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FASHION REVOLUTION | FASHION TRANSPARENCY INDEX 2019

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5. SPOTLIGHT ISSUES IMPLICATIONS leading fashion brands are sharing about their climate impacts, so we looked to see if brands are publishing their carbon and water footprints as well as their use of renewable energy.

Carbon footprint We found that 55% of brands are publishing the annual carbon footprint or greenhouse gas emissions in the company's owned and operated facilities, but only 19.5% of brands are publishing the carbon footprint in their supply chain, where over 50% of the industry’s emissions occur, according to Quantis.

Renewable energy use 35% of brands are disclosing the percentage of renewable energy they’re using in the company’s owned and operated facilities but only 6% share the percentage of renewable energy use in the supply chain. We noticed that many brands are actually disclosing data on reductions in the amount of energy used in their operations and supply chains, but this was not measured by our methodology this year.

Water footprint 30.5% of brands are publishing the annual water footprint in company’s owned and operated facilities, 14% of brands share this data at manufacturing and/or processing facility level and just 4% of brands share water footprint data at fibre production and/or raw material level.

Integrating environmental impacts into the bottom line Furthermore, just 7 brands (3.5% out of 200) map environmental impacts directly to their financial statements. Kering Group’s Environmental Profit & Loss report is still the best example of how this can be done. Perhaps as the work of the UN’s Fashion Industry Charter for Climate Action progresses, we will see more brands start to disclose their carbon footprint, use of renewable energy and other environmental footprints and impacts.

Examples of good practice in transparency Adidas and Reebok’s Green Company Performance Analysis report is impressive. It covers 64 corporate sites, tracking performance in energy, carbon emissions, water consumption and waste reductions. They even disclose detailed breakdowns of energy usage, carbon emissions and water usage per facility. Esprit (pages 55 to 61) offers an interesting detailed breakdown of its carbon footprint from its office, shipments and business travel. Burberry gives a detailed breakdown of the company’s carbon emissions, energy consumption coming from renewable sources and water used in its UK offices and manufacturing sites. C&A provides comprehensive data on its year-on-year water footprint looking at green (rainfall used to grow plants), grey (pollution) and blue water (fresh or ground sources used to grow crops). C&A also details its water footprint across the product lifecycle from design through to consumer use.

Most impressive of all is Kering Group’s Environmental Profit & Loss report (who owns Gucci, Bottega Veneta and Saint Laurent), which extensively measures the company’s contribution to air pollution, land use, waste, water consumption and water pollution from raw material production to its stores, warehouses and offices.

75% of consumers said it is important for brands to protect the environment at every stage of making their products. Fashion Revolution Consumer Survey 2018

Profile for Fashion Revolution

Fashion Transparency Index 2019  

A review of 200 of the biggest global fashion brands and retailers ranked according to how much they disclose about their social and environ...

Fashion Transparency Index 2019  

A review of 200 of the biggest global fashion brands and retailers ranked according to how much they disclose about their social and environ...