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PORTFOLIO - 2012

Fawad Nadir Osman


Name: Fawad Nadir Osman Country: Pakistan Date of Birth: 30th March, 1989.

Bio: My fascination lies in the oscillating relationship between people and the spaces they inhabit in the city. Having grown up in Lahore, the socio-spatial transformations have somewhat been a muse for most of my academic exploits. My major concern lies in the diminishing sense of civitas and the shrinking public sphere. As architects I believe that we have always enjoyed this ‘divine’ status in building societies, persistently restructuring thought and revolutionizing paradigms.


Architecture as an Event The Circus

Industiral design: Architecture for All 52nd NASA India Convention 2009

Children Resource Center ARCASIA Students’ Design Competition 2010

The Summer Pavilion Group Project

Deterritorializing the act of Devotion Reconstructing the Shrine of Data Ganj Baksh

Urban Projects

Competition Projects

Architecture and Democracy Legislative Assembly of Azad Kashmir

Revitalization of a Historical Urban Center Regal Chowk, Model Town Lahore

Relocation of a Rural village Kotsheran Village

Professional

Design Projects (2009-12)

Table of Contents

Flood Rehabilitation Housing 2010 Layyah, Punjab


Design Projects

(2009-12)


Site Context & Analysis Macro Context

Architecture & Democracy

The site is found juxtaposed the centre of the city where the two rivers of Jhelum and Neelum meet. The rivers cut the city into different segments making influencing the fabric of the city. The sity finds itself right near the to the center which itself is quite a tourist attraction.

Legislative Assembly for Azad Kashmir, Pakistan Winter, 2010 duration: 7 weeks

Supreme Court

Grand Mosque

River Neelum

Site

Meso Context

The present assembly building occupies a very strategic place at the heart of an intitutional corridor which comrpises the grand mosque, the supreme court, the civil sectariat. This whole corridor is guarded by security personnel and there are real spaces for public gatherings.

River Jhelum

Site Massing “Democracy is endangered when its Parking restricted by controlled public life.” Janaki Nair To fully integrate the democratic principles into the architecture of the building it was necessary to develop a process which would have 763’ democracy in its core. An attempt was Administration made to identify all the dissimilar elements and systems and by reconstructing a continuous architectural User Circulation language through which those elements were to be combined while MLA’s still maintaining their integrity within a continuous field of other free elements. The eventual form had to be 'viscous' a form that could only be made possible with internal motivations with Speaker existing factors, as they develop internal stability in direct proporPublic tion to the external pressures exerted upon them

Civil Sectraiat Prime Minister House

Design Concept - Where all disparate elements unite Mla’s Hostels 60’

Zoned Masses According to Area Calculation

Assembly Building 60’

Open Space For Public

353’ Main Entrance

Density of User Activity and the Intensity of their activity

Admin Vips the building amalgamates all disparate elements working on the site (utility,circulation) are blended in to form one contiunous form creating uniformity and celebrating difference at the same time.

“Democracy is endangered when its restricted by controlled public life.”


Overlapping of the conceptual and functional layer

Finalizaing the Form

Nodes for the max intensity and density mapped

Covered area after various iterations

To fully integrate the democratic principles into the architecture of the building it was necessary to develop a process which would have democracy in its core. An attempt was made to identify all the dissimilar elements and systems and by reconstructing a continuous architectural language through which those elements were to be combined while still maintaining their integrity within a continuous field of other free elements.

Translating 2d into 3d considering Massing Heights and Anthropometric Data 565’

60’

n-E Elevation

The eventual form had to be 'viscous' a form that could only be made possible with internal motivations with existing factors, as they develop internal stability in direct proportion to the external pressures exerted upon them. The model was alterated by further programmatic and functional requirements regarding access, clearance and anthropometrics.

Structure Study

60’

S-W Elevation Structure experimentation with Rhino and Grasshopper Plugin.

Plan View

Structure Study

The structural Layer should be left exposed in the architecture so that the architecture of the building also manifests the democratic values of the society. To fully integrate the democratic principles into the architecture of the building it was necessary to develop a process which would have democracy in its core. An attempt was made to identify all the dissimilar elements and systems and by reconstructing a continuous architectural language through which those elements were to be combined while still maintaining their integrity within a continuous field of other free elements.

3-DWireframe Model

Skin as a structural Layer

Interlocking of struts making up a Space Frame Structure. “Democracy is endangered when its restricted by controlled public life.”


Architectural Drawings

3-D Visualizations

565’

Masterplan 1/4” Rubber pad one thin sheet of stretch metal 20mm Glass sheet

6” Stainless Steel Frame

Mla Hostels Plan Blow-up

Roof Detail

Assembly Plan Blow-up

96’

Study Model

80’

Section AA’ 51’

Section BB’ “Democracy is endangered when its restricted by controlled public life.”


Site context

THE CIRCUS spring, 2011 duration: 4 weeks

SITE PANORAMA Site

badami bagh

bus stop minar e pakistan

The site occupies a significant position in Minto park near Badami Bagh and the walled city, Lahore. This place is a hub for sports enthusiasts from far flung areas and these sports fields are used for a variety of sports.

program analysis the masterplan is derived out or pure programmatic needs and the spaces are assigned according to their own functional requirements,

271’-0”

Georg Simmel defines ‘The Stranger’ as a person who ‘comes today and stays tomorrow’. But his position in this group he says ‘is determined, essentially, by the fact that he has not belonged to it from the beginning, that he imports qualities into it, which do not and cannot stem from the group itself. A circus focuses on irrationality, incongruity and strangeness.

The site occupies a significant position in Minto park near Badami Bagh and the walled city, Lahore. This place is a hub for sports enthusiasts from far flung areas and these sports fields are used for a variety of sports.

3-d masterplan

LEGEND BIG TOP ACCOMODATION OTHER STALLS WELL OF DEATH TOILETS STORAGE ACADEMY ADMINISTRATION FERRIS WHEEL PARKING PEDESTRIAN BRIDGE EATEIRIES ANIMAL SHELTERS

There are two pedestrian based overhead entrances which allow easy access from the top of the bus stop. ...The stranger ... has qualities which do not and cannot stem from the group itself.


design concept: architecture as an event

experiential sequences

architecture as an event

climax resistance

flux framing

chaos narrative With a state of ‘anxiety’ I would take a journey to familiarize myself with the lost tradition of attending a circus. Upon arriving at the Mela I got a firsthand experience of what it really felt like on being a stranger in an unfamiliar environment. All the eyes of the crowd were on the ‘aliens’ that had just gotten out of the bus; these aliens exuberating an uncommon aura around them that was not local to that place. The walk from the bus to the Big Top of ‘Lucky Irani Circus’ defined what a circus actually is. A circus focuses on irrationality, incongruity and strangeness. The unusual food, the bizarre street acts, the outlandish rides, the exotic dancing all pointed towards absurdity. Amongst all the bizarreness of the situation one could still not escape the harsh realities of today’s world.

objectification

vertigo

the purpose to lay down these events on site is to provide an experience for the user which would enthrall and captivate the imagination of the user. architecture would play the lead role in manifesting itself as the narrative through which the user would experience the site.

...The stranger ... has qualities which do not and cannot stem from the group itself.


Masterplan

3d- views

pedestrian bridges

admin food courts

hostels

toilets

storage acedamy well of death storage

big top ferris wheel other stalls Admin Parking

3-d Masterplan

...The stranger ... has qualities which do not and cannot stem from the group itself.


Design Process and form development

summer pavilion summer, 2011 duration: 3 weeks

with an appropriate material choice, we embarked on journery to discover the form that would aptly describe our personality.

personality sketch A con artist is an individual who is skilled and experienced at devising and executing scams and other fraudulent schemes. The purpose is to deceive a victim and get something from him in return. but to do so in a way the victim actually believes they are getting a benefit. The form according to this personality would have to be molded by its context. The circulation paths, levels can play an integral part in devising the form of the pavilion. The pavilion would never reveal its true form from any particular angle giving credence to the personality.

the choice of material was bamboo due to its elastic nature. bamboo use in local conditions contradicts its inherent nature and is solely used for its compressive strength. its used to make basic furniture, ladders. our main objective was to realise bamboo’s tensile nature and to prove that with minimum use of the material we could attain larger spans just by using its tensile nature. our initial study models were made to experiment with its tensile stregth and to achieve larger spans by providind shade to the people. Experimentation in rhino with grasshopper plugin


Final Form

Joinery Details

to counter the thrust caused by the tensile nature of the of the arched bamboo linear bamboo bracers were used to balance the outward thrust.

the final form was derived after a progression of attempts tested on the material. the site played a major part in defining the form of the pavilion as the steps and the difference in levels had to be accomodated by the form. the emergent form was seen to be an amalgamation of site restrictions and the limitations it had to overcome to become an integrated part of the college courtyard. a lightweight membrane was used to cover the secondary panels to provide shade from the sun.the resultant was left to interact with the students and and they appropriated the steps and its form to provide a truly interactive experience.

joinery detail

joinery detail


plan

photographs

3'-8"

6'-5"

3'-8"

8'-0"

19'-2"

9'


Locating an architectural argument from a personal world view

Deterritorializing the act of devotion Design Studio Project Summer, 2011 duration: 8 weeks

By the dominance of rationality and logic through science we have seen the demise of some very fundamental dynamics that determined the way we live. Rationality or lack of it in both cases has polarized our society. Man is forced to follow his faith with a warped understanding of religion which does not come from him but from someone who himself is inept to expound. We’ve been so securely in grip of desires which really are not ours to begin with.’ We’ve been hoodwinked into believing that what is theirs is in essence, ours. Too much decadence has nullified the values in our society. The marginalized are downtrodden into abysmal levels of poverty and shame day in day out. We’ve been ‘territorialized’ as Deleuze says, we are the ‘hefted sheep’ whose movements are predictable; they can be herded by dogs for dipping and shearing but are closer to being wild animals who are just allowed to graze in enclosed fields,’ This analogy is a harsh reminder of man’s state in today’s world. We go about our lives in banality, stuck to mundane routine things. There is a dire need in today’s world for the architecture to deterritorialize; where it detaches the user from his surroundings and places him in an unfamiliar realm of self. like ‘the sheep’ having by chance or through temporary madness wanders away from the flock, falls in a new flock and becomes ‘hefted’ in a new place again. In our built environment, every aspect of the building is dominated by visual experience. It is believed that visual perspective has hindered man’s understanding of space. There is a dire need for all the other senses of the architecture should be employed in giving a complete multisensory experience. Space should be experienced through sound, hapticity and smell. We need to bring in all the phenomenological associations pertaining to space. As Derrida says, phenomenology is in effect a selfreferential system. In this life where our world is dominated by intangible realities we should not

forget the aspect of lived experiences We need to make architecture that intensifies and mystifies the urban experience. We need to generate ‘shock’ in the life of the common man to deterritorialize him from his banality even if for a few moments of his life.

Religion has deep roots embedded in this society and can be the prime target for the deterritorialization as it motivates and gives way to the most extreme of our emotions. The purpose of this intervention would be to disengage the user from his commonplace activity, guide him to a realm of unfamiliarity where he is forced to pause for a moment and reflect. That is only possible if all of his senses are activated by being part of that intervention. The experience that a person is going through needs to be sublime. The

‘Men believe they are free, precisely because they are conscious of their volitions and desires; yet concerning the causes that have determined them to desire and will they have not the faintest idea’ (Spinoza, 1677)

sublime is sensation at the point at which it can no longer be felt, and is therefore only capable of being thought. The ultimate aim would be to detach the user from their current state of beliefs, to defamiliarise them from preconceived forms of reverence to make them reflect on their ideas of devotion through through lucid space and corporeal architecture.

Site Dargah

entrance

Data

*This project started with us locating an architectural argument from our Worldview and developing a Project out of that architectural argument. The inital writeup is imperative to understand the conception of the project.

Pedestrian Bridge

Ci

rc

bar Dar Rd

Mosque

Courtyard

Data Darbar Park

ul

ar

Ro

ad


Dargah / Tomb of the saint The term ‘Dargah’ in Persian means a threshold or a portal. In Islamic cultures and societies Dargahs for Sufi Saints are considered as highly revered places. ‘They act as portals by which they can invoke the deceased blessings.’ The Dargah thus acts as an intermediately stage; a realm between two worlds, of life and death and connects the devotees with the spirit of the sufi saint through prayers and offerings.

Program Analysis Dome The dome often used In Muslim shrines and other religious buildings is said to symbolize ‘infinity’. It is a common occurence in most religous buildings. The dome’s placement in sufi shrines is mostly directly above the tomb. The dome acts as a visual and symbolic association for the devotees with the shrine.

Tomb This octagonal room houses the grave of the sufi saint. Entry is prohibtted to the common man but the room is covered with marble ‘jalis’ which make the room somewhat accessible but only visually. A person cannot stand there for more than a few seconds as there are long queues of devotees lining up just to see the grave and pay their offerings.

Verandahs The verandahs are used as shade for the devotees who sit there all year long out of reverence for the sufi saint. The arches make informal partitions for other activities to take place and to some extent privacy to the devotees. Store Women’s Section Library

The Shrine of Data Ganjbaksh The present shrine was made right after the saint’s death in 1074 AD. The shrine is demarcated with a steel fence dividing the men’s and the women’s section. There is a section dedicated just to religious scripture where devotees read the Holy Quran. There is also a small section for a store where all the necessities to maintain the shrine are stored.

Tomb

65’-0” Men’s Section

65’-0”

Intensities Mapping

Sound Impact

“A groundless depth from which errupts something that creates its own space and time....It is not the line that is between two points, but the point that is at the intersection of several lines.” - Deleuze.

Several ‘folds’ help in creating a blurring of the inside/outside, solid/void ; thereby reconceptualizing traditional architectural notions of spatial connections and separations. Space conceived, developed and executed with an experience of variations as opposed to a traditional architectural style. This particular image shows how space and its elements transcend physical boundaries.

Visual perspective has limited our understanding of space so these diagrams represent space in dimensions that we do not experience usually; this particular analysis is mapping out sentimental/emotional intensities in the shrine.


Concept Development

Le Pli / The Fold Deleuze believed that one’s thought process went through a kind of ‘fold’ where the ‘forces from outside, fold the inside.’ Through folding it is believed that a building is not just one space situated on a particular site but many spaces folded into many sites. The objective through architecture is to create a space with shifting arrangements thereby constantly changing the experience of the space.

..into another realm of unfamiliarity..

To deterritorialise, we need to create architecture that causes sensation, that intensifys and provocates. a sensation is responsible for the body’s prior seperation from the earth, from nature and into another realm of unfamiliarity. Our primary objective would be to create architecture that emerges when sensation can

detach itself and gain an autonomy from its creator(nature) and its perceivor(body). Where the involvement of the body and the space around it transcends preconceived notions and ideas that govern its state of mind.

.. and causes sensation..

In the fold, space is experienced through variations as opposed to traditional style of architecture of ‘experience of identity’. In the architecture of the fold the so called ‘identity’ of space keeps shifting as time and activity is constantly changing. ‘Folds that create a blurring of inside/outside, solid/void and space to space thresholds.’

blurring of solid/void

Architecture in this phenomena can be considered as a pure expression of movement’. Here the concept of lucid space finally starts to kick in. Here space is conceived as ‘becoming’ with no external measure or ends.

lucid space

Space will start reconceptualizing Đgureground relationship, contradicting tradition (Le Corbusier and the ‘pilotis’) and aim towards breaking hierarchies blurring the divide, giving more freedom to the user, giving way for intimacy with the space.

..where architecture transcends preconceived notions.. figure-ground relationship


3-D Views

80’-0”

Masterplan

140’-0”

140’-0”

b’

Library

a

main hall

a’ tomb store

b top view

plan cut at 12’-0”

50’-0”

section aa’

section bb’


Urban Projects

(2012)


Site Context

AD RO

LAKSHMI MANSIONS

N

PARKING LOT

AD O BE

in regal chowk, there is an intense overlapping of spatial and social patterns making them heavily interdependent. there is a mix of religous, insitituitional and commercial buildings which in turn have given regal chowk a status of a financial, social and economic hub.

AD L RO

fall, 2011 duration: 6 weeks

regal chowk, mall road, lahore

HAL

Revitalization of a historic urban centre

LAKSHMI BUILDING CHAMAN ICECREAM

MALL ROAD MASJID -E- SHUHUDA PANORAMA SHOPPING CENTRE REGAL CINEMA

WR LA CE

EN

ST. ANTHONY’S CATHEDRAL

SADIQ PLAZA AD

RO

Site analysis Cities are nests for human settlements, a complex weave made up of intricate patterns (physical, spatial and social), they are contingent equations which consist of many variables; they keep shifting with time, individuals and social systems. Among the contingencies include the entire dynamics of economics, culture, religion and politics. Having said that, behind the crux of all things lies the orchestrating power of the basic individual; an individual by his own will or otherwise morphs his surroundings to a state that in turn governs the collective unconscious of his fellow counterparts. Revitalization in essence is to bring back the human element in the individual. what starts with the individual assimilates into his immediate permeable environment.

landuse diagram

noise intensity

CINEMA ELECTRONICS SHOPS PARKING FACILITY RESTAURANTS SCHOOL/CHURCH BANKS MOSQUE CLOTHING SHOPS RESIDENTIAL WAREHOUSES OTHERS

CRIME ANALYSIS

TEMP INTENSITY ANALYSIS

ABOVE 105 dB

MOBILE SNATCHING

85 - 105 dB

PICK POCKETS

60 - 85 dB

TRAFFIC VIOLATIONS DRUG ADDICTS

5 > MEAN MEAN 5 < MEAN


design concept

Problems seen on site the two highlighted time frames indicate that majority of the traffic congestion and other vices rise exponentially as the influx of people in that time increases. thus indicating that these urban systems have a complex interdependency over one another and a shift in the balance in any one of them would trigger a ripple effect causing a change in the other systems surrounding it.

120 Shopkeepers 100

Beggars Policemen

80

Rickshaw Stand Hawkers

60

Sweepers Waiters

40

Suppliers Customers

20

Traĸc

0

Eateries 8:00 AM

3:00 PM

6:30 PM

10:00 PM

activity analysis on regal chowk

ABOVE 105 dB 85 - 105 dB 60 - 85 dB

noise intensity analysis of hall road

the traffic congestion and unruly commercialization on hall road has been very detrimental with contributing to noise levels. The particular graphic clearly illustrates and makes a particular analysis of hall road and shows clearly where those harmful frequencies were heard on a saturday night. Major contributing factors to this form of pollution are mentioned on this graphic. noise >105 db results in permanent hearing loss

CORRUPTION WITHIN GOVERNING AUTHORITIES

DETERIOATING BUILDINGS

WORSENING ECONOMIC CONDITIONS

EXCESSIVE NOISE POLLUTION

(E.G: BILLBOARDS, BANNERS ETC)

RESIDENTIAL DECAY

ABUNDANCE OF SOLID WASTE FOUND ON THE STREETS

POOR CONDITION INFRASTRUCTURE

COMMERCIALIZATION

INCOMPETENT ADMINISTRATION

SECURITY SITUATION NO FOOTPATHS

NO SEGREGATION IN THE MODES OF TRANSPORT

POOR DRAINAGE

TRAFFIC CONGESTION

from one place to another. Deleuze and Guattari saw the flow inherent to capitalism makes the city possible but having said that these same forces of imbalance create congestion, filth in the surroundings.v Globalism,

following capitalism has on the whole been a powerful urbanizing phenomenon, with populations increasingly drawn

lems relating to flux within cities and yet it is capitalism which at the same time prevents such problems from being resolved. A mixed economy prevails where the question of values, the ILLEGAL ENCROACHMENTS

VISUAL DECAY

focused at the local level as active civic engagement plays a pivotal role in making fundamental political and social change. Today the ideology of global capitalism is Capitalism increasingly dominant. depends on its survival on a dynamic imbalance: the flow of value

towards places through which money flows (hawkers, informal economy). An ideology is the cause of the very flux which drives a city, global capitalism produces prob-

cause and effect relationship ABANDONMENT OF BUILDINGS/ BUSINESSES

in regal chowk, there is an intense overlapping of spatial and social patterns which in turn are heavily interdependent. If the environment is being adversely affected, that has to have an effect on the social living conditions of the actors there. A commonly perceived fact is that the market is an accurate reflection of the choices that individuals make and an appropriate way to influence decisions. In Regal chowk we see the common man, more in grips with his notions of being a consumer rather than a citizen. Regal chowk today sees the perils of commercialization over-riding the basic proponents of civic engagement. This misleading image of economic empowerment dishevels the course of the common man into becoming a self-centered consumer with a complete disregard to civic involvement. Statistics point out that policymaking and decision-taking need to be

HIGH TEMPERATURES IN MICRO CLIMATES

DISORGANIZED PARKING

economy, society and politics operate is less clear. We have an unquestioned tendency towards globalization of the economy and the culture. But the

real problem lies with the political citizenship. What does it mean for the citizen to have an effect on his or her government? Very little, this is where globalization and the substitution of consumer sovereignty for citizen sovereignty become a problem. The role of capitalism now all over the world is being questioned. Our markets and cities are designed according to that market model, its time we start questioning that model and build our cities according to the lives of our people. We digress from the status quo of a citizen acting in the theater of this own civic environment and delve into what we commonly perceive as ‘improper’ identitites. Lets for a second call them the ‘urban nomads’. These individuals are characterized by the fact that they don’t long for properly defined city limits, rather to the openness to

transformations and regenerations that cannot be fully anticipated or regulated in the present. We look at an environment that has no heading, where its destiny does not have a destination. We look at mode of dwelling that is urbanely nomadic; a home from home in a ‘place’ which is exemplary in its openness to the other heading.


proposal

The form of the built envronment will follow the new prevailing social order; where the social activities determine how the flow of the physical space will reveal itself. The sturated function of hall road is broken down and many other types of uses are faciliatated in the same facility giving the citizen the chance to appropriate and own the place according to their own needs.

â&#x20AC;&#x2DC;..we may say that while it grows for the sake of mere life, it exists, for the sake of a good life..â&#x20AC;&#x2122; Aristotle The connecting bridges that we see on our left are are direct manifestations of the userâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s needs and ambitions. It acts as a seed which then in turn goes beyond its boundaries of its catchment area and here the concept of the urban nomad is properly realised; where dwellers are not characterized by city boundaries rather how they actually want to live their lives devoid of the pressures exerted by external market factors. This intervention aims to bring, symbolically the words of Aristotle back to our minds; by not being a hindrance to the way Regal Chowk evolves this intervention allows the individual to claim back his right to own and appropriate his encompassing public space to his own will, by emancipating his cognizance on what appropriation of our urban centres should be like. That in turn would hopefully give the lost notions of citizenship more credence.


The Site

Relocation of a rural housing settlement Winter, 2011 duration: 6 weeks

Site context

gujranwala is an industrial city while kotsheran village is 3 km away from the outskirts and is a victim of urban sprawl. once a strictly rural village is now going through rampant urbanisation the rural to urban influx is increasing at alarming rates.

guranwala city

3

km

kotsheran wala village rural to urban distance

MOSQUE

mansion

COMMERCIAL

existing house type

In nature, no two men are alike, what distinguishes the two are their hopes and aspirations. when we build one house and multiply it into thousands, we deny that unique characteristic to man. Hasan Fathy argues that the conception or the framework of all architecture comes from these very same hopes and aspirations. In a housing project the aim of the architect should be to start with a group of people which would bring design within his domain. Once that manageable group is dealt with then the desired variety will naturally and locally follow in the community.

scattered growth of old settlement

Conclusions:

HAVELI M.S

LAND OCCUPIED BY 48 ACRES

LIVESTOCK FARMERS the growth of the settlement started around the haveli

45 ACRES

LIVESTOCK TOTAL NO. OF UNITS REQ.

50

30

150 UNITS

rooftop view

narrow streets leading to increased social interaction on rooftops

INDUSTRIAL LABOUR & OTHERS

5 15

100

DISTRIBUTED ACCORDING TO NO. OF CATTLE

FACTORY/VEGETABLE/MASONS

- to accomodate both existing typologies in new settlement, - to facitate the urbanisation phenomenon. - incoroportating the courtyard as the most integral part of the house. - to maintain their existing living patterns in the best possible ways and allocating appropriate areas.


Framework for a sustainable masterplan for the relocation of the rual settlement

Design concept for a basic unit

SECONDARY ROAD

12’

12’

SECONDARY ROAD

12’ RESIDENTIAL

The plot size should be chosen according to the individual family needs and their ability to pay for the plot. For a more socially sustainable settlement, active participation of the future residents should be in the decision making process from the micro to the macro level. the designer would be simply to regulate the whole process.

There should be no preconceived plan. the location of the open areas of the plots should take place in response to the requirements and aspirations of the future residents. 45 deg

The n-s orientation allows of solar heat to the built structure while e-w allows direct penetration of heat to the street infrastructure. the optimum solar orientation of the plot should be on a north to east orientation.

BEDROOM BEDROOM

SERVICES

GROUND FLOOR

FIRST FLOOR

PRIMARY ROAD To bring their livelihood activities into one roof. Having said that, segregation of both of these activities should be maintained to a certain extent so it does not interfere or disturb the residential activities of neighbouring families. Livestock owners would be access to a primary road where they have access to vehicular transport (Trucks, tractors)

3-d Perspective

BEDROOM

BEDROOM

COURTYARD

BASIC UNIT CATTLE YARD

BEDROOM

BEDROOM

COURTYARD

SERVICES

primary road SERVICES

COURTYARD

ENT.

- ALL VEHICLES

25’- 0”

ENT.

ENT.

the individual plot should be flexible enough to accomodate any changes in livelihood or for the family size for future use. The designs of the houses would be made to break into smaller units or intergrate themselves into adjacents units if the need arises.

secondary road - CARS - PEDESTRIANS

12’- 0”

The purpose of the module is to calculate and distribute the exact amount of area required for the relocation of the people. The Basic unit is built for a family of not less than eight people. What the module does is that it allows the adjacent units to assimilate to the basic unit as per the reuirement of the future aspirations of the user.


Masterplan

Housing Typologies

NORTH secondary road open spaces primary road

S

D

IN

ER

W

M

M

U

)

-E

The plot size should be chosen according to the individual family needs and their ability to pay for the plot. For a more socially sustainable settlement, active participation of the future residents should be in the decision making process from the micro to the macro level. the designer would be simply to regulate the whole process.

S

(S

type a for 6-8 cattle

’ 5 4 8

510’

type B for 16-21 cattle modular stacking of a basic unit

BASIC UNIT

2

6

0

LEGEND

CATTLE TYPE A CATTLE TYPE B CATTLE TYPE C

2

8

5

SCHOOL

HEALTH FACILITIES

WATER TREATMENT & BIOGAS

MOSQUE

type C for 35 cattle


Competition Projects

(2009-10)


Design Objective

Industrial design:

Architecture For all

Figures are arranged in a way to bring the subjects close together making experience of the bath wholesome and convenient

Chennai, India Competition Project Winter, 2009

A Design that glorifies the relationship with a space that serves the function considered to be otherwise mundane The Jul 2010 Flooding of the River Indus caused widespread devastation to the adjoining areas of the river basin. More than a million people were affected and thousands were killed. This crisis gave way to an acute housing shortage in the nearby villages. Charitable organizations like Tameer Pakistan and the Al khair Foundation rose to the humanitarian aid efforts and provided temporary relief camps to the various flood affected people in the district of Layyah after successfully starting a housing society in the more adversely affected areas. A masterplan was developed keeping in mind the culture and livelihood of the people from the surrounding villages and an effort was made to rehabilitate and revitalize the living standards of the people affected by this crisis.

An experience of communication within a closed space.

Design Inspiration

Physical Reality is the basis for the construction of a physical form which conveys not only its visual characteristics but also its psychological and imaginary suggestions. - Henry Moore

Reclining Figure (1951), Henry moore

Note: awarded the Special Mention Category (2nd Position) in the competition. Group Members: Fawad Nadir Osman, Hajra Cheema, Roushan Mir, Fahad Dasti


Design Development: Conceptual & Developmental Sketches

Evolution of form through illustrative sketches

Design Development 01

07

02

08

03

09

04

10

05

11

06

12

Parametric Deformation of a cube through optimum anthropometrical data feed. Note: The Project Handout and Certificates can be presented upon request.


Architectural Drawings

3-D Visualizations 1.5” Brick Tile Floor 3” to 4” mudfilling One Layer of Polythene Two coats of Bitumen 6” R.C.C Slab (1.2.4)

  

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The final result is an outcome of meticulous anthropometric and ergonomic study of the fixtures regarding comfort, function and aesthetics to cater to all age groups and also to pay tribute to the relationship between the mother and child X'

4” R.C.C Slab (1.2.4)

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X

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Details of Fixtures Wash Basin

1’-6”

2’-0”

Top

Towel Stand

Bath Tub

Water Closet

1’-6”

Top

2’-10”

Top

2’-6” 1’-6”

Side

Side

Side

Baby Tub

Shower Head

Front

2’-6”

2’-10”

1’-6”

Front

Front


Architecture and the Human Spirit Children Resource Center Lahore, Pakistan ARCASIA Students’ Architectural Design Competition Summer, 2010

Site: Central Park, Model Town, Lahore The site has been chosen after taking all considerations of the site analysis. it keeps a safe distance from all the ongoing activities in the park but at the same time it maintains an integral position in the park for a facility like the children’s resource centre. this site is successful in the aspect that it captures all the essence of the park but it does not let any other activities in the park disrupt its presence.

water channel not used for boating

water channel used for boating

High intensity Noise generated by Traffic

Water Channel Usage

Water Channel Usage

The countries of the Asian Region are blessed with very rich, but varied vernacular architectural traditions that have evolved over the centuries. A commonality of these traditions runs throughout the Region* OBJECTIVES*: Drawing inspiration from the local building traditions of their own country, participating students are required to design a “Children’s Resource Centre”, an interactive, fun facility that educates the 21st century child on issues of ecology and sustainability and the preservation of related traditional knowledge and indigenous technologies.

Aerial View

The site finds itself in the heart of the central park with a scurry of human activity but also finds itself distancing itself at the same time from the crowd to establish a congenial atmosphere for the students.

n-e

n-w

Sun Path

Seating Patterns

Cafeterias

Site context

In Winters In Summers

* Directly from the preamble

Sound Impact

Commercial Open Space

Residential

Human Influx

High intensity human influx is seen around the center because of the presence of the boating facility provided in one of the channels


Design Development: Concept

Design Development: Climatic and Programmatic Integration. Climate: Lying between 31°15—31°45 N and 74°01—74°39 E Lahore features a hot semi-arid climate with rainy, long and extremely hot summers, dry and warm winters, a monsoon and dust storms. Stack Affect The weather of Lahore is extreme during the months of Warm air rises due to difference in May, June and July, when the air density and cool air flows in from the windows. temperatures soar to 40–48 °C. From late June till August, the monsoon seasons starts, with heavy rainfallCourtyard Affect throughout the province. Cold air because its heavier sinks while the hot air rises iniating a conventional current of air circulaRadiative Cooling tion

Architecture has always been a form of human reflection. IT has been an outlet for the architect to instill his inmost emotions and his experiences. My journey to these various parts of Lahore was to find how architecture and the people confined in that space connect with their human spirit. How people by being part of a certain seies of events in that space manage to completely alter and uplift their human spirit. Whether it’s the passion ignited in the hearts of people at the gate closing ceremony in Wagah Border. The Tranquility experienced at the Badshahi Mosque in the midst of the lively walled city or the sudden rush of life infused in a child as he dives in the LAhore Canal abandoning the scorching summer sun albeit temporarily. My experiences would lead me to design space for children elevating the human spirit and aspiring humility and passion.

vegetation lightweight soil filter mat drainage layer root barrier waterproof membrane

green roof

the sloping roofs of the park will drain the cool air to the courtyard.

Conclusions: Considering the climatic considerations the building will be mostly underground with a semi-open courtyard with natural air ventilation circulating through the premises. A Qanat system used by the Persians traditionally is used in a contemporary way to used geothermal properties of the ground to cool the hot air from above by a channel of underground shafts to cool the building with natural air

Zoning and Circulation Diagrams


Architectural Drawings

Architectural Drawings

As one walks down the steps inside the building, they pass the water wall that acts as a natural coolant with the air passing through it.

11.5 m

reception 0m

the buidling is underground so there is no direct heat gain from the sun thereby resulting in significant drop in temperatures. All rooms have access to the open courtyard for continuous air circulation.

Sections

5.5 m

The building is submerged and blended harmoniously with the small slopes of the park. It preserves the slopes for the children activity while providing a new activity underneath.

administration -5.2 m

wn do

Underground Cooling System

-2.4 m 8.1m

storage

exhibition

-5.0 m

-4.9 m

Congregation Space -5.2 m

the hot air gets cooler when it goes below ground and its propelled by fans and channeled across the shafts to the various rooms of the resource centre

13.2m 12.31m

13.4m

av room -5.0 m

bathroom -5.2 m

maintenance 4.67m

library -4.9 m

The hot air from above ground trapped by the on ground wind catchers positioned on ground level

4.72m

PLAN 14.84m

The library with the help of retaining glass wall allows the water channel to flow above it allowing natural light filtering in through the water.

the red arrows represent the incoming air taken in from the o-o’ level and and they’re taken 28’ below ground level by a ‘qanat’ system here the air is cooled down by addition of filter pads and the relatively cool temperature of the earth. the effeciency of the ystem is increased by fans which blows the cool air by an extensive layout of ducts and exit into the interior rooms showed by the blue arrows.


3-D Visualizations

3-D Visualizations

Exterior View, the resource center is submerged harmoniously with the contours of the park

The sub-level circulat courtyard a place of unison for the students and faculty: an event space

Another Exterior view highlighting the proximity of the surface with boating portion of the lake.


Professional Projects

(2010)


Site Context & Analysis

Flood Rehabilitation Housing Layyah, Punjab Winter, 2010 duration: 7 weeks Layyah Layyah

Population Affected compared Globally

Pakistan After completing 2 successful housing schemes in the adversely affected areas. Tameer Pakistan went on to rehabilitate the affectees from nearby villages comprised in the Layyah District.

Source: The Web

Damage Inflicted on Housing (by dist.)

Pakistan Earthquake 2005 - 3,500,000

Source: Dawn

Punjab

Above 15,000

Katrina Cyclone - 500,000

1,001-15,000

Nargis Cyclone - 2,420,000

501-1000

Tsunami Indian Ocean Basin - 2,273,723

101-501

Research on existing clusters and villages* The Jul 2010 Flooding of the River Indus caused widespread devastation to the adjoining areas of the river basin. More than a million people were affected and thousands were killed. This crisis gave way to an acute housing shortage in the nearby villages. Charitable organizations like Tameer Pakistan and the Al khair Foundation rose to the humanitarian aid efforts and provided temporary relief camps to the various flood affected people in the district of Layyah after successfully starting a housing society in the more adversely affected areas. A masterplan was developed keeping in mind the culture and livelihood of the people from the surrounding villages and an effort was made to rehabilitate and revitalize the living standards of the people affected by this crisis.

Pakistan Flood 2010 - 14,751,885

pakka house with I beam and timber roof frame Place for Cattle and parking private tractors and carts kacha house made with thatch and mud Semi-kacha house

The houses that were made in local materials like thatch and timber roof could not survive the intensity of the flood and collapsed under the pressure and relatively affluent people in that society who had houses with fired brick supported with I section girders survived the flood. The villagers prefer living in introverted clusters and the settlements comprising 15-29 houses are relatively homogenous as the caste or the family name is prevalent in each settlement. A challenge to us as designers was to accomodate this homogeniety into a heterogenous society of 400 different families.

Aerial View of Mauza Binda Milana Village

Section A typical village/cluster settlement surrounding multan & Layyah

The section clearly represents the skyline of a typical cluster where we can usually find adobes thatch made with mud and timber. These houses are not sustainable in crises. * This research is from a study done by the students and faculty of NCA over the Flood Affected Villages.


Objectives for the Final Masterplan

Project Requirements The Site

+ +

Street Sections

- ALL VEHICLES

or 400 Houses in 36 Acres 400 Houses in

Site Area - 36 Acres Single unit House - 860 sqft 400 Units Hospital Polytechnic Insititute for Men & Women Bio-Gas Treatment Facitility Cattle yard for 25-30 cattle for ever cluster A Grand Mosque

Kacha Road

440’

1980’

+

Site Area -

The site is 3.2 km away from the district of layyah. This new scheme would expect to have a symbiotic relationship with the the district of layyah (the nearest town center). Since most people lost their farmlands they would go seek employment in urban centers. For that they would require various amount of skills. The housing scheme stresses on providing employment for skilled and unskilled labour by their various technical programs. primary road

Irrigationsqft Canal 1,288,658

990’

An introverted space with an open shared ground in front, following the “eyes on th street” concept where the families can watch the children and their cattle allday long while they go on do daily chores.

RBL co. already had the single unit devised through their previous flood rehabilitation projects so they did not want to alter the previous unit.

440’

Single Unit

Stabalized Mud-Cement Plaster on Precast RCC slab 2’ x 4’ on Precast RCC Beam 14’ by 9”

Hillocks

30’- 0” secondary road -

CARS PEDESTRIANS CARTS CATTLE 15’- 0”

Irrigation Channel

30 feet metalled Road

440’

Existing Site Features

40’

Main Entrance

Direct Sun Heat Gain 21’-6”

Since the majority of these people spend their time outdoors so we need to be particular about how to accomodate their activities outdoors. Spaces need to be contingent allowing for chanced encounters.

The houses with the 4.5 “ thick walls are stacked next to each other on both sides combining their thermal mass to resist summer temperatures which go up to 45 deg. C in the months of June and July. This respite with natural vegetation and naturally stabalized local materials. We aim to ease the summer temperatures so that they lie within the comfort zone of the residents.

Thermal Mass Increased by Stacking units next to each other.

Open courtyards are the most used spaces in the lives of the residents and this is where they cook do most of their chores and usually sleep at night.

43’-0”

Two Units Joined Together

40’-0”


Masterplan

3-D Visualizations 880’

Empty Plot for informal commercial activities

990’

Grand Mosque

Chopal Community Centre

1980’

Bio-Gas Treatment Facilties

Commercial Centre

Cattle Yards

Open Space Surrounded by a Cluster of Houses

Learning & Education Facilities

Scale:

50’

150’

Health Facilities

250’

440’

- The community centre and mosque are within 4 minute walking radius of the residents. - the health care facilities and education facilities are provided near the entrance for outside use so that residential activity does not get disrupted. - Balanced distribuition of built-unbuilt ratio is kept in mind to preserve the lifestyle and culture of residents. - A state of the art bio-Gas treatment plant will provide employment and also provide natural gas for cooking,heating made by the local cattle. - Spaces provided for unplanned and contingent activities.


Copyrights: Fawad Nadir Osman, 2012


Portfolio 2012