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Our purpose is to

CAUSE HEALTH By creating places where we

THRIVE Done through

CO-CREATION In order to

EXPAND POSSIBILITIES


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E Farrow


Cause Health Farrow is a world leader in creating architecture that lifts the human spirit while achieving clients’ most challenging project goals. Farrow has initiated a global ‘cause health’ movement to accelerate demand for places where people can thrive physically, mentally, culturally and economically. Working individually or in joint venture, we have designed and delivered projects located across Canada and around the world valued at over $3 billion. Working under a variety of procurement methods, we are adept at delivering stipulated sum, design build, construction management, build-finance and designbuild-finance for public and private clients. With roots established over 50 years ago, Farrow is a leading Canadian –based company working internationally. We offer a full range of services in architecture, interior design and master planning.

Above & Opposite: Credit Valley


We know a lot about what causes disease, but not much about what causes health. Peace is not the absence of war, happiness is not just a lack of sadness—and health is much more than being free of disease. Yet we commonly think of health in negative, pathological terms of preventing illness and managing deficiencies. Every day we face a barrage of alarming headlines that dwell on real and imagined symptoms, medical staff shortages, escalating rates of chronic disease and financial calamities. Rarely, however, do we ask the most fundamental question: What causes health? While the quest to know more about diseases cannot be neglected, a pathology-centric world view obscures vast opportunities. Major leaps toward realizing a truly thriving population will not happen until we give equal attention to determining the causes of health. The term cause health is not simply a new spin on conventional wellness programs; it frames health as a societal resource. Taking an assets-based approach to causing health would mean establishing the right social, physical and psychological conditions for people to make the most of their strengths.

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Progress in implementing this bigger vision will require us to look beyond positive thinking, good intentions and wellness programs that focus on prevention. Everyone must see how individual and community assets can be mobilized to create a new normal. This magnitude of change can be compared to a generation ago, when attitudes toward smoking on airplanes and in offices shifted. Today we expect our built environment to do no obvious harm, yet rarely do we ask, “How healthy is this place?�


A Bigger Vision of Health The first step in expanding our vision of health is to see for ourselves that the current picture is out of date and needs to be reframed. One way to illuminate the whole spectrum of health opportunities is to ask: How does this (policy, place, relationship or thing) actively cause health? This fundamental question brings to light what makes us healthy and keeps us that way, and raises expectations for what our world can be. What if the potential to cause health became the basis for evaluating the elements of our daily lives? For example, discussions about architectural and urban design are typically limited to issues of style and personal likes or dislikes. What if we understood the health-causing potential of every building, every public space and every home? Dreary design and merely functional places would become unacceptable from the standpoint of actively causing health. Instead, people would expect optimistic design that encouraged social interaction, pride in community identity, connections with nature, cultural meaning and a positive legacy. We know there is more to life than preventing disease and fixing health deficiencies. Real needs for health care have become obscured by a deficits mindset which has led us to unnecessary treatment and wasted resources. As a society, we need to reduce dependence on an already burdened medical infrastructure, so that when any citizen truly needs a doctor, hospital bed or emergency treatment, these resources will be available. The answer to global health care woes can be found by expanding our vision of health and social change. Public policy, community and individual choices must now be guided by a strengths-based approach. The persistent question, “How does this cause health?� will accelerate a much needed shift in thinking by bringing awareness into our everyday lives.

Above: Health Promoting Life Style Centre, South Africa Opposite: Alexandria, Singapore


Contents Co-creation Possibilities Health Leadership Sustainability International Leadership Education Leadership Corporate Expertise Residential Expertise Hospitality Expertise Team


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Key to the firm’s success is its ability to apply the research of globally recognized leaders in the fields of group decision-making and the co-creation process. The “hands-on” methodology used by Farrow's facilitators has been designed to actively engage participants in expanding their options. This approach leads to greater opportunities for the same cost and allows clients to make more knowledgeable choices. Farrow's national and international reach is represented by a portfolio of diverse projects across North America, the Caribbean, Asia, Africa and both the Israeli and Arab Middle East. The firm understands regional, cultural and environmental needs and responds with thoughtful and sustainable designs that meet local and international standards. For these projects, Farrow partners with local firms that provide a variety of on-the-ground services for the team. Farrow is recognized as a visionary world leader on the subject of how the built environment can ‘cause health.’ Tye Farrow has been invited to present his ideas and examples on this theme at some of the leading institutions in the world including the Mayo Clinic and the Cleveland Clinic. He has also presented at conferences in Singapore SG, Kuala Lumpur ML, Helsinki FI, Haifa IL, Tel Aviv IL, London UK, Glasgow UK, Manchester UK, Frankfurt DE, Cape Town ZA, Dubai UAE, Seoul KR, Auckland NZ, Welling-ton NZ, Christchurch NZ, Sydney AU, Vancouver CA, Edmonton CA, Toronto CA, St John’s CA, Boston MA, Charlottesville VA, Washington DC, Richmond VA, Atlanta GA, Dallas TX, College Station, TX, and Chicago IL.

Co-creation

Group decision-making and co-creation process.


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Farrow's ideas and projects have been published in numerous publications, books and newspaper around the world, including: the Globe and Mail, the Report on Business, the National Post, the Toronto Star, the Canadian Broadcast Corporation, the UK Daily Mail, the UAE National, Fast Company, World Health Design, Azure, Canadian Architect, Architectural Review, Canadian Journal of Green Building and Design, SAB Magazine, Southern Design & Building Magazine, UK’s AD Architectural Design, the Volvo Car magazine, UK’s FX, Jim Taggart's book "Toward a Culture of Wood Architecture,” Lisa Rochon’s book “Up North,” Christine NicklWeller’s book “Masterpieces: Hospital Architecture and Design,” the Ryerson School of Design’s book “Canada Innovates: Sustainable Buildings” and Robin Guenther’s book “Sustainable Health Architecture.” Farrow has won numerous recognitions and awards from around the world, including: the World Congress on Design and Health’s inaugural World Architect Award; the Royal Architectural Institute of Canada’s Award of Excellence for Innovation in Architecture; a number of Ontario Association of Architects Design Excellence awards; an Ontario Association of Architects Innovative Practice Award; Nova Scotia Lieutenant Governor's Design Award of Merit; and numerous Academy for Design and Health Design Excellence Awards. The Stockholm-based World Congress on Design and Health has identified Tye Farrow as a global leader who is making “a significant contribution to health and humanity through the medium of architecture and design.”

Possibilities

“Masterpieces: Hospital Architecture and Design” book featuring the Thunder Bay hospital on the cover


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Health Leadership Farrow’s health design leadership is recognized internationally for setting new standards in human-centred health facility design. The firm’s proven ability to apply leading research in co-creation and decision-making methodologies has resulted in enthusiastic clients who are proud of what we create together. The firm exceeds client expectations through a specific process that expands options and achieves the best overall value. This rigorous and exciting methodology “gets it right.” The key factor in building understanding and support is bringing stakeholders together to create a strong, specific and inspiring project Purpose and Legacy statement. Farrow’s design is supported by solid evidence in neuroaesthetics, which indicates qualities that have a positive impact on learning, health, healing and wellness. Farrow’s critically acclaimed health care projects include the Thunder Bay Regional Health Sciences Centre, which has been described by the founder and Director of the International Academy for Health and Design as “one of the most architecturally advanced hospitals in the world.” This project was also recently recognized by Online Masters in Public Health as one of the “30 most architecturally impressive hospitals in the world.” The Credit Valley Hospital has also been recognized globally as setting a new standard in both cancer centre and ambulatory care design. This project was selected by the Commission for Architecture and the Built Environment (CABE) as the Best International Design at the Building Better Health Care Awards program in the United Kingdom.

Above & Opposite: Thunder Bay Regional Health Sciences Centre


Planning for the Changing Role of Hospitals. Today’s hospital is a cross-cultural social hub, the scene of major life events, a place for sharing knowledge and a focus for citizens to give back to the community. The physical infrastructure of hospitals must support these activities in addition to delivering medical services so that patients, physicians, staff and the wider community can thrive. In order to reduce the overall financial burden of ill-health on society, a bigger vision for health than through traditional treatment and prevention of disease is necessary. Design at the top of the pyramid treats health as an individual and community asset. This means providing the social, physical and psychological conditions that enable people and regions to make the most of their strengths. In addition to being functional, the design must also be optimistic, encourage social interaction, instill pride, reinforce cultural identity, integrate the natural world, feed the psyche, enhance performance of the brain and create a positive legacy. Exceeding expectations: wise investment advice. We believe it is our responsibility to guide clients in making the best investment of their total project budget. This means understanding where to save money that can be channeled to yield the greatest design impact. It also means providing foresight to help clients avoid painting themselves in a corner by not building structures or making decisions that limit their options in the short- and long-term. Our rigorous methodology ensures that we “get it right” together—both technically and in terms of creating a positive environment that will cause health.

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Healthy planning process = healthy hospital design. We believe that a healthy planning and design process is the foundation for healthy project management and, ultimately, a healthy built result. Our co-creation approach to developing and evaluating design options is rooted in the realities of human nature and motivation. In other words, rather than rely on a rigid mechanical approval process, we begin by understanding how people absorb new information and how they draw on existing knowledge and assumptions to think through complex questions. We are also aware that people are motivated by working on planning projects which have a higher purpose and a jointly defined legacy that is both shared and personally meaningful. An optimistic, health-centric viewpoint. Our planning and design approach builds on a health-centric view of the world, rather than a disease-centric perspective. The disease-centric view can be defined as focusing on human deficiencies and gaps, which casts patients in the role of passive recipients of services. The healthcentric view sees human assets and capabilities—regardless of the patient’s diagnosis—with everyone engaged in leveraging these assets to optimize health. Our team is known globally for creating places where people can thrive -economically, culturally and physically.

Above: liquid arrow planning process diagram Opposite: designed to thrive pyramid diagram


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Sustainability Farrow’s recently opened Sechelt project in British Columbia has been recognized as arguably North America's 'greenest' building of its type. Designed to be carbon-neutral, in addition to a high-performance building envelope, the project includes 125 boreholes, each 250 feet deep, to provide zero-carbon energy for heating and cooling for the building distributed through radiant slabs. A 19-kilowatt photovoltaic array provides electricity, the largest of its type of building in British Columbia. A green roof which, along with white roofs, reduces solar heat gain. Passive design strategies, such as the use of solar shading and operable windows, allow for natural ventilation. Lighting is equipped with occupancy sensors and exhaust air recovery ventilation. As a result, the project is on target to achieve a 40-per-cent energy savings when compared to other LEED Gold certified hospitals. Farrow’s sustainable design leadership includes a number of LEED rated buildings, including the carbon-neutral Sechelt project, along with: Bluewater Health in Ontario, the first and largest LEED certified project of its type in Canada; the LEED certified Colchester East Hants project in Nova Scotia; and the LEED gold Mission CCC project in British Columbia.

Above: the carbon neutral Sechelt project Opposite: the LEED certified Colchester East Hants project


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Salter Farrow Pilon Architects of which Farrow Partnership Architects is a successor firm This 650,000 square foot, 375-bed acute care regional hospital includes acute care services, forensic mental health, a helicopter pad and base hospital facilities to serve all of North Western Ontario. Furthermore, the complex includes the 68,000 square foot North Western Ontario Regional Cancer Centre. The Thunder Bay Regional Health Sciences Centre has been described by the Canadian Medical Journal as “one of the most architecturally advanced hospitals in the world.” It was also recently recognized by Online Masters in Public Health as one of the “30 most architecturally impressive hospitals in the world,” the only such hospital from Canada. Construction Management, Completed Value: $185 million Opposite: Aerial view of the Thunder Bay Health Sciences Campus

Thunder Bay Health Sciences Centre Thunder Bay, Ontario


Left: Main Entry Below Top: Building organization to the sun Below Bottom: Central Stair Opposite: Main Public Corridor

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Farrow Partnership Architects The Credit Valley Hospital's Cancer Care and Ambulatory Care facility is the first fully integrated complex in Ontario that combines ambulatory clinics and cancer treatment. The client’s vision for this project was to be “the finest hospital in Canada in the hearts and minds of the people we serve.” Transforming these words into reality became the unifying purpose for this project. The resulting design provides a distinctive, therapeutic, “pride of place” image for the community. The dramatic spaces and natural materials, themes and connections to nature are life-affirming and reassuring. The strong tree forms provide a sense of shelter and enduring optimism. The cancer centre is phase one of a three-phase $349 million dollar project designed to serve the future health care needs of Mississauga. Stipulated Sum, Completed Value: $90 million Opposite: Credit Valley Hospital main lobby

Credit Valley Phase One Mississauga, Ontario


Left: Radiation Treatment Area Below Top: Master Site Landscape Plan Below Bottom: Main Lobby Opposite: Aerial Photo of Campus

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Farrow Partnership Architects This expansion project includes 78 inpatient beds and a doubling of the number of labour and delivery rooms (from seven to 15) with additional for growth the surgical program. Other improvements include expanding cancer treatment resources to incorporate a new high-dose radiation therapy suite and additional surgical oncology. The design also includes neonatal care, increased diagnostic imaging services and an expanded laboratory. Build Finance, Completed Value: $150 million Opposite: Women's and Children's Departments’ main lobby

Credit Valley Phase Two Mississauga, Ontario


Left: Maternal Child Lobby Opposite: NIC Unit

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Farrow Partnership Architects in association with Perkins+Will Architects “The greenest hospital in North America” After presenting a preliminary assessment of the proposed master plan at the project short list interview, the client agreed that the Master Plan of Record was not optimal and that a more appropriate set of alternatives should be mutually explored. Ultimately greater value for money was delivered. The project scope includes a building expansion and extensive renovation to the existing hospital as well as the construction of an “Energy Centre” for physical plant services. The redevelopment includes: plans for additional beds with an increase in the number of private rooms; new Special Care Unit for high acuity patients; improved infection control and isolation capacity; new emergency department with fast-track capacity; expansion to Ambulatory Care; Surgical Day Care; and a new diagnostic imaging department. Stipulated Sum, Complete Value: $44 million Opposite: St Mary’s main entrance

St Mary’s Hospital Sechelt, British Columbia


Opposite: St Mary’s Campus Opposite bottom: First Nation Bent Box Left: First Nation Tradition of Bent Box Fabrication

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Left & Below Top: Main Lobby Stair and Haida Sun Sculpture Below: Emergency Reception Opposite: Inpatient Unit Circulation

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Farrow Partnership Architects The 45,000 square foot project integrates a new community entrance, ambulance drop-off and renovations to emergency and diagnostic imaging within an existing 50-year-old, full-service hospital. The program also includes new teaching spaces, diabetic education facilities and a new cafeteria. A new street-oriented faรงade was created to strengthen the relationship of the hospital with the existing residential fabric and adjacent long-term care facility. Stipulated Sum, Completed Value: $13 million Opposite: Norfolk General Hospital main entrance

Norfolk General Hospital Norfolk, Ontario


Left: Main Entrance Canopy Below Top: New Courtyard Garden Below Bottom: Day-lit Emergency Trauma Room Opposite: Main Entrance Garden

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Mission CRC

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Farrow Partnership Architects and KMBR Architects Mission Complex Residential Care Facility and Mission Community Health Centre Mission, British Columbia. The design for this new complex care community residential centre and campus of care evokes an “architecture of wellness” for the facilities, which will be located adjacent to the existing Mission Memorial Hospital in the Fraser Valley. The campus of care for seniors will be approximately 130,000 square feet in size with 200 residential care beds for people with complex health care needs, as well as a day program for other adults. A community health centre on the campus is 27,000 square feet and features a range of programs, such as primary care, a diabetes clinic, a seniors’ clinic, public health care, mental health and addiction care. The project takes its design inspiration from the traditional west coast First Nation sun crest with a series of arms extending outward and radiating around a central sun figure, a design that reflects the local culture of the region and the peoples who have helped shape the land and the surrounding communities. Design Build, Completion 2014 Value: $27 million

Mission Complex Care Hospital Opposite: Aerial view of Mission campus

Mission, British Columbia


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Above Top: Floor Plan Middle: Central Courtyard Bottom: Haida Sun Left: Aerial Photograph of Campus Opposite: Main Entry


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WHW Architects and Farrow Partnership Architects This replacement hospital, which sits on a 33-acre greenfield site, is designed to deliver efficient clinical and support services while ensuring maximum value for dollars in terms of building phasing, constructability and schedule. The 124-bed hospital supports medical, surgical, palliative care, mental health, critical care, emergency and ambulatory care services. Taking advantage of the site topography, the master plan realized creative yet effective solutions for convenient parking, site circulation, shipping and receiving, and storm water management. Construction Management, Completed Value: $185 million Opposite: Aerial view of Colchester East Hants Health Centre campus

Colchester East Hants Health Centre Truro, Nova Scotia


Left: Main Public Corridor Below Top: Master Site Plan Below Bottom: Central Entry Courtyard Opposite: Main Entrance

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Farrow Partnership Architects and Stantec joint venture architects Bluewater Health Sarnia, Ontario. This project features the addition of 325,000 square feet of new construction and 145,000 square feet of renovated space to the main hospital site, and master planning and renovations to a satellite hospital site in the nearby town of Petrolia. A sustainable environment that provides life, light and comfort, Bluewater Health sets a new standard in terms of serving community needs now and well into the future. Sustainable features include: a green roof; a central atrium with glazing and sharing devices to realize passive solar gains; a high R-value building envelope; coordinated modular wall and furniture systems; and the establishment of strategic corporate partnerships. The project is the first and largest LEED Certified acute care hospital in Canada. Build Finance, Completed Value: $198 million Opposite: Aerial view of Bluewater Health campus

Bluewater Hospital Sarnia, Ontario


Left: Main Lobby Below Top: Various building options that were explored Below Bottom: Main Entry Drop-Off Opposite: Ambulatory Care Reception

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Farrow Partnership Architects and Number 10 Architecture Group The design of this integrated health centre offers not only a welcoming environment for the community of Kipling, it also provides an acute care centre and community amenities to the populace at large. The 45,000 square foot building is built around inviting circular spaces, which greet visitors and offer beautiful outdoor spaces for residents. The house-like rooflines and timber construction make the building feel familiar and comfortable. In order to efficiently serve the population of Kipling, a wing with 11 acute care beds, plus one palliative bed, has been integrated into the facility. This wing provides immediate care for long-term residents in distress while also providing 24-hour-a-day care to the township. The nursing station ensures that staff can effectively monitor all acute care patients while also observing the 24-hour care entrance in case of a late-night emergency. Design Build, Completion December 2014 Value: $25 million Opposite: Aerial view of Kipling Integrated Health Centre campus

Kipling Integrated Health Centre Kipling, Saskatchewan


Left: Main Entrance Veranda Below: Ground Floor Plan Below Bottom: Construction Photo of Main Entry Courtyard Opposite: Main Lobby

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Montgomery Sisam Architects Farrow Partnership Architects Joint Venture Architects This expansion and renovation project includes a new ambulatory care wing, expanded inpatient and outpatient facilities, renovated inpatient wing, innovative therapy pool, a wellness centre, administration, gift shop, main entry and front-ofhouse waiting areas. The master plan and new building expansion enhance and reinforce the hospital's image within the community, and also integrate the new building seamlessly within the existing beautiful and mature landscape. Stipulated Sum, Completed Value: $32 million Opposite: St John’s Rehabilitation Hospital main entrance

St John’s Rehabilitation Hospital North York, Ontario


Above: Therapy Pool Opposite: Main Entry Stair

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Farrow Partnership Architects Wellesley Central Place is a 150-bed, 100,000 square foot longterm care and outpatient facility designed to resemble a small village, with a town square, main street, internal neighbourhoods and outdoor courtyards. A green roof and the outdoor courtyards provide a tranquil place for respite and healing for patients and staff alike. A respectful symbol of compassion, Wellesley Central Place references the architectural language of the surrounding community while presenting a warm and welcoming face to the street. Construction Management, Completed Value: $17 million Opposite: Wellesley Central Place central courtyard

Wellesley Central Place Toronto, Ontario


Left: Main Wellesley Street Façade Below Top: Central Café Below Middle: Central Courtyard Below Bottom: Green Roof Opposite: Front Veranda

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Farrow Partnership Architects Conceived as a prototype for future clinics, the Kensington Eye Institute offers ophthalmic surgical services and resident training within a warm and pleasant "spa-like" environment. The 10,000 square foot state-of-the-art outpatient eye care centre is the third largest in Canada with four surgical suites. The clinic is organized around a central waiting area, from which treatment areas filter off in two directions. The waiting area is lit from above via a dramatic overhead skylight. Construction Management, Complete Value: $3 million Opposite: View of main reception

Kensington Eye Institute Toronto, Ontario


Left: Recovery Area Below: OR Opposite: Reception

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Farrow Partnership Architects and Busby Perkins + Will Phase one is the development of a comprehensive site master plan guided by a draft functional program and output specification documents (design required application of LEAN principles). Providence Health Care is a Catholic organization providing health care services on eight sites in Vancouver, BC, and is a partner in the Vancouver Coastal Health Authority. The Legacy Project is an initiative launched by Providence Health Care to better meet the needs of their acute care patients. The project will include the design of a new acute care facility to replace the existing St. Paul’s Hospital in downtown Vancouver. Comprehensive Master Plan, completed Value: $1.5 billion Opposite: Aerial view of Providence Legacy Hospital campus

Providence Legacy Hospital Vancouver, British Columbia


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Farrow Partnership Architects & WHR Associate Architects Trillium Health Partners is one of the largest community-based, academic affiliated hospitals in Canada; a multi-site health care organization providing a range of tertiary care services across three sites in the Mississauga region. Composed of the Credit Valley Hospital, the Queensway Hospital and the Trillium Health Centre (Mississauga Hospital), THP cares for more than 1.3 million patients annually, making it one of the busiest health care providers in the country. Faced with pressures of population growth and a collection of aging facilities across its sites, THP retained Farrow Partnership (to complete a Stage 1 Ministry of Health and Long-Term Care Master Plan to integrate short- and long-term growth across all three sites. The result is a multi-phased growth strategy that provides an efficient, flexible and fiscally responsible solution to Trillium’s future physical infrastructure requirements. The project required a comprehensive understanding of all existing physical facilities, their general physical condition and opportunities for highest and best use given changing programmatic needs. Collectively, the project planned over 4.3 million square feet of new, replacement and renovated space and approximately 2,000 inpatient beds, with each space implemented in successive time periods across all three sites over the next 20 years. Value: $2.9 billion

Trillium Health Three Site Master Plan Opposite: Aerial view of the Credit Valley, Mississauga and Queensway campus massing

Mississauga, Ontario


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1. Cariboo Memorial Hospital, BC; 2. Kelowna General Hospital, BC; 3. Royal Inland Hospital, BC; 4. Guelph General Hospital, ON; 5. Kaplan Medical Centre, Israel; 6. Eastern Heath, NFLD; 7. Halton Health Care, ON; 8. York Central Hospital, ON; 9. William Osler Hospital, ON; 10. Alexandra Hospital, Singapore


Farrow Partnership Architects and various architects Farrow has completed master plans for a number of leading organizations throughout Canada the Middle East and Asia. Our team of master planning specialists has consistently applied our proven methodology to successfully deliver complex master plans, including: Kaplan Medical Centre, Rehovot, Israel Shaare Zedec Medical Centre, Jerusalem, Israel WH&IHC Hospital, Doha, Qatar Alexandra Hospital, Singapore Kuwait University Hospital, Kuwait King Edward Hospital, Bermuda Kelowna General Hospital, Kelowna, British Columbia Royal Inland Hospital, Kamloops, British Columbia Cariboo Memorial Hospital, Williams Lake, British Columbia St Mary’s Hospital, Sechelt, British Columbia Guelph General Hospital, Guelph, Ontario Halton Health Care, Oakville, Ontario William Osler Hospital, Brampton, Ontario Thunder Bay Regional Health Sciences Centre, Thunder Bay, Ontario York Central Hospital, Richmond Hill, Ontario Bluewater Health, Sarnia, Ontario Credit Valley Hospital, Mississauga, Ontario Trillium Health Partners, Three Campuses, Mississauga, Ontario Colchester East Hants Health Centre, Truro, Nova Scotia Eastern Health Authority, Four Campuses, St. John’s, Newfoundland

Master Planning Leadership Canada, the Middle East and Asia


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International Leadership Farrow's international reach is represented by a portfolio of diverse projects in the Caribbean, Asia, Africa and both the Israeli and Arab Middle East. The projects include: Bermuda, an unbuilt public private hospital pursuit; Singapore, a master plan for a new hospital; Trinidad, a new flagship cancer centre for the English-speaking Caribbean, presently under construction; Israel, three projects, including a 60acre hospital master plan, the new Harzfeld Hospital and a new cardiology hospital all for the largest not-for-profit health provider in the country; Qatar, a new 700,000 square foot hospital, integrated health centre and stand-alone health centre presently under construction; a master plan for the new Sherborne School in Doha, Qatar; South Africa, resulting from an international design competition for a Health Promoting Lifestyle Centre, the prototype facility is to be built by the Ministry of Health through the nine provinces, in the cities, townships and rural areas of the country. Farrow has also been short listed for a new two million square foot hospital and medical department to be named in honour of Nelson Mandela for the South African Ministry of Health.

Above: Health Promoting Lifestyle Centre, South Africa. Opposite Kaplan Medical Center, Israel

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Farrow Partnership Architects and Associate Architects Co-rd Ltd The new National Oncology Centre is a three-storey structure with four radiation treatment bunkers linked to the existing Eric Williams Hospital via walkways and landscaping. Gentle sloping lines and sprawling therapy gardens create a 'village gathering place' for cancer patients and their families. One of the challenges on this project was planning to consider future flexibility of the facility and its related impacts on the host hospital. Working closely with the user groups in Trinidad, Farrow Partnership brought the firm's experience in designing internationally recognized cancer centres to the project. Stipulated Sum, Under Construction Value: $55 million Opposite: National Oncology Centre main entrance

National Oncology Centre Port of Spain, Trinidad


Above: Main Lobby Opposite: Construction Site Farrow


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Farrow Partnership Architects and associate architects Gharnata consultant engineers Farrow was selected to design a new Integrated Health Centre (IHC) and Workers’ Hospital in Doha, Qatar, that embodies the country’s progressive health system expansion initiative. The project comprises a 220-bed, 645,835 square foot hospital and ambulatory care facility. The design expresses regional values and aspirations within the cultural identity of Qatar and is consistent with leading Canadian health care design standards, while aiming to be a global exemplar for how design can be a catalyst for health. The project comprises a co-located, integrated ambulatory health services facility and hospital designed to serve the single male expatriate workforce in Qatar. The overall built area comprises 699,655 square feet, including future expansion. Due to the influx of groups of up to several hundred workers at any given time, the plan must support the efficient flow of workers through the facility toward appropriate services and waiting areas. Stipulated Sum, Under Construction Value: $315 million Opposite: Aerial view of WH&IHC Hospital campus

WH&IHC Hospital Doha, Qatar


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Above: Main Entry Opposite: Construction Site


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Farrow Partnership Architects & Uzi Gordon Architects Farrow was retained by Kaplan Medical Center, a 582-bed acute care hospital, to facilitate development of a comprehensive master plan for their 58-acre site. A significant goal of this project was to create a master plan that inspires and raises organizational aspirations in the context of fund capital initiatives that rely on philanthropy. The new Harzfeld Hospital represents the first phase of this team’s implementation of the master plan for the revitalization of the campus. The 129,000 square foot facility will consist of 153 beds, a dialysis unit, rehab daycare and comprehensive therapy services. The hospital will be moving from its current location to benefit from the new site’s strong connections to nature and proximity to the Kaplan Medical Center’s acute care hospital. Farrow is now working on its third project for Kaplan, a new Cardiology Centre next to the Harzfeld Hospital. Stipulated Sum, Under Construction Value: $315 million Opposite: Kaplan Medical Center main lobby looking out to the garden

Kaplan Medical Centre Rehovolt, Israel


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Opposite Right: Phase one new Harzfeld Hospital construction site Opposite Left: Campus Master Plan Above: Main Entrance Farrow


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Farrow Partnership Architects, Clark Nexsen and Ngonyama Okpanum & Associates Aiming to dramatically improve health and reduce costs in their country, the South African Ministry of Health funded an international design competition to build exemplar Health Promoting Lifestyle Centres (HPLCs). Jury members from five continents selected Farrow Partnership’s team as the winner in response to an open design brief, which called for a new type of health centre. The HPLCs are planned for assessment, adaptation and construction in the rural settings, townships and cities throughout the country’s nine provinces. The HPLCs are intended to advance strategic goals of South Africa’s national health insurance system by introducing a new “salutogenic” model that changes how people think about their health. While the concept of pathogenic (disease-causing) is well recognized, the notion of salutogenic (health-causing) presents a groundbreaking shift toward a vision of healthy living beyond conventional models of acute care, prevention and sustainability. Construction Management, Schematic Design Opposite: HPLC rural campus location

Health Promoting Lifestyle Centres Nine sites throughout South Africa


Below Top: South African National Flower, The Protea Below Middle: HPLC in a Township Location Left: Central Information Hub Opposite: HPLC in Cape Town

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Farrow Partnership Architects The design of the new Sherborne Qatar School is derived from the organic shapes of the calligraphy of the region while also conveying the signature of a progressive, yet enduring, centre of academic excellence. Drawing on the concept of the ‘knowledge souk’, the design of Sherborne School is that of an open, active marketplace of ideas weaving together and connecting the junior and senior schools, with that of the common dining and sports facilities. The classroom areas are laid out in a modular format that will allow the school to grow over time, as was the design mandate for this 25-year master plan. Master Plan, Completed Opposite: Central Knowledge Souk

Sherborne School Doha, Qatar


Below Top: Organizing Circulation Routes Below Bottom & Opposite: Central Souk Left: Campus Plan

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Farrow Partnership Architects with Parkin Architects and Botel Howood Architects The scope for the 179,000 square foot King Edward Memorial Hospital Paget, Bermuda, included the addition to the existing 360-bed hospital of 90 single-occupancy medical / surgical inpatient beds, a new emergency department, diagnostic imaging department and ambulatory care clinics, including: chronic disease management; renal dialysis and medical oncology; a day surgical suite; information services; facility management space; and public lobbies and amenities, all linked to the existing hospital facilities. Apart from meeting clinical and related output specifications, this project was notable for the very challenging topography, limited available footprint and the requirement to create a design that would complement the “Bermudian image� while achieving a world-class clinical facility. Design innovations include application of evidence-based design principles in all single bedrooms to enhance patient safety, dignity and recovery times, reducing risks associated with medication errors and reducing stress associated with inefficient room and unit layout while incorporating views to nature, colour and natural light. This project is targeting LEED Certification. Master Plan, Completed

King Edward Hospital Opposite: Main Entrance Drop-Off

Hamilton, Bermuda


Below Top: View of Campus Below Bottom: Main Reception Left: Covered Drop-Off Opposite: Main Lobby and Central Garden

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Farrow Partnership Architects and Consultants Inc. Architects and Planners Anchored in the principle of "a hospital within a garden, a garden within a hospital," this design marries a strong, inviting organic form with operational efficiency. The plan provides for a future 100-bed expansion. Design details are drawn from Singapore's unique culture and distinctive style. The building is made up of five standardized nine by nine metre structural grid building orientated towards the lake, each separated by garden courtyards. The entire building is sheltered by an undulating canopy, with openings above the courtyards, providing shade in the sub-tropic environment. Master plan, Complete Value: $350 million Opposite: View of typical building section

Alexandra Hospital Singapore


Above: Typical building section Right: Building components; Canopy plan; typical building blocks; View of a courtyard Opposite Top: View of hospital from lake Opposite bottom: Main concourse; Main entry drop off; Waterfront promenade

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Education Leadership Farrow’s education sector expertise is based on its leadership in creating healthy environments. This is reflected in the firm’s expanding expertise in independent private school projects for some of Canada’s most prestigious academic organizations, including various projects for Bishop Strachan School, Country Day School, Pickering College, Havergal College, Royal St. George’s College, Dearcroft Montessori School, Kingsway College School, Berkeley Academy and Oakville Christian School and a design for the British Sherborne School’s new campus in Qatar.

Above: Ryerson University Auditorium Opposite: Bishop Strachan School Student Centre


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Farrow Partnership Architects Stakeholders of The Bishop Strachan School contacted Farrow Partnership to create a vision for the new student centre. The goal was to expand the facilities to encase an open space / atrium to provide students with a place to meet during academic down-time. Fully glazed along its length, the centre creates a dialogue with the school’s historic façade across the open court. Set against this rich backdrop, the ensemble of rough-hewn stone and warm woods respects the school’s architectural tradition and also communicates a contemporary freshness. Farrow Partnership assisted the school with its fundraising campaign and in turn the budget requirements for the additions and renovations were met. Farrow also designed the library and the Bishop Strachan School Head's house. Stipulated Sum, Completed Opposite: View of the student centre courtyard

Bishop Strachan School Toronto, Ontario


Below: Donor Recognition Floor Leaves Left: Student Centre Opposite: Student Centre and Courtyard Beyond

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Farrow Partnership Architects The Country Day School is an independent universitypreparatory, non-denominational school for boys and girls located in King City, a community north of Toronto, Ontario, Canada. With a student population of approximately 700, the renewal and expansion of the Senior School will provide a focus for kindergarten to grade 12 students and will greatly enhance the overall learning environment. The school’s 80-acre site overlooks rolling hills and protected wetlands that are part of the vast Oak Ridges Moraine, a vital watershed for the region. Farrow Partnership was selected to complete the planning and design for this project. The new Senior School program includes classrooms, science laboratories, a library, art rooms, administration, guidance and staff offices, common areas and rooms, washrooms, change rooms and storage rooms. A new 400-seat dining hall will include on-site food preparation for catering, loading and storage areas. The design and functionality of the space will integrate well with the school's country setting and will particularly embrace the wetlands to the east of the existing senior school. Construction Management, Construction Start June 2014 Opposite: Aerial view of the Country Day School campus

Country Day School King City, Ontario


Above: Main Entry Drop-Off Opposite: Main Entrance Farrow


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Below: Central Atrium Left: Entry to Dining Hall Opposite: Dining Hall Mezzanine

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Farrow Partnership Architects and Quadrangle Architects Pickering College is a rapidly growing independent school in Newmarket, Ontario. With strong roots to Quaker values and principles, the school required a comprehensive facility map for a long-term growth strategy that incorporates the reuse of existing heritage buildings, new structures and future site uses. Our design considers programming and development options for a new purpose-built Arts Centre and Auditorium, a new standalone Junior School, a new student and staff Residence and an addition to the existing athletics facilities. The result is a design that builds on the core Quaker values of simplicity while expressing the College’s meaningful heritage and high aspirations to advance Pickering College as a “campus of influence”. The design sets a new standard for enabling individuals to thrive and engages students, parents, staff and alumni in a lifetime relationship with the school, while creating an outstanding place for healthy learning, working and building a strong a sense of community. Stipulated Sum, Schematic Design Opposite: Bird’s-eye view of the Pickering College Campus

Pickering College Newmarket, Ontario


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Above: Main Entry Court Opposite: New East Centre for Innovation


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Farrow Partnership Architects Stakeholders of The Bishop Strachan School contacted Schematic Design Farrow Partnership is completing the redevelopment of the existing Junior School and Dining Hall at Toronto’s Royal St. George’s College, an urban day school for boys offering a challenging program of academics and extra-curricular activities designed to prepare the students for placement at the university of their choice. The redevelopment project will create student-centred spaces that support 21st century learning, including a variety of flexible breakout areas for open seminar or group collaboration. A welcoming new entrance foyer will add a home-like atmosphere, while also improving access to the renovated Ketchum Hall dining area. The jewel of the junior school, the historic Ketchum Hall will be redesigned to allow natural light to flood the oversized room during both mealtime and also the range of related educational programs that the space will be tailored to accommodate. The first phase of construction is scheduled to begin in June 2015 so as to be completed for the College’s 50th anniversary. Above: Existing Ketchum Dining Hall Opposite: Proposed Ketchum Dining Hall

Royal St George’s College Toronto, Ontario


Below: Existing exterior of Ketchum Hall Opposite: Proposed exterior of Ketchum Hall Left: Proposed main entry to the junior school Below bottom: Existing entry to the junior school

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Corporate Expertise Farrow’s corporate sector experience includes new buildings, renovations and corporate fit-outs for a range of clients, including large organizations through to small private clients. Our projects include: 21 Caniff Street Renovations 121 Richmond Street West Lobby Renovation 134 Peter Street Office Renovations 426 Adelaide Street West Renovations 559 College Street Offices Altus Helyer Office Renovations Canali Office and Showroom Geo A. Kelson Company Office Renovations Greater Toronto Airport Authority, Terminal 1 Fit-out Projects McConnell’s Offices MMM Group Thornhill Office Needs Analysis Inventory MMM Group Office Design OPP and Attorney Generals Headquarters Robins Appleby & Taub Offices Triaxis Office Renovations

Above: Robbins Appleby & Taub Opposite: OPP Headquarters


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Farrow Partnership Architects The 16,000 square foot office space for Robins, Appleby & Taub is a bright and open environment designed to express the progressive nature of this corporate law firm. The environment is achieved through sensible interior planning expressed with highend materials, including granite, wood veneers, specialty dropped ceilings and light wells, and a contemporary colour palette. Clerestory lighting between associates' offices and open workstations creates a dynamic, well-lit environment in which everyone has uniform access to natural light. Construction Management, Completed Opposite: View of the main lobby of Robins Appleby & Taub

Robins Appleby & Taub Toronto, Ontario


Below : Reception Left: Main Entrance Opposite: Lobby Seating

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Dunlop Farrow Architects & Salter Associates of which Farrow Partnership is a successor firm The 640,000 square foot facility houses the Ontario Provincial Police and the Administration Division of the Ministry of the Solicitor General. A curved, two-storey concourse and light-filled atria promote a sense of accessibility and welcome to visitors. The complex also includes a museum, a 450-foot communications tower, a helicopter facility and pad, a canine facility and parking for 1300 cars. Construction Management, Completed Opposite: View of OPP and Attorney General Headquarters

OPP & Attorney General Headquarters Orillia, Ontario


Below Top: Building concept Below Bottom: : Main auditorium Left: Atrium Opposite: View of main entry from the lake

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Farrow Partnership Farrow provides services to the development community, helping to analyze the full potential of their properties. The feasibility studies cover a range of statistical, planning and context analysis. In simple terms, we get it right as well as get it done. Using our Common Ground and Charrette processes, we bring people together to discover the best way forward, rather than jump at answers. Our purpose-driven process has been designed to make the best use of the client’s investment and resources. We believe that the creative process should be rewarding and energizing for participants, thereby building consensus for complex projects across multiple stakeholders. Various Feasibility Studies, Complete Opposite: Context Analysis

Development Feasibility Expertise Toronto, Ontario


Below Top: Statistical Analysis Below Bottom: : Site Analysis Left: Context Views Opposite: Option Analysis

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Farrow Partnership Architects Located on the top floor of a vintage industrial building in the heart of Toronto’s Little Italy neighbourhood, this workspace benefits from a 360-degree view of the city. Recognizing that their business success depends on effective creation and application of knowledge, the designer's intent was to enhance both collaboration and concentration. The approach reflects the firm’s overall philosophy, which is to work with human nature, rather than against it. For example, movement through the space reveals natural, protected nodes for working and the display of architectural models, while breathable meeting areas accommodate various modes of participation. A central kitchen table invites conversation, and model-making is treated as theatre in a centre-stage location, rather than relegating it to a “back-of-house” location. Construction Management, Completed Opposite: Central knowledge area of 559 College Street

559 College Street Toronto, Ontario


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Above: Main Reception Opposite: Common Meeting Areas


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Residential Expertise Farrow’s residential sector experience includes single-family custom houses and multi-family residential condominiums for a range of clients. Our projects include: Domus Condominium Boswell House Cedar Ridge Cottage Dunvegan Road House Renovations Finnegan House Fleming Residence Glenayr House Renovations Hutcheson House Renovations Langley Avenue House MacPherson House Millbank Residence Moss Cottage Nadir House Popular Plains House Ross House Roxborough Residence Scholl Cottage Tuli Residence Warren Road House Saddington Residence Inwintash Residence

Above: MacPherson House Opposite: Domus Condominium


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Farrow Partnership Architects This private residence includes primary living spaces, three bedrooms, master bedroom and ensuite, a library / study and multi-car garage. Originally the site was comprised of an existing mid-1950s two-storey pitched roof house, deeply set against a ravine to the rear. Rather than demolish the existing house, it was preserved and a new "front house" was constructed adjacent to it. The design provides a series of conceptual 'light drawers' that are intentionally pulled up and out to capture daylight and distant views through strategically placed openings. Construction Management, Completed Opposite: Street view of the Millbank House

Millbank House Toronto, Ontario


Below Top: Building massing with existing house in foreground Below Bottom: Second Floor Study Left: Main Entrance Opposite: Entry Vestibule

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Burka Architects Inc and Farrow Partnership Architects Domus Condominium is situated in the heart of Toronto's Yorkville neighbourhood. Domus consists of one 10-storey building and two stacked townhouse buildings with a total area of 115,000 square feet. The modern gothic-inspired building consists of 69 beautiful loftstyle suites. The project weaves together a ragged area by creating a central garden with openings, walkways and view corridors that link the three surrounding streets instead of creating one object building on a podium, as was the original zoning / massing. The design pushed the massing to the edges, creating a central community focus. Construction Management, Completed Opposite: Garden courtyard view of the Domus Condominium

Domus Condominium Toronto, Ontario


Below: Central Garden Court Left: Street Faรงade Opposite: Southern Terraces

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Farrow Partnership Architects The MacPherson House is situated in central Toronto and developed out of an existing 1911 yellow brick cottage with an addition to the rear which sits back to allow the original cottage to retain its mass and presence on the street. T he interior of the cottage is opened up to contain the living room with a small mezzanine slipped in under the roof line. This room and the centre of the house are lit by a 16 by 7 foot skylight that brings light deep within the house. The rear of the house makes up the dining, sitting and kitchen areas with bedrooms above and play area below. Completed Opposite: Living room with skylight above

MacPherson House Toronto, Ontario


Top left to right: Study, central skylight and kitchen Left: Dining room, dining table and original cottage Opposite: Renovated cottage

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Farrow Partnership Architects The Ray Chair’s name is derived from the shape of its structure, which evokes rays of light opening up. The story of the Ray Chair connects nature, technology and design history. Concepts from nature have influenced the materials; the burdock is a seed with hooks that attach themselves to the fur of passing animals to become widely dispersed (offering inspiration for the invention of VelcroTM). A similar approach to adhesion is reflected by the recycled metal gripper material which is the chair’s key structural and aesthetic component. This product, known as NRX™, was originally developed for use in the auto industry with subsequent applications in aerospace, mining, marine and other industries. Its light weight laminated construction creates a strong, adhesivefree bond with other recycled materials. No glue or other toxic agents are required to construct the chair. In the history of furniture design, the Barcelona Chair is recognized as a 1929 classic by Ludwig Mies van der Rohe. It was considered to be a precious object which depended upon precision engineering and required the highest level of craftsmanship to weld the joints, polish the stainless steel and upholster it with premium Italian leather. By contrast, this new chair demonstrates that something comparably beautiful, strong and simple can be created for the 21st century from recycled compressed paper and recycled metal. NRX™ can be manufactured by license on common equipment. Minimal tooling maintenance is required to ensure consistent hook application and production rate.

Ray Chair

Toronto, Ontario


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Hospitality Expertise Farrow’s hospitality sector expertise includes continuously working for Starwood Hotels, with ongoing renovations to its flagship downtown Toronto Sheraton Hotel over a 30-year period. Farrow has completed numerous new buildings, additions and renovations at the Toronto Hunt Club over many years and has completed projects for other clubs, including the Caledon Trout Club and the Oakville Golf Club. Farrow has also completed the design for E'Terra Samara Resort in Tobermory, Ontario. The design concept for the E'Terra Samara 5star eco resort, located in the Bruce Peninsula, consists of 12 suspended, reimagined one-bedroom tree house villas nestled into a forest which is part of the UNESCO World Biosphere Reserve. The structure is designed to be suspended from the trees’ trunks, rather than following the common practice of nailing to the tree, thereby hugging the tree rather than piercing its flesh. The design emerged from a desire to not only be “in the trees” but also “of the trees.”

Above: The E’Terra Samara Resort Opposite: The Toronto Hunt Club


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Farrow Partnership Architects E'Terra Samara 5-star eco resort design emerged from a desire to not only be “in the trees” but also “of the trees.” The dominant image is derived from the shape of a samara, commonly known as the maple key, a winged, fibrous, papery propeller shape that appears in autumn and enables the wind to carry maple tree seeds (which biologists refer to as the “fruit”) farther from the parent tree than regular seeds. The sleeping area of the tree house is located in the “fruit” section of the samara shape, with the socializing area located in the “wing” section. Prefabricated off-site in three pieces, the structure will draw from East Coast light-weight wooden sailing boat construction techniques. Each samara villa frame will be hoisted into place and bolted together in the winter months with absolute minimal disturbance to the delicate flora. The locally harvested, Forest Stewardship Council-certified frames are suspended from a remarkably simple steel shoulder and cable system that hugs the tree trunk. This construction methodology is inspired by the umbrella-like yukitsuri ropes which support the black pine tree branches in Kenrokuen Garden located in Kanazawa, Japan. Construction Management, Schematic Design Opposite: Lakeside view of E'Terra Samara

E’Terra Samara Resort Tobermory, Ontario


Below Top: Interior Below Bottom: Samara Structural System Left: Maple Key Opposite: View of Samara in the Forest

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Tye Farrow Tye Farrow has been recognized internationally for creating seminal places where people can thrive—economically, culturally and physically. The Stockholm-based World Congress on Design and Health has identified him as a global leader who is making "a significant contribution to health and humanity through the medium of architecture and design." His firm’s portfolio includes multiple international awards for designing some of the most technically advanced facilities in the world. Tye is a frequent keynote speaker on opportunities to optimize health rather than cope with disease by re-thinking public and private sector places. He has initiated a global “Cause Health” movement aimed at raising public expectations for design. His projects across North America, the Caribbean, Asia, Africa and the Middle East demonstrate leadership in this visionary quest. Professional Affiliations and Memberships Fellow, Royal Architectural Institute of Canada Registered Architect, Ontario Association of Architects Registered Architect, Architectural Institute of British Columbia LEED Accredited Professional Governor, Board of Governors, University of Toronto Alumni Association Past First Vice President, Board of Governors Architectural Conservancy of Ontario Past Vice-chair, College of Electors, University of Toronto Alumni Faculty Representative Faculty Council John H. Daniels Faculty of Architecture, Landscape and Design University of Toronto Past Chairman of the Board, Board of Governors, Royal St. George’s College Education Master of Architecture in Urban Design, Harvard University Graduate School of Design Bachelor of Architecture, University of Toronto


Conferences and Public Presentations Presentation, ““The Ultimate Test for Design: Does it Cause Health?” Melbourne School of Design, Melbourne, Australia, March, 2015 Presentations, ““The Ultimate Test for Design: Does it Cause Health?” AIA Australia, Brisbane and Sydney, Australia, March, 2015 Presentation, “Can the Design & Architecture of Public Space Cause Health?”, Design & Health 10th World Congress, Toronto, Ontario, July 2014 Presentation, “Designing for Health and the Patient Experience”, 5th annual Patient Experience: Empathy + Innovation Summit: Transforming Healthcare through Empathy and Innovation at the Cleveland Clinic Summit, Cleveland, Ohio, May 2014 Keynote address, “Design Your Process to Get it Right”, C2C: Concept to Construction, Saskatchewan Association of Architects Conference and Annual General Meeting, Saskatoon, Saskatchewan, May 2014 Keynote address, “Cause Health: The Ultimate Test for Design?”, Design and Health Summit convened by the American Institute of Architects, Washington, D.C., April 2014 Presentation, “The Ultimate Test for Design: Does it Cause Health?”, Healthy Environments, Healing Space Conference, University of Virginia, March 2014 Presentation, Architectural Institute of British Columbia Annual Conference, Sea Change – Architecture on the Crest, “Designed to Thrive: Creating Salutogenic Environments”, Vancouver, October 2013

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Public Lecture, University of Auckland, Auckland, New Zealand, March, 2013 Public Lecture, Wellington City Art Gallery, Wellington, New Zealand, March, 2013 Public Lecture, Christchurch Polytechnic Institute of Technology,


Conferences and Public Presentations , continued Public Lecture, Waiariki Institute of Technology, Rotorua, New Zealand, March, 2013 Healthcare Estates Annual Conference, “Salutogenesis: Setting a Bigger Agenda,” Manchester, UK, October 2012 AIA Architectural Exchange East, Keynote Speaker, Richmond, Virginia November, 2012 Royal Architectural Institute of Canada Annual Conference, “Salutogenesis: Setting a Bigger Agenda,” St. John’s, NFL, Canada, June, 2012 Ontario Association of Architects Annual Conference, “Salutogenesis: Setting a Bigger Agenda,” Ottawa, Ontario, Canada, May, 2012 Healthcare Design Conference, “Health Promoting Lifestyle Centres South Africa, Salutogenesis: Setting a Bigger Agenda,” Phoenix, Arizona, January, 2012 Design & Health International Symposium & Workshop, Cape Town, South Africa, October, 2011 Design & Health Symposium, “Building Health: Purpose and Legacy for Health Creation,” Boston, July, 2011 "The Nature of Cancer Centres: Essential Elements of Exemplary Healing Environments," Hospital Build Middle East 2011, Dubai, UAE, June, 2011 "Hospital Design: Transformed by Purpose and Legacy,” Alberta Association of Architects, Annual General Meeting, Edmonton, Alberta, Canada, April 2011 "The Nature of Hospitals: Essential Elements of Exemplary Healing Environments,” Design & Health Conference, Helsinki, Finland, March 2011 Farrow


Conferences and Public Presentations , Continued “The Nature of Hospitals: Essential Elements of Exemplary Healing Environments,” Clalit Health Services, Rehovot, Israel, March 2011 “The Nature of Co-creation: Kaplan Medical Centre Master Plan & Harzfeld Hospital,” Clalit Health Services, Rehovot, Israel, March 2011 "The Nature of Hospitals,” Design & Health Malaysia, Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia, September, 2010 "Building Mission Vision & Values: Three Hospital Organizations Transformed by Design Thinking," Design & Health Canada 2010, Toronto, June 2010 "Fat Places, Fit Places - Leadership in the Campaign to End Obesity," Texas A&M University - College of Architecture Health Lecture Series, Texas, USA, December 2010 "Six Vital Signs - Essential Elements of Fertile Translational Research Environments," Thunder Bay Regional Research Institute, Thunder Bay, October 2010 "Fat Places, Fit Places: Seeing the Difference," Mayo Clinic's TRANSFORM 2010: Thinking Differently About Health Care, Mayo Clinic, Rochester, Minnesota, September 2010 "The Nature of Health," Living Learning in Retirement Architecture in Our Life series, Glendon College, York University, October 2010 "Building Mission Vision & Values: Three Hospital Organizations Transformed by Design Thinking," Design & Health Canada 2010, Toronto, June 2010 "The Intangible Factor: Design Quality Standards that Inspire," Farrow Architectural Institute of British Columbia annual conference, Vancouver, May 2010


Conferences and Public Presentations, Continued “Healing Environment and Safety,” Halifax 9 Pre-Conference 2: Designing with Safety in Mind, October 2009 “Quality Standards: Bringing Hospitals to Life,” Design and Health 6th World Congress, Singapore, June 2009 “Bringing Hospitals to Life: Design Quality Standards,” Royal Architectural Institute of Canada (RAIC) Conference, Ottawa, June 2009 “The Case for Nursing Focused Design,” Registered Nurses’ Association of Ontario Innovation Forum, Toronto, June 2009 “HI-FOG Fire Suppression Technology,” Ontario Association of Architects Conference, Toronto, May 2009 “Twenty Years After – Five Distinguished Graduates; Five Diverse Architectural Careers,” University of Toronto Faculty of Architecture, Landscape and Design, October 2008 “Reimagining the Hospital“ and “Healthy Places,” Honeywell Users Group for Buildings Conference, Arizona, June 2008 “Greenbuilding North: The Nature of Hospital,” Brownfields 2008 Conference, Detroit, Michigan, May 2008 “Favourite Sacred Spaces,” Pecha Kucha Toronto, May 2008 “Re-imagining the Hospital,” Planning. Looking Forward – Future Planning and Recruiting Resources for Hospitalization in Israel Conference, Ramat Gan, Israel, January 2008 “Designing Strong Links to Nature,” International Hospital Federation, World Hospital Congress, Seoul, Korea 2007 “Designing for a Diverse Population: What Our Professions Can Learn From Each Other” - Panelist, Association of Canadian Ergonomists Conference, Toronto 2007

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Conferences and Public Presentations, Continued “Ecology-based Humanism in Environmental Design,” International Future Design Conference, Seoul, Korea, October 2006 “Innovative Integration of Healthcare Architecture and Technology,” American Institute of Architects, Academy of Architecture for Health Conference, 2006 “Humanism in the Art of Healing,” Construct Canada, Toronto, November 2005 (panelist) “Thunder Bay Regional Health Sciences Centre,” Healthcare Facilities Symposium & Expo, Atlanta, October 2005 “New Green Field Hospitals: Thunder Bay Regional Health Sciences Centre,” World Congress on Design and Health, Frankfurt 2005 Royal Architectural Institute of Canada Annual Convention, Quebec City, 2005, Edmonton, 2005 SARS Conference, Ontario Hospital Association, Innovative Design Solutions 2004; Construction Solutions, Toronto 2005 Canadian Wood Council Associations, Annual Meeting, Quebec City, 2004: Wood Fair, Vancouver, 2005; Wood Fair, Edmonton, 2004; Wood Fair, Calgary, 2004; Professors Conference, Toronto 2004 “Healing and the Delivery of Health Care Architecture,” Ontario Association of Architects, Toronto, May 2003 “Healing and the Health Care Village: Beyond the Mega-Hospital to a New Model of Health Design,” (Poster Presentation) Design and Health Conference, Montreal, June 2003 “Thunder Bay Regional Hospital: Healing and the DeliveryFarrow of Health Care Architecture,” (Poster Presentation), Design and Health Conference, Montreal, June 2003


Conferences and Public Presentations, Continued "Healing and the Health Care Village,” Healthcare Facilities Symposium & Expo, Boston, September 2003 “Wood in Architecture,” Architectural Institute of British Columbia Annual General Meeting, Vancouver, British Columbia, May 2002 “Humanism in Architecture,” Hong Kong Healthcare Ministers, Hong Kong, November 2001

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Jury Participation Design & Health International Academy Awards, Salutogenic Design Award Panel, May 2014 Design & Health International Academy Awards, Salutogenic Design Award Panel, July 2013 Alberta Wood Design Awards, June 2012 Montreal McGill Hospital, March 2010 WAN Awards 09, International Sector Awards - Healthcare, June 2009 Design & Health Awards, Best International Healthcare Project (less than 40,000 sqm), May 2009

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