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FASHION REVOLUTION | FASHION TRANSPARENCY INDEX 2019

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GOVERNMENTS AND POLICYMAKERS Fashion Revolution believes that laws and regulations are key to transforming the fashion industry. There are plenty of international standards set by the United Nations and related bodies such as the International Labor Organisation, and many countries actually have living wages, workers rights and environmental protections written into their Constitutions. However, enforcement of existing laws is often absent, implementation is weak and there is little opportunity to address violations though the courts. This needs to change. Transparency is beginning to become subject to legislation. For example, in the UK, companies must now disclose their gender pay gap. France passed a law in 2017 which requires corporations to assess and address the adverse impacts of their activities on people and the planet, by having them publish annual, public vigilance plans. This includes impacts linked to their own activities, those of companies under their control, and those of suppliers and subcontractors,

with whom they have an established commercial relationship. The UK Modern Slavery Act and California’s Transparency in Supply Chains Act require companies to disclose their efforts to eradicate human trafficking and slavery from their supply chains. Similar legislation was recently passed in Australia, and in 2016 the U.S. banned the import of goods made by child and forced labour. The European Union is currently discussing a number of measures that would legally require companies to carry out risk-assessments across their supply chains. This builds upon the 2014 EU Directive which requires the disclosure of non-financial and diversity information by large companies. We hope the findings of the Fashion Transparency Index demonstrate the urgent need for stronger mandatory due diligence and transparent reporting from major fashion brands and retailers. Your constituents deserve to know that the clothes and shoes they buy and wear have not contributed to human exploitation and environmental degradation.

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We ask that governments and policymakers take action in several key ways: Legislate  and support transparency — i.e. mandatory due diligence and standardised disclosure by brands on human rights and environmental issues;


Better implement and enforce existing laws that are meant to protect workers and the environment everywhere;

 Make companies at home liable for human rights and environmental harms caused directly or by business partners across its global supply chain, if companies fail to take effective measures to stop harms materialising in the first place.

Profile for Fashion Revolution

Fashion Transparency Index 2019  

A review of 200 of the biggest global fashion brands and retailers ranked according to how much they disclose about their social and environ...

Fashion Transparency Index 2019  

A review of 200 of the biggest global fashion brands and retailers ranked according to how much they disclose about their social and environ...