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Engineer your career with Claas Claas UK has chosen Farmers Guide in which to launch a new initiative to raise awareness of the opportunities available within its service and parts business, and to attract young talent into the high-tech machinery service industry.

engineers with many years of practical experience under their belts. School leavers and college graduates can join our apprenticeship scheme, or work directly in a dealership with the right qualifications or experience,” explains Claas UK CEO Trevor Tyrrell. “Many people fail to appreciate that agriculture is an exciting industry, with machinery that uses state-of-theart technology on a par with aerospace and other cutting-edge industries. It is an industry that has embraced the internet, satellite technology and computers like no other, as we continue to develop machinery that will help farmers feed an ever growing population.”

There is the need for service engineers skilled in electronics and electrohydraulics for a highly advanced machine such as the Lexion.

Agriculture is probably unique in the machinery service world for the expectation placed on service engineers to manage themselves while being part of a team, and for the high level of customer contact they will experience. And it is this that makes the work both challenging, but ultimately rewarding when recognition from the customer is received for a job well done. The agricultural service and support industry has changed out of all recognition in recent years, and the number of roles now available under that ‘broad brush’ title is extensive. There is still a solid, mechanical element at the heart of any agricultural machine, meaning there is still an important role for service engineers with the skills to work on engines and transmissions. However, alongside this are complex control and other systems contained in every machine, from the

Close relationship

Service engineers are expected to take responsibility for jobs right through from initial diagnosis, to liaising with the customer and completing the job as professionally and efficiently as possible.

smallest tractor to a highly advanced machine such as the Lexion combine harvester. This means that there is also the need for service engineers highly skilled in electronics and electrohydraulics. “While it is important to bring new blood into the industry, we are just as keen to hear from experienced

Claas says that it is completely flexible in how people work. If they prefer to be mobile they will be supplied with a new van which typically will be equipped with about £50,000 of specialist tools.

Farmers have a very close working relationship with the machinery supplier and their service teams, and, unlike many commercial vehicle service roles where the service engineer has no contact with the customer, many service engineers are attracted into agriculture for that very reason – and to be part of a dealer service team where no two days are the same. They are expected to take responsibility for jobs right through from initial diagnosis, to liaising with the customer and completing the job as professionally and efficiently as possible. Being family owned, Claas is unique among the major manufacturers within the UK. The family ethos is at the core of the business and this extends throughout the company. As part of this ‘family’, for a service engineer with Claas there are many benefits available in addition to the opportunity to earn substantially over the base salary with regular overtime and incentives. “We are in a position where we can be completely flexible when it comes to our employees,” says Trevor Tyrrell. “Because we own many dealerships in the UK, Europe, the USA and Canada, we understand the job better. Apart from the job security that comes with working for a global company, if an employee wants to move within the UK or even migrate to work abroad, that is not a problem. The opportunity is there. “We also have close links with the Claas importer in Australia and New Zealand, and all apprentices have the

There is also still a solid, mechanical element at the heart of any agricultural machine.

opportunity to spend three months working ‘Down Under’ during their harvest, which is our quiet winter period, and is a fantastic experience for them. “We are completely flexible in how people work. If someone wants regular hours and to be workshop based, that’s fine. If they prefer to be mobile we will supply them with a new van, which typically will be equipped with about £50,000 of specialist tools. We will even insure their personal tools up to £15,000.”

Youth opportunities For young service engineers, there are opportunities to join a Claas dealer either as a qualified service engineer having completed a college course or they can enrol on the industry leading four-year Claas Agricultural Apprenticeship scheme based at Reaseheath College in Cheshire or SRUC Barony in Scotland. For a qualified young engineer, while they will sometimes be expected to work alone, there will always be the full support of being part of a large team and they will have a mentor within that team that they can turn to for advice and assistance. There will also be the opportunity to progress their career and as a result of annual training at Claas UK; they can achieve the higher level Master Mechanic and Master Technician roles, and ultimately progress on to more senior positions in management, should they wish to do so. You don’t have to look far within Claas UK to find sales and after-sales directors who started their careers as apprentices with Claas or in a dealership, or have gone on to work within senior product or management positions. The opportunity is there today to “Engineer Your Career”. ■

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Farmers Guide January 2017  

Farmers Guide Magazine January 2017 Issue