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FASHION REVOLUTION | FASHION TRANSPARENCY INDEX 2019

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3. TRACEABILITY IMPLICATIONS

Major fashion brands are making significant progress when it comes to disclosing their suppliers publicly. When we first started conducting the Fashion Transparency Index report in 2016, only 5 of the 40 brands (12.5%) we reviewed were publishing their first-tier suppliers and now 70 brands (35%) out of 200 brands are publishing their first-tier suppliers.

Publishing supplier lists is becoming a new norm 70 brands (35%) are publishing a list of the first-tier manufacturers. Last year 55 brands (37%) of the 150 brands reviewed were publishing their first-tier suppliers. Although the percentage has slightly decreased this year, the number of brands publishing is still notably higher. We hope that a higher number of the brands new to the Index this year will decide to publish their first-tier suppliers in time for the 2020 edition. In addition, 38 brands (19%) are disclosing their processing facilities, where ginning and spinning, wet

processing, embroidering, printing, finishing, dye-houses, laundering often takes place in 2019. This is an increase from last year where 27 brands (18%) of the 150 brands reviewed were publishing this information.

More brands are disclosing raw material suppliers And finally, where we have seen the most significant new disclosure in this section in 2019 is brands publishing their raw material suppliers. 10 brands (5%) are disclosing some of the facilities or farms supplying their fibres such as viscose, cotton and wool. This is a significant increase from 2018 where only one brand disclosed this information and no brands shared this information in 2017 or 2016.

and Esprit as well as The North Face, Timberland, Vans, Wrangler (all owned by VF Corp) and Converse, Jordan and Nike (all owned by Nike, Inc.) — each scoring in the 61-80% ranges. Notably, Hugo Boss and Hermès are the only premium and luxury brands publishing a supplier list. This year the average score in the traceability section is 12% amongst the 200 brands reviewed, an increase from 11% amongst the 150 brands reviewed last year. Encouragingly, if we look at the 150 brands that were reviewed last year and again in 2019, we see a 4% increase in their average score, despite the fact that some of the indicators are more ambitious this year. If we look at the 98 brands reviewed in 2017, 2018 and 2019 then we see an increase in average score by 7% in this section.

Good progress being made but most premium and luxury brands still not disclosing suppliers

A few more things to note

The highest scoring brands on traceability this year are Patagonia

We have designed the methodology to align with the requirements of the Transparency Pledge, a campaign

run by a coalition including Clean Clothes Campaign, Human Rights Watch, IndustriALL Global Union, the International Corporate Accountability Roundtable, the International Labor Rights Forum, the International Trade Union Confederation, the Maquila Solidarity Network, UNI Global Union, and the Worker Rights Consortium, in 2017 and 2018. We looked for additional data to be shared on brands’ supplier lists that go beyond the Transparency Pledge, including gender breakdown and percentage of migrant workers for each facility. This year we were also looking to see if brands’ supplier lists include whether each facility has a trade union or worker committee in place. Only 2% of brands include whether each first-tier supplier facility has a trade union or worker committee. 9% of brands include the gender breakdown and just 2% of brands include the percentage of migrant workers for each first-tier facility.

Profile for Fashion Revolution

Fashion Transparency Index 2019  

A review of 200 of the biggest global fashion brands and retailers ranked according to how much they disclose about their social and environ...

Fashion Transparency Index 2019  

A review of 200 of the biggest global fashion brands and retailers ranked according to how much they disclose about their social and environ...