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FASHION REVOLUTION | FASHION TRANSPARENCY INDEX 2019

A brand might place an order with one supplier, who in turn subcontracts the work to another facility if they need to meet a short deadline or require a special process to be done. This happens regularly across the industry and makes it extremely difficult to monitor human rights and environmental impacts. Unauthorised subcontracting causes workers to become effectively invisible in the supply chain, and this is where the highest risk of human rights violations and environmental degradation tends to occur. But these subcontracted facilities are not the only places where poor conditions persist - sometimes it’s right under our noses in factories and communities close to home too.

Transparency as the first step towards change Right after the Rana Plaza factory collapse happened, it became very clear to us that the fashion industry needed urgent, transformative change, and that the first vital step towards this change required far greater visibility and transparency of the people working in supply chains, the business relationships at play across supply chains and information about working conditions and environmental impacts.

Progress is happening but it is still difficult to know #whomademyclothes Of course, much has changed since Rana Plaza, especially in Bangladesh. Many factories have been upgraded, and with all the attention on Bangladesh since then, some very real and positive progress has been made towards improving working conditions. However, not enough has changed in global fashion supply chains and business practices on the whole across the industry are still very secretive. It is extremely challenging, if not almost impossible, for a consumer to find out where their clothes have been made, by whom and under what conditions — which means it is hugely difficult to know what real-world impacts, both positive and negative, our clothing purchases are having on people’s lives and on the environment. This is why we are still calling for a revolution of the fashion industry. Never again should a tragedy like Rana Plaza happen, yet factory fires, safety accidents and faulty buildings continue to harm people in the places where our clothes are made. The women who make our clothes continue to face

Profile for Fashion Revolution

Fashion Transparency Index 2019  

A review of 200 of the biggest global fashion brands and retailers ranked according to how much they disclose about their social and environ...

Fashion Transparency Index 2019  

A review of 200 of the biggest global fashion brands and retailers ranked according to how much they disclose about their social and environ...