Page 1

Malouf’s Forum/The Substance of Style/FW 2016/17

ARCHITECTURE OF STYLE

THE INTERSECTION OF FORM & FUNCTION

MENSWEAR RULES! WHAT’S IN STORE?

UP-AND-COMING DESIGNERS, SPECIAL SERVICES AND MORE


CONTENTS

Malouf’s Kingsgate Center 8201 Quaker Avenue #106 Lubbock, TX 79424 806-794-9500

Southlake Town Square 190 State Street

56

Southlake, TX 76092 817-416-7100 EDITOR-IN-CHIEF

Karen Alberg Grossman DESIGN DIRECTOR

Hans Gschliesser MANAGING EDITOR

Jillian LaRochelle PROJECT MANAGER

Lisa Montemorra DESIGNER

Jean-Nicole Venditti CONCEPT DIRECTORS

Andrew Mitchell, Russ Mitchell

38

MERCHANDISING DIRECTOR

Bob Mitchell DIRECTOR OF PRODUCTION

FEATURES 8 24 26 28 30 34

Peg Eadie DIRECTOR OF PREPRESS

John Frascone

Our Point of View: Meet the Team Peter Millar: Head to Toe PT01: The World’s Best Pants We Norwegians: Cool Climate Jonathan Simkhai: In His Own Words Why a Multi-Brand Store?

BUSINESS JOURNALS FASHION GROUP PUBLISHER

Stuart Nifoussi CHIEF FINANCIAL OFFICER

Christine Sullivan

APPAREL FORUM

FASHION 32 Quality: Hallmarks of Top Tailoring 42 Menswear Rules 48 Architecture of Style

DEPARTMENTS 1 4 6 20 36 38 56 60 62 64 66 68

Welcome Letter Ask Forum for Him Ask Forum for Her Designers: The Giving Season Man of Style: Anthony Whitaker The Fashion Forum Travel: Grand Velas Riviera Nayarit Food: Multicultural Cuisine Spirits: Inventive Drinking Wheels: Autonomous Vehicles Essay: The Card Game At Your Service

Andrisen Morton DENVER, CO Garys NEWPORT BEACH, CA Hubert White MINNEAPOLIS, MN Kilgore Trout CLEVELAND, OH Larrimor’s PITTSBURGH, PA

43

Malouf’s LUBBOCK/SOUTHLAKE, TX Marios PORTLAND, OR / SEATTLE, WA Mitchells WESTPORT, CT / HUNTINGTON, NY Mitchells/Richards GREENWICH, CT Oak Hall MEMPHIS, TN Rodes LOUISVILLE, KY Rubensteins NEW ORLEANS, LA Stanley Korshak DALLAS, TX Wilkes Bashford SAN FRAN/PALO ALTO, CA FASHION FORUM MAGAZINE IS PUBLISHED IN 11 REGIONAL EDITIONS FOR MEMBER STORES OF THE APPAREL FORUM © 2016. PUBLISHED BY BUSINESS JOURNALS, INC, P.O. BOX 5550, NORWALK, CT 06856, 203-853-6015 • FAX: 203-852-8175; ADVERTISING

26

OFFICE: 1384 BROADWAY, NY, NY 10018-6108, 212-686-4412 • FAX: 212-686-6821; ALL RIGHTS RESERVED. THE PUBLISHERS ACCEPT NO RESPONSIBILITIES FOR ADVERTISERS CLAIMS, UNSOLICITED MANUSCRIPTS OR OTHER MATERIALS. NO PART OF THIS MAGAZINE MAY BE REPRODUCED WITHOUT WRITTEN PERMISSION OF THE PUBLISHERS. VOLUME 19, ISSUE 2. PRINTED IN THE U.S.A.


© D.Y U RM A N 2016


ask

FALL 2016 FASHION TIPS FOR HIM My girlfriend tells me I’m in a I have a friend who buys “fashion rut,” that my custom suits from a Chinese wardrobe is both boring and dated. maker who periodically shows at (I wear mostly khakis and nice local hotels. Can this be a reliable button down shirts.) How do I source for good clothing? Probably not. Anyone with a tape update my look?

Q:

Q:

Personal style is about knowing yourself, your comfort zone and the image you want to project. Here are a few easy suggestions: 1) Throw on a soft sportcoat or cardigan: it adds instant “attitude,” requires no special fashion savvy and gives you pockets to keep stuff. If you dare, try a printed silk square in the pocket of the sportcoat. (No need to fuss with it: our sellers will show you the most simple folds.) 2) Instead of your basic khakis, try five-pocket pants in luxury fabrics with stretch. These are comfortable, fashionable and the fit is amazing. 3) Invest in a great leather belt. 4) Consider a custom shirt. They’re not much more expensive than regular shirts, but they’re a lot sexier. 5) Call us and make an appointment for a closet update; we’ll send over one of our personal shoppers. There’s no pressure to buy, just great ideas to upgrade and update your wardrobe for a fashionable fall/winter ’16.

measure and a few swatches can call himself a custom clothier; the critical issues are the accuracy of the measurements, the quality of the suit (fabric, interlinings, construction) and what recourse you have if you’re not satisfied. The advantages of buying custom clothing from an independent menswear store are many: a vast selection of made-to-measure options from the finest brands; expert in-house tailors for accurate adjustments; and guaranteed top quality. For what’s the point of having a suit that fits if the fabric is inferior, or if the interlinings are glued rather than sewn? (And try tracking them down in Hong Kong when your “custom” suit comes back from the dry cleaner with ripples…) As always: caveat emptor.

4

Yes! We love various shades of brown and tan with dark suits: it’s perfectly appropriate, and very Italian!

IMAGE BY DAVID ARKY

Q:

Can I wear brown shoes with black, navy or gray suits?


designers

THE GIVING SEASON OUR FAVORITE DESIGNERS OPEN THEIR HEARTS (AND WALLETS) TO AN ARRAY OF CHARITABLE CAUSES.

BRUNELLO CUCINELLI, BRUNELLO CUCINELLI

BY JILLIAN LAROCHELLE

“My vision first and foremost has always been to create a company based on human dignity. Eight years ago, my wife and I created the Brunello and Federica Cucinelli Foundation to nourish the humanist aspirations born in Solomeo. Through art and aca-

ARNOLD SILVERSTONE, SAMUELSOHN

demics we have put emphasis on creating a work environment

“Recently established in memory of our executive chairman, The

full of life and inspiration.

Lawrence Pollack Foundation will be the main philanthropic endeavor

“I felt in order to create a

for Luxury Men’s Apparel Group and its companies, which include

beautiful product, my employees

Samuelsohn and Hickey Freeman Tailored Clothing. The primary

needed to be working in a beau-

focus will be on children in need—both those with special needs as

tiful place, where their creativity

well as those with financial needs.

could flourish. Solomeo is the

“Just last year, with Lawrence as the key

heart of where we work and

catalyst, we contributed a large gift to

where product is created. The

Make-A-Wish Foundation and it filled

environment is tranquil and

Lawrence with joy. Since his pass-

serene. It is important to me that

ing in April, we’ve raised funds

our employees work in a place

towards ambucycles in Israel.

rich with history, beauty and

The ambucycle program pro-

humanity. The Foundation aims to have a direct influence on

vides initial response in emer-

human values, understood as being the relationship between peo-

gencies until first respon-

ple and various activities in society.

ders arrive.

“The Foundation’s first project was the Forum of the Arts, which

“The Lawrence Pollack

began with the creation of a theatre. The theatre allows art, culture

Foundation and asso-

and spirituality to come together in a place that encourages

ciated events are cur-

absolute freedom of thought and religion and continues toward the

rently in develop-

development of human knowledge. We also created the academy,

ment. Once there is

which is a library home to ancient and modern texts. Our most

more specific infor-

recent development, “A Project for Beauty,” is dedicated to reviv-

mation, we will share

ing the land of Umbria surrounding Solomeo and creating parks

through our company

dedicated to youth, agriculture and beauty. The Foundation allows

websites. We hope you will

us to work for a higher purpose: a personal well-being in order to

join us in making a difference

enhance the beauty of the world.

in children’s lives, here in

“No act of kindness is too small if it will improve the life and

North America and abroad,

growth of people.”

on an ongoing basis.”

20


SEBASTIAN DOLLINGER, ETON “Médecins Sans Frontières (Doctors Without Borders) is something that I have supported since I was 19. I read about their work in a Swedish newspaper and that they were almost out of funds, and I was horrified. So, I donate 500

ADAM DERRICK, TO BOOT NEW YORK

SEK (approximately $55 USD) every month,

“Among the causes I support, several LGBTQ charities are among my near-

and have been doing

est and dearest. In particular I have come to appreciate and support the

so for the past 14 years.

work of the attorneys at Lambda Legal. They’ve taken on the legal cases

“Forum readers can

that have won rulings supporting gay marriage; workplace and housing

easily help out: start by visiting doctorswithoutborders.org

non-discrimination; rights for LGBTQ kids; and securing rights for trans-

and get involved in this fantastic charity. I think emer-

gender men and women. This is a time of positive change in America for

gency aid to people affected by armed conflicts, epidemics,

these issues, and these rights must be fought for and won in the courts to

health care exclusion and natural or manmade disasters

become legal precedent.

should stir everyone to help. Every little bit of support—

“My husband and I became aware and got involved with Lambda Legal through Andrew Mitchell (of Mitchell Stores, part of the Forum Apparel

even if it’s just $5 a month—is appreciated because together we make a big difference.”

Group), who has been a tireless advocate for the organization and many other charities. Every year we, and To Boot New York, help Andrew and the Mitchell family sponsor an event called Connecticut Cares, which attracts a great, energy-filled crowd from all walks of life, united in their desire for a more free, more fair America for all, including LGBTQ people.”

BOB CORLISS, ROBERT TALBOTT “The Robert and Audrey Talbott Foundation works with local charities in the Monterey, California area, but for a more global perspective, I’ve always been passionate about the St. Jude Children’s Research Hospital, and ALSAC, their fundraising arm. Those with the smallest voice and the least ability to pay—sick children—are the most noted and cared for at St. Jude. They don’t discriminate at all, and the organization has a global reach. “They started an amazing program called “Thanks And Giving” that, during the holidays, focuses attention on raising money to fight childhood cancer and other life-threatening diseases. Earlier in my career they partnered with the retail community, and I’ve worked with them when I can ever since. We are looking forward to expanding Robert Talbott’s relationship with St. Jude very soon. “I would encourage Forum readers to support this worthy cause. Cancer research and treatment is expensive, so any time you can, send a donation and support the businesses that support St. Jude during the holidays. It will take $1 billion to operate St. Jude this year and most of those funds must be raised through individual contributions. Visit stjude.org to contribute and learn more about ways to help them in the fight to end childhood cancer.”

22


profile

PETER MILLAR HAS FOUND SUCCESS BY OFFERING A FULL RANGE OF QUALITY MENSWEAR OPTIONS. BY BRIAN SCOTT LIPTON attending a cocktail party. The truth is, what we really want is for our customer to wear at least one piece of Peter Millar every day.” While that sounds like a tall order, there are plenty of men who do just that. “People really like wearing our clothes; that’s what we hear from our stores,” says Mahoney. “And it’s fine if that’s just a shirt, or if it’s a suit. Seeing someone in Peter Millar is validation for everything we do.” Clearly, the company works incredibly hard to keep its customers interested. “We visit mills all around the world, we use factories from Europe and the Far East who work quickly, and we keep on top of fresh ideas so that we can always have exciting new products for our specialty store cus-

HEAD TO TOE It all started with a cashmere sweater and a lawn bowling ball. Such are the origins of Peter Millar, which began 15 years ago producing the former and taking its name from the latter. Since then, it has grown into one of the most successful men’s apparel brands, offering up a wide range of tailored clothing, casual sportswear, and luxury and performance golf attire. “The breadth of the brand today is one of our success secrets,” says Scott Mahoney, chairman and CEO. “We believe that a man can be dressed head to toe our in clothes for the entire day, whether they’re in business, playing golf, or

tomers,” he says. That doesn’t mean, however, that the company is obsessed by what’s “hot.” “We don’t chase trends,” says president Scott Ruerup. “Being based in Raleigh-Durham, North Carolina, we’re not jaded and don’t let ourselves be guided by the whims of one group of people. We know we have lots of different types of consumers, and our job is to serve them.” Indeed, Peter Millar takes great pride in doing whatever it takes to keep its clients happy. “There’s an incredible culture in our company about customer service,” says Ruerup. “We can do 24-to-48-hour turnaround on special orders. We can ship one pair of pants if we have to. We appreciate every sale. We take nothing for granted.” Moreover, as Ruerup points out, they have continued to supply product to the same upscale specialty stores and golf clubs year after year, often creating lifelong partnerships. “That’s one of our biggest messages, that our distribution does not change,” he says. “We’re not like other brands, and we don’t want to be.”

24


LOWELL SHEARLING

©2016 A Genesco Company

BECCA

F A L L 2 016 C O LLE CT I O N


profile

A CHAT WITH MARIO STEFANO MARAN, EVP OF PANTALONI TORINO USA. BY KAREN ALBERG GROSSMAN t’s been said PT01 makes the world’s best pants; what substantiates this claim? It’s largely about our unique heritage, our tailoring and our technology. Our ongoing research, which is a part of our brand DNA, inspires us to keep innovating. We are famous for breaking the rules and creating unique styles. We offer customers a collection of trousers that reflects the finest Italian tailoring and craftsmanship, as well as special details, amazing fabric options and (most importantly) a perfect fit.

The World’s

BEST PANTS

Please share a little about your history. In 1969 Pierangelo Fassino started manufacturing apparel, a major step for the Fassino family, which had been in the textiles business in Torino for three generations. When Pierangelo’s son Edoardo joined the company in the 1990s, the business went decidedly upscale. I was brought in in 2006 to direct the U.S. business, which currently represents 60 percent of global sales. We now have four flagship showrooms: Milan, Tokyo, Munich and NYC.

Tell us about the fall ’16 collection. It combines the historic DNA of American denim with Italian style and design. There are music influences and several different fits. Among the most directional is a carrot fit, which has some fullness on top narrowing to a slimmer leg. But we offer numerous fit options, from classic to contemporary, in styles from formal and elegant to casual and sporty.

What’s next for PT01? The recent listing on the Milan Stock Exchange represents a milestone for our company, allowing us to grow. Current goals include expanding our women’s collection, strengthening our presence in international markets, and investing in new product segments.

26


profile

FROM SKI SWEATERS TO LIGHTWEIGHT WOVENS, WE NORWEGIANS DESIGNS CLASSIC CREATIONS FOR ALL SEASONS. BY BRIAN SCOTT LIPTON

season after season. In fact, I love to see people wearing my clothes in ways or combinations that I haven’t thought of.” Indeed, Grane—who compares her working methods to those of architects and industrial designers— always keeps her customer in mind. “I try to make flattering shapes, rather than focus on the silhouettes that are in fashion right now,” she says. “Of course, they have to work in the time we live in, but they should not look outdated for next season, or even for next year. The idea is that you can add pieces to your We Norwegians wardrobe over time and make them work with what you already have.” For all these reasons, it’s hardly surprising that the brand is already taking off in America. But Grane also has her own theory. “Norwegians are practical and active people, and I feel we are more similar to Americans in that way than some of our fellow Europeans,” she says with a smile. “But the bottom line is that it’s good clothing that is made well, and that you will feel comfortable and look stylish at the same time.”

enmark has become famous for its mid-20th century modern furniture; Sweden is world-renowned for bringing us Ikea; and Finland—well, it’s produced a lot of heavy metal bands. And if Tove Grane (pictured at right) has anything to say about it, her homeland of Norway will soon become renowned across the globe for her two-year-old men’s and women’s collection, We Norwegians. Featuring wovens made of premium merino wool from Italy that can be worn year-round, the line is more than just skiwear. “We try to push the boundaries of the ‘traditional’ perception of what wool can be used for,” she notes. One of Grane’s primary considerations is the fabrics that go into every garment. “When I start working on a new season, I always start with the fabrics,” she says. “We use three different yarns, and with those yarns, we make three or four different fabrics. We spend a long time testing and developing each of them.” Grane also adds two or three new colors every season, and finds inspiration in Norwegian knitting prints and folk art. But her line, she stresses, is “the antithesis of disposable fashion. I have always loved basic garments that you can wear and style in different ways

28

STILL-LIFE IMAGES BY FINN BURROWS

Cool CLIMATE


profile

mom would bring all of her friends over to shop and buy my clothes. She still does!

How has life changed since you received the CFDA/Vogue Fashion Fund Award last year? It was an amazing experience and a dream come true for me. It provided the Jonathan Simkhai brand with fantastic exposure, as well as strong support from the fashion industry as a whole. Each season I try to move the brand forward and push myself creatively while at the same time remaining true to the brand’s DNA—creating beautiful clothing of impeccable quality and craftsmanship. It is a very special feeling to be recognized for something that I love to do.

In His

Let’s talk about your beautiful clothing! What can we expect from your fall 2016 collection? I am always inspired by architecture. The structures

OWN WORDS WE CAUGHT UP WITH JONATHAN SIMKHAI TO TALK INSPIRATION, ACCOLADES AND WHAT’S NEXT FROM HIS EPONYMOUS CLOTHING LINE.

Why did you decide to end your formal education and focus instead on gaining real-world experience? I briefly attended design school at both Parsons and FIT before deciding to launch my own brand; so while I do have some formal design training, I have always learned best by doing. I come from a family of entrepreneurs, who have instilled that spirit in me. My early retail experience provided me with invaluable insight into the bigger picture by giving me the opportunity to work directly with customers and learn what women really desired from their clothing. When I was launching the Jonathan Simkhai brand years later [in 2010], I was able to make informed decisions based on what I had learned as a womenswear buyer. Having formal design training is very helpful, of course, but it’s not the only path. Everyone should do what feels right for them.

Who are some of your mentors? I feel incredibly lucky to say that I have a tremendous support system. Michael Kors became my mentor through the CFDA/Vogue Fashion Fund. Having the opportunity to consult with an overwhelmingly successful and influential fashion designer is a true blessing. In life, my parents have always been such pillars of support. When I first launched the brand, my

30

that Santiago Calatrava creates are feats of both design and construction. Not only that, Calatrava thinks about and addresses every last detail, from the amount of natural light to the overall aesthetics of his structures. I have been familiar with his work for many years; but for this collection, I was particularly inspired by his bridges, because they are a balance of sleekness and strength. Each custom lace fabric was inspired by different design elements from these structures.

Tell us about the process of designing your own fabrics. Why is this so important to you? The fabrics are crucial to each collection. All are customized, whether it’s a custom color or completely original artwork. We always start with a concept, and then we gather a few basic motifs to expand on so that everything in the collection is of the same continuous theme. We tend to lean toward novelty fabrics and love finding new techniques to experiment with. Lace fabrics are so important to me because of the wide range of creative possibilities they offer—from creating different textures to cutting incredibly intricate designs. My family heritage plays a big part of it, as well. My grandfather owned a lace and embroidery factory in Iran in the 1970s, so I have always been surrounded by and exposed to this part of the fashion industry.

How do you want a woman to feel in your designs? I want every woman to feel like her best and most beautiful self. Confidence is key.


quality

Hallmarks of

TOP

TAILORING ROLL-PADDING provides spring and shape to the lapels.

HAND-SEWN ARMHOLES

create softness in the shoulder for comfort and a more natural shape.

FULLY BASTED CANVAS CHEST PIECE is labor-intensive but adds shape, fit and longevity to the garment.

HAND STITCHING

on all edges, flaps and collars provides a superior overall finish.

REAL HORSETAIL CANVAS is for added durability in the chest piece.

GENEROUS SEAM ALLOWANCES

BLIND STITCHING

32

IMAGE COURTESY OF SAMUELSOHN

create ease of tailoring should you gain (or lose) weight.

in the jacket vent and hem lining provides better lining fit and easier alterations.


One hundred years of excellence.

Handcrafted in America since 1916.


BY ANDREW MITCHELL-NAMDAR

OUR PHILOSOPHY ON WHY A MULTI-BRAND STORE LEADS TO A BETTER WARDROBE. Multiple designers. An edited

selection of hundreds of

assortment of clothing cus-

designers in our network, our

tomized to the lifestyles and

multi-brand store offers an

tastes of our customers and

opportunity to dress all in

the climate of our location.

one brand or mix many dif-

Associates that know you

ferent designers to create a

and how to put it all togeth-

truly signature look. Like your very own closet,

er. One-stop shopping!

our selling floors give you a

We believe the best way to build a well thought-out

chance to mix edgy with tra-

wardrobe is with the guid-

ditional, high with low or any

ance and expertise of a store

combination in between for a

with multiple brands. With a

look that’s all your own.

34


man of style

Steel STANDING MEET THE MAN BEHIND THIS ICONIC 9/11 PHOTOGRAPH. BY KAREN ALBERG GROSSMAN

nthony Whitaker was at his apartment in Harlem on September 11, 2001 when he got the call from his boss at Con Ed: he was needed downtown at the World Trade Center to ensure that first responders had power for their rescues. Subways weren’t running, so he walked many miles to get there. Nearly asphyxiated by heavy smoke, he repaired power lines in the Hot Zone, mesmerized by the haunting image in front of him: the skeletal remains of the South Tower. Overcome by this spiritual symbol of endurance and hope, he snapped a photo; days later, the building came down. So who is this man who shared his iconic 9/11 image with the world in order to establish a foundation (steelstanding.org) to help those confronting adversity? (Among the first beneficiaries: Homes for Our Troops.) Whitaker grew up in the Bronx, has always had a passion for ancient art, was an athlete as a teenager, launched a clothing line as a young man, and turned down a modeling career because his mother, a Jehovah’s Witness, disapproved. “She’s all about humility and spiritual pursuits vs. ego and material things. I’ve always admired her values; I could never disappoint her.” Still, based on an early foray into fashion design (he once won an award at a menswear trade show for “most promising new designer”), Whitaker is into clothes. He loves Zegna suits and Italian leather shoes; he owns literally hundreds of ties. And at 6’4’’ and a 44 long (“I’m not as fit as I once was…”), he looks great in whatever he wears. Whitaker is now completing work on a Steel Standing sculpture in steel and marble to be permanently displayed at the Pentagon this fall. Not just a man of style, this is a man of steel, a man of character.

36


the FASHION forum OH KEI!

I

f Canali’s Kei jacket has taken the fashion world by storm, it’s no surprise. As cozy and light as a knit garment, impeccably sharp, and so comfortable it can be worn year-round, this softly structured jacket is a masterpiece of Italian tailoring that can be appreciated (and worn) by men from every walk of life. And that’s exactly what Giorgio Canali had planned from the start: “When we created the Kei jacket, we didn’t have a specific customer in mind. We wanted something that would be timeless and appeal to many different types of men. The Kei strikes the perfect balance between comfort and style and can be dressed up or down depending on the occasion. It’s this level of versatility that makes it such a hit season after season.” Trust us: no closet should be without one!

PERFECTION PERSONIFIED

Wisdom of many sorts is dispensed in A.C. Phillips’ wonderful how-to guide, The Pocket Square: 22 Essential Folds. Each chapter (with such unforgettable titles as “The Guido Puff” or “Diamonds are Forever”) illustrates how to create one pocket square look perfect for any suit or sportcoat. Better still, each section is preceded by an aptly chosen quote from a style icon, ranging from playwright Oscar Wilde to actors Cary Grant and Jimmy Stewart to designers Hardy Amies, Tom Ford and Luciano Barbera. Best of all, there’s also a page with eight must-know “Etiquette” rules, including our favorite: “A gentleman should carry one square for show and another to blow.” Now this is what we call essential reading.

If there was any lingering question of the brilliance, innovation and craftsmanship of the late couturier Yves Saint Laurent, the new museum exhibition Yves Saint Laurent: The Perfection of Style (on view at the Seattle Art Museum from October 11 to January 16 before traveling to the Virginia Museum of Fine Arts on May 7) should put any doubts to rest. This multifaceted retrospective drawn from the collection of the Fondation Pierre Bergé-Yves Saint Laurent will shine a bright light on the designer’s genius. On view will be 100 of his greatest creations that span nearly 50 years— some never before seen in public—along with photographs, drawings and films that give insight into his particular process. Says curator Florence Muller: “The changes he progressively introduced into the traditional representation of the feminine and masculine bodies and the codes of seduction stand at the origin of the profound changes of contemporary ways of dress.” Truer words were never spoken.

38

THE FASHION FORUM WRITTEN BY BRIAN SCOTT LIPTON

Square Deal


The Fashion Forum

J

ohnny Cash wasn’t always the man in black. Don’t believe us? Just head to the Hard Rock Hotel Palm Springs, which not only has Cash’s signed green corduroy jacket on display, but such other fabulous fashions as Sammy Davis Jr.’s 1974 custom suit, a one-of-a-kind vinyl outfit worn by Cher, and Lady Gaga’s shiny silicon, silver wire and crystal dress. And through December 31, you can truly feel like a rock star by taking advantage of the Hard Rock’s “Amplified” package (available at all 23 of its hotels around the globe), which includes not just a personalized tour of the hotel’s memorabilia collection, but also a pre-reserved Fender guitar complete with floor amp and headphones, a special collectible pin and a limitededition hat. One visit here and any blues you have (Folsom Prison or otherwise) will be a long-forgotten memory.

SPRINGS AHEAD

40


MENSWEAR

RULES Back in the day, gentlemen seeking sartorial perfection had strict rules to follow— so many, in fact, that books were written to help them avoid embarrassing faux pas. Thankfully, the rules have relaxed, and these days well-dressed guys can rely on their intuition, their personal style and some sound suggestions from their favorite store associates. But as they say, you have to know the rules before you can break them. Here, our suggestions for upping your fashion quotient this fall. STYLING BY JOSEPH DEACETIS • PHOTOGRAPHY BY DAVID ARKY

42


THE BUZZ ON

BUTTONS ?????????????????????????????????????????????????????????

Sometimes, always, never: this rule tells you when to button the top, middle and bottom buttons on a threebutton suit. On two-button jackets, it’s always for the top and never for the bottom (except for sitting, when all buttons should be undone). Today’s bestselling suit is a two-button model, since its elongated V-neckline flatters almost any body type,

2


The consensus is that wider suit lapels flatter big guys, while thinner men can get away with narrow lapels. The notch lapel, shown at right, is a go-to option since it’s forgiving to most body types. Peak lapels, shown at left, add an element of power and strength. They’re trending on both singlebreasted and double-breasted models, while shawl collars are still reserved for tuxes and dinner jackets.

3

ROLEX/ TOM O’NEAL

LAPEL LOGIC


SOCK IT TO ME

Traditional menswear rules hold that socks should coordinate with your trouser, not your shoes, while contemporary sensibilities allow for a colored sock that complements something else in your outfit. Work your sock into the color scheme established by your shirt, sweater, or pocket square for a coordinated feel that leaves no detail overlooked.


NECKWEAR NOTES

ROLEX/ TOM O’NEAL

ROLEX/ TOM O’NEAL

A tie worn at the proper length helps to balance the proportion between your legs and torso. Squarebottom ties (common on knit styles) should end at the top of your belt buckle, while ties with pointed bottoms should hit around midbuckle.


Millennials are reshaping the rules of menswear for all age groups. Take a cue from the kids: don’t be afraid to mix textures and patterns, pair sportswear (even sneakers!) with tailored pieces, or break up your suits into separates.

MILLENNIAL MASH-UP

6


of

ARCHITECTURE

STYLE

Like iconic structures, well-designed clothing beckons to be “inhabited.” This fall, form, function & fabric converge for a season of unforgettable style.


PHOTOGRAPHY: BRIAN KLUTCH PRODUCT STYLING: ALEJANDRA SARMIENTO


INFRASTRUCTURE


FUNCTION

Those favorite pieces you can’t help wearing over and over again are easy on the eye, and just as importantly, easy to wear.


travel

A BEYOND-EXCLUSIVE ALL-INCLUSIVE, GRAND VELAS RIVIERA NAYARIT AMAZES AND DELIGHTS IN ENDLESS WAYS. BY KAREN ALBERG GROSSMAN

Luxury WITH SOUL

should have known this would be no ordinary holiday when I received a questionnaire from the resort a few days prior to my trip, an offer to “personalize my wellness experience.” If I would like my suite scented throughout my stay, would I prefer myrrh, lavender, cedar or tangerine? From the following selection of organic soaps, please select oats-bran-honey, agave, lavender or grapefruit-salt. Would I like to try a pillow and mattress with magnetic technology? Do I want my morning juice to be detox, antioxidant or energizing? Do I prefer my private fitness class in the gym or on my terrace overlooking the ocean? When would I like to schedule my Serenity Massage (on my terrace) and my hydrothermal ritual (in the 16,5000-sq.-ft. spa)? Would I prefer the resort’s award-winning restaurant menus, the spa cuisine menu, or a personalized menu created by the chef? Before I share my experience at the amazing Grand Velas resort (a AAA Five Diamond, all-inclusive Leading Hotel of the World on the Pacific near Puerto Vallarta, Mexico), let me preface by not-

56


AVAILABLE| 1470 N. Kimball Avenue | Southlake | $4,999,000

SOLD | 133 Welford Lane | Southlake | $1,059,000

Making a

Difference in

SOUTHLAKE SOLD | 100 Brentwood Circle | $949,000

972.523.9740 jkeoughan@briggsfreeman.com jameskeoughan.com

SOLD | 604 Clariden Ranch Road | Southlake | $849,000


sine, yoga, Pilates, Zumba and much more. But whether your desires lean toward wellness, decadence or laziness, the resort meets them all in style, in an ambiance that’s welcoming and steeped in natural beauty. The flowering landscaped gardens, the dramatic backdrop of the Sierra Madres, the legendary sunsets and, of course, the long stretch of pristine beach lining azure waters, all serve to comfort body and soul. We alternated floating in the warm gentle waves of the Pacific with dips in the magnificent three-tiered infinity pool, each section heated to a different degree. (Our favorite was the oceanfront tier with swim-up bar and superfriendly bartenders concocting delicious combinations of rum, vodka, pineapple, nutmeg and all sorts of intoxicating ingredients.) Grand Velas has won numerous awards from Conde Nast Traveler, Travel + Leisure, TripAdvisor, U.S. News & World Report and Forbes, which named it one of the Top Ten Coolest All-Inclusives. I can now confirm that it’s beyond cool: a blissful escape where one can’t help but relax, renew, resolve and thoroughly appreciate life’s blessings. Or as my husband observes, “If you enjoy being miserable, don’t stay here!”

ing that my husband and I are not “wellness” people. He is a perennially stressed-out CPA who has been trying to lose about 50 pounds for the past five years and enjoys being negative and grumpy. I live on coffee, wine and pasta and have not entered a gym in ages. A New Yorker by birth and disposition, I thrive on crowds and chaos: the prospect of a peaceful, soothing, sustaining respite intrigued but also terrified me. I needn’t have worried. Everything about Grand Velas—from the rooms (267 oceanview suites, some with private plunge pools) to the luxury amenities (an award-winning spa with 20 treatment suites and 30-plus spa treatments, many inspired by the native traditions of Mexico; fitness center; 24/7 in-suite service; water sports; tennis; baby concierge; Kids Club; teen lounge) to the personalized service (exceptional but not gratuitous) to the incredible restaurants (three of which have received AAA Four Diamond awards)—is pure perfection. Their wellness package includes a personal concierge, Serenity Massage (heaven!), personal training session, two-level oceanview suite with private hot tub on the rooftop level, in-suite training equipment (ours served as a perfect valet to hold wet swimwear), spa cui-

VELAS VARIETALS

IF YOU LOVE GRAND VELAS, CHECK OUT THESE TWO OTHER NEARBY VELAS RESORTS. Casa Velas is a luxury boutique hotel and fabulous ocean club (just minutes from the beach) for adults only, nestled on the greens of Marina Vallarta’s 18-hole golf course (golf fees are included in the all-inclusive package). Just five minutes from the airport and 15 minutes from the boardwalk, shops and art galleries of Puerto Vallarta, this upscale resort features 80 suites, many with private pools and hot tubs. Amenities include Spa Casa Velas (specializing in couples treatments) and a unique “handbag bar” where guests can borrow designer bags for the evening. Emiliano is their wonderful AAA Four Diamond restaurant; guests also enjoy dining privileges at Grand Velas. Velas Vallarta is a fabulous family all-inclusive located on 10 acres of oceanfront in Puerto Vallarta. Situated on the emerald waters of Banderas Bay, it offers 345 suites in three eight-story buildings, seaside spa cabins, a transformative spa, fitness center, multiple restaurants, nightly theme dinners, and an inviting lounge with live music. Eco-conscious at its core, the resort uses solar panels and protects/releases marine turtles. A recently renovated Kids Club features supervised activities for kids under 13 so their parents can hit the golf course, spa or any one of numerous excursions, including various adventure activities in the Sierra Madre mountains.

58


food THE JOYS OF CUSTOM CLOTHING MIGHT BE EXCEEDED ONLY BY THE JOYS OF CUSTOM COOKING. BY KAREN ALBERG GROSSMAN

Multicultural

CUISINE

n a recent trip to Montreal, we and the other member stores in the Forum Apparel Group were treated to a fabulous dinner, sponsored by Samuelsohn, created and curated by award-winning chef Antonio Park. In their book Montreal Cooks, Jonathan Cheung and Tays Spencer attribute Park’s talent to his unique heritage (South American and Korean) and his training (in Japan, where he studied with several masters at the Michiba culinary school). Park attributes it mostly to his mother, from whom he first learned about cooking. “She prepared everything from scratch using ingredients from the family’s one-acre backyard,” he explains. “She even dried and milled her own spices, fermented her own miso, and created her own soy sauce.” At his popular restaurant, Park, this modest and humble young man is famous for putting healthy spins on traditional dishes using natural foods like brown rice, quinoa, organic vegetables and vegan ingredients. “My current style of cooking features sustainable ingredients, using the whole product so there’s minimal waste in the kitchen,” Park tells us. “Because we are

what we eat, we should respect the ingredients we use.” As Cheung and Spencer write in their book: “With Kimchi and sashimi running through his veins, Antonio delivers some of the best Asian food in the city from his eponymous Westmount restaurant.” They also note that Park is one of few chefs in Canada to have his own private fish import license. But then there’s his father’s roots, the Argentinian connection, the meat-loving half of his heritage. In Park’s second restaurant, Lavanderia (featuring 30-foot walls and laundry lines hung with seasonal artwork), it’s all about tapas-style grilled meats (asada). Interestingly, the restaurant is named for the factory his father owned in Argentina that produced acid wash and stonewash finishes for top American denim brands. Lunchtime at the factory, a meal for hundreds of workers, often featured blood sausage, ribs, chorizo, sweetbreads, even a whole cow grilled over the roots of a mango tree. Asked what he does when he’s not working and what most inspires him, Park (a Chopped Canada winner and frequent TV contributor) admits that he’s always working. “But my main inspiration, since childhood, continues to be my mom.”

60


spirits

Inventive

DRINKING FROM HOUSE-MADE INGREDIENTS TO ORGANIC BOOZE, YOUR COCKTAIL, ELEVATED. BY ROBERT HAYNES-PETERSON s little as 15 years ago, even the top bars in the country relied on ingredients like store-bought sour mix, nuclearred maraschino cherries, and a variety of other chemicallaced mixers in their cocktails. Then about a decade ago, the rise of the “craft” cocktail speakeasy began. Now even your corner bartender is incorporating fresh ingredients, infusing his own simple syrup with rare vanilla bean, or adding cedar smoke to her whiskey. The elevation of the humble cocktail to a culinary work of art (and science) involves many steps: research and development, interaction with chefs, and a constant desire on the part of the bartender to explore local greenmarkets, ethnic specialty stores and century-old bar books for inspiration. “Not everything at the bar is what you can get in a store,” says Craig Ventrice, the bar manager at Kawa Ni, a Westport, Connecticut-based restaurant inspired by Japanese pubs. “There are house-made syrups and tinctures we do in the back, with ingredients Chef is using at the moment. It’s a process: it often takes a few failures to get a drink to work.” On the menu, you’ll find elements like mint-infused Campari, ginger-infused Fernet or smoked almond syrup. Even the casual Sake Bombs feature unlikely ingredients like Yuzu (an Asian citrus) or Thai chili syrup. Customizing and creativity in ingredients can approach “mad scientist” levels: At both 69 Colebrook Road in London and Booker + Dax in Manhattan, bartenders employ lab tools like rotovaps, centrifuges and high-tech heat pokers to clarify, re-distill or otherwise

62

manipulate ingredients. At SushiSamba London and New York, bartender Richard Woods has revitalized the Sex and the City-era drinks menu into a range of eye-catching (and delicious) “Culinary Cocktails” for the Instagram generation. Garnishes include whole peppers and Wagyu beef, while drinks are enhanced with ingredients like avocado puree and barely legal spices. “My role has always been creative,” says Woods, who gained fame as London’s “most imaginative bartender” at the bar/restaurant Duck and Waffle. “I worked with chefs at both Duck and Waffle and SushiSamba, so there is definitely a culinary element.” His delicious Tom Yam cocktail (cilantro vodka, pureed cilantro, serrano pepper, ginger and lemon, sashimi garnish), for example, is a riff on a classic Thai soup. Keeping up with the times, he recently added cold brew coffee cocktails and complex mocktails to the menu. Being creative isn’t enough anymore. A new wave of “conscientious cocktails”—featuring organic or sustainably produced spirits, locally procured ingredients or ecofriendly techniques—is spreading across the globe. In Chicago, Nandini Khaund of Cindy’s Rooftop has created the Howl at the Jun cocktail incorporating locally produced kombucha (a fermented honey tea). The cuisine at Lazy Bear in San Francisco is driven by seasonal produce from local growers, and bar manager Nicolas Torres reflects this in his drinks: a majority of the modifiers are made in-house, including black lime bitters, aquavit and a car acara shrub. Sourcing other ingredients is “all about relationships,” says Torres. “We want our suppliers to care about their craft as much as we do.”


MEPHISTO shoes with SOFT-AIR TECHNOLOGY:

For a comfortable and effortless walk. ELETTRA

VALENTINA

TOSCA


wheels

regulations that allow for totally autonomous vehicles. The mission of Rosekind’s group, the Self-Driving Coalition for Safer Streets, is to focus on public policy issues. (Other members include Volvo and ride-sharing companies Uber and Lyft.) More groups that support the development of autonomous cars include Mothers Against Drunk Driving, AARP and various associations for disabled persons. Automakers are already putting some self-driving features, like automatic braking and steering, into current models. There are three things

Autonomous Vehicles:

THE FUTURE IS NOW BY DAVID A. ROSE

he auto industry has evolved tremendously in the last decade. The day is coming soon when you will phone your car and have it pick you up at a designated location without a human driver. The world of autonomous vehicles is fast becoming a reality. Several companies have begun testing driverless cars, and unique alliances are being formed. One such alliance is Ford Motor Company and Google. Google has been at the forefront of testing driverless models and Ford is accelerating development of a wide range of autonomous vehicles. Ford’s chief executive, Mark Fields, has said that his company plans to form partnerships with other firms to assist with developing autonomous vehicles, while Google recently announced that it will also work with Fiat Chrysler Automobiles (FCA) to produce 100 autonomous versions of the 2017 Pacifica Hybrid minivan. They are planning a test program in four U.S. cities to begin at the end of this year. The U.S. government plans to expedite regulatory guidelines for autonomous vehicles and to invest in research to help bring them to market. The nation’s top auto safety regulator, Mark Rosekind, said the federal government was hopeful that driverless technology could reduce the annual death toll from traffic accidents. In 2014, the last year for which data was available, 32,675 people died in auto accidents, more than 90 percent of which were the result of bad decisions made by drivers. The coalition led by Ford and Google is urging swift passage of

required to turn a regular car into an automated one. First is a GPS system pretty much like the ones found in vehicles today. Second is a system to recognize dynamic conditions on the roads. Third is a way to turn the information from the two systems into action. Sensors feeding information into the differential GPS include cameras that let the car’s computers see what’s around it, radar that allows the vehicle to see up to 100 meters away in the dark, rain, snow, or other vision-impairing circumstances, and lasers that operate like spinning sirens to check for objects around your vehicle. There is hope that, in the future, all cars will be able to talk to each other in a connected vehicle environment. Your car would know precisely where other vehicles are, where they’re going, and where they will turn, so the computers can navigate smoothly. Clearly, the future has arrived.

64


Game

LAUGHTER AND CAMARADERIE IN A SERIOUS WORLD. BY WAYNE MAIBAUM ears ago, after a divorce, I moved to a nearby town and asked a colleague if he was interested in forming a poker game. I also asked a neighbor, an acquaintance I met at my daughter’s day care, a former coworker and a friend of a friend. When enough people showed interest, the game was on. Twenty-five years later, although players have come and gone, a core seven remain. I’m a semi-retired general dentist; Fedele is also a dentist, Stan an oral surgeon, Lloyd a professor of molecular biology, Jeff a CPA, Robert a television engineer and John a retired systems analyst. The group has some diversity: Stan is African-American and John, Chinese. We’ve played together so long that we implicitly know each other’s style, so it’s hard to bluff! We’ve learned to accept each other’s quirks and idiosyncrasies. We recall many of the same stories at each game. My favorite is about the time I bit into a hot pepper while eating a sub sandwich. The juice of the pepper squirted across the table and hit Fedele in the eye. He screamed like he’d been shot and, with one eye closed, ran to the nearest bathroom. Bending down to splash some water in his eye, he didn’t notice that Stan had recently installed a glass shelf above the sink. When he stood up, his head hit the shelf with a loud crash and he hobbled back to the card table with one hand pressing his eye and the other the top of his head. We couldn’t stop laughing. One game we play is called three-legged: the pot keeps growing until someone wins three hands. We have a sophisticated tracking system: each player marks his wins with cheese Combos or peanut

M&Ms; if you eat one, you lose it. Fedele’s brother was sitting in at a game one night and quite innocently put one of his markers in his mouth. One of the guys noticed and screamed out, “He’s eating it!” Hearing this, Fedele’s brother urgently spit the candy across the room, certain he was being poisoned. Stan usually works the day of the game and rushes to get home, eat dinner with his family, do some chores, and then get to the game. As a result he’s always late; our tradition is to place a side bet on what time he’ll show up. One night Robert mentioned that he was going to celebrate his birthday the following week. Surprised, I told him I had similar plans; it turned out we had the same birthday. We’d been playing cards together for decades before learning this! Lloyd is very methodical (or superstitious). For as long as I can remember, he has come to the games with his money in an old metal Band-Aid box decorated with Disney characters. He leaves with his money in the same box, never counting it, always declaring, “It’s about the fun of playing…” We are all grown men with good minds, responsible jobs and decent math skills. But when it comes to counting the pot or splitting the winnings, we defer to Jeff, the Certified Public Accountant. Much has happened in the past 25 years: moves, marriages, children, job changes, illnesses, loss of loved ones. Life is unpredictable; nothing stays the same. But for 25 years, our game has survived, providing continuity, connection and comfort to an unlikely group of guys who share an ineffable common bond.

66

GETTY IMAGES THE CARD PLAYERS BY PAUL CÉZANNE

essay

The Card


FALL 2016 COLLECTION


MALOUF’S FORUM FW 2016/17

Malouf's  
Read more
Read more
Similar to
Popular now
Just for you