not only produces authentic-tasting and esthetically pleasing bacon products, but also meets high volume requirements along with some very attractive economies. Versatile & Compact Another determining factor in Olymel’s decision to purchase the spiral oven was its smaller environmental footprint. For example, Unitherm’s spiral is a 12.5ft x 14.5ft x 11.8ft unit that has up to 150 ft. of belt. Because of the spiraled configuration, these ovens maximize the amount of product that can be cooked within a given footprint. To handle greater volumes in a linear microwave oven, the length of the oven has to be extended, increasing the plant area occupied by the unit. A spiral oven’s capacity

and throughput can be increased by simply adding more belt. While this makes the equipment somewhat taller, the advantage of a small footprint is retained. The spiral oven is also more versatile than most linear ovens and is able to roast, steam, bake, broil or pasteurize a wide range of product – bacon and other meat products, chicken, seafood, kabobs, vegetables and potatoes – any foods included in ready-to-eat or frozen food products. Cowherd summarizes that a single spiral oven would only take up 20 percent of that space required for three microwave lines to do the same output – with a lot less energy. Enhanced Food Safety The spiral oven cooks bacon by traditional heating in a small-footprint system. It can be set to temperatures that eliminate bacteria, doubled with the machine’s “clean-in-place” (CIP) 13


PRODUCTION system to create a safe cooking environment. “The clean-in-place technology is engaged at the end of each cycle, which can be very important,” says Peter Muriana, Ph.D., Food Microbiologist Professor at the Robert M. Kerr Food & Agricultural Products Center, Oklahoma State University (Stillwater, OK). “One of the problems with ovens that do not incorporate a clean-in-place function, including the linear microwave version with the big belt systems, is that they could get contaminated with Listeria monocytogenes. That is a big problem with readyto-eat products such as bacon.” Dr. Muriana adds that Listeria has always been troublesome and

a persistent contaminant in meat processing facilities, especially in equipment where the processing regimen doesn’t eliminate it by heating (i.e., chilling tunnels, microwave tunnels, etc.) because Listeria can become lodged in the nooks and crevices of the equipment. “In my experience, microwave beams work by ‘line of sight,’ which may heat unevenly, and are more focused onto what is on top of a conveyor belt in a linear commercial microwave oven. It is conceivable that a chamber that processes raw meat ingredients (raw bacon) other than by heating the chamber, may have contamination issues that need to be addressed,” says Dr. Muriana. “Also, the microwave beam may not completely penetrate particles such as those that can drop off bacon slices and fall onto the belt. That can possibly result in Listeria or some other form of contamination that gets mixed in with the finished product when it exits the oven. The high-temperature steam of the clean-in-place spiral oven virtually eliminates that possibility.”

Unitherm Mini Spiral Oven using freezer sliced bacon

Improved Energy Efficiency Available in electric or gas models,

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PUTTING THE SIZZLE BACK IN BACON

The decision to use Unitherm’s spiral oven is about improving quality and profitability. Whether you’re making a rational move from a batch process to continuous process, or you finally have approval to replace your aging impingement oven, choosing Unitherm’s spiral oven is a decision to move your company forward. It’s about flexibility for longevity, investing in a machine with a life expectancy of 20 years

spiral ovens consume significantly less energy than the linear microwave and other cooking equipment, and are more efficient in terms of labor costs. “The spiral oven replaced two linear electric belt grills so there was an immediate savings in electrical energy, labor and space,” says Croteau. “It is a compact piece of equipment and requires fewer personnel to produce the same output.” Some spiral ovens can also run off natural gas, which is typically less expensive than electricity. “The cost to cook sliced bacon on a spiral oven is about one-third the cost

of a linear microwave oven that uses electricity” Cowherd explains. To see Unitherm Food Systems in action visit them at the Pack Expo, Chicago, November 2-5th 2014 (Booth E8152). For more information contact: Unitherm Food Systems, 502 Industrial Road, Bristow, OK 74010. Phone: 918-367-0197 Fax: 918-367-5440 unitherm@unithermfoodsystems.com www.unithermfoodsystems.com

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FRANCHISING

Creativity Meets Collaboration in Arby’s New King’s Hawaiian BBQ Brisket Sandwich With a new LTO launch and a strengthened partnership, Arby’s sets out to rethink the boundaries of craft and QSR Writ ten by: SASH A ORM A N



FRANCHISING THERE’S STRENGTH IN numbers. That’s a concept that has stood the test of time, and one that all fast food franchises should take to heart. Collaborating with other like-minded brands draws on the biggest strengths and the consumer appeal of both to create a product that’s even bigger than the sum of its parts. Collaboration is also a simple way to elevate consumer interest through brand recognition, and a successful launch means increased exposure and better sales on both sides of the partnership.

This season Arby’s launched the King’s Hawaiian BBQ Brisket sandwich, a new LTO building on

the initial success of last year’s collaboration with specialty bread brand King’s Hawaiian. We sat down with Jim Taylor, Arby’s Senior Vice President of Product Development and Innovation, to discuss the new sandwich and what it means for the franchise and its future. Food Drink and Franchise: What was the inspiration for new sandwich and the collaboration with King’s Hawaiian? JIM TAYLOR: From a product development standpoint, a key to Arby’s success has really been taking a look at what Americans

Executive Chef Neville Craw explain what makes a good smoked brisket


ARBY’S NEW KING’S HAWAIIAN BBQ BRISKET SANDWICH

love to eat and then trying to figure out how to put a unique twist on it that makes it even more craveable and of more value to our guests.

Great sandwiches are really centered around two things: really flavorful high-quality meat, and then bread that is equally delicious. We happened to have great tools for both of those things in our arsenal already when we launched our first step with King’s Hawaiian back in May of 2013. It’s just fantastic bread – the sweetness of it, the softness of it, the flavorfulness of it – and a lot of consumers are starting to recognize this brand across the whole USA. So that innovation, when we applied it to roast beef, was a big success. In October of 2013, we launched our Smokehouse Brisket, which is smoked for 13 hours in a fantastic facility with hickory wood and these amazing pit BBQs, and so we felt like “wow that is the perfect way to elevate a classic American taste for BBQ, with this really premium high quality brisket meat that people quite frankly can’t cook or don’t want to cook at home and take that amount of time and care to do, with this amazing

Hawaiian inspired sweet buns

Arby’sTexas-smoked brisket

Arby’s New King’s Hawaiian BBQ Brisket Sandwich 19


FRANCHISING

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ARBY’S NEW KING’S HAWAIIAN BBQ BRISKET SANDWICH

premium high quality bun and put those two things together. FDF: How does this new sandwich reflect on Arby’s overall product innovation strategy? JT: We believe Arby’s defines a unique position in the marketplace. We’re starting to call that place “fast-crafted.” What we are trying to do for our guests is deliver the quality and made-to-order with care aspect of fast casual within the convenience of QSR. This sandwich I think is a great example of that. This is really about slow food cooked with culinary expertise and care – 13-hour smoked brisket – but served within a minute or two through a drive-thru for under six bucks.

“We believe Arby’s defines a unique position in the marketplace. We’re starting to call that place ‘fast-crafted.” – Jim Taylor, SVP Product Development and Innovation

Again, I think it’s a perfect representation of where we want to take the brand – to really knock people’s socks off for the type of food they can expect to get at Arby’s. It’s always going to be about great high-quality meats and great bread as components to a great tasting sandwich, but within a price point and certainly within a type of time frame they’ve come to expect with the premium side of QSR. FDF: Why partner with Kings Hawaiian? What is the benefit of partnerships for you and your partners? JT: The foundation that our brand

was built on, even when the Raffle brothers started it fifty years ago, was all around differentiated high quality premium products. So we want to partner with people from a brand standpoint that share that value of differentiated high quality premium food, but that also share the value of saying that it shouldn’t be exclusive. I kind of like to say that we’re about the “democratization of deliciousness.” In terms of partnering with brands, we can provide greater access 21


FRANCHISING to guests through our footprint and the hundreds of thousands of guests we serve per day. In turn, for providing them access, we get access to unique differentiated high quality products and ingredients that help us build that brand culinary point of view that we want to carry in the marketplace that ties back to this fast-crafted positioning. It’s just a wonderful purpose and value to get up every day and think about what can we introduce a mass consumer to – what flavors, what ingredients that they may not have had a chance to try yet, but once they do they’re going to be hooked.

FDF: How will this sandwich help Arby’s maintain its steady growth? JT: LTOs are the lifeblood of many

QSRs, and that goes for us as well. This is just the latest chapter in what we’re writing, which is a consistent steady stream of highly compelling, unique, differentlyshaded LTOs that are going to get folks up off the couch and have them drive past several other QSR choices to get something that they can only get at Arby’s and can’t get at home. We’re finding great success with our sales this month as we’ve launched this sandwich, and we’re just looking to keep that momentum rolling in the coming months with innovations that build on this success model that we think this sandwich certainly represents. FDF: What does the future hold for Arby’s as far as new upcoming LTOs? JT: We’re a brand that was founded

An Arby’s Exterior

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on roast beef – we love beef and our guests love beef, and we’re going to be introducing additional ways to enjoy beef, and one of those is coming up soon in December. It’s


An Arby’s interior

not going to be brisket or roast beef, we’re going to give people another way to enjoy a premium sandwich and bring that to the masses. We’re excited bout that one for sure. Overall we’re looking to have a portfolio of LTOs to keep things fresh each and every period and give people something to look forward to. We’re confident that we can sustain the success that we have here in our product innovation

pipeline because of the people we have in place, our partnerships we have in place, the process we have in place, and it’s our key strategy for winning which is a consistent stream of menu innovations. In terms of what the brand can become – in terms of fulfilling this unique market positioning, this fast craft positioning of high quality made to order food within the convenience of QSR – we’re just getting started. 23


R E TA I L

The Rise of the DISCOUNT SUPERMARKET As the economy recovers, why are discount supermarket chains like Aldi, Lidl, and Trader Joe’s continuing to capture bigger portions of the market share? Writ ten by: SASHA ORMAN


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R E TA I L THE GROCERY LANDSCAPE is changing. As more options are made available, through brick and mortar means and online, the basic catch-all supermarket form is losing market share ground to more specialized markets that are able to offer an array of products that may be smaller, but are targeted toward more focused demographics. On one end of the spectrum, there are upscale specialized grocery stores like Whole Foods and Waitrose that appeal to shoppers with more money to spend on organic or artisanal products. On the other end of the spectrum are some of the fastest growing chains today: the discount chains. All That Discount Chains Have to Offer Many consumers started turning to discount chains when the global economy took a critical hit in 2008 – but in a world filled with coupons and club cards, it takes more than prices alone to make consumers realign their brand loyalties to shop at new brands and chains. What is happening is that, while traditional grocery stores have been maintaining the status quo, 26

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‘According to studies, many consumers have grown fatigued with coupons and rotating savings, and are looking instead for everyday lower prices’


T E S C O TA C K L E S F O O D W A S T E

Shoppers may be looking for something new beyond discount vouchers

“Enormous amounts of food are being lost and wasted globally – at least 1.3 billion tonnes each year” many discount chains have been working to improve the quality of their products and customer service while maintaining their prices. Aldi, a US-based subsidiary of German discount grocery chain Aldi Sud, cited the quality of its private label brands and its green policies as some of the reasons for being named a grocery leader earlier this year. “These latest survey findings prove that a growing

number of consumers are choosing to shop at ALDI for more than just low prices,” said Aldi president Jason Hart. Of course, low prices are still vital. But what consumers are looking for in low prices has changed over the years. According to studies, many consumers have 27


R E TA I L grown fatigued with coupons and rotating savings, and are looking instead for everyday lower prices. Some traditional grocery store chains like Albertsons and Ralph’s have already begun adjusting their pricing systems to better reflect this change, but those that haven’t are now finding themselves lagging behind in sales when their sales fail to compete with everyday prices elsewhere. A Reformed Reputation for the Discount Chain For a long time, reputation had a lot to do with saving traditional grocery stores from losing ground against discount chains – while discount chains may be less expensive, that has also come with the association that they carry lower quality products. But over the years, discount grocery stores have been working to overcome the issue. In some cases this stereotype still stands, but it’s no longer considered a given that low prices mean low quality. Of all discount grocery store chains, the one that has singlehandedly done the most to counter the idea is a wellknown cult favorite chain that has been a subsidiary of Aldi Nord since 28

November 2014

“Even if you believe the rise of the discounters is a temporary fad – which would be foolish – you must understand why families who drive Audis and BMWs have started to shop there”


THE RISE OF THE DISCOUNT SUPERMARKET

1979: Trader Joe’s. For decades the brand has built a reputation of offering unique and high-end products at relatively low prices, achieving this by sticking almost entirely to private label products and valuing a breadth of items over a depth of brand name choices. Across the Atlantic, Sainsbury’s is gaining a similar reputation, bridging the gap between budget prices and higher-end product choices. Both chains challenge the notion of what it means to be a discount store, a challenge that has resulted in a stronger percentage of the grocery market share compared to more standard chains.

rivals like Aldi and Lidl and making an effort to understand what it is about them that keeps their customers coming back. “Even if you believe the rise of the discounters is a temporary fad – which would be foolish – you must understand why families who drive Audis and BMWs have started to shop there,” he notes. For struggling grocery chains, the smartest money is on believing wholeheartedly that discount chains are here to stay, understanding what makes them so appealing, and finding those traits within themselves.

What Can Traditional Supermarkets Learn? Does this compartmentalization of the grocery store industry mean that traditional supermarkets are going the way of the buffalo? Not quite – but some will certainly have to change their strategies if they want to stay relevant and marketable to consumers for the long haul. In an open letter to incoming Tesco CEO Dave Lewis, Telegraph correspondent Graham Ruddick advised taking a long look at 29


S U P P LY C H A I N

Increasing your

Supply Chain Security

What are the best services and software to protect your supply chain from the threat of risk from inside and outside the business? W R I T T E N B Y: S A S H A O R M A N

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S U P P LY C H A I N

A secure supply chain starts with well-trained employees WITH SO MANY businesses reaching a global audience today, maintaining strong security throughout your supply chain is of the utmost importance. At every step, from production facility to warehouse to end location, there are windows and openings for a failure in security that can compromise your products and put your brand’s reputation in jeopardy. 32

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Keep Your Personnel Up to Standard A strong and secure supply chain starts with a well-trained and educated team of employees. There is always room for improvement to defend against human error, and having your workplace certified for supply chain security management. There are several International Organization


F E AT U R E A R T I C L E S H O R T E N E D H E A D L I N E

for Standardization (ISO) protocols related to this field, including: ISO/PAS 28000:2007 – an international standard for best practices in developing a supply chain security management system for your business. ISO 31000 – a grouping of standards (including ISO 31000:2009, ISO/IEC 31010:2009, and ISO Guide 73:2009) 33


S U P P LY C H A I N meant to certify the implementation and maintenance of strong risk assessment strategies. By training for and achieving certification in ISO standards proves to your board members and clients alike that your supply chain is on the right track and intends to stay that way. Make Smart Partnerships Are you utilizing all of your resources? Sometimes you have to look outside

‘Consider enlisting the help of an experienced third-party consultant with expertise in the logistics industry, that can take in your supply chain as a whole and analyze for any potential risk factors’


I N C R E A S I N G Y O U R S U P P LY C H A I N S E C U R I T Y

of the private sector to make that happen. Look into programs that link private businesses and government entities to ensure better safety across an international supply chain. Some of these programs include: C-TPAT – This is the U.S. CustomsTrade Partnership Against Terrorism, an initiative that encourages private businesses and the United States government to work together to integrate their supply chain protocols. The program also offers certification, for clients who want to know that their distributors are taking part. AEO – The European Union’s Authorised Economic Operator (AEO) program is essentially the European version of the C-TPAT with similar structure and certification. For European and global businesses, this certification is an equally valuable asset.

back and look objectively for technical errors, when you are so in tune with what you know that you meant to write. This is why a copy editor serves a necessary function, reading through with a completely fresh set of eyes to catch what the writer himself might have glossed over. In the same way, a business can benefit greatly from a fresh set of eyes looking over their supply chain viability to find vulnerabilities that even the best and most thorough of your own personnel might have missed. Consider enlisting the help of an experienced third-party consultant with expertise in the logistics industry, that can take in your supply chain as a whole and analyze for any potential risk factors. It might add some extra cost into your operations, but that’s a lot less in the long run compared to investments that could be lost due to a weak link in the supply chain.

Get an Outside Opinion Now that your supply chain is upgraded and in place, it is time for an audit to take stock and make sure that everything is the best that it can be. But here is the thing. It is very difficult for a writer to proofread his own work – it can be nearly impossible to step 35


TOP 10

Top10

Sustainable Brand Acquisitions Written by: Sasha Orman


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TOP 10 Small brands don’t always stay small brands forever. Sometimes they grow on their own accord, but more often than not they are acquired by a parent company. Every year, dozens are snapped up by multinational corporations hoping for some mutual benefits – in helping provide a smaller brand with the production and distribution power to succeed on a larger scale, that parent company might also absorb the good will and consumer following that the smaller brand has built up.

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Stonyfield Farm (2004)

Acquired By: Groupe Danone Equity Stake: 80 Percent Groupe Danone may not own Stonyfield Farm completely, but it is quite the majority shareholder

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with an 80 percent equity stake in the organic yogurt brand. This ten-year partnership has worked out quite well for Stonyfield Farm overall, granting the oncesmall business access to larger retailers like Walmart and further distribution throughout Danone’s network in Europe.


S U S TA I N A B L E B R A N D A C Q U I S I T I O N S

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So Delicious (2014)

Acquired By: WhiteWave Foods Price: $195 Million Consumers are demanding non-dairy milk alternatives – and with the popularity of Greek yogurt

refusing to recede, the demand for non-dairy yogurt alternatives is just as strong. No one is a bigger force in the dairy alternatives market than WhiteWave Foods, and this year the brand made a bid to consolidate and grab more of the market share by moving to acquire smaller plant-based beverage and yogurt brand So Delicious. 39


TOP 10

08

Horizon Organic (2004)

Acquired By: Dean Foods Price: $216 Million In the early 2000s, Dean Foods still owned WhiteWave Foods and was looking for an organic milk producer to bridge the gap between Dean’s conventional milk brands and WhiteWave’s plantbased milk alternatives. Horizon Organic fit the bill, and over a period the company purchased

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equity until finally in 2004 it bought all remaining shares to own Horizon outright. Horizon Organic caught some flack from the Organic Consumers Association while under Dean Foods’ management, facing allegations that the company was shirking proper organic standards. Perhaps Dean Foods decided that organic was not worth the extra effort – Horizon followed WhiteWave Foods when the subsidiary spun off in 2013.


S U S TA I N A B L E B R A N D A C Q U I S I T I O N S

07

Naked Juice (2006)

Acquired By: PepsiCo Price: Not Disclosed Naked Juice was the quintessential health juice at the first glimmer of a juicing trend.

Sensing the possibilities of the juice market taking off, as well as a general waning of consumer interest in mainstream soft drinks, PepsiCo snapped up Naked Juice from small private equity group North Castle Partners, who had purchased the brand from its original owners in 2000.

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06

Ben & Jerry’s (2000)

Acquired By: Unilever Price: $326 Million Iconic Vermont-based ice cream brand Ben & Jerry’s had always been famous for its social and environmental campaigns, opposing chemicals and use of rGBH in its products. So

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consumers were apprehensive when the brand was purchased by global giant Unilever in 2000. While some ingredients have changed, leading Ben & Jerry’s to discontinue its Eco-Pint packaging and to stop using the label “All-Natural” in 2010, the brand does still remain dedicated to supporting a variety of social causes including the World Wildlife Fund.


S U S TA I N A B L E B R A N D A C Q U I S I T I O N S

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Kashi (2000)

Acquired By: General Mills Price: Not Disclosed Back in 2000 General Mills made news with its acquisition of La Jolla-based fan favorite healthful muesli cereal brand Kashi. It

should have been a slam dunk acquisition, but General Mills failed to stick the landing by letting ingredient quality and GMO integrity slip, leading to a drastic drop in brand perception. Today, consumers are hoping that General Mills have learned from its mistakes and won’t repeat history with Annie’s. 43


TOP 10

04

Cascadian Farm (1999)

Acquired By: General Mills Price: Not Disclosed In 1999 General Mills acquired Small Planet Foods, rolling into its portfolio several organic and natural brand names like Cascadian Farm Organic and Muir Glen. In 2006, Michael Pollan

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criticized Cascadian Farms in his book “The Omnivore’s Dilemma” for sliding on standards to only just meet the requirements for organic certification. Nevertheless, General Mills has been resolute in keeping Cascadian products organic and GMO-free while also contributing to important social causes like bee preservation and more sustainable packaging.


S U S TA I N A B L E B R A N D A C Q U I S I T I O N S

04

Earthbound Farm (2013)

Acquired By: WhiteWave Foods Price: $600 Million In 2013, Dean Foods and WhiteWave Foods parted ways. With its acquisition of Earthbound Farm that same year, WhiteWave is working to establish itself as

more than just a plant-based milk company. The addition of Earthbound Farm diversifies WhiteWave’s portfolio to include a wide range of fresh and frozen produce typically grown in Central California from lettuces and tomatoes to broccoli and cauliflower, plus ready-toeat snacks like dried fruit and smoothies. 45


TOP 10

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S U S TA I N A B L E B R A N D A C Q U I S I T I O N S

02

Annie’s Homegrown (2014)

Acquired By: General Mills Price: $820 Million Confirmed just this September, the latest General Mills sustainable brand acquisition is still fresh in our minds. Annie’s Homegrown adds considerable clout to General

Mills’ already robust organics and better-for-you products portfolio. Right now, if General Mills is going to obtain the maximum benefits of this buyout, its most important job is going to be to assure consumers that it will be taking much better care to maintain the same ingredient and product standards that led them to Annie’s in the first place. 47


TOP 10

01

Bolthouse Farms (2012)

Acquired By: Campbell Soup Company Price: $1.5 Billion General Mills may have brought

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the most small businesses under its wing, but Campbell Soup Company gets a prize for the biggest deal with its acquisition of Bolthouse Farms in 2012. But that price tag didn’t materialize out of nowhere – Bolthouse caught Campbell’s eye by virtue of its


S U S TA I N A B L E B R A N D A C Q U I S I T I O N S

full vertical integration, built up over nearly a century to include everything from farming and harvesting of fresh vegetables to processing into salad dressings and beverages like juices and smoothies. The acquisition of Bolthouse Farms provides

Campbell Soup Company with not only fresh vegetables for its soups, but produce and complementing products for its V8 line. All the while, Bolthouse Farms products maintain success in their own name. It’s a win-win situation, and Campbell is taking full advantage.

BF will help inspire people to lead healthier, more vibrant lives.

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TH E

Pancake Parl Taking On Social Media

Pancake Parlour Marketing Manager Nico brand’s strengths in social media to conne Written by: Sasha Orman Produced by: Andrew Zhao


lour:

ole Jackson discusses the iconic Melbourne ect with employees and fans

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T H E PA N C A K E PA R L O U R

Fresh Strawberries

THE PANCAKE PARLOUR has been an iconic Australian restaurant institution for decades. Despite this legacy status, the company is committed as ever to staying fresh and up to date – it’s this dedication that has kept The Pancake Parlour at the forefront for the past fifty years, and will continue to carry it with 52

November 2014

consumers and employees alike well into the future. Building a Better Internal System “We’ve been around for fifty years, but we realized that it’s really important to stay relevant and move ahead with the times – especially when we have more than 600 employees mostly millennials,


AUSTRALIA

Scotch Fillet Steak

and all using technology,” says Nicole Jackson, Marketing and Communications Manager for The Pancake Parlour brand. “To really stay ahead and stay focused with them, we needed to implement something that was going to be suitable and able to talk to that generation.” For The Pancake Parlour that something is Sherpa Systems, an

integrated web-based program framework that forms the basis of the restaurant’s fully customized internal communications tool “The Mix”. “We did a lot of research on what companies were out there and what programs and what web-based systems were out in the marketplace, and we really formed an alliance with Sherpa

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We are manufacturers and distributors of Quality Australian Dairy Products and have been for over 75 years. We are a One Stop Dairy Shop with the ability to supply a full range of Quality Dairy Products to Industrial, Foodservice and Retail Customers.

One Stop Dairy Shop For Quality Dairy Products

Marsh Dairy Products Pty Ltd ABN: 25 005 086 288 Phone: 03 9689 3433 Fax: 03 9689 3422

86 Maribyrnong Street Footscray Victoria 3011, Australia Email: hamish@marshs.com.au

www.marshs.com.au

“Social media has become a digital form of traditional word of mouth advertising, and a picture tells a thousand words,�


T H E PA N C A K E PA R L O U R because we found that their vision and development of their system was on par with our vision for the company,” says Jackson. Set to roll out within the next couple of months, the company will be using “The Mix” as a complete employee management tool, ranging from recruitment training, rostering, payroll and task management to social communication between restaurants, managers, and employee teams. “Employees can access the tools they need from any device at any time, and they are in touch with the restaurant for all of their communication, rostering and workflow needs,” Jackson explains. “They can use it for swapping shifts, leave requests and staying in touch - it’s basically like a mini-Facebook group within the company with added management tools.” Award-Winning Social Media Expertise The Pancake Parlour is well familiar with Facebook. Using it is a cornerstone of the brand’s finely tuned social media strategy, executed fully in-house by the

AUSTRALIA

brand’s social media team with the goal of keeping fans naturally engaged in The Pancake Parlour experience on a daily basis. It’s a big job, requiring a full-time commitment from The Pancake Parlour’s marketing and social media team, but that hard work has paid off with more than 250,000 Facebook fans for the group and a recent award for Excellence in Social Media from the Australian Restaurant and Catering Association. “I think that our number one strategy is really just keeping our brand at top of mind for Facebook users,” says Jackson. “We appear daily in their newsfeed with all sorts of key messages that are relevant for the time – whether they are coming for breakfast, lunch, or supper – and the thing about our product is we have fantastic images we can use.” That wealth of images has gone a long way in helping The Pancake Parlour develop its social media strategy, which revolves mainly around image-based mediums such as Facebook and Instagram. “Social media has become a digital form of traditional word-

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T H E PA N C A K E PA R L O U R

The Short Stack

of-mouth advertising, and a picture tells a thousand words,” notes Jackson. “We could do a radio ad that talks for thirty seconds about our Lemon Berry Pancakes, or you can see a picture in an instant and know exactly what it looks like and you 56

November 2014

can almost know what it’s going to taste like just by looking at the photo. So mouthwatering images work really well. The minute we post a chocolate pancake with whipped cream and ice cream and strawberries our fans are totally engaging with us and


AUSTRALIA

sharing their experiences. So our strategy is really just about staying relevant to them.” The Pancake Parlour at Fifty The Pancake Parlour is at the precipice of a major milestone – fifty years in the restaurant business as of 2015. “With fifty years of history being a milestone, we’re launching a history book on the family business that will be coming out in 2015,” says Jackson. “It’s the story of how The Pancake Parlour has evolved, with a lot about the family behind the business as well.”

Company Information INDUSTRY

Restaurant Group HEADQUARTERS

Melbourn Australia FOUNDED

1965 EMPLOYEES

Fifty More Years and Beyond Fifty years in business is an impressive feat for any business in any sector, especially in today’s global economy. But The Pancake Parlour isn’t just holding on to business – it’s thriving and growing, while remaining true to its roots. “We’re a bit of a Melbourne icon, and with our current CEO, Simon Meadmore, being the son of the original cofounders, it’s still very much a Melbourne family business,” says Jackson. “Fifty years is a great achievement, but we’re really making sure we’ve stayed relevant. We’re always looking at ways we can create new dishes, renovating for a new modern look, and building our strong social media presence to keep us more in tune with the current generation.” If its current efforts are any indication, The Pancake Parlour will continue to build its base and thrive for another fifty years to come.

600 REVENUE

Privately Held PRODUCTS/ SERVICES The Pancake Parlour is an Australian family-owned restaurant featuring ten restaurants in Victoria. Founded by Allen and Helen Trachsel and Roger Meadmore in 1965, The Pancake Parlour was created as a neighborhood restaurant for Melbourne residents to enjoy all-day pancakes and a friendly atmosphere. Today The Pancake Parlour continues to evolve for modern tastes, while retaining the quality food and family charm that made it a Melbourne icon.

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From the

ocean to your table Altamar Foods has a proven leadership in seafood quality by following global standards in aquaculture.

Written by: Mateo Rafael Tablado Interview by: Rebecca Castrejon Produced by: Taybele Piven Interviewee: Alberto Pescatore, Founder and President of Altamar Foods Corp


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A LTA M A R F O O D S C O R P.

T

Mahi mahi portions

he inception, growth and success of Altamar Foods are parallel with the evolution and progress of Alberto Pescatore, current President and founder of the company, who at age 17 started operating this new business by traveling to the East Coast of Venezuela in his journey to bring quality seafood to the capital, and to what later was established as the first headquarters of Altamar in Caracas. His first business transaction was so successful that he was able to acquire credit to buy a truck for transportation. Months later, Altamar Foods had a respectable fleet and business in the country. Some of their milestones include: 1. A direct distribution into restaurants, hotels and hospitals. 2. An increase in its portfolio of products. 3. Becoming a well-known company, with drivers, a fleet and sales managers. Altamar Foods currently exports to all South America and the United States with products that maintain quality and integrity. “We have personnel that have worked in other companies and have not been able to succeed in those places because no one detected or

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developed their capabilities; for me it is a pleasure to see hundreds of employees succeed�, said Alberto Pescatore, Founder and President of Altamar Foods Corp. The Beginning of a Global Brand Shortly after the company was created, Altamar Foods became a supplier to retail chains such as CATIVEN, Madeiran and Makro, and expanded its services to hospitals, restaurants and the military, among other clients.

Pretty fish from Piura, Peru

With the growth of the company, imports to Venezuela also increased, mainly because other suppliers hardly satisfied the demand for fish and other seafood related products. It was then that Altamar Foods turned to Peru, Chile, Argentina,

Stock products of Altamar Foods in Piura, Peru w w w. a l t a m a r f o o d s . c o m

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A LTA M A R F O O D S C O R P.

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Ecuador and Surinam to bring marine products and meet the needs of Venezuelan customers. When the political conditions in Venezuela changed due to devaluations, the company moved to Peru and established a central office to export more products to the United States and around the world. Technology and Training Altamar Food’s dedication in providing the best possible sea products manifests in its constant renewal of fishing fleet and giving employees the most modern equipment to optimize productivity.

Quality control in the production plant

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A LTA M A R F O O D S C O R P.

L AT I N A M E R I C A

Another important factor they enforce is the freezing process handled with global standards and from which they have industrial certifications. The process starts in the fishing boat, continues in transportation by land and finalizes in processing plants. Increasing Productivity and Sustainability Altamar Foods has taken a giant step by investing US $25 million in a processing plant located in the city of Piura, Peru. The new plant will be completely automated with a minimal margin of error, thus delivering a reliable product.

Packed mahi mahi portions

Quality control in Altamar Foods w w w. a l t a m a r f o o d s . c o m

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A LTA M A R F O O D S C O R P.

Product of Altamar Foods Corp.

“We have a projected growth of 1,000 percent due to the size, freezing capacity, storage and amount of technology integrated in the plant,” Pescatore said.

Giant Squid wings

One of the most important features in the plant is the use of resources; the company uses LED lights in most areas. “Altamar Foods depends on renewable resources,” Pescatore said. Additionally, the company has two water treatment plants (for sanitary and industrial waste,

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and the treatment of third-party water), which produce potable quality water for use in irrigation systems.

Company Information NAME

Partners and Suppliers in all Processes

Altamar Foods Corp.

Altamar Foods maintains strong relationships with its logistical suppliers, providing the best equipment to the fishermen that travel to catch quality ingredients, and investing with large corporations in developments such as the construction of their new plant in Peru.

INDUSTRY

Fish / Seafood (frozen) HEADQUARTERS

- Fort Lauderdale, Florida. - Offices in Peru and the United States

Projections Based on Exports FOUNDED

Altamar Foods believes that there are still many countries left to be explored and marketed to. The goals for the company in the next five years are high according to the future demands of the population, and the productivity and development of their new plant in Peru.

1992 EMPLOYEES

500 REVENUE

US $100 million (aprox.)

“It is important to develop the environment in which we live. Altamar Foods depends on renewable resources”

WEBSITE

www.altamarfoods.com

– Alberto Pescatore, Founder and President of Altamar Foods Corp. w w w. a l t a m a r f o o d s . c o m

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A Sustainable &

Self-sufficient Sugar Mill:

Renewing the Guatemalan sugar-cane industry with substantial energy and operations

Written by: Rebecca Castrejon Interview by: Taybele Piven Interviewee: Fraterno Vila, CEO of Corporacion San Diego


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CORPORACION SAN DIEGO A Family Business United by Sugar

C Corporacion San Diego and the communities of Guatemala

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orporacion San Diego is a sugar-cane production company based in Guatemala. Its history goes back to the 1940s when Faterno Vila Betoret, business executive and founder of Ingenio San Diego, opened this sugar mill as part of his corporate vision of elevating the country’s agribusiness. During the first harvest, San Diego produced around 300,000 tons of sugar. By 1960, Vila Betoret decided to open a new mill with an installed capacity of 60 thousand tons of sugar production per year. With the company’s growth, a second generation of entrepreneurs joined San Diego in the 1980s. Among them was the current CEO of the company, Fraterno Vila Giron, along with family members Alfredo Vila (brother), Luis and Víctor (brother-in-law), who soon enough was involved in the administrative business-family sphere. His first major accomplishment was the acquisition of a small sugar mill with a great strategic location: Ingenio Trinidad. The new acquisition provided competitive advantages to the Corporacion because of its proximity to the port and by producing 72,000 tons of sugar cane per harvest. “We are a family business which was originally directed by my father. He established the foundation of this company,” says Vila Giron. In 2009, the original sugar mill “San Diego” was


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closed in order to consolidate all operations into one venue. The company chose Ingenio Trinidad because of its location, logistics, security, and production capabilities for the future. A third generation of young executives joined San Diego in 2012. Additionally, the Corporacion hired external talent and corporate consultants to mediate operations. “Since the founding of the company we have tried to keep certain parameters, certain lines according to our code of ethics and what defines us in values and principles. We follow five fundamental standards, which are: integrity, respect, work, unity, and sustainability,� said the CEO.

Aerial view of Ingenio Trinidad

Suppliers with Value CorporaciĂłn San Diego has maintained the same company ethics with all business partners,

Machinery imported from India, Japan and England

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CORPORACION SAN DIEGO

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including suppliers. Many of their raw material is essential in the daily life of the sugar factory, from cane (its primary input during a harvest cycle of six months) to international equipment. “Our suppliers have been very efficient and serviceable with us. In some cases, they have sacrificed part of their utility sales to meet our demands,� he said. Additionally, the machinery that the company requires for daily activities, such as boilers, power generation equipment and milling material, has been imported from India, Japan, and England as a result of collaboration with foreign suppliers.

Energy production, an added business of San Diego

Energy Self-sufficiency The family business experienced substantial growth after introducing a new business model:

SUPPLIER PROFILE

ISGEC

Isgec Heavy Engineering Ltd., a multi-product, multi-location public company, based in India, has been providing engineering solutions to customers across 83 countries over the past 80 years. With a diversified portfolio of products that includes, Boilers, EPC Power Plants, Sugar Plants & Machinery, Process Equipment, Presses, Castings, Air Pollution Control Equipment, Metal Cutting Machinery and Contract Manufacturing, Isgec boasts of an impressive track record that includes the setting up of over 100 Sugar Projects, 650 Boilers, and 40 Power Plants. In fact, as many as 35 of these projects are across 21 Countries in the Western Hemisphere (Central & South America, USA, Canada).

Website: www.isgec.com

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IN SHELL LUBRICANTS, WE ARE COMMITED TO PROVIDE HIGH QUALITY SERVICE TO THE INDUSTRY

With a great product and services portfolio for each challenge.

www.horcalsa.com


CORPORACION SAN DIEGO

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the cogeneration of energy (CHP). Around 30 percent of this resource is used for the plant’s self-consumption while the rest is used for external sales. Since early 2013, Corporación San Diego has commercialized their energy produced in the sugar factory in addition to resources purchased from generators. As a result, both the Corporacion and the generating company have increased profits thanks to the large amount of sales in Central America. San Diego has strengthened operations and reformed its international strategies with the opening of commercial branches in El Salvador with the opening of this new business in the

This year, they produced more than 161 thousand tons of sugar

Sustainable and dry processes to save resources w w w. s a n d i e g o . c o m . g t

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mayafertventas@unisourceholding.com


CORPORACION SAN DIEGO

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energy sector, As for their exports, the Corporacion is conducting thorough market research in Mexico and Central America—where it expects to invest in the next couple of years. “Approximately 10 years ago, we started to sell energy. Last year, we sold more than 18 megawatts per hour and in the next two years we expect to sell 85 megawatts per hour,” says Vila Giron. A Responsible Sugar-Cane Mill Guatemala holds a great importance for the family business, Therefore, its procedures are friendly to the environment and it supports the community with socially-responsible programs to improve their quality of life. “We want our partners, employees, suppliers, and even the government—but specially the surrounding communities— to perceive us as an efficient, highly responsible, and sustainable business,” he says.

“This month we exported more than 30 percent of the energy produced in Central America” – Fraterno Vila, CEO of Corporacion San Diego

Ingenio Trinidad Production Goals In 1980, the company produced 72 thousand tons of sugar. Now it produces more than 161 thousand tons of sugar cane during the harvest. “We hope to produce between 245 and 250 thousand tons of sugar in the next two years,” says Vila Giron.

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CORPORACION SAN DIEGO

The growth of a family business

Sugar-cane plant 78

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Commercial and Organic Expansion In the past three years the company has been reaching positive numbers with the introduction of new businesses and their development in foreign markets. They are hoping to complete this expansion in 2016, begin the path of consolidation, and add new units or added value products such as alcohol and refined sugar. “We are convinced that a productive and efficient company can contribute to the welfare of its members, associates, and the community. In addition to this, we want to assist both the


L AT I N A M E R I C A

Company Information INDUSTRY

Production and commercialization of sugar and energy HEADQUARTERS

City of Guatemala, C.A., Guatemala FOUNDED

1963 EMPLOYEES

2,500 – 4,500 REVENUE

USD +$200 million

country and people with improvements,” says Vila Giron.

WEBSITE

“We are convinced that a productive and efficient company can contribute to the welfare of its members, associates, and the community. In addition to this, we want to assist both the country and people with improvements”

www.sandiego.com.gt

– Fraterno Vila, CEO of Corporacion San Diego w w w. s a n d i e g o . c o m . g t

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Written by: Rebecca Castrejon Produced by: Taybele Piven Interviewee: Juan Felipe Macia, CEO of Compañía de Galletas Pozuelo DCR, S.A.


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C O M PA Ă‘ Ă? A D E G A L L E TA S P O Z U E L O D C R , S . A .

S

ince 1919, Central America has enjoyed the sweetness and delight of Pozuelo, a company whose brands have become part of daily life for millions of Latino families. Brands such as Soda, Chiky, Merendina, Bokitas and Festival have remained as the favorite cookies of various generations, and as the perfect companion for that morning coffee or afternoon snack. Celebrating almost one hundred years since its launch, Pozuelo has established its position in the Central American market with distinguished leadership in the dessert sector. In 2006, the company experienced a significant transformation after being acquired by Grupo Nutresa (fourth largest food company in Latin

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America in terms of market capitalization). Pozuelo expanded its product portfolio and increased its export productivity and presence in Costa Rica, El Salvador, Guatemala, Nicaragua and Panama. Pozuelo has been a brand close to the consumer for the past 95 years. Additionally, they are characterized by their commitment to sustainability, which includes their ongoing work with the community and their employees through strategies that include environmental awareness and healthy habit programs. The permanence of Pozuelo has been possible thanks to the company’s productive competitiveness, recognized and valued brands, a motivated and prepared team, and continuous updates. As part of their annual budget, the company sets aside a high percentage of their profits for technological modernizations. Pozuelo has a highly automated production plant, produced with an investment of three million dollars and the merging of two of their old factories. Pozuelo-Nutresa: Uniting Forces “We have the support of the name Pozuelo, a company that has been around for their consumers and their clients for more than 95 years,” said Juan Felipe Macia, CEO of

Key People

Juan Felipe Macía CEO of Compañía de Galletas Pozuelo Macia is a production engineer who graduated in 1992 from the University EAFIT in Colombia. In 1997 he received a specialization in management (MBA) with emphasis in International Business at the University of Brighton in England. He then completed his course in management at the business school Grenoble Ecole de Management in France. He has participated in executive programs such as the one held at Kellogg School of Management at Northwestern University and is currently studying Management at Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT). His first position in business was at Compañía de Galletas Noel in Colombia, he then took the post of Regional Manager at 3M Colombia, where he served until August 2001. He then joined GLOS SA as their new CEO.

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Compañía de Galletas Pozuelo. Macia has a career of 15 years with Grupo Nutresa, working primarily in international roles. In February 2014, he took over the post of CEO and is now responsible for the operations of all Pozuelo brands in Central America. Pozuelo, now part of Grupo Empresarial Nutresa, has expanded its services for the Group’s regional portfolio, with the inclusion of a distribution route and increased commercialization efforts in the region.

Expanding its distrubution network in Central America

Differentiators 1. Pozuelo has 95 years of experience in the region. 2. Certifications that exemplify the highest quality standards and safety procedures in the

Inside Pozuelo’s production plant w w w. p o z u e l o . c o m

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C O M PA Ñ Í A D E G A L L E TA S P O Z U E L O D C R , S . A .

“On behalf of all the employees who are part of Pozuelo, I deeply express my gratitude to all of those who throughout the years have made it possible for our company to consolidate and celebrate 95 years of operations” – Juan Felipe Macia, CEO of Compañía de Galletas Pozuelo

manufacturing plant. 3. Strategic alliances with other Grupo Nutresa companies. 4. The continuous innovation of a brand with a great history within the Central American market, and that will reach new generations of consumers through both their classic and new product lines. 5. Product availability through a global distribution network. 6. More than 1,400 direct employees, whose primary commitment is to the progress of the company. 7. Sustainable growth and community efforts. Celebrating 95 Years of Smiles The 95-year celebration of the history of Pozuelo marks a very special date. The company recalls its most important milestones since its founding in 1919, including their expansion to various countries of Latin America. It is certainly a story that incorporates strategic business development within the life of the regional consumer. “On behalf of all the employees who are part of Pozuelo, I deeply express my gratitude to all of those who through the years have made it possible for our company to consolidate and celebrate 95 years of operations,” the CEO said. Growth Allies Compañía de Galletas Pozuelo has a large

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F D F SW EC OT RO LD R

Chiky, the kids favorite

number of partnerships with suppliers, customers and companies in the industry, which have played a key role in the success of Pozuelo. Furthermore, the company has been further strengthened by these synergies following its association with Grupo Nutresa, which helped by streamlining logistics in different territories. An example of this union is the supporting commercialization and distribution of sister companies such as Compañía Nacional de Chocolates from Costa Rica, Colcafé from Colombia and Tresmontes Lucchetti from Chile. Pozuelo contest winner

“We serve more than 145,000 customers throughout the region and there is an opportunity for synergies on several fronts,” Macia said.

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C O M PA Ñ Í A D E G A L L E TA S P O Z U E L O D C R , S . A . The company has increased sales by expanding their client base per the inclusion of chain stores, both traditional and modern, and with their incorporation to new markets such as Panama.

Cookie brand Club Extra Pozuelo

“A large number of raw material, packaging and even service suppliers have accompanied us throughout our history. They have been our partners in the growth of our business by strengthening distribution channels,” Macia said.

Thriving as a Multi-Latina Company By having their headquarters in Costa Rica,


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Compañía de Galletas Pozuelo seeks to consolidate exports in Central America; their natural market. “We are leaders in the business of cookies and crackers in Central America, this gives us great strength not only in Costa Rica but also in Guatemala, El Salvador, Honduras, Nicaragua and Panama,” Macía said. Pozuelo currently has a presence in 18 countries in Central America, and is growing as a multi-Latin American company. They are currently studying international markets from the distribution and commercial front, such as the United States, where the Chiky brand has a high penetration rate. In the Caribbean they are amplifying their business in food chains across Puerto Rico and the Dominican Republic. And in South America the company is exploring opportunities in Colombia.

Pozuelo’s version of María

A Look into the Future Compañía de Galletas Pozuelo will continue to follow the vision and entrepreneurship of Grupo Nutresa. By 2020, after celebrating one hundred years in the market, they expect to reach a revenue close to five billion dollars. “We are very grateful to our customers, clients, suppliers, employees, strategic partners and the whole community, because each of them w w w. p o z u e l o . c o m

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C O M PA Ñ Í A D E G A L L E TA S P O Z U E L O D C R , S . A .

Pozuelo’s world

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Company Information

has contributed directly and indirectly in the development of the company, not only in Costa Rica, but also in the whole region,” concluded Macia.

NAME

“We are leaders in the business of cookies and crackers in Central America, this gives us great strength not only in Costa Rica but also in Guatemala, El Salvador, Honduras, Nicaragua and Panama

Compañía de Galletas Pozuelo DCR, S.A. INDUSTRY

Production and commercialization of cookies and derivatives HEADQUARTERS

La Uruca, San Jose, Costa Rica FOUNDED

1919 EMPLOYEES

1,400 REVENUE

USD $150 million WEBSITE

www.pozuelo.com

– Juan Felipe Macia, CEO of Compañía de Galletas Pozuelo

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Colombian Agricultural Society: (SAC) Written by: Jenny Patricia Perdomo Produced by: Taybele Piven


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C O L O M B I A N A G R I C U LT U R A L S O C I E T Y

Journalism workshops imparted by SAC

The Colombian Agricultural Society - SAC, is the highest agricultural trade association of national character, composed of farmers, ranchers, foresters, rural production professionals, and universities, legal persons of the same character and trade associations formed by them. It was founded on December 15, 1871, with the purpose of promoting the advancement and ensuring through public discussion of the interests of the sector. It is a private, non-profit entity. The role of the SAC is to bring the representation of the producers of agriculture. In this sense SAC carries out internal articulation of interests and serves as interlocutor with other social groups and the state.

“SAC should have adequate autonomy and independence, not only with the State but also from private interests that may be faced by other organizational consulting” – Rafael Mejia Lopez, SAC President 94

November 2014

SAC contributes to the strength and functionality of Colombian democracy as well it helps to organize the society, synthesize the aspirations of producers, build consensus through dialogue with other social groups and harmonize the interests of the agricultural sector with the general interests of the nation. SAC has a fundamental commitment to the highest aspirations of the Colombian welfare, justice, peace and unity, based on the democratic system. This was stated by the union campaign from Colombian Agricultural Society, “SAC is not political or religious, or totalitarian, or corporate, it


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is simply an open democratic organization where each farmer can work accordingly with their spirit and their own ideas and feelings.� To fulfill its function of representation, SAC uses the media to reach its public and publishes the National Agriculture Magazine, a newsletter and website, among others. Performs other contacts with unions and other social organizations and also has political representation with the state.

SAC members

Introducing the best agricultural practices for the Colombian fields

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Rafael Mejia Lopez, President of SAC


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In this regard, the SAC is, by law, an advisory body of the Government in the field of agriculture and participates in its own right, inter alia: the boards of the National Apprenticeship Service, Sena, the Colombian Agricultural Institute, ICA, the Colombian Institute Rural Development, Incoder, the Colombian Corporation of Agricultural, Corpoica Research, the Permanent Commission on Wage and Labour Policies, also on the board of the Fund for Financing the Agricultural Sector, Finagro. The Colombian Agricultural Society is the only guild leadership that exists in the country, i.e., the union of unions. This constitutes a valuable institutional and organizational development, thanks to the wisdom and foresight of farmers and industry associations. The existence of producer associations and their leadership responds to two distinct problems. The first exercise as spokesman and representative of their particular products and procedures and relevant negotiations, the dome devotes his attention to the general interests of all producers of agriculture and its alignment with the interests of the nation. Consequently, the SAC coordinates and express the positions of the agricultural sector in aspects of welfare policies of the rural population, prices, credit, land reform, suitability, land, research, innovation and technology transfer, management of natural resources, marketing of agricultural products,

Monthly agribusiness meetings

Agriculture Congress in Colombia

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Seminars from SAC

foreign trade, public investment directed to the rural sector and the impact of global economic management on agricultural production. To properly perform its functions, the SAC should have adequate autonomy and independence, not only with the State but also from private interests that may be faced by other organizational consulting. This autonomy and the relative distance of the SAC regarding immediate interests allows it to act with authority and balance in their pronouncements. This requires a solid institutional, technical and financial entity. Brazil tour

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“SAC has a fundamental commitment to the highest aspirations of the Colombian welfare, justice, peace and unity, based on the democratic system” – Rafael Mejia Lopez, President of SAC

Company Information NAME

Colombian Agricultural Society INDUSTRY

Agribusiness HEADQUARTERS

Colombia SERVICES

Promotes national agricultural development and welfare of producers, represents and defends the interests of those living in the Colombian countryside, promotes partnership and cooperation PRESIDENT

Rafael Mejia Lopez ADDRESS

Carrera 7, Numero 24-89, Torre Colpatria EMAIL

prensa@sac.org.co WEB

www.sac.org.co

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Improving America’s nutritional bases

Team Foods is raising its leadership among consumers within the lipid industry in Latin America with products that integrate quality, nutrition and sustainable elements.

Written by: Rebecca Castrejon Produced by: Taybele Piven Interviewee: Luis Alberto Botero, President of Team Foods


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TEAM FOODS

I

t was 1999 when six leading companies in the field of production and commercialization of cooking oil and butter, merged to form Team Foods.

Headquarters in Barranquilla

Team Foods has expanded its product range into new industries, such as restaurant chains and bakeries, increasing its presence among consumers and culinary professionals in the food sector in Latin America.

Internationalization in America The company exports to Argentina, Bolivia, Brazil, Ecuador, Trinidad and Tobago, Panama, Puerto Rico, United States, among other countries in the continent. Team Foods is looking to increase its distribution network with new product lines and commercial customers. In Latin America the company has the following branches and plants: Colombia: In 2013 a new plant in Bogotรก was inaugurated for the management of international logistics and brand innovation, and in Buga the company opened a new refinery. Four high efficiency plants are also located in this country, in the vicinities of Buga, Caloto, Barranquilla and Bogota.

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Mexico: After acquiring Tron Brothers Factory, Team Foods took over the plant in Morelia, Michoacan and commercial offices in Mexico City, increasing the company’s market presence since 2007. Additionally, the refinery in Michoacan is expected to expand operations with a millionaire investment between 2015 and 2016.

Key People

Chile: Team Foods opened one of the most modern refineries in Santiago de Chile. This refinery took on an investment of nearly USD $ 8.5 million, and in just one year has become one of the most productive plants in South America.

Luis Alberto Botero President of Team Foods Andean

Team Foods Value

Luis Alberto Botero was born in Medellin and is the second of three brothers. Since age 13 he began working in the market Success, This marked his entrepreneurial commitment at an early age. At 18 he worked with his father as a messenger, years later he was selling insurance and bonds.

As part of its commitment to grow as a multi-

Simultaneously Botero was studying at EAFIT University, where he graduated in Business Administration in 1982, he then continued his studies in a management program in Latin America from North Western University, which ended in 1998. In 2003 he attended an Advanced Management Program from Harvard Business School.

They have dabbled in the restaurant industry

During his business career he has held various management posts, Botero began as a marketing manager in Yardley, where he served for 13 years, later on he joined the Corona Organization from 1995 to May 2010 in the positions of business manager, VP of corporate marketing and general manager various units. His life in Foods Team began in June 2010, with the post of CEO and chairman of this food alliance. Botero is located at the head of the operations branch of Colombia, Mexico and Chile, and continues to show corporate leadership to date.

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C O M PA N Y N A M E

Campi, one of the products of Team Foods

“We have established ourselves as a pillar of profitable growth for our operations in Colombia” – Luis Alberto Botero, President of Team Foods

latina company, Team Foods has followed quality principles required in international certifications such as ISO 9001, ISO 14001, OU KOSHER, OHSAS 18001, HACCP, ISO 28000, etc. “Integrity” is one of the many values that distinguishes all collaborators in Team Foods. All employees must follow the behavioral manual that is based on the company’s mission, marking a unified view on all administrative levels. Entrepreneurial Innovations As part of its business innovations, Team Foods plans to expand its new brands in Latin America, especially in Mexico and Chile, where the company has commercial offices.

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SECTOR

They have a range of products in the field of fats

“With innovation, we have established ourselves as a pillar of profitable growth for our operations in Colombia, Chile and Mexico. We also have established an area of new business development,� said Luis Alberto Botero, President of Team Foods for the Andean region. Competitive Differentiators In addition to its constant innovations, Team Foods has been characterized by its investment in research and development, upgrading their machinery and processes with the most advanced technology in the industry and to established its permanence as leaders in the Colombian market. w w w. t e a m . c o

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TEAM FOODS

Team Foods sponsors nutritional programs in the community

“We are still very young in Mexico and Chile but we have ongoing investments in technology and brand innovation, and an excellent level in the development of our products,” Botero said. The company has invested in improving its brands according to the needs in new markets and industries while ensuring a sustainable operation. One example of this effort has been the introduction of brands such as Mestre and Kardámili in restaurants and bakeries. “We have become leaders in the field of butter and cooking oil in Colombia, Mexico and Chile,


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and this has positioned us as competitive players in the industry of lipids,” he added.

Sustainable Development “A core value of the company is our environmental value,” Botero said. Team Foods has three programs to ensure a friendly production environment. 1: Program to reduce the carbon footprint. 2: Program to reduce solid waste. 3: Program to optimize the use of water and energy.

Selecting Suppliers Team Foods has firm strategic alliances with suppliers of raw materials, as well as cardboard, plastic and energy providers. In logistics, ethics go beyond price and trade proposals, “trust, ethics, transparency and integrity” are the basis of the relationships built between suppliers and Team Foods. “With these criteria we have remained constant over time, we believe we have the best w w w. t e a m . c o

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TEAM FOODS suppliers that an industry can have, and they are fundamental in our development,� Botero said. Goals for 2023 The realization of Team Foods dream will meet its first phase in 2023, the year in which they hope to substantially increase the size and profitability of the company and shareholders. To achieve this goal, the team is constantly innovating its brands and renewing 20 percent of the portfolio. Dedicated personnel at Team Foods


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Company Information NAME

Team Foods INDUSTRY

Food HEADQUARTERS

Bogota, Cundinamarca, Colombia FOUNDED

1999 EMPLOYEES

Foods Team in pastry shops, bakeries and

1,200

restaurants from their industrial range REVENUE

“We have established ourselves as a pillar of profitable growth for our operations in Colombia”

USD $500 million WEBSITE

www.team.co

– Luis Alberto Botero, President of Team Foods

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