__MAIN_TEXT__
feature-image

Page 1

ANNUAL REPORT

A Year of Collaboration, Stories & Survival

NOVEMBER 2013 TO SEPTEMBER 2014

Warra-Warra Far West Community Legal Centre Annual Report 2014

Legal Service

A Year of Collaboration, Stories & Survival

1


ACKNOWLEDGMENTS We acknowledge our funding and pro bono partners, and all of our local businesses and collaborative community sector partners in the Far West NSW and in NSW that have provided financial and in-kind support to FWCLC Inc. particularly to the 2013/2014 Festival of Respect and the Road Show Outreaches to Tibooburra, Ivanhoe and White Cliff. • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • •

Ashurst Lawyers Broken Hill Art Exchange Commonwealth Legal Services Program, Commonwealth Attorney General’s Department Community Legal Centres Program, Legal Aid NSW Cooperative Legal Service Delivery Program, Legal Aid NSW Dennis Roach, Consultant Duke of Cornwell, Fabric Closet, Outback Pharmacy and Top End Meats Far West District Department of Family and Community Services Festival of Respect Celebration Booklet Partners and Supporters – www.festivalofrespect.org.au Josh Cowdrey, Mackenzie Business Centre Justice and Community Sector Partners in the Far West NSW & NSW LawAccess NSW Legal Aid NSW – Civil, Family & Employment Law Local Media: 999 ABC Broken Hill, 2BH / HILL FM, BDT and SCA Northern Rivers Community Legal Centre Safety and Wellbeing Programme Management, Community Safety Branch, Community Safety and Policy Division, Department of the Prime Minister and Cabinet Women’s Domestic Violence Advocacy Program, Legal Aid NSW

Annual Report Coordinator Annual Report Editors Annual Report Photos Design & Production

Tracey Willow Mariette Curcuruto & Donna Kennedy Tommy Wallace, Meg Kelly & Donna Kennedy Josh Cowdrey, Mackenzie Business Centre

We respectfully acknowledge the Elders and the Aboriginal people who are the traditional owners of the Far West NSW. Published by Far West Community Legal Centre Inc. Address Phone Fax

PO Box 399 08 8088 2020 08 8088 2060

Copyright 2014 Far West Community Legal Centre Inc. All rights reserved


TABLE OF CONTENTS Our Vision, Values & Work

4

The 2014 FWCLC INC. Board

6

The Staff & Volunteers at FWCLC Inc.

8

Our Students & Their Learning Experience

12

Reports President 16 Chief Executive Officer

18

Far West Community Legal Centre

22

Warra-Warra Legal Service

28

Far West Women’s Domestic Violence Advocacy Service

36

Far West Cooperative Legal Service Delivery Program

40

New Program: Staying Home Leaving Violence Broken Hill

42

Access to Justice with Our Community

46

Financial Reports

52


OUR VISION, VALUES & WORK

4

A Year of Collaboration, Stories & Survival


OUR VISION, VALUES & WORK FWCLC Inc. is represented by the following vital-front line services. These three services are committed to providing a responsive service to the most vulnerable and financially and geographically isolated people and communities in the Far West NSW who have the least access to justice. •

FAR WEST COMMUNITY LEGAL CENTRE (‘FWCLC’)

WARRA WARRA LEGAL SERVICE (‘WWLS’) – Auspiced by FWCLC Inc.

FAR WEST WOMEN’S DOMESTIC VIOLENCE COURT ADVOCACY SERVICE (‘FWWDVCAS’) – Auspiced by FWCLC Inc.

Far West Community Legal Centre Annual Report 2014

FAR WEST COOPERATIVE LEGAL SERVICE DELIVERY PROGRAM (‘FWCLSD’) - Auspiced by FWCLC Inc. The CLSD Program is a regionally-based approach to legal service delivery in NSW. It aims to improve outcomes for economically and socially disadvantaged people by building cooperative and strategic networks of key legal services and community organisations.

STAYING HOME LEAVING VIOLENCE BROKEN HILL (‘SHLVBH’) - Auspiced by FWCLC Inc. SHLVBH is funded by Family & Community Services NSW. SHLVBH is a specialised domestic violence program aimed at preventing women and children becoming homeless. SHLVBH provides long term, needs-based and integrated intensive case management.

The FWCLSD Program meets quarterly and identifies unmet legal needs in the region. As a result of a collaborative planning process, the FWCLSD Regional Coordinator facilitates consultation and discussion and encourages local projects, partnerships and community legal outreach in the Far West region.

A Year of Collaboration, Stories & Survival

5


2013 - 2014 FWCLC INC. BOARD

6

A Year of Collaboration, Stories & Survival


2013 - 2014 FWCLC INC. BOARD EXECUTIVE MEMBERS President

Dave Garland

Vice President

Elizabeth Sandow

Treasurer

Ellen Day

Secretary

Traci-Lee Powles (as of 4/2/14)

ORDINARY MEMBERS Julie-Anne Philp Linda Nadge (resigned 22/08/14) Nandini Ray (as of 4/2/14)

ACKNOWLEDGEMENT The FWCLC Inc. Board and Staff acknowledge and sincerely thank Linda Nadge, for her leadership, tireless efforts and wealth of experience. Linda served as the Chairperson from 2011 -2013. Linda’s major achievements in this role included, leading the organisational review and restructure; ensuring that FWCLC Inc. utilised its resources in the most effective way and reach the ever increasing needs of the most disadvantaged people in the Far West NSW, and supporting and mentoring the CEO, Tracey Willow. Linda’s contributions significantly strengthened and enhanced the organisation as a whole, and as a result, FWCLC Inc. is now a major contributor as a leading community organisation in the Far West. The Board and Staff wish Linda Nadge and Outback Astronomy the very best in the future. FWCLC Inc. also acknowledges and sincerely thanks Elizabeth Sandow and Nandini Ray for their positive and constructive contributions to FWCLC Inc.

PUBLIC OFFICER Vicki Cullen

Far West Community Legal Centre Annual Report 2014

A Year of Collaboration, Stories & Survival

7


CURRENT STAFF AT THE FWCLC INC.

8

A Year of Collaboration, Stories & Survival


CURRENT STAFF AT THE FWCLC INC.

FAR WEST COMMUNITY LEGAL CENTRE Tracey Willow Chief Executive Officer (started October 2011) Mariette Curcuruto Principal Solicitor (started August 2012) Vicki Cullen Finance Officer (started May 2000) Eliza Hull Solicitor (started July 2013) Jodie Lemon Solicitor (started October 2013 until April 2014)

Stacey Jackson Senior Administration, Information, Referral & Project Officer (20072009, returned September 2011) Bianca Cattonar Legal Secretary/Intake (started February 2011) Meg Kelly FWCLSD Regional Coordinator (started May 2009) Jen Mitchell Community Development Worker (started August 2013) Matt Lyster PPF Solicitor (started June 2014)

Far West Community Legal Centre Annual Report 2014

WARRA WARRA LEGAL SERVICE Donna Kennedy Manager (started April 2012)

Anthony Hayward Resource Worker (started March 2012)

Kelly Oxford Principal Solicitor (started January 2013)

Julie Dennis Family Support/CLE Worker & Victims of Crime Paralegal, (started August 2013 until July 2014)

Prue Sulicich Finance Officer (started July 2009) Ann-Maree Payne Senior Administration/Resource (started 2009) Alexia Zsigmond Solicitor (started April 2013)

Taryn Mitchell Resource Worker (started September 2014) Synitta Adams Trainee (started September 2014)

A Year of Collaboration, Stories & Survival

9


FAR WEST WOMEN’S DOMESTIC VIOLENCE COURT ADVOCACY SERVICE Loretta Stuart Coordinator/Aboriginal Specialist Worker (started April 2008)

Susan Marks Wilcannia Outreach/ WDVCAS Worker (started July 2009)

Narelle Blows Coordinator (started September 2009)

Prue Sulicich Finance Officer (started July 2009)

STAYING HOME LEAVING VIOLENCE BROKEN HILL (‘SHLVBH’) Fiona Camilleri Coordinator (started September 2014)

Libby Matthias Advocacy Worker (started September 2014)

Rhonda Fekeila Aboriginal Advocacy Worker (started September 2014)

Fiona Camilleri Wentworth Outreach/ WDVCAS Worker (June 2013 until September 2014)

10

A Year of Collaboration, Stories & Survival

Far West Community Legal Centre Annual Report 2014


WE FAREWELL, THANK & ACKNOWLEDGE •

Jodie Lemon, Solicitor, FWCLC

Julie Dennis, the Family Support /Victims of Crime Paralegal Program Worker, WWLS

Fiona Camilleri, Outreach Court Support Advocate, FWWDVCAS (now coordinator of SHLVBH)

We wish Jodie and Julie the best for the future and thank them for their significant contributions to FWCLC Inc. We also acknowledge our wonderful cleaners Ann-Maree Wilson and Ann-Maree Payne, and Robert Stollar for all his renovation work at three of the FWCLC Inc. offices. Everyone at FWCLC Inc. makes a difference. Thank you to all of the FWCLC Inc. Staff for making our working lives so much easier; we value and appreciate you.

Far West Community Legal Centre Annual Report 2014

A Year of Collaboration, Stories & Survival

11


OUR STUDENTS & THEIR LEARNING

12

A Year of Collaboration, Stories & Survival


OUR STUDENTS & THEIR LEARNING This year FWCLC and WWLS supervised, resourced and supported a record number of students from high schools and universities. Their individual and collective contributions have been of vital importance to the respective services and the organisation as a whole. Each student deserves recognition, as ethical and honourable people committed to making a difference in the Far West. The students include: • • • • • • • • • • •

Alicia Matthews-Tucker, Year 10 (work experience), Loreto College Adelaide, Bonnie Le Compte, 4th Year Social Work, The University of Sydney Courtney Kemp, Year 9 (work experience), Menindee High School Dionne Devlin, Community Development Placement, Murdoch University Djani Kelly, Year 12, School Based Trainee, Menindee High School Kyra Hazelman, 4th Year Social Work, University of NSW Lillian Lewsley, 3rd Year Nursing, University of Western Sydney Ruth Brigden, Criminology Placement, The University of Sydney Sam Goldrick, 4th Year Social Work, The University of Sydney Selina Hall. 1st Year Policing, Charles Sturt University Tommy Wallace, 4th Year Social Work, University of NSW

Far West Community Legal Centre Annual Report 2014

A Year of Collaboration, Stories & Survival

13


DIONE DEVLIN

KYRA HAZELMAN

ALICIA MATTHEWS TUCKER

My placement at the FWCLC has allowed me to engage with my community in important areas such as social justice.

My time at FWCLC has opened my eyes to the unique opportunities that non-government organisations such as FWCLC provide. I have been involved in research, advocacy, community development and education, as well as court support work.

I am a year 10 student and I am unsure of what occupation I would like have in the future.

I have not only learnt to work as a Social Worker in a community legal centre, but I have learnt to work as part of a team and part of a community, to encourage the breaking down of barriers, to make the justice system more accessible, and to build the Broken Hill community into a stronger and more supportive one.

Being at FWCLC was a great week of learning, personal development and hands on experience. I also learnt some of the skills and requirements needed to practice social work and law, and got the opportunity to put some of the learning into practice.

I have been introduced to the practices of reflection and of self-care and I can see the importance of these practices in retaining a sustainable long term career in this field. I have been engaged in robust discussion and have benefitted greatly from the generosity with which the staff and students display their thoughts and opinions. I have been encouraged to challenge myself and my thoughts in a supported and intelligent environment. Relating practice to theory has taught me to find the similarities between my university education and the real world and to understand how my thoughts and actions affect others in my practice.

FWCLC gave me an upfront experience which will benefit me with my journey and the future choices I will make.

I have been challenged, but these challenges have come in an environment that has been extremely hopeful and encouraging.

I have been required to think about who and what I am and how that relates to how I behave and think.

14

A Year of Collaboration, Stories & Survival

Far West Community Legal Centre Annual Report 2014


BONNIE LE COMPTE

SAM GOLDRICK

TOMMY WALLACE

Working at WWLS was an experience that will stay with me for life. I began to see myself as a social worker.

This entire journey has been reflective, transformative, challenging and confronting and will be the most memorable experience of my social work degree. I was able to develop skills out here that will be invaluable for my future as a social worker.

On placement I have been able to incorporate my passion for theatre, videos and graphic design into social work practice.

WWLS is there for community when there is crisis and they are part of a movement of prevention and this is synonymous with the social work profession. My role as a community development worker provided a space to work creatively, learn to understand and respond to community need, whilst working in a team environment. I also did yarn bombing out the front of WWLS, with a group of eager students and community members.

The team modelled strength, professionalism, compassion, and care for not only their clients and their work but for each other and you really got the sense that there really isn’t a mountain high enough they couldn’t or wouldn’t take head on.

FWCLC encouraged me to recognise and use my strengths, test my comfort zone and pre-conceived ideas in many collaborative discussions. I was given the opportunity to mentor students and staff with new ideas surrounding social work theories, technology and provide technological tools for the organisation’s survival.

Having only left a couple of months ago, I still keep drawing upon my experiences from the CLC in many aspects of life. I have become more aware of and appreciate the diversity that exists in our society and critical of the policies and institutional approaches that so often silence it. It has also made me look at my own local community and become more involved, helping to establish and create connections at home.

Far West Community Legal Centre Annual Report 2014

A Year of Collaboration, Stories & Survival

15


PRESIDENT’S REPORT

16

A Year of Collaboration, Stories & Survival


PRESIDENT’S REPORT I would like to thank Linda Nadge for the brilliant all-encompassing work that she did as our past President, and also thank all the dedicated Board Members that voluntarily donated their time, sometimes through demanding times. With a change of the Federal Government comes a change in the way the wind blows in regards to our funding for FWCLC and WWLS. We are again in a fight for our very existence in providing the most valuable services to the community of Broken Hill and the Far West. The FWCLC Inc. Board will continue to provide all the assistance and support that is possible to our most valued staff through these trying times.

I also acknowledge all of our highly valued staff from FWCLC, WWLS, FWWDVCAS, FWCLD and now, SHLVBH. The FWCLC Inc. Board and Staff will maintain a strong and united team in 2015. I look forward to remaining as a member of the FWCLC Inc. Board, and I am confident that a healthy and active Board will continue to give support, guidance and wisdom to all concerned in the operations of the FWCLC, WWLS, FWWDVCAS, FWCLSD and SHLVBH. David Garland President, FWCLC Inc.

I acknowledge the dedication and commitment of our senior staff – the FWCLC Inc. CEO Tracey Willow, Donna Kennedy, Mariette Curcuruto, Kelly Oxford, Vicki Cullen, Prue Sulicich, Narelle Blows, Loretta Stuart, Meg Kelly, Fiona Camilleri, Stacey Jackson and Ann Maree Payne.

Far West Community Legal Centre Annual Report 2014

A Year of Collaboration, Stories & Survival

17


CEO’S REPORT

18

A Year of Collaboration, Stories & Survival


CEO’S REPORT Courage is more exhilarating that fear and in the long run it is easier. We do not have to become heroes overnight. Just a step at a time, facing each new experience, seeing each new experience, not as dreadful, but as a discovery. We all have the strength to stare down adversity. When I reflect on the last year, I am inspired by Eleanor Roosevelt. FWCLC Inc. is indeed an organisation that faces adversity on a daily basis and with courage, resilience, tenacity and persistence, fights the fight, every day, for those who need it most. This year has been another incredible year for FWCLC Inc. Each service has strived to be even more responsive, resourceful, productive and efficient. Each service has endeavoured to meet its clients’ and communities’ needs, and where we have been unable to, have referred in the most considered and effective manner, to our community sector partners. We have also presented these unidentified needs at numerous forums and at local, state and national conferences.

Far West Community Legal Centre Annual Report 2014

FWCLC Inc. has also strived to create valuable learning environments for its staff and students, and create an environment that inspires and invites collaboration and partnerships, internally and externally. In this period, FWCLC Inc. completed the very 1st Far West Festival of Respect. This innovative new access to justice strategy started on 25 October 2013, and ended on 29 March 2014. This strategy delivered sixteen community-inspired events. We then reviewed and evaluated the process, and started again in September 2014 to develop the framework for the second Festival of Respect. This new strategy will feature even more collaborations and partnerships, and is more organic in terms of its planning process. The Annual Report showcases these events. The Festival of Respect won the 2014 Broken Hill City Council Volunteer Award for Event of the Year, is a NSW Tidy Town Community Project nominee and was a nominee at a gala ceremony in Sydney at the LGBTI ACON Awards. FWCLC Inc. was one of four community organisations recognised for their contributions to the LGBTI communities in the Far West. We also have presented the collaboration strategy at two major conferences, the NSW Legal Symposium and the National Community Legal Centres Conference. Each year, we do what we do best; we advocate and represent vulnerable and marginalised individuals, who need us the most. And we do more; much more.

We convened important interagency forums i.e. Far West Domestic/Family Violence Working Party, GLBTI Network, Festival of Respect Collaboration strategy.

We demonstrated our commitment to innovation i.e. Speaking and Healing Strategy (WWLS) and the Barrier Partnership Domestic Violence Agency referral Scheme (WDVCAS), Saturday Morning Clinic (FWCLC).

We organised and facilitated new training initiatives i.e. Law for Community Workers, Family/Domestic Violence Forum, Diversity & Complex Needs.

FWCLC Inc. successfully tendered for Staying Home Leaving Violence Broken Hill, along with our two consortium partners, the NSW Police Local Area Barrier Command and Lifeline Broken Hill. This is an important new service for women and children experiencing domestic violence and who are at risk of homelessness. SHLVBH is funded for two years and promises to deliver long term case management. FWCLC Inc. welcomes the new team led by Fiona Camilleri. FWCLC Inc. has had an explosive social media presence this year, and has used social media to actively promote all of its events and collaborations. FWCLC and WWLS have new websites, and its auspiced partner services are linked to these two websites. We thank the very talented Jen Mitchell for her extensive IT skills. Jen also developed the Festival of Respect website. Both are important mediums for FWCLC Inc. to promote

A Year of Collaboration, Stories & Survival

19


its achievements and its service delivery strategy. We also acknowledge Tommy Wallace, a final Year UNSW Social Work student, for breathing a new style of creative energy into our organisation. Both Jen and Tommy have reminded us that there are no limits to creativity and we, even as a relatively small NGO, can have a major impact. In this Annual Report, all of our services have showcased their inspirational work. We are proud of our achievements and the difference we make in the Far West region. This achievement is a result of every FWCLC Inc. staff member committing 100% on a daily basis. As the CEO, I thank all of our staff and all of our students for their diligence, passion and professionalism. I acknowledge our senior staff members - Donna Kennedy, Mariette Curcuruto, Kelly Oxford, Vicki Cullen, Prue Sulicich, Narelle Blows, Loretta Stuart, Meg Kelly, Fiona Camilleri, Stacey Jackson and Ann Maree Payne. Each person is extraordinary in their own right and collectively, they are a powerful force. There are serious “core funding” challenges ahead for FWCLC Inc. in 2015, especially FWCLC and WWLS. These challenges may have dire consequences, and may affect our ability to operate as strong and responsive services. This year has been another incredible year for FWCLC Inc. Each service has strived to be even more responsive, resourceful, productive and efficient. Each service has endeavoured to meet its clients’ and communities’ needs, and where we have been unable to, have referred in the most considered and effective manner, to our community sector partners. We have also presented these unidentified needs at numerous forums and at local, state and national conferences. Tracey Willow CEO, FWCLC Inc.

20

A Year of Collaboration, Stories & Survival

Far West Community Legal Centre Annual Report 2014


FAR WEST COMMUNITY LEGAL CENTRE

22

A Year of Collaboration, Stories & Survival


FAR WEST COMMUNITY LEGAL CENTRE CELEBRATING A BRILLIANT YEAR! Of all of the wishes I have had for this Centre, the strongest and most persistent has been to increase staffing – legal and non-legal – so that we could meet the unmet legal need that is so great in this region. This year, we had a taste of all that could be. It has been exciting to say the least – high advice numbers, more files open than ever before, excellent outcomes for clients, servicing outlying communities through consistent outreach, trialling new strategies to reach out to our community and engage people and other community organisations in the region in many different ways. We have a wonderful team of very skilled people with passion, drive and determination. This Community Legal Centre could not operate as effectively or service the number of clients that it does without the contribution of each staff member: their contribution to the success and growth of the service is immense. We have been able to achieve great things, in providing legal advice and casework to the vulnerable and disadvantaged in our community, as well as producing our website to put important legal information on issues that we see constantly in practice “out there”, and working collaboratively with our partner agencies in this region to deliver valuable and timely community legal education and community development strategies. Unfortunately, the relief and celebration of our last annual report is tempered by the funding Far West Community Legal Centre Annual Report 2014

realities faced by Far West CLC on 30 June 2015. Our funding injection under the last Federal Labor Government has been halved – now ending on 30 June 2015. As a result, without investment by either the State or Federal Government, our vital frontline service, which provides quality, professional and responsive face to face legal advice and casework to people in our region will be reduced by up to two thirds of its capacity. I write this report with one wish - that the wonderful work of our team, its dedication to our local community and its frankly ever expanding workload is recognised and rewarded with a necessary funding injection that will maintain and optimise its service level.

OUR TEAM FWCLC is the combination of the talents of these dedicated and amazing people: Stacey Jackson our Senior Administration, Reception, Intake/ Project Worker, Bianca Cattonar our paralegal, Eliza Hull our junior solicitor, our new Junior Solicitor Matt Lyster, Jen Mitchell who filled many roles including IT and Website design and support and paralegal, Vicki Cullen our finance worker and Tracey Willow our CEO. I also acknowledge the contribution of Jodie Lemon, who left us in April, who worked as a solicitor with us for a contract period of 6 months. Thanks also to Djani Kelly, our school based trainee and also brilliant students who have given their time and energy to the CLC this year – Sam Goldrick, Kyra Hazelman, Tommy Walsh and Dionne

Devlin. Each has contributed so much to our team, and was willing, enthusiastic and skilled. Again, I acknowledge our fearless leader, Tracey Willow – it is a pleasure and a privilege to work with you. You lead by example and your commitment to this vital service is appreciated by staff and community alike.

LEGAL ADVICE AND CASEWORK The increase in Solicitors and staff in our service has of course had a positive effect on our ability to service our community. We have serviced far more clients than anticipated, and exceeded all of our targets regarding the delivery of advice and casework. This year has seen the work of the Centre broaden significantly. Family Law continues to be a large proportion of our work, which equates to 39% of the work of the Centre this year. Of the family law matters that the Centre has undertaken, 43% of those matters involved domestic or family violence. Of the entire work of the Centre, domestic and family violence matters account for 20% of matters. There has been an increase in Traffic Matters which accounts for 9% of our work. We continue to cover a vast spread of legal issues, which include Employment Law, Credit and Debt, Issues with Government and other civil law problems. Our new innovation – Saturday morning clinics - has proven very popular with our community.

A Year of Collaboration, Stories & Survival

23


Since their commencement on 5/4/14, we have given 120 advice sessions on Saturdays between 10am and 1pm.

PUBLICATIONS

COMMUNITY LEGAL EDUCATION AND COMMUNITY DEVELOPMENT

On April 2014, we launched our new website. It has garnered some brilliant feedback – both from clients who are our end users, who recognise the benefits of the information and its clear language, but also from other key industry bodies, including the Law and Justice Foundation. We are pleased to present what we believe is a well-planned, clear and relevant resource for use by our community.

It has been a busy year for FWCLC in Community Legal Education and Community Development. As well as LoveBites, Cross Roads, New Voices-New Laws, the Youth Expos, Children’s Week, NAIDOC Week, White Ribbon Day, Reclaim the Night and 1 Billion Women Rising, we have done so much more. We have been instrumental in running the very first “Law for Community Workers” project in the Far West, delivering Advocacy and Systems Training, Workplace Bullying Training and two excellent forums – a Domestic Violence Forum and also a Care and Protection Forum. All have been well received and attended. From little things big things grow - the Aurora Grant regarding the legal issues that affect Gay, Lesbian, Bisexual, Transgendered and Intersex people (GLBTI) – led to so much more – incorporating the GLBTI community into the Festival of Respect, and resulting in a nomination as a finalist in the AIDS Council of NSW Honour Awards Community Organisation section. The success of our access to justice strategy, the Festival of Respect, speaks for itself. As always, we continue to innovate and challenge ourselves to be responsive to the needs of our community, to start conversation about big issues and work from a framework of primary prevention as well as appropriate and professional response.

24

I thank Jen Mitchell for her knowledge and skill, and tireless effort in bringing the idea to fruition, and for assisting in the development of the plain language resources on the Website. More such clear and accessible publications are planned, funding permitted.

OUTREACH We continued to outreach to Tibooburra, White Cliffs and Ivanhoe. This continued collaboration with Warra Warra Legal Service, Lifeline, Maari Ma Aboriginal Health, NSW Health, Centacare, Mission Australia, the University of NSW and the wonderful people of those communities is so positive. Outreach services in the Broken Hill Correctional Centre, Menindee and Wilcannia continue and have been strongly supported. We thank the local communities of Wilcannia, Menindee, Ivanhoe, Tibooburra and White Cliffs and the staff and inmates at Broken Hill Gaol for their willingness to work with us. Mariette Curcuruto FWCLC Principal Solicitor

A Year of Collaboration, Stories & Survival

Case Study Jenny had been a victim of domestic violence and had one child, who was very young. She had fled to Broken Hill after the violence became too much for her to handle, and after numerous interventions by Police and medical and counselling professionals. She wanted to come home to family to be safe. Her violent partner continued to try to intimidate and threaten Jenny, and it seemed was more interested in terrorising her than having any relationship with their child. Jenny wanted the violence to stop, and also to protect her child from being taken away by her partner – who had threatened to do so on several occasions by text and voice message. We were able to assist Jenny by advocating with Police to obtain an Apprehended Domestic Violence Order for the protection of herself and her child. We also assisted Jenny navigating the family law process. After gathering evidence and making strong submissions to the Court about the violence and the need for the child to be kept safe from the psychological harm that the violence would cause and the need for Jenny and her child to be close to her support networks, we were able to obtain final orders to allow her to have sole parental responsibility for her child and for her child to live with her in Broken Hill, protective injunctions to prevent her partner from coming to her home, work or the child’s school or preschool, and also allowing any time that her partner spent with the child to be at her discretion with the supervision of a third party to ensure the child’s safety.


Far West Community Legal Centre Annual Report 2014

A Year of Collaboration, Stories & Survival

25


9%

9%

6% 6%

A Year of Collaboration, Stories & Survival

138

OTHER CIVIL LAW

CIIL AND DEBT

TRAFFIC

WILLS, GUARDIANSHIP, POWERS OF ATTORNEY

EMPLOYMENT

20%

26

809 NON-CASEWORK PROJECTS

FAMILY / DOMESTIC VIOLENCE

FAMILY LAW, CHILDREN & PROPERTY

39%

INFORMATION ONLY

8%

Far West Community Legal Centre Annual Report 2014


31%

LEGAL & NON-LEGAL CLIENT ACTIVITIES GENDER & IDENTITY 925 (81%) 210 (19%)

MEN

LEGAL

NON-LEGAL

21%

69% WOMEN

89%

ABORIGINAL OR TORRES STRAIT ISLANDER

BROKEN HILL

LOCATION

1%

NOT STATED

78%

Our clients are from the following geographic areas in the Far West region

NONINDIGENOUS

4%

2%

WICANNIA

Far West Community Legal Centre Annual Report 2014

MENINDEE / SUNSET STRIP

1%

WHITE CLIFFS

1% TIBOOBURRA

2% BROKEN HILL CORRECTIONAL CENTRE

A Year of Collaboration, Stories & Survival

27


WARRA-WARRA LEGAL SERVICE

28

A Year of Collaboration, Stories & Survival


WARRA-WARRA LEGAL SERVICE WWLS has been extremely busy this year in 2013 -2014. It has been about changes and survival for WWLS and our Aboriginal communities in the Far West NSW. We would like to acknowledge the WWLS staff for their dedication and the excellent work that has been achieved within the communities of Broken Hill, Wilcannia, Menindee, Ivanhoe, White Cliffs, Tibooburra and Wentworth/Dareton.

in case managed disengaged children and families. •

Synitta Adams, WWLS Volunteer & Trainee: Synitta is a young Dieri woman from South Australia, born in Broken Hill but raised in Silverton. Synitta is very interested in Aboriginal Studies, especially the legal side such as Aboriginal Deaths in Custody and Domestic Violence.

WWLS TEAM UPDATE

LEGAL REPORT

We would like to congratulate Ann-Maree Payne on her new role as the Senior Resource Worker and for her leadership and stepping up into the senior team. Ann-Maree was the Administration/Client Referral Officer for the last 5 years and 7 months.

Fortunately we have had an unprecedented period of stability in the WWLS Team with both myself and Alexia remaining in our roles and seeing out the full financial year. Together with the rest of the team we have worked hard to provide a responsive and flexible service, ready to meet the needs of our community.

We acknowledge and farewell Julie Dennis, the Family Support /Victims of Crime Paralegal Program Worker. We thank her for her work and for supporting victim/survivors of family and sexual violence to seek compensation, counselling and take a step forward for their healing. Welcome to Taryn Mitchell our new Resource Worker, and Synitta Adams, our new Trainee. •

Taryn Mitchell, WWLS Resource Worker: Taryn Mitchell is Yawarrawarrka born and raised in Broken Hill. Before starting her journey at WWLS, Taryn was employed at Mission Australia as a Youth Support Worker/ Reception Trainee where she gained invaluable skills

Far West Community Legal Centre Annual Report 2014

This year our litigation case load has remained stable although we have noticed an increase in the complexity of our matters, all of which require significant investment of time and resources. It is difficult to imagine that we would have further capacity without additional administrative or legal support. Given the nature of our service, each and every one of our legal matters represents the unpacking of an individual’s trauma involving family violence or sexual abuse. The associated issues are complex, often touching upon each and every aspect of a person’s life. This is difficult work

and I would like to acknowledge our Aboriginal team who are so valuable in providing additional assistance and support. While we continue to provide regular outreach to Wilcannia and Menindee, we have now expanded services to encompass the Wentworth/Dareton region, which has been particularly critical in the care and protection arena. The support for this initiative has been significant, with Family and Community Services and other organisations providing regular referrals. We hope to be sufficiently resourced to continue our important work in that region well into the future. In 12 short months our Victims of Crime Program has seen our service, model best practice in assisting and supporting victims from a multidisciplinary perspective. That program has now ended with all funding exhausted. Unfortunately this has seen the departure of Julie Dennis from our service. Julie was critical in case managing and supporting clients. Last year I made reference to the timeliness of our initiative and this year I can say that the program was a resounding success, with many longstanding matters now completed and successfully finalised. To date no client at our service has been denied payment in relation to their claim. The legal team continues to collaborate with partner agencies in delivering Community Legal Education and other programs. Of particular significance is our participation in Law for Community Workers and the Speaking and Healing

A Year of Collaboration, Stories & Survival

29


Program delivered to our communities in collaboration with Knowmore Legal Service. In terms of training, Alexia and I were recently attended the National Family Law Conference held in Sydney which afforded us valuable learning and also networking opportunities. We have both taken an active role and interest in the Far West Regional Law Society and in that capacity we have been able to source and initiate further learning opportunities for the local legal profession. In particular, Alexia was able to arrange for a local offering of the ‘Lawyers Guide to Wellbeing Seminar Program’ which is particularly important to professionals working in our field. While we all wish that we were living in a world free from family violence, sexual abuse and discrimination, we are not, and unfortunately statistics demonstrate that there is a lot of work needed to address these complex issues. Until then, the work that WWLS does is vital in assisting Aboriginal victims and survivors to escape family and sexual violence, pursuing justice and attempting to heal. Going forward, WWLS faces an uncertain future. It is difficult to confront the notion that this time next year our region could be robbed of the knowledge, expertise and support delivered so competently by WWLS. Unfortunately the possibility is real and in March 2015, without prospect of further funding, WWLS will need to take measures to commence the long process of winding down the legal practice. This will place enormous pressure on the legal practice and all of our workers. We remain optimistic that this will not be necessary and the Federal Government will see value in the work that we do. Kelly Oxford, WWLS Principal Solicitor

30

Human Rights Day (10/12/13) HOPE (Healing Our People with Empowerment) and the WWLS Team organised a community event in the Town Square. This included a BBQ and a Red Rose campaign to support the elimination of violence against woman and children. There were a number of guest speakers from the community.

COMMUNITY ENGAGEMENT DELIVERED BY WWLS NAIDOC Week WWLS joined with FWCLC and FWWDVCAS for the annual NAIDOC Day in the Park. Information on our service and promotional goodies were given away to community members. And the end of the week WWLS held a pancake morning tea, outside WWLS, to conclude the NAIDOC week celebrations National Aboriginal & Torres Strait Islander Children’s Day This is the largest national day to celebrate our Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander children. The theme for 2014 was “Kids in Culture-Strong Proud and Resilient”. WWLS held a disco for children at the PCYC. Thirty five children and young people attended for this event. All received goodie bags WWLS & Broken Hill Community Restorative Centre Women’s Group Partnership WWLS and the Broken Hill Community Restorative Centre have run a woman’s group on a weekly basis at WWLS. The woman’s group has been a space for yarning for healing, doing art work and making jewellery. This group is a new initiative and has been very well attended by 15-20 women weekly.

A Year of Collaboration, Stories & Survival

In the evening, Ann-Maree Payne organised for Lani Brennan to come to Broken Hill to tell her story. Lani is a survivor of family domestic violence and sexual assault. Lani’s visit was also supported by DV-alert, Lifeline and Medicare Local. Reclaim the Night (Festival of Respect event) WWLS’ women workers and their children led the march and WWLS’ then volunteer, Synitta Adams performing an original song “Remember”. Pink Breakfast 2014 WWLS joined with FWCLC to raise funds for breast cancer research and for the local Breast Cancer Support Network. Speaking and Healing Project In four remote Aboriginal communities in the Far West, WWLS facilitated and organised four ‘Speaking & Healing’ sessions in collaboration with knowmore Legal Service. The project introduced Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander communities in the Far West to the Royal Commission into Institutional Responses to Child Sexual Abuse. WWLS created a safe space to yarn, to be heard and to heal. The sessions were facilitated by Aboriginal workers and engaged by Aboriginal people and workers by together. There was an enthusiastic response to this new initiative. Speaking and Healing Project also brought new hope to communities who are desperate for positive change. WWLS provided a space for people to not only share their painful stories, but to also reconnect

Far West Community Legal Centre Annual Report 2014


and share positive stories of family and loved ones and aspirations for the future even in the current climate. Communities were asked to think about what healing meant for them and what was needed for real tangible positive change. The day was broken up with activities about looking after one’s self and having pride in the positive contributions each person made to their own communities. Each of the communities welcomed the presence of both legal organisations. Community members, Elders and service providers attended four sessions. In Broken Hill, the community discussed setting up a Healing Committee to facilitate local healing initiatives. Elders expressed that despite being one of the most studied people in Australia, there was still great disadvantage experienced by their people and that cultural healing is necessary in Aboriginal communities. As the Manager of WWLS, I have always had a passion and drive for healing for the Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people of Far West NSW, even more so after commencing work in an Aboriginal Family Violence Prevention Legal Unit. I know “our mob” don’t always like using counsellors because they are worried and have fear and shame. So, when an opportunity came for us to do a project about healing in a culturally safe way, funded by our national FVPLS, we took that opportunity. Part two of the Speaking and Healing Project led to a Grief and Loss Workshop, designed and produced by Trudy Hanson, Grief Counsellor and Educator and Manager of the NALAG Centre for Loss & Grief in Dubbo. The Aboriginal Healing Workshop Training is a program designed to teach Aboriginal community service workers, support volunteers, psychologists and counsellors how to facilitate Healing Workshop for Aboriginal people. The course content is also useful to assist in individual support and counselling.

The Aboriginal Healing Workshop covered: • Historic losses, • Contemporary losses, • Unrecognised emotional losses, • Reactions to grief, • Traumatic grief, • The brains response to prolonged trauma, • The experience of grief, • Exploring what helps with coping, • Exploring a model for working with grief, • Exploring creative and meaningful ways of working with grief in group and individual settings, and • Learning to facilitate a Healing Ritual using music, art, nature, candles etc. Outreach/Road Shows WWLS visits Wilcannia and Menindee once a fortnight for appointments and visiting services within each of the communities. WWLS also participates in locally organised events and celebrations, organised by local communities, like Dareton NAIDOC week and Wilcannia community service information days. We also travelled with other Broken Hill services to White Cliffs on a Roadshow visit. This is an important opportunity to promote WWLS to these much smaller remote communities.

PHIL’S ART WORK AT WWLS

CHALLENGES AHEAD FOR WWLS The greatest challenge ahead for WWLS is the survival of our vital front-line service to victim/survivors of family and sexual violence. We are facing the prospect of losing our service with the new Indigenous funding changes. This would have a devastating impact on victim/survivors of family and sexual violence and on our communities. We submitted a tender in the Indigenous Advancement Strategy and are now in a waiting period for the outcome of that tender process. If I as Manager of WWLS could a wish anything for WWLS in 2015, I would wish the following: 1. WWLS continues to operate after 30/6/15, and becomes incorporated as an Aboriginal managed service. 2. WWLS would expand its team and its operational service delivery model. 3. WWLS would create authentic healing programs that empower and encourage healthier lifestyles and futures for our Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander young people, families, victim/survivors of family and sexual violence, and our communities. Donna Kennedy, WWLS Manager

WWLS thanks Phillip Kennedy for his amazing and inspirational art that now lines the walls of the WWLS office. Each art piece, tells stories about working with our communities in the Far West and protecting our children and families. This work is featured on our website, www.warrawarra.org.au

Far West Community Legal Centre Annual Report 2014

A Year of Collaboration, Stories & Survival

31


32

A Year of Collaboration, Stories & Survival

103

OTHER CIVIL

1%

2%

OTHER RESTRAINING ORDERS

1%

CREDIT & DEBT

TRAFFIC

34%

WILLS. EPOA, GUARDIANSHIP

57%

146

NON-CASEWORK PROJECTS

VICTIMS OF CRIME

FAMILY

INFORMATION ONLY

4%

1% Far West Community Legal Centre Annual Report 2014


22%

LEGAL & NON-LEGAL CLIENT ACTIVITIES GENDER & IDENTITY 76% (477) 24% (114)

MEN

LEGAL

NON-LEGAL

78% WOMEN

17%

87%

BROKEN HILL

NONINDIGENOUS

3%

NOT STATED

LOCATION

84%

ABORIGINAL OR TORRES STRAIT ISLANDER

Our clients are from the following geographic areas

7%

WICANNIA

3%

WENTWORTH /DARETON

Far West Community Legal Centre Annual Report 2014

1% 2%

BROKEN HILL CORRECTIONAL CENTRE

MENINDEE / SUNSET STRIP

A Year of Collaboration, Stories & Survival

33


34

A Year of Collaboration, Stories & Survival

Far West Community Legal Centre Annual Report 2014


35


FAR WEST WOMEN’S DOMESTIC VIOLENCE ADVOCACY SERVICE REPORT

36

A Year of Collaboration, Stories & Survival


FAR WEST WOMEN’S DOMESTIC VIOLENCE ADVOCACY SERVICE 2014 has been an exciting and productive year for the Far West Women’s Domestic Violence Court Advocacy Service (‘Far West WDVCAS’). There have been staff and/or position changes within the service. Susan Marks returned from maternity leave in March and came back to a service that had evolved whilst she was on leave. We bid farewell to the Wentworth Outreach worker, Fiona Camilleri. Fiona is now the new Coordinator for Staying Home Leaving Violence Broken Hill. Although she hasn’t gone far, she will be missed by this service. We wish her well and we know that she will be a huge asset to SHLV. The Wentworth/Dareton Outreach worker is now Narelle Blows. FWWDVCAS is now the lead agency in Broken Hill and Wilcannia; and secondary in Wentworth/ Dareton, in the Barrier Partnership Domestic Violence Agency referral Scheme. The Barrier LAC is now referring to FWWDVCAS every victim from every domestic violence incident that they attend. As a result, there are approximately 25 domestic violence related incidences a week referred to FWWDVCAS. While this has substantially increased FWWDVCAS’ workload, the FWWDVCAS staff are open to the challenge, and ultimately our goal is to assist and support as many women and children as possible to leave violent relationships This partnership has so far proven to be very productive and beneficial not only to the current clients of FWWDVCAS, but to all victims of domestic violence in our region, especially those

Far West Community Legal Centre Annual Report 2014

that may previously have gone through the processes themselves, unassisted and were not aware of the services and help that was available to them. We also receive referrals where there is no AVO attached or matter at court. FWWDVAS contacts the victims, assesses their support needs and then refers them onto the appropriate services. Through participation in this strategy, FWWDVCAS hopes that victims of domestic violence receive the assistance they need and no longer “slip through the cracks”. These statistics (see graph on page 38) highlight the difference in client intake for FWWDVCAS. We have compared the same period last year to this year. The difference in numbers is not only a result of the new Barrier LAC referral system but also the new collaboration with the Far West CLC and the implementation of effective new strategies now in place to reduce the issue of conflict of interests. Our court work at Broken Hill, Wilcannia and Wentworth Local Courts and being advocates for our clients is our main priority. We are always available and easily visible to court staff, clients and other service providers. We attend court on Tuesdays and Fridays and provide support, referrals and non-legal advocacy to victims of domestic violence in a safe and friendly environment in Broken Hill, Wentworth (1st Tuesday of each month) and Wilcannia (3rd Wednesday of each month).

The FWWDVCAS is actively involved in community events such as the NAIDOC celebrations; Reclaim the Night, White Ribbon Day and the Festival of Respect activities. This not only raises the profile of the FWWDVCAS in the community and with other service providers but also sends a powerful message that domestic violence is never acceptable. Once again this year, Narelle was involved in the delivery of the LoveBites program at the two local high schools, along with many other services from the Broken Hill community. While we are involved in many community events, we ensure that our core practice of assisting women and children victims of domestic violence through the court process is maintained by the FWWDVCAS staff. The FWWDVCAS have continued to work hard to fulfil their obligations to Legal Aid NSW and have attended Network Meetings and training as required. The service is also represented quarterly at the WDVCAP Workers Forums in Sydney. We would to acknowledge that we have a solid and collaborative working relationship with the Far West CLC Inc. We would also once again like to thank Tracey Willow and Mariette Curcuruto for their encouragement, support and motivation. As always, we thank the Board for their ongoing support and dedication to not only our service but the organisation as a whole. Narelle Blows & Loretta Stuart, Joint Coordinators

A Year of Collaboration, Stories & Survival

37


Client intake for FWWDVCAS 250

200

150

100

50

0 01/11/2012 to 30/09/2013

38

01/11/2013 to 30/09/2014

A Year of Collaboration, Stories & Survival

Far West Community Legal Centre Annual Report 2014


Far West Community Legal Centre Annual Report 2014

A Year of Collaboration, Stories & Survival

39


FAR WEST COOPERATIVE LEGAL SERVICE DELIVERY REPORT

40

A Year of Collaboration, Stories & Survival


FAR WEST COOPERATIVE LEGAL SERVICE 2014 was an extremely busy year for the Cooperative Legal Service Delivery Program. The Festival of Respect drew to a close in March with a fabulous gala fun day in Patton Park. The five months of the Festival was a resounding success and as the CLSD Regional Coordinator, I played an active role, in promoting events to justice partners. Like many other services, the change of government jeopardised the CLSD program. The funding for the CLSD Program is sourced from the National Partnership Agreement (NPA) funds. This funding includes payments to Regional Coordination Services for wages and the CLSD Project Funds. Thankfully, the funding is secure until 30/6/15. The FWCLSD hosted its annual Planning Day in March 2014. 22 people representing a broad range of community sector services attended. It was agreed that service providers in the Far West had similar goals and to achieve the best outcomes for our clients and communities, we need to work collaboratively in terms of funding, decision making and service delivery. FWCLSD has been centrally involved in: •

Hosting Quarterly CLSD meetings with an average of 20 partners involved.

Attending the ‘Working Collaboratively’ CLSD Planning Day in Sydney, May 2014.

Regularly attending the Far West Domestic/Family Violence Working Party, YSSI Interagency and the Social and Wellbeing Interagency.

Participating in and promoting the Festival Of Respect events.

Participating in and promoting Law Week activities.

Participating in and promoting Children’s Week activities.

Participating and promoting Mental Health Week – Stress Less Day.

Participating and promoting Lifeline Broken Hill’s 50 year celebrations.

Participating and promoting the Launch of Staying Home Leaving Violence Broken Hill.

I would like to thank all CLSD partners and the community who are involved in all the CLSD funded and supported projects, and those who are supportive of the CLSD program and who strive for access to justice in the Far West for all of our clients and communities in the Far West NSW. Meg Kelly FWCLSD Regional Coordinator

Far West Community Legal Centre Annual Report 2014

A Year of Collaboration, Stories & Survival

41


INTRODUCING STAYING HOME LEAVING VIOLENCE BROKEN HILL

42

A Year of Collaboration, Stories & Survival


SHLV BROKEN HILL Staying Home Leaving Violence Broken Hill (‘SHLVBH’) is a new service, funded by Family & Community Services NSW for two years, and is auspiced by FWCLC Inc. It is a service governed by a new consortium model. This is a partnership between FWCLC Inc. the NSW Police Local Area Barrier Command and Lifeline Broken Hill. SHLVBH is a specialised domestic violence program aimed at preventing women and children becoming homeless. SHLVBH provides long term, needs-based and integrated intensive case management. On 7 October 2014, SHLVBH opened its doors.

welcomed her new team, and along with Michael Coutts Trotter cut the ribbon. The three Consortium representatives – Tracey Willow, Acting Superintendent Matt Scott and Greg Pearce cut the cake. Fiona welcomed people to visit the new service, collect promotional resources, and enjoy afternoon tea. SHLVBH has a dynamic new team. Each brings a broad range of skills and experiences to the new service. For more details on its role and its new team, see www.farwestclc.org.au and follow the SHLVBH link.

een Invited You Have B

ing Of n e p O e h T o T

�ursday 16th October 2014 2:30pm - 3:30pm @ 5A Chloride Street t In the Town Square

Speakers: SHLVBH Representatives & Michael Coutts Trotter - Secretary, NSW Department of Family and Community Services Meet the New Team: Fiona, Rhonda & Libby

AAernoon Tea Provided R.S.V.P by the 13.10.14 reception@farwestclc.org.au or call 8088 2020

Fiona Camilleri, SHLVBH Coordinator

SHLVBH was officially launched on 16 October 2014. Tracey Willow, CEO of FWCLC Inc. and Fiona Camilleri, SHLVBH Coordinator welcomed over fifty guests to the launch in the Town Square. The launch was officially opened by Michael Coutts Trotter, Secretary, Family and Community Services NSW. Acting Superintendent Matt Scott representing the Local Area Barrier Command and Greg Pearce representing Lifeline Broken Hill provided celebratory messages as Consortium partners. Fiona

Far West Community Legal Centre Annual Report 2014

A Year of Collaboration, Stories & Survival

43


44

A Year of Collaboration, Stories & Survival

Far West Community Legal Centre Annual Report 2014


45


ACCESS TO JUSTICE WITH OUR COMMUNITY

46

A Year of Collaboration, Stories & Survival


FESTIVAL OF RESPECT 2013/2014

Far West Community Legal Centre Annual Report 2014

A Year of Collaboration, Stories & Survival

47


48

A Year of Collaboration, Stories & Survival

Far West Community Legal Centre Annual Report 2014


2ND YEAR OF FESTIVAL OF RESPECT 2014 Far West Community Legal Centre Annual Report 2014

A Year of Collaboration, Stories & Survival

49


50

A Year of Collaboration, Stories & Survival

Far West Community Legal Centre Annual Report 2014


FESTIVAL Of Respect Far West Community Legal Centre Annual Report 2014

2014 A Year of Collaboration, Stories & Survival

51


FINANCIAL REPORT

52

A Year of Collaboration, Stories & Survival


FINANCIAL REPORT FAR WEST COMMUNITY LEGAL CENTRE Once again this year has been a challenging year for the FWCLC. We ended the year with a deficit of $203,424. We carried over an approved surplus of $209,000 and the term deposit off $106,000. Coming into a new year, FWCLC will make sound and strategic decisions, to ensure that the organisation ends the next financial year without a deficit. Funding in this period included: • • •

$267,422.00 - core funding this year, $90,000.00 - new Family Law Funding, Auspice fees from WWLS, FWWDVCAS and

FWCLSD contributed a total of $75,572.00 FWCLC received $68,248 from the Public Purpose Funding (PPF). This funding pays the wage package for one of the Junior Solicitors. This year the funding was decreased by $1,749.81. FWCLC topped up the wage package. We have received our quarterly funding on time and all debts have been paid accordingly. PAYG Group certificates have all been issued and finalised together with all superannuation guarantee payments. GST payments have been paid and forms lodged up until 30/06/2014. Gallagher Bassett (Workers’ Compensation) updated our policy based on actual wages for the year 2013/2014 and have issued an adjustment

Far West Community Legal Centre Annual Report 2014

premium of $2,919.12 which has been paid. The final premium for the year was $15,638.34. In conclusion, we thank the FWCLC Inc. Board for their support and commitment throughout the year. We also say a huge thank you to all our colleagues who have been supportive of all the changes over the last financial year. We have done so with a high standard and without question. We acknowledge our Auditors Crowe Horwath and Dale Sayers.

FAR WEST COOPERATIVE LEGAL SERVICE DELIVERY PROGRAM The CLSD’s funding for the 2013/14 year was $20,231.61. The year ended with a minor deficit of $2,191.59. The new budget will offset this deficit and the program will end the next financial year without a deficit.

WARRA WARRA LEGAL SERVICE WWLS this year went ahead in leaps and bounds. Our employment overall has been very stable. We have applied for additional funding to enhance the service. This new funding came from the NSW Police for the WWLS Men’s Group ($5,000.00) and from the National FVPLS Secretariat, in partnership with knowmore Legal Service, for the Speaking and Healing Program ($28,000.00). We expended all funds for both of these extra funding sources.

This year WWLS and the national FVPLS were transferred from the Commonwealth Attorney General’s Department to Prime Minister and Cabinet. As a result, we have had many changes of Program Managers. The core funding was expended and we ended the year with a deficit of $54,215.00. All financial requirements have been met. There are challenges ahead, and WWLS will make sound and strategic decisions, to ensure that the service ends the next financial year without a deficit. PAYG Group certificates have all been issued and finalised together with all superannuation guarantee payments. GST payments have been paid and forms lodged up until 30/06/2014. As a result of the last Federal budget, WWLS and the National FVPLS were advised that they would be funded until 30/6/15. WWLS has been funded since 2007. This has been a difficult reality for the service and our staff overall. There is enormous uncertainty. However, our staff are all committed to WWLS and to the Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander communities in the Far West. We submitted a tender under the Indigenous Advancement Strategy. It is now out of our hands and as we wait to hear the result, the business of an Aboriginal Family Violence Prevention Legal Service will go on as usual. We have high hopes for our future and know that we have done everything possible to keep this essential service going.

A Year of Collaboration, Stories & Survival

53


FAR WEST WOMEN’S DOMESTIC VIOLENCE COURT ADVOCACY SERVICE The FWWDVCAS has maintained its commitments as outlined in the service agreement. Fiona Camilleri joined the service in this financial period and ensured that Wentworth/Dareton received the most effective outreach service. Susan Marks returned from maternity leave in the second half of the last financial year. Our core funding has been expended and the service has ended the year with an accumulated deficit of $4,100.00. We have expended the previous years’ surplus that we have carried from the start-up of the service in 2008. From this period on, we will be mindful of all spending. FWWDVCAS is in desperate need of a funding boost. With extra work being generated from the Local Barrier Area Command’s Referral Scheme and the cost of travel in the Far West region to Wilcannia and Wentworth/Dareton, this service will struggle financially in the next financial year to keep up with the demand on its current funding. PAYG Group certificates have all been issued and finalised together with all superannuation guarantee payments. GST payments have been paid and forms lodged up until 30/06/2014. Prue Sulicich & Vicki Cullen, Finance Officers

54

A Year of Collaboration, Stories & Survival

Far West Community Legal Centre Annual Report 2014


56

A Year of Collaboration, Stories & Survival

Far West Community Legal Centre Annual Report 2014

Profile for Farwest CLC

FWCLC Annual Report 2014  

FWCLC Annual Report 2014  

Advertisement

Recommendations could not be loaded

Recommendations could not be loaded

Recommendations could not be loaded

Recommendations could not be loaded