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FALL & WI NT ER 2017/18

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O ff i ci a l m e n s wear of th e L A Gal axy Jel l e Van Dam me / A ri e l La ssi t e r / G y a si Z a rde s / B ri a n Ro w e


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Ultimate Luxuries

Andrisen Morton 270 St. Paul Street Denver, Colorado 80206 303-377-8488

PUBLISHER

Stuart Nifoussi EDITOR-IN-CHIEF

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Karen Alberg Grossman

5 Fall Icons

DESIGN DIRECTOR

Hans Gschliesser MANAGING EDITOR

Jillian LaRochelle PROJECT MANAGER

Lisa Menghi

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Travel: Hit the Road

CONTRIBUTING WRITER

Bruce Abels DESIGNERS

Jean-Nicole Venditti Chad Morgan

FEATURES 6 8 10 16 22 26 28 100

You Can Go Home Again: Tara Simpson New Faces: Matt Wagster Looking Up in Cherry Creek North Craig’s Way Denver Food Scene A Blanket of Hospitality: Bobby Stuckey Hail to the Chef: Troy Guard Gifts: Ultimate Luxuries

CONCEPT DIRECTOR

Andrew Mitchell ASSOCIATE PUBLISHER

Michelle Brown DIRECTOR OF PREPRESS

John Frascone CONTRIBUTING PHOTOGRAPHER

Studio JK ON-LOCATION STYLIST

Matt Sayers

FASHION 30 In the Studio and On the Streets with Andrisen Morton 60 On Trend Men? 64 Swedish Style: Eton 68 Fabrics: Commanding Performance 72 Made to Measure: Have it Your Way 74 Dressing Up, Dressing Down 94 5 Fall Icons

DEPARTMENTS

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Get Smart

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Welcome Letter Ask Craig & Lindsay The Fashion Forum Wine: Futures Tense Wheels: Driving Nostalgia Travel: Hit the Road End Page: Get Smart

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FASHION FORUM MAGAZINE IS PUBLISHED IN 11 REGIONAL EDITIONS FOR MEMBER

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Falling for fall in

COLORADO DAVE MORTON “With the usual excitement that always accompanies the new season, plus all that’s happening in Cherry Creek North, I constantly think about how we can do better for our customers? The answer: humility and servant spirit should always be our benchmark.” LINDSAY MORTON GAISER “I love fall. With its vivid colors and cool, crisp air, this is my favorite time of year. Luxurious cashmere sweaters and a beautiful piece of outerwear are just what we want to wear after a long, hot Colorado summer. I can’t wait to show what we’ve hand selected to help you look your absolute best this season!” Fall is the season ideally suited for Colorado. The days are still warm, while the nights are a perfect degree of brisk. While aspens glow gold in the mountains, maple, oak and ash trees shower the city in burnt reds, yellows and oranges. The sky seems bluer. Sunlight appears sunnier. The city somehow seems even better than it already is. Here at the store, we’re anxious for you to see the new collection of great clothing we’ve assembled. But to paraphrase the iconic Yves Saint Laurent, “Fashions, like the seasons, fade; style is eternal.” We interpret that this way: while we live to present you with new styles, colors, trends, and brands each season, what’s most important is your complete and utter satisfaction with the experience of being part of our customer-family.

JOHN JASTER “There is a special sense that emerges in autumn. The depth of color and texture combines to express what our Italian friends call ‘sprezzatura’: this means dressing with such a natural, easy grace, it appears no thought went into your look at all. That’s where we come in.” CRAIG ANDRISEN “Honor the moment by dressing for it. No matter what you do at work or play… Always try to look your best. After seasonal buying trips and many choices, we always strive to bring you the finest quality, value and selection of menswear to fit your lifestyle. Our goal is to exceed your expectations from the moment you arrive and long after you leave.”

As always, warmest regards, CRAIG, DAVE, JOHN & LINDSAY 4


T H E S H I R T M A K E R S I N C E 19 2 8


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TARA SIMPSON Rejoins the Andrisen Morton Family

CELEBRITY LOOK-ALIKE Drew Barrymore with glasses.

Since 1996, Tara Simpson had been a constant at Andrisen Morton’s point of sale counter. Her natural warmth and charm were only equaled by her professionalism, efficiency and remarkable customer knowledge. She made sure everyone felt comfortable, welcome and cared for. Then, after 17 years, Tara informed us she was leaving to take a very important position: focusing all those considerable talents on her husband, teenage daughter Cassandra and young son Caden. Of course we were heartbroken to see her go, as were the many customers who had also come to know and love Tara. Fast forward to August 2016. Young Caden was about to start kindergarten and eighteen-year-old Cassandra was a senior in high school. (Cassandra has now started her freshman year at NYC’s renowned Fashion Institute of Technology). With a little more time on her hands, Tara met Dave Morton to catch up over coffee. Before you could say Ermenegildo Zegna, Dave convinced her to become the store’s new business office manager. And the rest of the AM team was absolutely thrilled. Her knowledge of the business from the front of the house has given Tara invaluable insight to help keep it all running smoother than ever behind the scenes. “I feel like my experience downstairs, knowing both the staff and customers so well, gives a unique balance to this position that hasn’t existed before,” says Tara. Welcome home, Tara! As Frank Sinatra once sang, “Love is lovelier the second time around.”

HOBBIES Her son’s swim team, soccer team, t-ball team and vacation travel. FAVORITE VACATION SPOT The beach, either the Jersey Shore or Florida. KNOWN FOR MAKING Killer Italian red sauce and meatballs. WHY AM IS SPECIAL “Everything Craig and Dave do is for the customer experience. And everything has been elevated since I left, from the amazing remodel to the trunk shows to the incredible customer service.”

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MATT WAGSTER

Sales Associate at Peter Millar Store Born in the Bay Area and raised in Northbrook,

CELEBRITY LOOK-ALIKE

Illinois, Matt Wagster became part of our Peter Millar team this past spring. In his younger days, Matt was quite the figure skater: he made it as far as the U.S. Junior Nationals, but knee injuries prevented him from realizing his Olympic dreams. Matt earned a political science degree from CU Boulder and started an internship at a Denver law firm, but he didn’t enjoy it. He somehow landed a coveted sixmonth internship at Esquire in New York City, where he fell in love with men’s fashion. As second assistant to the marketing director, Matt was very involved in the magazine’s fundraising efforts for various charities. Prior to joining the Andrisen Morton family, he spent a few years at Nordstrom as a personal stylist, assisting both men and women in their wardrobe selections. While there, he sold Peter Millar clothing and was very impressed with the quality they offered at such a great price point. When he learned of the opening at our Peter Millar store, he jumped at the opportunity. And fortunately for us, he nailed it. If you can land a double axel, you can likely do anything you set your mind to!

Paul Newman HOBBIES Yoga, playing with his cat and his Jack Russell Terrier, Baxter, and enjoying Denver’s live music scene, especially at Red Rocks. FAVORITE VACATION SPOT Anywhere “coastal,” and he particularly loves NYC. KNOWN FOR MAKING Spaghetti squash lasagna love boats. WHAT HE WEARS Everyday wear is cotton chinos, a lightweight V-neck and sneakers. For dressy occasions, a made-to-measure suit. WHY AM IS SPECIAL “The overall family culture at Andrisen Morton is amazing. And it’s very inspiring to work with Bridget and Rudee here at Peter Millar. It’s all about customer service. We want every customer to feel better leaving the store than when they came in.”

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THE ROLEX DEEPSEA Built for extremes and capable of withstanding depths of up to 3,900 metres, exceeding the demands of professional divers. It doesn’t just tell time. It tells history.

OYSTER PERPETUAL ROLEX DEEPSEA

rolex

oyster perpetual and deepsea are ® trademarks.


The growth of urban infill development and walkable live, excited that so many more people will be living, working work, play and stay neighborhoods in cities nationwide is in and visiting what I believe will always be a quaint, very no greater evidence than right here in Cherry Creek North. comfortable neighborhood. This is all smart growth that Within a two-block radius of our store are six major develop- enhances everyone’s experience.” It’s exciting to imagine how great our neighborment projects! In the past two-and-a-half years in all of CCN, hood will be when all these beautiful new buildings are 16 projects have been completed, 13 are currently under concompleted. Until then, getting around by car and parkstruction and another eight have been announced. The projing in CCN has becom—let’s politely say—frustrating. ects run the gamut from new hotels and residential complexes Fortunately, you will always find complimentary on-site for purchase or rent to high-end office and retail space. parking when visiting us. And if our own lot is full, we will “The old saying ‘a rising tide lifts all boats’ is totally gladly cover your parking fees at any nearby lot. So come at play here,” says Dave Morton. “All business owners are explore Cherry Creek North! 10


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J O H N E LWAY C A D I L L AC H A S C O LO R A D O ’ S L A R G ES T I N V E N TO RY O F N E W A N D P R E- OW N E D C A D I L L AC S .


ASK CRAIG & LINDSAY

with casual pants (or jeans) and sneakers. What makes a sport coat modern these days is fine performance fabrics, light canvas construction, interesting details and an attitude of nonchalance. There’s also an ineffable characteristic known as “expression,” which refers to the uncontrived way a tailored garment drapes and hits the body. Other things to note: modern fit is body-skimming but not tight, slightly shorter in the arm and body length but not extreme. Come into the store and we’ll help you figure out which models are most flattering for you. Q: ALTHOUGH EVERYONE SEEMS TO BE DOING IT, BUYING CLOTHES ONLINE DOES NOT FEEL QUITE RIGHT TO ME. AM I CRAZY? No, you’re not crazy: there’s nothing more satisfying than working in person with a professional style advisor who knows your taste, your body type and your budget, and can therefore help you look your best. But did you know that there are numerous ways you can use technology to enhance your in-store shopping experience? You can pre-shop collections on our website to save time when you arrive in store. You can email, text or chat with your style advisor to ask questions or set up appointments, in store or at home. You can click through the many fabulous collections on our website and reserve items for in-store shopping. Bottom line: digital support is not intended to circumvent your style advisor, but rather to enhance and improve your in-store shopping experience. Take advantage of it and look better than ever before.

Q: I DON’T WEAR SUITS TOO OFTEN ANYMORE BUT WOULD LIKE TO BUY A FEW COOL SPORT COATS FOR FALL. WHAT SPECIFICALLY DO YOU SUGGEST? We’d recommend one perfect deconstructed blue blazer (it doesn’t have to be navy; there are various new shades of blue) and one subtle plaid sport coat to pair

Q: SNEAKERS SEEM TO BE EVERYWHERE, BUT I THINK THEY LOOK RIDICULOUS WITH SUITS AND SPORT COATS. SO WHAT SHOULD I WEAR ON MY FEET ? Sorry to disagree, but we love sneakers worn with suits and sport coats, especially many of the newer styles that are clearly not meant for the gym! That said, there are numerous other non-sneaker options this fall, including chukka boots for an outdoorsy look, burnished leather lace-ups for a dressier look and classic loafers for something in between. Another tip: choose neutral shades of brown, which pair perfectly with both navy and gray clothing (and are appropriate with everything but formalwear).

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Nature is full of infinite causes Leonardo da Vinci


CRAIG’S WAY

Craig Andrisen has been in the men’s clothing business for more than 50 years. He began as a teenager working in a men’s shop in tiny DeSmet, South Dakota, and ultimately co-founded Andrisen Morton, arguably one of the nation’s finest men’s specialty stores now approaching its 40th anniversary. Over the years, he has forged a reputation as a respected businessman, style expert, relationship builder and storyteller. Here, from a recent conversation with Craig, are his views on the state of men’s style, the clothing business, selling and more. 16


ON SELLING Never oversell. “Never! Always start with building trust.”

suiting, which isn’t the quality they’re charging you for. So instead of a good deal, you’re actually being overcharged. Who sets their prices? They do. Our vendors have suggested retail prices, so for example, a Canali suit purchased here will essentially cost the same if bought at any store in the country.”

ON REASONS TO SHOP ANDRISEN MORTON Sell service first, clothes second. “The Andrisen Morton experience is far more important than just buying clothes. We carry the finest luxury brands from Italy and around the world, but our customers buy the store first and the brands second. We know what you really want is a great experience. It’s about providing matchless personal service and building relationships that extend past the sale. Our actions and how we treat people dictate whether or not someone returns to become a legacy customer.”

[Editor’s Note: The best-quality suits are full canvas, meaning that horsehair canvas is sewn between the lining and the cloth of the jacket. This allows the fabric to drape properly and mold to your body over time for the perfect fit. It adds to the suit’s longevity, allows the fabric to “breathe” and holds up to repeated dry cleaning. Quality fullcanvas suits start at $1,200 and can run well into the thousands. Half-canvas jackets have canvas running only through the chest and lapels of the coat. They’re much less expensive to make because the process involves much less handwork—but they won’t fit as well, look as good or last as long.]

ON THE NEXT GENERATION OF CUSTOMERS The future depends on attracting younger customers. “We’re seeing more and more younger people caring about how they dress. They want to look great, yet be casual and cool, like wearing a knit shirt with a suit. So in addition to our top-line merchandise, we offer lower-priced, but still top-quality, tailored

ON MADE TO MEASURE There will always be good business in made-tomeasure. “Today, we are able to offer not just made to measure suits and sport jackets, but also outerwear, dress slacks, 5-pocket trousers and denim, any type of shirt, shoes, even belts. We can have almost anything made to measure for the man’s closet.”

clothing as a way to introduce younger men to the world of better dressing. Plus, we carry sportswear, premium denim, 5-pocket pants and knits that reflect the more relaxed sensibilities of the up-and-coming generation and meet their ‘casual cool’ quotient.” ON FINDING THOSE NEXT-GEN CUSTOMERS After word-of-mouth, Google is number one in reaching new customers. “Seventy-eight percent of all people under the age of 37, and a big percentage of people of all ages, do research using Google before they buy anything, including high-end clothes. But approximately 50 percent of those people still prefer purchasing at a brick-and-mortar store. We always try to give you a reason to come to us.”

ON BUYING AT MARKET You have to reinvent yourself a little bit every season. “We can’t bring the same merchandise into the store year after year because customers always want something new and fresh. As buyers, we have to take chances, but still fit within the framework of our brand and image. Any time we add a new line, we test it out for a season, and educate our sales associates, who in turn educate our customers. If it works, we expand our buy the following season. If it doesn’t… that’s why we have sales!”

ON TRAVELING “CUSTOM” TAILORS We sell nothing but full-canvas clothing; they don’t. “There are traveling custom tailors out there going from city to city offering ‘incredible deals’ on custom clothing. But they all sell half-canvas

ON CO-OWNING ANDRISEN MORTON FOR NEARLY 40 YEARS “It’s like hosting a dinner party that opens at 9:30 every morning and closes at 6:00 each night. I still love it!”

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FROM COW TOWN TO WOW! TOWN

Even when Denver was indisputably considered a “cow town” in the 1980s, there were still good, possibly even great, restaurants to be found in the city. Among the best were old-school steak houses including The Buckhorn Exchange, The Aurora Summit and Bastien’s. And don’t forget the more eclectic upscale spots like The Normandy, Tante Louise, Dudley’s, Little Pepina’s, The Fort, Flagstaff House, Chez Thoa and so on.

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In the 30 years since, Denver has been transforming into a true foodie heaven. Make no mistake: most cities across America have seen their food scenes grow, but none has elevated its game quite like Denver. In fact, Zagat ranked Denver the third hottest food city in the country behind number one Washington, DC and second-place finisher Los Angeles. Another win for our great city, already recognized as one of the top places to live for singles, Millennials, entrepreneurs, craft brewers, outdoor-lovers… the accolades for Denver are non-stop. So how did Denver’s food renaissance come to be? Much can certainly be attributed to the influx of affluent people moving here annually from larger, lesslivable cities. Factor in the continued growth of many different food movements, too: slow food, sustainable food, farm-to-table food, global food, food trucks, etc.

Then there are the chefs: locals with vision like Toshi Kazaki (Sushi Den et al.), Troy Guard (TAG et al.), Frank Bonanno (Mizuna et al.), Jennifer Jasinski (Rioja et al.) and Bobby Stuckey/ Lachlan Mackinnon-Patterson (Frasca), plus newcomers like Hop Alley’s Tommy Lee and Bar Dough’s Mac MacKissock, have found success and lured national players like Nobu Matsuhisa, Gregory Gourdet, Hugh Acheson and others. Whether in our own Cherry Creek North, Lodo, Union Station, RiNo, Highlands, the suburbs, ex-burbs, or Boulder, you can enjoy 5-star eateries, fast-casual innovators and hidden gems that span the gastronomical globe. Get out there and enjoy all the incredible food Denver has to offer; you’ll say “Wow!” too

Here are some of our favorite and not-so-hidden hidden restaurant gems. Mmmm… SMOKIN’ YARD’S BBQ

EL TEJADO

ROCKO’S CANTINA

(900 W. 1st Ave, and in Idaho Springs)

(2651 S. Broadway)

(6981 W Alaska Dr. in BelMar)

“Try the sliced brisket sandwich with country mac ‘n’ cheese and baked beans. Add Cow Tippin’ Sweet Sauce or Spicy Chipotle.”

"I love the chicken enchiladas or tamales".

“I eat the same thing every time: the enchiladas de verde with barbacoa. Great TexMex!”

KIRSTEN NELSON

OKINAWA SUSHI (3927 Tennyson St.)

“Whenever the king salmon appetizer is on the menu, definitely order it. Everything is great, especially the spicy tuna.” MARK RODRIGUE

POTAGER (1109 N. Ogden St.)

“Rustic. Organic. Locally sourced ingredients. Try anything that’s on their seasonal menu.” MANAR HAFFAR

TARA SIMPSON

"You've gotta try the carnitas, especially when piled with green chili and egg." DAVE MORTON

LA CUEVA (9742 E. Colfax Ave.)

“I always get the chorizo enchilada dinner and the chili relleno dinner. Yes, two dinners— can’t pass either up!” JOHN JASTER

CHRIS SMITH

BAR DOUGH (2227 W 32nd Ave.)

"Their pasta is almost as good as what’s found in NYC’s amazing Italian restaurants! The spaghettini is my fave!” LINDSAY MORTON GAISER

ELWAY’S & CHERRY CREEK GRILLE (2500 E 1st Ave., 184 Steele

CHILE VERDE

St.)

"Any steak at Elway’s, and the chicken and artichokes at the Grille."

(2311 Federal Blvd.)

“Fun atmosphere. Good tequilas! Tableside guacamole is the best, and the ceviche is even better!” BOB SCHULTZ

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CRAIG ANDRISEN


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A BLANKET OF HOSPITALITY Q&A with Bobby Stuckey, master sommelier and co-owner of Boulder’s Frasca Food & Wine. There’s a long list of terms that define Bobby Stuckey: master sommelier, marathon runner, restaurateur (partnered with Chef Lachlan Mackinnon-Patterson at Frasca and Pizzeria Locale), cyclist, TEDx presenter, skier, winery owner and husband. Then another list of the award-winning dining rooms he’s worked, including The Little Nell in Aspen, Napa Valley’s

YOU’RE UP FOR ANOTHER JAMES BEARD AWARD. ARE CULINARY AWARDS IMPORTANT? Culinary awards are important for the staff that works so hard every day grinding it out. My most important awards are when guests feel a blanket of hospitality.

The French Laundry, and now Frasca. Plus a list of all the awards he’s garnered, including the prestigious James Beard Award for Outstanding Wine Service and Wine Enthusiast’s Sommelier of the Year. Add one more thing to Stuckey’s list: friend of Andrisen Morton.

Frasca Food and Wine is based firmly on the region Friuli-Venezia Giulia [in northeastern Italy]. It is hyper-focused on this micro region of Italy. We had an employee, Jordan “Bruiser” Wallace, who was inspired by the hyper-micro region of Naples and Napolitano pizza. We moved him there in the summer of 2010 while we built the restaurant, and that’s how Pizzeria Locale came to be. He might still be recovering from that summer in Naples.

HOW DID YOU BECOME INTERESTED IN WINE? I started bussing tables in Scottsdale, Arizona as a dyslexic, ADD-challenged student. The restaurant business ended up being the perfect environment for me! I got to see the joy of hospitality, and that joy included pouring wine for people. WHAT WAS YOUR PATH TO BECOMING A SOMMELIER? I went from busboy to waiter to head waiter to manager to sommelier to wine director to master sommelier and back to busboy. As a hands-on owner, I do every task. With no task being too small, I bus a lot of tables. IF YOU COULD ONLY PICK ONE BOTTLE, WHAT WOULD YOU ORDER FROM YOUR OWN LIST? It would depend on the time of the year and what my wife Danette was ordering food-wise. Let’s say it’s fall or winter and white truffles are being sliced: I know I can’t go wrong with the 2000 Giacomo Conterno Monfortino.

HOW DID PIZZERIA LOCALE COME TO BE?

HOW DOES SOMEONE WHO DOESN’T KNOW ANYTHING ABOUT WINE ORDER FROM A WINE LIST WITHOUT SOUNDING LIKE AN IDIOT? You go to the sommelier or manager and simply say, “Hi, what do you love on your wine list right now?” Don’t be afraid to ask. I’m a master sommelier and if I see a list with a bunch of crazy stuff I haven’t had before or I haven’t had recently, I’m going to ask for help. That’s why they’re there. And you’ll end up spending less money, too. WHAT DO YOU SEE IN THE DENVER FOOD SCENE THAT EXCITES YOU? I would have to say young chefs and restaurateurs making a go of it in an independent format. Denver has a wonderful mix of independent operators. In the last 13 years since we’ve been open, the Denver food and wine scene has really exploded.

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FAVORITE RESTAURANTS IN METRO DENVER? THE USA? THE WORLD? In metro Denver, we love going to Oak and seeing Frasca alums Bryan Dayton and Steve Redzikowski. In the USA, Charlie Bird in NYC and Vetri Ristorante in Philadelphia. And in the world, La Subida in Friuli-Venzia Giulia, Italy.

WHEN/HOW DID YOU START SHOPPING AT AM? My wife took me there over a decade ago, and it’s one of our special things we like to do a few times a year. I choose a new sport coat or a suit, usually Isaia.

ANY ANECDOTES ABOUT THE STORE GOING ABOVE AND BEYOND? ARE THERE ANY PARALLELS BETWEEN RUNNING There are countless stories. They are tireless disciples A RESTAURANT AND A CLOTHING STORE? of hospitality. “Brooklyn” Bob Schultz once drove When it comes to a clothing store like Andrisen up to Boulder with samples from an Isaia trunk Morton, there are a lot of parallels. Peter Hoglund, show, because I got checkmated and couldn’t make my business partner, and I always love going to it to the store. I ended up buying a suit while we Andrisen Morton and seeing the extra steps of were setting up in the kitchen, chefs looking on hospitality the team takes there. Many similarities. wondering what their boss was doing. Amazing!

Stuckey’s obvious great taste in wine, food, people and yes, style, together with his warm, easygoing personality, continues to catapult his illustrious career forward. All we can say is, “Go Bobby, go!” 27


Hail to the Chef Troy Guard leads an ever-expanding empire of Denver hot spots

It began in 2009 with his flagship TAG restaurant on Larimer Square, and Denver chef/restaurateur Troy Guard now helms a growing restaurant group that includes Guard and Grace, multiple Los Chingones, two Bubu locations, TAG Burger Bar, Mister Tuna, Hashtag, and new neighborhood spot FNG, opening this fall. With all these Denver restaurants to direct, plus being a husband and father to two young children, saying he has a whole lot of pans on the stove is an understatement. Guard grew up in Hawaii, Seattle and San Diego (seven years in each locale), and started cooking “under the table” around age 13. In the early years of his career he was also a busser, host and a bartender, though never a server. It was always the kitchen where he felt most at home. Yet, when he was growing up, this now-successful chef didn’t eat his veggies; he especially hated canned vegetables. “Canned asparagus and canned peas: the worst. I’m having nightmares just thinking about them,” he says. But he has many fond food memories of grilling and eating outside every night in Hawaii, and of his mother’s homemade cookies, cakes and pies. When he was 21, he returned to Hawaii and found his way into the kitchen of the legendary Roy Yamaguchi, chef/ owner of Roy’s. He spent eight years working for Yamaguchi, who practiced the farm-to-table concept long before it became the foodie movement it is today. “Everything was fresh and local. And we were using ingredients I’d never heard of before like lemongrass, lime leaf and even ginger.” Eventually, Guard lived and worked in Hong Kong, Tokyo and New York opening new Roy’s locations. Another interesting fact about Guard: he never went to culinary school. Yamaguchi, a James Beard Award winner, was his teacher, mentor and friend. “I clocked in at 3:00 p.m.,”


he recalls, “but I went in at 9:00 each morning and worked

all the craft brewers, fresh produce growers—it’s amazing.

six hours free. That was my schooling.” While he feels culi-

We’re not just a steak-and-potato town anymore.” Guard

nary school is worth attending, he warns it isn’t as glamorous

enjoys trying all the new places but finds it hard to choose

or as cool as Food Network shows make it appear to be. “It’s

a favorite. All these options, while good for the eating-out

far from that,” says Guard. “It’s a lot of hours, and working

public, also make it harder for new restaurants to succeed. When asked what would be his death row meal, Guard

holidays and weekends. You have to be passionate about it.” His approach to developing new restaurant concepts like

didn’t hesitate: “I’d start out with some Kobe beef sliders from

Los Chingones or Mister Tuna is somewhat surprising: about

TAG with duck fat fries. Then I’d do a 24-ounce bone-in ribeye

25 percent is based on the concept and figuring out check aver-

with a loaded baked potato from Guard & Grace. And I’d finish

ages; the remaining 75 percent is based on location. “I might

it all off with my mom’s house-made chocolate chip cookies.”

see a cool space in a neighborhood and say, ‘Wow, I’d love to open a restaurant here.’ Then I think about what would work there, because I want it to fit into the community and what they want or need.” This idea of creating a welcoming neigh-

“I love the quality

borhood place is common to every Troy Guard restaurant.

and style [at AM].

Like for all chefs, sharp knives are the key tools in Guard’s kitchen. He’s also a big fan of micro-planers.

It’s not too young,

“Micro-planers are made to slice citrus and cheese very

or too old man-

thin, but they have a ton of other cool uses,” Guard shares. “For instance, we freeze foie gras, then micro-plane it.”

ish. It’s hip and

He also speaks at length about the virtues of the immer-

cool. And I love

sion circulator, which circulates precisely heated water to

all the colors.”

slowly pre-cook vacuum-sealed steak and other foods. Guard doesn’t cook as much as he used to, and we can tell he misses it a bit. He speaks with great admira-

Obviously, Guard really enjoys his own food—because

tion of his chefs, managers, servers and staff, and is still amazed there are 500 people working at Troy Guard res-

he has great taste. And speaking of taste, Guard start-

taurants today. “Now I’m more of a businessman, but I still

ed shopping at Andrisen Morton about 12 years ago.

work with my chefs on all menu items and menu changes,

It was the quality merchandise that first drew him in,

and I come up with the dishes for every charity event.”

but soon it came down to the relationships. “I love all

“Twenty years ago,” says Guard, “I could care less

those guys!” he says. “They call me when there’s a trunk

about food or labor costs. I just wanted to make good

show or a sale, drop off my alterations when I can’t

food.” Today he relishes these aspects of running his res-

pick them up, and sometimes, just call to say hello.

taurants, working in partnership with food and liquor

That kind of service is what we try to do here—just tak-

purveyors, landlords, and most of all, his employees.

ing care of our friend, our guest, our customer.” “I love the quality and style [at AM]. It’s not too young,

He knows how extremely important it is to motivate all these individuals to care about what he cares about: the

or too old man-ish. It’s hip and cool. And I love all the

food, the service, the ambience—the guest experience.

colors.” He mostly dresses casual in jeans and a T-shirt,

The three people in the food world Guard admires most are Danny Meyer in New York City, Sam Fox in

because when he visits one of his restaurants, he may just decide to jump on the line and start cooking. “Dave and Craig have always been gracious, hospitable and

Arizona and Rich Melman in Chicago, because like him, they’re innovative, successful restaurateurs who oper-

warm,” says Guard. In fact, he admires their path to success

ate multiple restaurant concepts, and all focus on cre-

so much that he keeps a seven-year-old profile of the partners

ating exceptional experiences for their guests.

torn from a local magazine pinned to his bulletin board. In

He’s also a big fan of what’s happening on the Denver

it, Dave and Craig discuss how they started and explain their

food scene. “There are hundreds of independent chefs and

service-first philosophy. Guard shares this with his staff all

great restaurateurs here now. They’re all amazing, inven-

the time, explaining, “I just like the way they do business.” The feeling is mutual!

tive and bringing top-notch concepts to Denver. Add in

29


IN THE STUDIO & ON THE STREETS OF RINO with Andrisen Morton To showcase this season’s spectacular collection of fall and winter fashion, the Andrisen Morton team headed to a photography studio in the historic Five Points neighborhood, now one of the city’s hottest locales. After our studio session, we decided to hit the streets of the equally hot RiNo neighborhood (formerly known as River North). Its cool urban vibe was a perfect complement to the very cool clothing we’ve assembled with you in mind. And remember: if you see it in these pages, you’ll find it in the store.

PHOTOGRAPHY © STUDIO JK PHOTOGRAPHY, DENVER.

30


Vest: Faherty Sport Shirt: Faherty Jeans: J Brand Shoes: New Balance Sunglasses: Persol

31


Kiton Watch: Shinola Sunglasses: Persol

32


Isaia

33


Sport Coat: Boglioli Sport Shirt: Giannnetto Portofino Belt: W. Kleinberg Jeans: AG Bracelet: Kenton Michael

34


Ermenegildo Zegna Bracelets: Spivey

35


Tuxedo: Canali Tuxedo Shirt: Eton Bow Tie: Robert Talbott Pocket Square: Simonnot Godard

36


Vest: Moorer Sweater: Gran Sasso Sport Shirt: Robert Tablott 5 Pocket: Hiltl Belt: W. Kleinberg

37


Over Shirt: Faherty Sport Shirt: Culturata Jeans: PT05 Belt: W. Kleinberg Shoes: Frye Boots

38


Sport Coat: Canali Dress Shirt: Eton Tie: Canali Sunglasses: Tom Ford Belt: W. Kleinberg 5 Pocket: AG

39


Sport Shirt: Frank & Eileen Jeans: AG Watch: Shinola Weekender Bag: Moore & Giles

40


Outerwear: Herno Sweater: We Norwegians Sport Shirt: Giannetto Portofino Jogger: We Norwegians

41


Outerwear: Moorer Sport Shirt: Culturata Belt: W. Kleinberg Jeans: Brunello Cucinelli

42


Sport Coat: Ermenegildo Zegna Knit: Isaia Pocket Square: Brunello Cucinelli 5 Pocket: J Brand Weekender Bag: Moore & Giles Shoes: Santoni

43


Vest: Moorer Sweater: Patrick Assaraf Sport Shirt: Good Man Brand 5 Pocket: PT05 Bracelets: Spivey

44


Brunello Cucinelli Shoes: Tod's

45


Outerwear: Kjus Sweater: Good Man Brand Knit: Patrick Assaraf Jogger: We Norwegians

46


Brunello Cucinelli Shoes: Santoni

47


Isaia Belt: W. Kleinberg 5 Pocket: J Brand

48


Outerwear: Moorer Sport Coat: Samuelsohn Sweater: Patrick Assaraf Sport Shirt: Eton 5 Pocket: PT05 Sunglasses: Tom Ford

49


50


Vest: Moorer Sweater: Gran Sasso Sport Shirt: Robert Talbott Watch: Shinola

51


52


W. Kleinberg

53


W. Kleinberg

54


Tom Ford

55


Santoni

56


Santoni

57


58


Tod's

59


On Trend Bright colors or earth tones? Loose fits or slim cuts? Spread collars or buttondown? What are the latest trends in men’s fashion? Do you, or should you, care?

When you own top-quality clothing, it’s not just about what’s being shown in the latest issue of Esquire or GQ. It’s about how a garment makes you feel on that day. So what if the lapels on your favorite suit are a little wider than the ones coming down the runway? Your choices are an expression of who you are. But as they say, you should know the rules in order to break them, so knowing the current direction of men’s style couldn’t hurt. Remember, a new stylistic touch here or there can raise your wardrobe and personal style up a notch.

MEN

CLOTHING

TRENDING

Tuxedos

Navy blue jacquard dinner jackets in black and navy

Suits

Blue, blue, blue-textured solids, functional cell phone pockets and detail on suit jackets

Sport Coats

Two lower open patch pockets Soft, casual and 3/8 lined

Pocket Squares

Fun prints or solid white with colored tipping

Dress Shirts

Cutaway collars, multi-color patterns

Neckwear

Slightly wider ties and solids rather than prints

Trousers

5-pocket styles in everything from denim to wool

Sport Shirts

Solids and mini checks, cutaway collars and hidden button-downs making a comeback

Knitwear

A big trend to wear under tailored clothing

Sweaters

V-necks are becoming more important

Belts

Multi-color woven nylon or leather

Socks

Low-key designs and solid colors

Footwear

Upscale sneakers with everything

Outerwear

Quilted vests

Accessories

Leather or beaded bracelets and luxe sunglasses

60


FASHION FORUM

the

READY, SET, SLALOM!

I

f you see someone heading down the slopes this winter on skis like nothing you’ve ever seen before, you’re not hallucinating. Pirelli Motorsport and Blossom, a leader in handmade high-performance skis, have partnered to create a remarkable pair of limitededition skis. They feature the iconic stretched P logo on top, an invisible layer of vibration-dampening rubber inserted by Pirelli into the sandwich construction, a double layer of Titanal for stability, and triaxial fiberglass for perfect torsion. The end result is a ski that provides excellent performance on narrow and sweeping turns due to improved fluidity and accuracy, as well as outstanding stability. —BSL

SPRING FEVER!

Although the leaves have barely turned, it’s never too soon to think spring! Fresh from the recent Pitti Uomo trade show in Florence and the runways in Milan, here are our top 10 men’s fashion trends for spring ’18:

A DRIVE FOR GREATNESS

1. 2. 3. 4. 5.

Happy whimsical prints on shirts and swimwear Variations on the banded-collar shirt Shorter, wider trousers; shorts for leisure and business Bold stripes in both suits and sportswear Bucket hats, retro shades, lapel pins, bandanas, cross-body fanny packs 6. Open-knit sweaters in linen and linen blends 7. Modified double-breasted suits and sport coats that can be worn open 8. A return to classic footwear, including tassels, monk straps and loafers 9. Mixing active influences with soft tailoring 10. Lightweight, light-color suits with bold accents —KAG

What could make a Rolls-Royce even more coveted? A collaboration with nine of Great Britain’s most revered musicians on a series of bespoke, limited-edition Wraith cars. Among the artists who are taking part in this extra-special partnership are Ronnie Wood (of the Rolling Stones), Sir Ray Davies (of the Kinks), Dame Shirley Bassey and Giles Martin (son of George Martin, the so-called fifth Beatle). Bear in mind: these one-of-akind vehicles are more than beautiful objects or even great investments. Rolls-Royce is donating a portion of each sale to charities selected by the musicians. It’s a win-win-win that should be music to any auto lover’s ears. —BSL

62


CECIL BEATON STUDIO ARCHIVE AT SOTHEBY’S

Few names carry the same weight in the world of fashion as Cristóbal Balenciaga, even 45 years after his death. A master of construction and design, the legendary Spanish couturier forever changed the clothing that women wear. In Shaping Fashion, now at London’s Victoria & Albert Museum, viewers can gaze upon over 100 pieces crafted by Balenciaga, including iconic ensembles made for Ava Gardner, dresses and hats belonging to socialite Gloria Guinness, and various pieces worn by one of the world's wealthiest women, Mona von Bismarck, along with work by his former protégées (such as André Courrèges and Emanuel Ungaro) and contemporary fashion designers working in the same innovative tradition, from J.W. Anderson to Nicolas Ghesquière. As an added bonus, the exhibition features a collaboration with X-ray artist Nick Veasey and a digital patternmaking project with the London College of Fashion, both of which reveal the hidden details that helped make Balenciaga's work so exceptional. —BSL

63

VICTORIA & ALBERT MUSEUM, LONDON

LOOK INTO MY CRISTOBAL


PROFILE

swedish

STYLE

“I would tell my American friends to consider the fit of everything they wear: not too long, too wide, or too boxy.” — Eton creative director Sebastian Dollinger

The story behind the world’s greatest shirt. BY L E S L E Y RU B E NS T E I N

I

t was a difficult time to feed six children during the 1920s Depression. Annie and David Pettersson sat at their kitchen table in Ganghester, Sweden, trying to figure out how to support their family now that the mill was closed. They owned a sewing machine and started crafting dresses for friends, but soon realized that men’s shirts were less seasonal and thus more profitable. Their philosophy was to provide finished shirts to their customers only when perfect. This venture was the genesis of Eton shirts, renowned worldwide for their quality, creativity, performance and fit. Sold in more than 40 countries, Eton continues to expand into new markets based on the Pettersson’s original high standards. Eighty-nine years later, grandson and Eton CEO Hans Davidson and his dynamic team sit at a conference table in Stockholm with top American menswear merchants to discuss the Eton brand at an intensive three-day Eton College experience. In addition to the “academic” portion of the trip, Eton showcased Sweden’s culinary scene, culture and history by hosting meals at historic restaurants and guiding tours of the historic districts of Gothenburg and Stockholm. Still, the highlight for most was experiencing firsthand the excitement, commitment and passion that Team Eton has for its product and company. “Quality, service, sustainability and responsibility—these are the backbone of everything we do. We want customers to experience the

64

feeling, to understand the heritage, to know that we care about more than product. We are a human company, with a commitment to the customer, the employee and the environment,” shares Davidson. In the design and production part of the presentation, retailers touched a sample of the exceptional cotton used in the making of the shirts. Eton is known for its high-quality fabrics in varied textures and weights as well as for its durability, impeccable styling and array of color options. But it is Eton’s Crease-Resistant Finish that makes the shirts stand out. “The performance of the shirt is what separates it from its competitors,” explains Davidson. “Wash it, put it on and 15 minutes later, the wrinkles are gone.” Unlike most brands, all of Eton’s patterns, designs and fabrics are designed in-house, ensuring exclusivity. White and light blue dress shirts remain the company’s bread and butter, but colors and prints are increasingly popular. For every Eton collection, designers create up to 100 different fabrics. Coupled with different color stitching, buttons and placket trims, there are 600 to 700 variations. Factor in the fit options (classic, contemporary, slim, super slim) and various collar and cuff choices, and the collection literally features a few thousand styles! According to Eton creative director Sebastian Dollinger, fit is the secret to dressing well. “I would tell my American friends to consider the fit of everything they wear. It’s important to wear clothes that are


Craig Andrisen (left) with Eton’s CEO Hans Davidson.

“Eton is a highly innovative company with a strong commitment to the future. Also, whatever magic potion they use to treat their cotton is amazing; it’s been our best performance shirt brand for about five years now.” CRA I G A ND RI SEN, A ND RI SEN MO RTO N

not too long, too wide, or too boxy. The average American man wears his clothes on the wide side, whereas many Europeans wear clothes too tight. It would be great to have a happy medium.” For the 2018 Eton collections, designs are inspired by Dollinger’s recent travels, especially brightly colored houses in Puerto Rico, beautiful tiles from Portugal, Dreams of Persia and Persian carpets, and various locales in Japan. On Eton’s unique corporate culture, Davidson maintains that employees need an inspiring environment to succeed. “People should be proud of where they work, whether it’s the boardroom or the warehouse.” In fact, thanks to a multitude of windows, the environment at Eton is all natural light and tree-filled views. Indoors, plants and natural furniture abound. Another highlight is the cantina: employees eat in a bright, spacious room or dine outside on a covered patio. It’s a gathering place, and a place of community for Eton associates (that once served as a restaurant for the neighbors!). Although thousands of boxes are stored and moved in and out of the warehouse, this facility is immaculate. The warehouse was built with windows on all sides so light streams through. To enhance working conditions, the building was made to preclude echoes. Companies throughout Scandinavia view this structure as a model warehouse; many visit the facility to observe its construction and design before building their own. Another Eton hallmark is its unique conveyer system, created years ago to keep up with demand as the company expanded into new markets. The automated system is built on the ceiling to move the shirts to each work station. This proprietary “Eton System” not only transformed the company but is now sold to other companies in various industries. Another unique invention: a folding machine al-

66

lowing employees to perfectly package the finished shirt. This machine was built in-house in the 1950s to flip the shirt collars inside out and create perfect points. In fact, virtually everything at Eton mirrors the company’s philosophy of transparency and openness. Davidson says he’s tried to create an environment where his people are not scared to say anything, where they’re free to think, to challenge and to create. “We’re all striving for excellence in everything we do. I like to say that I’m the conductor of an orchestra, but I can’t play all the instruments myself.” Thus, Davidson’s philosophy of making his employees part of the process. When there’s a reorganization in staffing, Eton lets its employees help decide where they’d like to work. “We see what their talent is, what they are burning for, and then we talk,” says Davidson. “In this way, employees grow and we see much innovation.” Just as Eton feels a responsibility to its customers and employees, they continually strive to honor the environment. “Taking care of nature is just something we do,” says Davidson. For example, the finishing process of the shirts is environmentally friendly. “We want the water to be the same after we’ve used it as it was before we started,” he says. It also comes down to details: covers for employees’ iPads are made from recycled materials, boxes in the warehouse are reused multiple times and ultimately recycled, a specially outfitted bicycle is used to transport boxes from the factory to the warehouse. “I’m very proud of what my grandfather, father and family have accomplished,” sums up Davidson. “But I’m equally proud of my amazing associates who are open, hardworking, creative and kind. This, more than the balance sheet, is the essence of the Eton company.”


FABRICS

COMMANDING PERFORMANCE

Or, How I Learned to Stop Worrying and Love the Suit (Again).

A

decade or so ago, “performance fabric” meant that an enterprising menswear manufacturer added stretch to enhance comfort, perhaps Teflon to boost stain resistance, or a quick chemical dip to protect against wrinkling. Flash forward to today. The modern man lives a speed-of-light

lifestyle, complicated by climate change, confounded by cranky, cramped business travel. Yet his suits must carry him from day into evening with stylish aplomb. Fortunately, research and development has spurred impressive innovation in even the most traditional luxury fabrics, delivering elegant tailored clothing that performs like its casual brethren. But all that flex and fortitude can’t trump the single, immutable reality: Suits and tailored sportswear must still possess covetable curb appeal. “Customers care first about the look of the fabric—performance is the ‘cherry on top,’” says Arnold Brant Silverstone, president and chief creative officer of Samuelsohn/Hickey Freeman, one of the earliest

Smart fabrics transition from city to country with ease and style.

IMAGES COURTESY OF SAMUELSOHN, ETON

(and most successful) adopters of luxury performance tailoring.

68


THE FINEST CLOTHES DEMAND THE FINEST CLEANERS. Andrisen Morton sells only the finest men’s clothing from the world’s best designers. La Nouvelle knows how to clean those world-class garments properly. Trust your wardrobe to La Nouvelle, the only dry cleaner and launderer recommended by Andrisen Morton.

4 02 5 E D I C K EN S O N P L AC E , D EN V ER CO 8 02 2 2 • 3 03 . 6 9 1 . 01 2 3 • L A N O U V EL L EC L E A N ER S .CO M

69


Luxury yarns are the key to Robert Talbott’s high-performing fabrics.

In 2011, Samuelsohn partnered with Loro Piana, one of Italy’s

premier fabric mills, to introduce a proprietary fabric called Extreme, and more recently with Colombo to launch a revolutionary luxurious fabric called Ice Wool, which is subjected to repeated thermic shock during the manufacturing process. This naturally seals the fibers, resulting in greater resilience, a far more supple texture and enhanced color clarity. Ice Wool helps maintain an optimal body microclimate and offers exceptional water and stain resistance, all while maintaining the luxurious feeling of super-fine 150s wool. Ermenegildo Zegna offers its super-fine (and aptly named) “High Performance” fabric in a collection of suits and jackets, all of which are defined by hightwist yarns that render the cloth exceptionally resistant to creasing and create a satisfyingly springy-yet-soft hand and a remarkably lightweight character: notably comfortable, packable and ideal for travel. Canali, too, offers a mashup of luxury and innovation. “Performance fabrics are more and more important in our collection, in both clothing and sportswear. We have believed in the attributes of performance for some time, and it is even more relevant today,” explains Giorgio Canali, director of Americas. The Canali collec-

formaldehyde are a dim memory. Eton’s North American sales director,

tion features a pure cashmere field jacket, distinguished by a “wave” ef-

Chris Donohue, believes that quality is the key. “We employ more

fect achieved through the synthesis of two traditional techniques. The

quality control people than design team members,” he shares.

first is “carding,” where the cloth is brushed using natural thistles, creat-

That rigor, in tandem with the company’s commitment to the

ing the visual “wave.” Then, hot metal cylinders are used to press the

T

exclusive use of extra-long staple cotton, informs its approach to

cloth, and finally the fabric is submerged in a hot fixing bath, which sets

innovation. ELS, characterized by extra-fine and long fibers that result

the pattern. The undulating result is visually compelling, with a hand

in durable yarns and elegant shirt fabrics, constitutes only 3% of the

reminiscent of fine sable fur.

world’s cotton, yet accounts for 100% of the fabric used by Eton. The

fabric movement, offering wash-and-wear or no-iron options as far

the prevailing sentiment: “If you can do luxury, and have it perform,

back as the 1950s, but the days of stiff polyester and toxic

what could be better?” – BY TOM MASTRONARDI

he ascendance of performance

brand also employs a “textile genius” who joined the in-house team

tailoring has not gone

three years ago from the venerable fabric mill Gruppo Albini. Although

unnoticed by purveyors of

the company does not tout “no iron,” Donohue is justifiably proud of

some of the world’s finest

the proprietary process that “changed the molecular structure to create

fabrics. Dougal Munro,

a smoother, flatter, more wrinkle-free surface of cloth.”

president of Holland & Sherry,

Mark Calder, creative director at Robert Talbott, believes in natural

which has supplied tailors and

performance enabled not by technical synthetic yarns, but instead

luxury brands with cloth since

through weave and construction. “For us, the only way to exceptional

1836, notes that the firm hasn’t

fabric is a commitment to luxury yarns. Our luxe fabrics continue to be

hesitated to enter into this

based upon Sea Island and Egyptian cottons, silk, super-fine merino

game: “We offer a range of fine

wool, cashmere and linen; we are grounded in that sensibility.”

cottons with 2% Elastane,

And in a global culture where “green” is not just the color of money,

which results in 8% to 10% of physical stretch for an elevated level of

all the companies we spoke to assert that the objective is to leave an

comfort. Beyond that, our AquArret wool is water repellent and offers

invisible ecological footprint in their wake. It’s an ethos probably

superior stain protection through a process that employs micro

summarized best by Eton: “For us, high quality equals sustainability...

encapsulated nano-particles rather than Teflon; it remains viable for

the first step to a more sustainable clothing industry is to promote

about eight cleanings.”

durable and timeless products.”

Dress shirts may have been the Founding Fathers of the performance

We’ll leave the last word to Silverstone, who rather adroitly sums up

70


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MADE TO MEASURE

Let the world know how much you value yourself. BY B RIAN SCOTT LIP TON

HAVE IT YOUR WAY

T

SHUTERSTOCK

Customize fit, fabrics, buttons and linings to your taste.

hat once-famous slogan now seems as applicable to men’s clothing as it does to the Whopper. Specifically, we’re talking about an increased interest in made-tomeasure clothing. Whether it’s picking fabrics, buttons, lining or lapels, more men than ever are taking the time to create a suit that expresses their individual style. Reasons for the growth in this business include more affordable price points than in the past (often only about 20 percent higher than off-therack) and increased visibility of made-to-measure suits on athletes and celebrities, whether they’re walking a red carpet, being interviewed after a game or appearing on a talk show. The primary raison d’etre for made to measure remains fit. MTM suits usually require taking anywhere from 15 to 40 measurements, a huge advantage for men whose physique may include droopy, mismatched shoulders, large midsections, muscular thighs, or extra-long legs. Most off-the-rack suits, no matter how well made and how much stretch is incorporated into the fabric, are less than forgiving to those without perfectly proportioned bodies, especially since many manufacturers (specifically Italian brands) are creating fits more suited to slim European bodies than to hefty, or even average, American ones. Today’s MTM customer is anyone from a high-school kid approaching prom to a college grad starting out in the business world to a successful investment banker—indeed, any guy who wants his wardrobe to make a lasting impression. Still, made-to-measure remains a particular favorite of men who work in more creative industries and who view made-to-measure suits as “an opportunity to dream out loud,” as one expert put it. In fact, Millennials, who have shown a desire for so-called “investment dressing,” are among those showing a fondness for made-to-measure clothing. Bottom line: made-to-measure suits appeal to those who want to be excited about what they purchase—and remain excited when they look in their closet later. A good made-to-measure suit can last for years, and can be dressed up or down. Above all else, a made-to-measure suit is a statement of confidence, proving that you know best what complements your style, your body type and your unique personality. Try it and be uniquely you!

72


M A KI NG A G R A ND E N TR A N CE

UP DO WN DRESSING

DRESSING

WHETHER YOU’RE HEADED OUT FOR A BIG NIGHT ON THE TOWN OR SOMETHING A BIT MORE CASUAL, A LITTLE DRAMA GOES A LONG WAY TOWARD MAKING YOUR LOOK — AND THE EVENING — UNFORGETTABLE.

PHOTOGRAPHER SERGIO KURHAJEC HAIR | MAKEUP BERNADINE BIBIANO WARDROBE WENDY MCNETT


ERMENEGILDO ZEGNA


J BRAND


BOGLIOLI

MAKE the WORLD YOUR STAGE


TRASK


LUCIANO BARBERA


PT01


ERMENEGILDO ZEGNA

Be BOLD Be FEARLESS Be DASHING


B R U N E L LO C U C I N E L L I VK NAGRANI


ERMENEGILDO ZEGNA


PETER MILLAR

LOSE YOURSELF in Fabulous Fall Textures


ISAIA B R U N E L LO C U C I N E L L I


B R U N E L LO C U C I N E L L I


B R U N E L LO C U C I N E L L I


ISAIA


CANALI ERMENEGILDO ZEGNA


M A U R I Z I O B A L DA S S A R I


ERMENEGILDO ZEGNA


Build your wardrobe on a foundation of neutral classics, adding a few fresh pieces each season. Modern styling will keep you looking cool and current year after year.

FAL L ICO NS P H O T O G R A P H E R Shane LaVancher F A S H I O N D I R E C T O R Michael Fusco P R O D U C E R Jillian LaRochelle S T Y L I N G A S S I S T A N T Leah Snow G R O O M E R Jojo McCarthy M O D E L Joe Weir for Wilhelmina


1

THE JOGGER

ELEVENTY COAT, FAHERTY SHIRT, RHONE JOGGER, LANVIN SNEAKER

This pant is the newest must-have in every manâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s wardrobe: sleek, comfy and wearable in more ways than one. Elevate your look with a rich camel coat and luxe suede sneakers.


2

Neutral-color patterns are surprisingly versatile and so much more exciting than basic black. Wear with a texture on top to stand out from the crowd.

HARRIS WHARF COAT, FAHERTY SWEATER AND THERMAL, PT01 TROUSER, TO BOOT NEW YORK BOOT

THE WOOL PANT


3

THE OVERCOAT

ISAIA COAT, ETON SHIRT, ELEVENTY PANT

For your next outerwear investment, pick a print, then make it pop against lightcolored solids. A three-quarter length works over your suits and sport coats, yet it doesnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t look silly with denim (like your long black coat does).


4

THE SNAPFRONT SHIRT

ELEVENTY

Long considered a casual cold-weather staple, why not try this quilted piece between your shirt and sport coat? Itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s an extra layer of warmth, and style.


ELEVENTY SPORT COAT, VEST AND BRACELETS, FAHERTY THERMAL, PT01 TROUSER, TO BOOT NEW YORK BOOT

5

THE BOOT In a broken-in, burnished leather, this style can be dressed up or down. Cuff your pants to show them off, or better yet: put your feet up and relax awhile.


GIFTS

SANITOV E-CARGO BIKE From London-based Danish designer Alexander Host comes this stylish and practical commuter alternative (perfect for the beach house), already popular with celebs like Liev Schreiber and Kate Winslet. The SCB+ model links past and future with built-in smart functions like app-friendly GPS tracking and a hidden motor for hills or heavy loads (up to a whopping 440 pounds). Kid-friendly add-ons like a shaded cover and seat belts are available for safe, comfy rides. $3,400.

ultimate LUXURIES

We’re all about products and experiences that take your life to the next level. Here are some ways to elevate the everyday, with a touch of style. BY ROB E RT HAYN E S - P E TE RSON

PLAYERS CHAMPIONSHIP PLAYERS CLUB

NOBLE AUDIO PRESTIGE

Enjoy one of the world’s top golf tournaments on a whole new level with the first package of its kind offered on the PGA Tour. Membership scores a weekly (Tuesday through Championship Sunday) VIP ticket to TPC Sawgrass (Ponte Vedra Beach, Florida) in May. The details for 2018 were still being finalized at press time, but sample perks include daily access to the TPC Sawgrass Clubhouse and luxury viewing suites along the 17th and 18th holes. Award-winning chefs and bartenders provide endless food and drink each day, and members receive a $500 gift card and private custom fittings at the pro shop. $5,000 per ticket.

Noble Audio has transformed in-ear headphones into high-tech, customizable pieces of art. The California-based manufacturer earned its stripes designing in-ear monitors for professional musicians. Their Prestige line is crafted from exotic woods and other materials, while still offering deep sounds, multiple drivers and precision forms. “Amboyna Burl” earbuds evoke the finest dashboard in a Bentley, or a classic 3-wood. “Spalted Tamarind” includes watch gears embedded in the varnish. Each style is distinctive and a definite conversation starter (if you’re willing to remove them). Starting at $2,800.

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LEICA M10

EASYPOSE YOGA Wouldn’t it be nice if the yoga studio came to you, whenever you wanted? Now it can: this online/app-based startup from founder Ruben Dia allows you to customize one-hour sessions in your home, yard, beach, pool or office. Choose from a wide range of styles, experience levels and local certified instructors (California and the New York Tri-State area so far, but expanding) and you’ll be striking a Downward Dog within the hour. Like Uber, users rate instructors and provide feedback for others. Starting at $80 per session.

The 2017 release of this high-end M-system camera brings together a lot of features of both favorite Leica analog and digital series into one elegant package. The 10 improves the M-series’ ergonomics, plus offers an enlarged field-of-view rangefinder, expanded menu for sorting files, integrated WiFi connectivity, and a new 24 MP, full-frame CMOS sensor unique to this model, improving all aspects of image performance. Most importantly, it still looks like the coolest digital camera on the block. $6,895.

PLUM WINE STORAGE

BODUM GOLD COFFEE PRESS Not every refined experience needs to cost an arm and a leg. This limited-edition golden Chambord Press from Bodum celebrates the company’s 50th anniversary. While it’s not crafted from actual gold, the dual coating process and bakelite handle ensures this sturdy press pot will wake you up with a touch of glam, even after you throw it in the dishwasher. $59.

Bring home the tech high-end bars and restaurants have been using to serve individual glasses of expensive wine without having to pour the entire bottle in one sitting. Plum attractively stores any standard 750ml wine bottle and its double-cored needle penetrates any closure without removing the foil. A replaceable argon gas canister, good for 200 bottles, injects gas into the remaining bottle space, preserving your wine at the exact temperature you prefer. Meanwhile, the integrated HD camera identifies the bottle label, varietal, vintage and region, and displays on the front. Pour a little, pour a lot: your favorite wine stays ready for another evening. $1,500.

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GINSTITUTE / THE DISTILLERY London has witnessed a resurgence of gin distilleries after more than a century without a new one. The creators of Portobello Road Gin have opted out of the traditional visitors’ center for an immersive experience dubbed “The Distillery.” Stay in one of three recently opened bespoke guest rooms (located in trendy Notting Hill), dine at Gintonica, a Spanish-influenced bar/restaurant, and top it off with masterclasses at The Ginstitute: a popular tour, cocktail class and opportunity to make your own custom gin recipe (which you can reorder online once you’ve quaffed the first bottle). From £60 to £120.


WINE

futures

TENSE Welcome to the world of Bordeaux wine futures.

BY RO BE RT HAY NES -PET ERSO N

D

iving into any investment market—art, cars, Air Jordans—can be intimidating to a newcomer. Such is the case with Bordeaux wine futures, where participants buy into a vintage from a specific winery while it’s still aging in barrels, years before they can drink it. “There’s a perception that it’s only associated with four-digit wines and that you need to go big, investing a significant amount of money,” says Mary Gorman-McAdams, master of wine and North America market adviser for Bordeaux wines. “The reality is you can buy futures at all levels, particularly with vintages after 2014.” Though the concept of “wine futures” (or en-primeurs) began in Bordeaux some 200 years ago, securing the best wines of the region for negotiants (middle-man merchants), the modern version only became available to private collectors in the 1980s as a means of securing up-front cash for the region’s growers and vintners. “It made economic sense,” says Gorman-McAdams, “before the top wines were priced like they are now. Today it’s kind of a speculation sport.” The reality is, just as with art, there are many reasons to buy into a barrel of wine. But it’s important to know what you’re doing and why. Here are a few hints and tips from the experts: FIND A REPUTABLE MERCHANT: “In the past,” says Hortense Bernard, general manager of Millesima, USA, a French-owned, NYC-based wine merchant and one of the five largest buyers of Bordeaux Futures, “disreputable companies would sell wine they didn’t actually have, then use that money to buy wines for other clients.” (Think Ponzi scheme.).She recommends seeking out a company that has been successfully working with futures for many years and can satisfactorily answer any questions. DO YOUR RESEARCH: “Regardless of what price point you’re dabbling in,” says Gorman-McAdams, “read about the wines, get a feel for the vintage, find what’s written about the previous vintage and the producers.” KNOW WHAT YOU WANT: Perhaps you seek a piece of the hard-to-get Château Margaux first growth at a bargain for investment (prices for futures are almost always less than once the wine is bottled), but perhaps you just really like French wine. “In Europe, especially, I see more and more everyday wine selling on the futures market,” says Bernard.

“I will have customers buy the same brand each year, just because they like it.” Gorman-McAdams agrees: “Looking back at inexpensive wines from 2010, I think, ‘Why didn’t I buy a case or two of that?’” Others buy into vintages that mark anniversaries or other celebrations. LEARN THE CALENDAR: Part of what makes the Bordeaux futures game both fun and challenging is the time-sensitive nature of each release. Excitement builds in the fall, when that year’s harvest enters the barrels, but it’s spring when the fun begins, with En-Primeurs Week bringing thousands of wine professionals and journalists to Bordeaux to try the latest vintage and report their impressions. By mid-July, the prices have been set. VINTAGE IS KEY: Each year’s sale reflects the previous year’s harvest, and Bordeaux is a region especially susceptible to weather extremes. But there’s another reason to know whether 2017 was a good year or bad: “I will tell some customers during a really good vintage to go with secondary labels, because the wines will be a really good investment,” says Bernard. “When it’s a smaller vintage, you’re better going with first growth wines.” IT’S OKAY TO NERD OUT: “When people come to us, one thing that’s very important to them is provenance, that the wines are in their original cases,” says Bernard. It’s akin to collectors of action figures wanting their possessions “mint-in-box.”

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TOP AND CENTER IMAGES COURTESY OF MILLESIMA USA, BOTTOM IMAGE COURTESY OF BORDEAUX WINE COUNCIL

The reality is, just as with art, there are many reasons to buy into a barrel of wine. But it’s important to know what you’re doing and why.


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WHEELS

Moke America is the new fashion must-have! BY DAV I D A . ROSE

driving

W

NOSTALGIA

hat do Brigitte Bardot, Paul McCartney, The Beach Boys and Princess Margaret have in common? They all loved a small utility vehicle called the Mini Moke. In fact, in the ’60s and ’70s, numerous celebrities could be spotted driving these iconic cars around the French Riviera and other resort areas worldwide. James Bond even drove Mini Mokes in You Only Live Twice, Live and Let Die, The Spy Who Loved Me and Moonraker. (Of course, his other car was usually an Aston Martin, a Lotus or a Jaguar.) After a few decades out of production, the legendary Mokes are back, now offered with electric engines and power steering. The new Moke looks identical to the original, but with its modern updates, options and safety features, it’s the perfect modern-day beach buggy (available with automatic or manual transmission). Todd Rome, president and founder of private jet firm Blue Star Jets, has acquired the rights to produce Mokes for the USA and has already seen excellent sales. “As I travel abroad, I see the Moke in St. Tropez, St. Barths, Monte Carlo and throughout the Caribbean,” says Rome. “I’ve always loved these cars and rent them whenever I can. But for me, the

best part of this project is creating an American-built vehicle: we’re assembling in North Carolina and most of the parts are made in the USA.” Because the Moke is classified as an electric low speed vehicle (LSV) with speeds up to 35 MPH, it’s not allowed on highways, but it’s perfect for driving around town or through the many gated communities popping up around the world. Says Rome, “For people who love these cool cars, it’s about the history, the memories of film and rock stars cruising the Riviera. Mini Mokes became famous as low-maintenance, fun cars to drive, especially in warm weather climates. And with the color schemes we now offer, the Moke is also a bit of a fashion statement.” Above: Paul McCartney and Brigitte Bardot enjoy cruising in their Mokes. Insets: The newest iterations of the Moke look like the originals but use today’s tech.

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Translation: “Can we GO already?”

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TRAVEL One of many ocean vistas to take in along California’s Pacific Coast Highway.

Maui’s tropical rainforest.

ROAD

Hit the

Forget the “friendly” skies and feel the earth move under your tires. BY S HIR A L EVINE

T

here’s freedom in witnessing the world from behind the wheel. No security. No schedules. No shared seats. When you’re road tripping, the decisions are yours to make. Check out these jaunts near and far to discover hidden treasures that can only be found on land.

T H E ALL-AMER ICA N DRI V E

The Journey: Mendocino to Orange County in California The Distance: Nearly 656 miles What You’ll See: Glittery coastline dotted with idyllic beaches, coves and tide pools, undulating cliffs flanking dramatic curves, vineyards, farmland and a storied castle. The winding stretch of US Highway 1 known as the Pacific Coast Highway is divided into three very different regions: Southern, Central and Northern California. Pit stop options abound, from Carmel, Morro Bay and Pismo Beach to Hearst Castle, San Luis Obispo and Big Sur. SoCal’s beaches aren’t to be missed either. There’s Malibu, Santa Monica and Venice—just to name a few. (visitcalifornia.com) Pro Tip: Book a retreat. Esalen, with its clothing-optional healing cliffside hot springs, has reopened. Other famed favorites include Shasta Abbey, Tassajara and San Ysidro Ranch. (esalen.org, shastaabbey.org, sfzc.org/tassajara, sanysidroranch.com) Amazing Alternative: From Santa Barbara, island hop “the Galapagos Islands of the North,” aka the Channel Islands. Once inhabited by the Chumash people, visitors now populate Anacapa’s sea grottoes, bio-diverse Santa Rosa and campsite-heavy Santa Cruz island. (sierraclub.org)

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ROA D TO HAN A The Journey: Kahului to Kipahulu in Maui, Hawaii The Distance: 64.4 miles What You’ll See: Along Maui’s winding, narrow north shore highway are 59 bridges connecting the tropical rainforest. Cruise by taro patches, seascapes, waterfall pools, botanical gardens and some very huggable rainbow eucalyptus trees. Designated the Hana Millennium Legacy Trail, the route along highway 36 is best driven roof down, music up and accompanied by the Road to Hana GyPSy Guide app ($4.99). (roadtohana.com) Pro Tip: Careful! One part of the highway alone has 620 curves. Amazing Alternative: A less meandering route is the drive to the Mt. Haleakalā crater. Guides suggest departing at an absurdly early hour to catch the sunrise, but even better is the sunset—just bring a jacket as it’s freezing up there. Adventure junkies: cycle down with Bike Maui from the 10,000-foot summit for a 26-mile descent to the ocean in Paia. (nps.gov/hale, bikemaui.com)

SOUTH O F THE B O RDER The Journey: Tijuana to Los Cabos in Mexico The Distance: 1,100 miles What You’ll See: Within a single peninsula lies Mexico’s Highway 1, featuring a dramatic, transformative visual change from azure bays to a seemingly endless expanse of tumbleweeded desert. Witness the gray whale migration from December through April. Yearround check out the Cochimi Indian caves adorned with petroglyphs, fancy vineyards and gut-busting gastronomy ranging from two-taqueria towns to epicurean hotspots. There’s the real


Castles and ruins abound in Wales.

Natural stone arch in Los Cabos, Mexico.

Hotel California, the kite-surfing mecca of La Ventana, 17th-century missions, and beaches with names like Lover’s and Divorce. The finale? The iconic natural stone arch that connects the Pacific Ocean with the Sea of Cortez. (bajainsider.com) Pro Tip: Avoid crossing one of the busiest borders in the world by car. Rent your vehicle in Tijuana to ensure Mexican insurance and other local paperwork. (cabaja.com) Amazing Alternative: Roll off the highway via motorcycle to take the interior dirt roads where mountains, waterfalls, pools and hot springs replace cactus and coastline. (bajaride.com)

AC ROSS T HE POND The Journey: Around the isle of Wales The Distance: Options vary What You’ll See: Literature and cinema have long depicted the romantic melancholy of the English countryside. But Wales is no longer a coal mining, industrial nucleus; rather it’s an awe-inspiring serrated coastline comprising lush greenery and shining sun. Pro Tip: Trade four wheels for two and saddle up with South Wales’ Drover Cycles. Pedal through the homeland of the Joneses (Catherine Zeta and Tom), where royal real estate dominates given the area’s sheer volume of regal fortresses. There’s a lot of stone to cover, but fortunately there are 2,000 km of National Cycle Network paths. The 20.5-mile cycle from folksy-chic Abergavenny to the famed Hay-on-Wye will take you through the sheep-littered Black Mountains. Then climb to Gospel Pass: a fairytale-like spot 549 meters above sea level ending in a steep, speedy drop. Further southwest is Pembrokeshire, where a ride along the 186-mile coastal path offers harbour seal sightings. Amazing Alternative: In Pembrokeshire stay at Preseli Venture’s eco lodge to experience the Welsh sport of coasteering. Outfitted in freezing-water wetsuits, guided groups scramble in and out of the water, grabbing onto rock formations, swimming into caves and jumping off cliffs. (drover.cc, preseliventure.co.uk)

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ROCKY MO U N TAIN , HO ! The Journey: Banff to Jasper in Alberta, Canada The Distance: 147 miles What You’ll See: Some seriously epic topography. Think jagged ranges with pristine mountain lakes (Peyto, Bow and Waterfowl are among the best). Waterfalls? There’s Panther, Tangle and Athabasca. To journey across the Icefields Parkway is to pass sweeping valleys and vast wooded wilderness, winding through the heart of the Rocky Mountains. Don’t miss the Canadian treasures that are Banff and Jasper National Parks. (icefieldsparkway.ca) Pro Tip: Take a hike! The Athabasca and Saskatchewan glaciers have guided alpine jaunts over moraines and up summit ridges. Star-seekers should note that Jasper is home to the impressive Dark Sky Preserve—just beware of grizzly and black bears! (jasperdarksky.travel) Amazing Alternative: Forgo the highway and travel by rail aboard the Rocky Mountaineer. The Vancouver to Banff sojourn chugs through the Continental Divide and more. (rockymountaineer.com)

AMISH PARADISE The Journey: The Mason-Dixon Line to Adamstown, Pennsylvania The Distance: 54.7 miles What You’ll See: A charming collision of Amish, Mennonites and hipsters. Lancaster County’s fertile farmland is where horse-led buggies slow Priuses in onetraffic-light towns. Local farm stands and farmer’s markets offer smoothies, kale salads and gluten-free delights, dotting a setting where an 18th-century German vibe still reigns. An ever-growing urban group hailing from NYC, Philly, Boston and DC, along with Franklin and Marshall College graduates, has invaded to enjoy the freshness and affordability. Pro Tip: Eat local! Much of the food served in the area hails from the region’s farmlands. Check out the towns of Lititz, Ephrata, and yes, Intercourse. Amazing Alternative: Get out of your car for a quiet birdwatch. At the base of the Conowingo Dam are eagles, ospreys, herons, vultures and egrets to be spotted.


— MARIKKEN: BASETWO HOODIE, SOTTOBOSCO — BASETWO PANTS, SOTTOBOSCO — TUBAKUBA, BERGEN — PHOTO: VIRRE DAHL —

— EINAR: BASETWO ½-ZIP, SOTTOBOSCO — BJØRKE PANTS, BLACK – SKUTLE SCARF, BLACK — ART DIRECTION: HALTENBANKEN —

A CONTEMPORARY TAKE ON WOOL


END PAGE

GET SMART

Smart Casual is a notch above Business Casual: an uncontrived, pulled-together look for a day in the office or night on the town. A sales executive friend of mine confessed that he hasn’t worn a suit in years because he conducts most of his business over the phone or email. We can lament or rejoice over technology’s impact. But from a fashion perspective, an unintended casualty of its rapid rise is the demise of office attire. Clearly, many men have traded in suits and ties for the somewhat-too-casual, downgraded and downright sloppy look of jeans and T-shirts or khakis and polos. What’s next, Snuggies? Not quite. When confident self-styled men play it smart by dressing for work in Smart Casual, it pays off in spades. So, exactly what is the Smart Casual aesthetic? It’s looking neat, relaxed and pulled together without necessarily “matching.” It’s about investing in versatile sports-

wear pieces made from quality fabrics, and learning how to pair them. Actually, when you buy the right items in the right neutral shades, there’s not much to learn: you can create multiple looks by effortlessly layering shirts, sweaters, vests and outerwear with wool trousers, five-pocket pants or clean denim. Adding the right accessories (handsome cashmere scarf, patterned pocket square, distinctive watch, cool eyewear, burnished leather belt) will take it up a notch without looking contrived. Italians believe in la bella figura: putting careful thought into the image you present to the world, through one’s clothing, one’s attitude, one’s ability to make the ordinary extraordinary. With so many great options for Smart Casual this fall, attaining the extraordinary is easier than you think. — BY HANS GSCHLIESSER

SMART TIPS FOR SMART GUYS

suit jacket with khakis or jeans; slim suit trousers work with a knit cardigan or vest. Then, when you want to get down to brass tacks, show them you mean business and wear the pieces together as a suit. (Advice: dry-clean both the jacket and pant at the same time, even if one doesn’t need it, so they age in unison.) T I E G A M E : Try a not-so-shiny knit, wool/silk or cashmere tie to make a casual-but-still “I mean business” impression. Pair a tie with a sport shirt rather than a dress shirt: a slightly lower knot is perfectly appropriate here and not stuffy. N E U T R A L T E R R I T O R Y: Fall’s neutral colors include gray, brown, black, navy and shades of olive and burgundy; stick to the neutrals in key pieces and add contrast with accessories. This way your tops (woven or knit) will always work with your bottoms. Winning combinations: navy and gray, navy and tan, or brown and gray. S O L E M A N : Get off on the right foot wearing this season’s updated cool sneakers, casual leathers and soft suedes . PAT T E R N R E C O G N I T I O N : Yes, solids are simpler to match, but sometimes it pays to stand out. (Advice: Consider a new soft plaid sport coat, that plays well with dark-wash jeans.)

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IMAGE COURTESY ELEVENTY

S U I T C A S E : Invest in suit separates and wear them in different ways. Pair that classic


THE ALL NEW

HAS ARRIVED

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J O N A S M A S O N a n d H U G O V I L L A N O V A , N Y, 1 1 a m


A N D R I S E N M O R TO N F O RU M FA L L & W I N T E R 2 0 1 7 / 1 8

Andrisen Morton  
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