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Arable

Protection is the priority With wheat fungicides coming under increasing pressure, particularly where curative efficacy is concerned, growers are advised to keep ahead of disease this spring with preventative control while also considering a T1.5 application. Dominic Kilburn writes. With continuing challenges facing wheat growers in tackling key disease septoria, the advice this spring is to treat crops early, incorporating multi-site fungicides, to ensure protection and avoid having to rely on curative activity. In addition, where appropriate, growers could consider a ‘T1.5’ timing, bridging the gap between T1 and T2 applications, particularly where leaf 2 remains unprotected in a standard programme and where spray intervals are stretched. That’s according to Adama fungicide technical specialist Andy Bailey (right) speaking at a ‘Spring Crop Protection’ briefing recently, where the company also highlighted its expanded product portfolio (see Table). Mr Bailey acknowledged that there were significant challenges to septoria management particularly with resistance to existing chemistry, now affecting SDHI and azole products, and the need to protect chemistry going forward. “There are clearly issues with curative activity and therefore it’s important that growers start their programmes early with a well-timed application of multi-site products which, in trials, provide good control of septoria,” commented Mr Bailey. “With no resistance selection penalty, multi-sites should be the first thing in the tank to protect other actives with other components of the mix built around them. “We are starting to recognise other benefits of multi-sites aside from disease protection, especially the mitigation of resistance issues when septoria is the driver,” he added.

Product choice at T1.5 Septoria – Use a multi-site like folpet Rust threat – Add a strob for protection Active rust – Add an azole for curative control

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Best practice Mr Bailey pointed out that varietal resistance to septoria (delaying the onset of disease build-up), the propensity for growers to drill later for better black-grass control (carrying less disease over winter and into spring), and better disease forecasting systems (better targeting of chemistry) were combining to form an integrated approach to disease management. He suggested that although these were all positive steps in terms of septoria management, they shouldn’t be seen as an opportunity to markedly cut spray inputs but more about fine tuning. He also stressed the importance of application timing and quality this spring to give fungicides the best opportunity of achieving good disease control. “There’s only a certain number of spray days available in a season and getting the timing right is crucial for septoria control. “These products must be applied properly for them to work well which means selecting the appropriate product in the first place and applying the right dose and water volumes. “Multi-sites are contact products and so if growers are going as low as 80-litres/ha water volumes, they have to ask themselves if they are giving the products the best possible chance of success,” he said.

Portfolio expansion Adama has added a large number of SDHI fungicides, and other products, to its portfolio for 2018. Among the additions are nine IZM (isopyrazam)-based SDHI fungicide brands for wheat, barley, oilseed rape and vegetables, an azole/ strobilurin-based fungicide for sugar beet/OSR/cereals, three insecticides and one herbicide (see table). Adama’s technical and marketing director Alison Bosher, said that the new portfolio meant that the company could now offer a complete range of products – SDHIs, azoles and multi-site fungicides – to control septoria in wheat. She added that the business’ barley portfolio had also been strengthened with the “in-bound” products which could tackle the key diseases of ramularia and rhynchosporium. Ms Bosher explained that, in May last year, Adama parent company ChemChina had completed the deal to buy Syngenta and, as part of the EU Commission’s agreement for the acquisition to go ahead, there had been a requirement for Adama to divest some products from its portfolio. However, by way of recompense, the company

Adama’s technical and marketing director Alison Bosher.

has received 14 products from Syngenta, including the IZM range of SDHI fungicides. She said that an agreement had now been reached for the sale of its divestments to NuFarm, details of which would be made clear at a later date. According to Ms Bosher, Adama currently has a 6 per cent share of the UK crop protection market, and it will remain a completely separate entity to Syngenta with no plans to integrate the two businesses, despite both being owned by the same company. “I am very upbeat about the future with 2018 the start of some big changes in the industry, and some exciting times ahead,” she said.

Adama’s in-bound crop protection products: Name

Type

Actives

Bontima

Fungicide

cyprodinil + isopyrazam

Cebara

Fungicide

cyprodinil + isopyrazam

Concorde

Fungicide

cyprodinil + isopyrazam

Keystone

Fungicide

epoxiconazole + isopyrazam

Micaraz

Fungicide

epoxiconazole + isopyrazam

Seguris

Fungicide

epoxiconazole + isopyrazam

Symetra

Fungicide

azoxystrobin + isopyrazam

Reflect

Fungicide

isopyrazam

Anyone for T1.5?

Zulu

Fungicide

isopyrazam

According to Mr Bailey, the erosion of curative fungicide activity on septoria has meant that leaving leaf 2 unprotected is becoming more of a gamble each season. “Leaf 2 comes out 14 days after the classic T1 growth stage 32 timing, and is normally left unprotected until growth stage 39 – the T2 flag leaf. “Historically, this was OK because if leaf 2 got infected, or when spray timings were stretched, growers could rely on curative triazole activity when it was applied at T2. “But now with less curative activity from azoles, and more limited curative activity from

Priori Xtra

Fungicide

azoxystrobin + cyproconazole

Aphox

Insecticide

pirimicarb

Karate 2.5 WG

Insecticide

lambda-cyhlothrin

Plenum

Insecticide

pymetrozine

Topik

Herbicide

clodinafop-propargyl

SDHIs, it means that you can’t get complete control if septoria gets established on leaf 2 between the T1 and T2 sprays,” said Mr Bailey. He pointed out that multisite chemistry such as folpet is only effective when applied as a protectant ahead of the disease. “Azoles and SDHIs are very effective

protectants too but their curative activity is only effective up to 50 per cent of the latent period of infection of the disease when there are still no visible symptoms on the crop.” After that point, septoria is beyond chemical control, he stressed. “So we need growers to consider continued over...

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