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FARMERS’

HARVEST Vol. 61 Issue 1

Nicole Collins Illustration

1098 W. Main St. Lewisville, TX 75067

Photo Courtesy NOAA

“Music: you can do it anytime. I think I would be pretty bummed if I couldn’t play music. I couldn’t imagine doing anything else for a living.” Senior Austin Clay

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October 15, 2010


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Farmers’ Harvest | Lewisville High School | Lewisville, Texas | October 15, 2010

Brief blurbs from around campus

Construction starts with changes in parking With a large chunk of the student and faculty parking sealed off by the Charter Builders construction crew, the preliminary changes that will eventually lead a thorough reconstruction of the main campus are underway. “We’re going to have more space to walk the halls,” assistant principal Stephanie Gore said of the end results of this 30-month process to rebuild the high school. Associate principal Dr. Mitchell Hall and assistant principal Teresa Wells look forward to the rebuild. “It’s about having a structure that is designed and constructed in a way that will maximize student and teacher performance,” Hall said. But Wells sees things in a slightly different way. “There are a lot of memories in this building,” Wells said. “This is where I went to school. Generationally speaking, it’s the people that make the school, not necessarily the building.” The first changes that will be observed are the leveling and clearing of the land for the new gyms and cafeteria. 5Compiled by Justin Gilbert

Results of TEA recognized rating to come

Principal Brad Burns has appealed to the Texas Education Agency to reassess the school’s demotion from being a recognized campus to an academically acceptable one, due to two too many student dropouts. “We had recognized TAKS scores, but the thing that got us was we had two too many kids over the completion rate,” Burns said. “We were at 84.4 percent; you had to be at 85 or greater that complete school on time.” Burns said the administration did everything in its power to locate the students that had been counted against the school and found that four were mistakenly counted against the school. “We had all the documentation that these students were actually attending school,” Burns said. “And once we did that, we had all that information [and] we could send the documentation to the state.” The status of the appeal is checked once a week, and as of right now the appeal is still pending but so far the school has met criteria. “We should know something by the middle of October,” Burns said. “My hopes are the commissioner’s office will grant us our recognized status back.” 5Compiled by Anna Brady

District suspends drug testing policy

The Random Drug Testing policy for 2010-2011 has been suspended, a decision made by the district due to financial problems only two years after the policy being instated. “It was just suspended so they can re-evaluate the validity of it, to see if they’re accomplishing what they need to accomplish with it,” principal Brad Burns said. Drug testing was costing the school around $108,000, and with the district facing an $18.7 million deficit, the policy was too expensive and results didn’t appear to support its necessity. The policy was put in place in 2008. But in the time that the policy was intact there were 4,600 students in total that were tested. Of those students, only 81 tested positive, 2 percent of the total. With the district saving $100,000 by temporarily removing the policy, they will have more money to put into extracurricular activities, and the Star counseling program will be boosted to fill the break left by the removal of the drug testing. 5Compiled by Anna Brady

News

City council places ban on K2 CHARLIEBRUSKO section chief

The Lewisville City Council committee voted 4-1 Sept. 20 to place a ban on a synthetic drug known as K2. K2 is a synthetic marijuana sold as incense, also known as Spice, that has been growing in popularity over the last year. Although it is being sold as potpourri, many purchasers of this product have been using it as a form of marijuana due to similar effects it can give. Many counties around Texas, as well as states within the nation, have been putting a ban on the synthetic drug and Lewisville has followed in their footsteps. The punishment to anyone found guilty of selling, holding or using K2, Spice, Salvia divinorum or any other similar synthetic marijuana will be a misdemeanor and subject to a fine of $2,000. This will also be the punishment for any person found with an “ingestion device,” like a bong, pipe, smoking mask, et cetera. Chief of Police Russ Kerbow proposed the ban on K2 to the council members after communicating with other counties around Texas about the drug being a potential health concern. A vote was taken on Aug. 16 amongst the board members as to whether the ban should be considered. It was a 3-1 vote, mayor pro tem Rudy Durham being the only opposed member. Because one council member was absent the day of the original vote, they needed to meet two more times in order for the vote to be finalized. “I think that we’re overreacting about something that the state or federal government hasn’t even banned at this point,” Durham said. “It started in Mansfield. I believe they were the first one to go about the banning, and everyone has been piling on since then.” Council member Lathan Watts, who voted in favor of the ban, disagrees. “[The council] acted on the recommendation of

[Kerbow],” Watts said. “He’s dedicated his life to serving and protecting our community and with a recommendation when it comes to law enforcement, I trust him. He’s the expert on it, so I went along with his recommendation.” K2 is rare in that it does not show up on drug testing, which worries Sergeant Dan Coltrane, narcotics officer for the Lewisville Police Department. “[K2] is readily available,” Coltrane said. “It’s not yet illegal [in all of Texas], and there are no tests available to law enforcement that it can show up on.” Due to LISD’s suspension on their drug-testing policy, Coltrane also said K2 usage is liable to grow less popular because students in extracurricular activities who use narcotics and were once tested no longer will feel the need to use a drug that doesn’t show up. This synthetic drug has been in mass production since early 2004 throughout much of Europe, though its popularity peak was reached in late 2009-early 2010 in the U.S. Since it has grown in popularity, there have been a few instances in which teenagers were sent to the hospital potentially due to K2/Spice. But, since there are no readily available tests that may detect K2 and medical research on it is limited, the reasoning behind these occurrences is not fully known. There have been reported illegal K2 usages in Lewisville, at least two of which the fire department responded to and none of which resulted in hospitalization. Assistant principal Teresa Wells believes that the ban will benefit the school though there have been no reported cases of students here using the drug. “I’m so glad that it has been banned,” Wells said. “I am against anything that makes kids spend their money on something that is evil and illegal. I think it’s good for our community, because any time kids can get away and free themselves from anything like that, they just need to be the better person and stay away and the ban will help with that.”

Ballots are in

King, queen to be announced tonight

Valley Parkway crosswalk closed down At the urging of Principal Brad Burns, the City of Lewisville closed the crosswalk near AutoZone on Valley Parkway due to safety concerns. “I met with the city officials a year ago and asked them to consider it,” Burns said. “They evaluated it, and they came back and their decision was to close it down.” In the past three years, two students have been struck by an automobile while crossing the streets around campus. “I was concerned for the safety of our students,” Burns said. “Main Street and Valley Parkway are the two busiest streets in Lewisville with the exception of Interstate 35.” In lieu of using the closed walk to AutoZone, students are being encouraged by administrators and the Lewisville Police Department to use the controlled crosswalk at the intersection of Valley and Main to get across the street. 5Compiled by daniel Manrique

Photo courtesy of Vern Skeldon

The 2010 Homecoming Court - Front Row from left: Freshman Duchess Kimberly Pina, Junior Duchess Ariel Brown, Senior Princesses: Mary Joyce Villanueva, Nikki Garcia, Irisa Ona, Cierra Sullivan, Vanessa Pacheco, Katey Marquis, and Sophomore Duchess Erin Hebert. Back Row from left: Freshman Duke Devin Tillis, Junior Duke Noah Daniels, Senior Princes: Wade Abney, Devon Williams, Jerry Young, Cameron Clark, Cody Kovach, Ian Fleming, and Sophomore Duke DeAndre Brown.


News

Farmers’ Harvest | Lewisville High School | Lewisville, Texas | October 15, 2010

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Roy retiring after 9 years in LISD; Search for superintendent begins JUSTINGILBERT reporter

Travis Irick Illustration

A price to pay for attention Prescription ADHD medication common for students JORDANWHITE reporter

Tick, Tock, Tick, Tock. The second hand on the clock seems to taunt him as he struggled to pay attention to the teachers lesson. This is the status quo for many people with attention deficit hyperactivity disorder [ADHD] and no medication. Junior Connor Wolf was tested when he was younger because he had trouble reading and writing. His parents were the deciding factor in the decision to get him tested. “They decided to get me tested because, when I was younger I had a hard time learning how to read and just paying attention in elementary school,” Wolf said. “They could tell that that was going to be a problem later on in life because I couldn’t focus on how to color something or I couldn’t focus on how to do geometry or calculus.” As for senior Ryan Southwick, he was tested in second grade and has had to take medications for it for the last 10 years, and counting. “When I was in 2nd grade I would always be messing around and the teacher would always have to get on to me to chill out and pay attention,” Southwick said. “And so my parents had a conference with my teacher and she said like straight up ‘your kid’s messed up, he needs to be tested.’” Wolf said the medicine helps and guides him through his day. “I think it’s actually really good,” Wolf said. “I used to be on Adderall before this, which was a pill that came out in 1990, and the pill I take now, its

just much better. It blocks more out. It lets me focus on whatever I want to. It doesn’t keep me wired through the night so I can sleep. It keeps me focused on my academics.” All these medications come in dosages, all depending on how strong the person’s ADHD is. Southwick said he takes a strong dosage of 36 mg. But it hasn’t always been that high or the same brand of medication. “I was like in 2nd or 3rd [grade] so I didn’t really have an opinion at the time; I just thought, ‘I keep goofing around and this may help me,’” Southwick said. “[But] three or four years ago we had to get the medication changed[from Adderall to Conserta] and each time we [went] to get the medicine filled, we would have to go talk to a psychiatrist and I thought that was really dumb. But we don’t have to do that anymore because it was a waste of money.” The whole purpose behind the medication is to help the person with ADHD focus better and stay on task. “During school [the medication] will help me focus more,” Southwick said. “During class when the teacher is talking, instead of being distracted by the kids next to me or something, it [helps me] focus and pay attention. [And] Over the weekend it will help me get my work done, like if I have homework over the weekend it will help me get that work done, and it helps me be [more] productive.” The drugs are not without side effects. Wolf said the main side effect of his medication is anger. “If someone were to get me mad. I would act quicker.” Wolf said. “I’d yell more or get angry for no particular reason.”

Farmer Scrapbook The Farmer Scrapbook is designed to recognize the achievements of students and faculty. NATIONAL MERIT SCHOLARSHIPS National Achievement Semifinalist Yared Admasse National Hispanic Scholars Matthew Bravo Kyle Rivera Sarah Souza National Merit Commended Scholars Yared Admase Susan Christian Alexandra Daniels Mackenzie Kurz Amanda Mancenido Stephen Smith Dylan Wheeler

SWIMMING Senior Daniel Mayes was chosen to attend a training camp at the Olympic Training Center in Colorado Springs along with 32 other members of Lakeside Aquatic Club BASKETBALL Boys summer basketball, first place, Metrocrest Tournament LEADERSHIP COUNCIL Seniors Justin Joseph [NHS] and Jaclyn Ellison [FFA] were nominated by advisors to the North Texas Council on Youth Leadership, and placed in the top five.

JOURNALISM CSPA Gold Circles Competition The Farmers’ Harvest, gold medal Aaron Bowles, Certificate of Merit, first person experience Nicole Collins, Certificate of Merit, spot news photo and sports photo, Third Place, sports photo Irisa Ona, Certificate of Merit, Page one design Jeff Whittaker, Second Place, Ad layout FCCLA Senior Esteban Arce was top-selling in FCCLA fall fundraisers with $265.50 in sales.

5Compiled by Crystal Keiffer

The school district officially announced the hiring of a firm in its search for a replacement for retiring Superintendent Dr. Jerry Roy during its Sept. 18 meeting at the Boling Administration Center. Hazard, Young Attea & Associates [HYA] will be responsible for finding candidates for the job of leading the 61-school district. Dr. Roy joined the district on June 1, 2001. HYA will be conducting a national search for its successor. HYA was founded in 1987 by four colleagues, Dr. William Hazard, Dr. Charles Young, Dr. William Attea, and Dr. Roderick Bickert. Their aim was to provide school districts with a thorough and engaging search to find new superintendents. “We really believe that we an outstanding company based upon our ability to work with boards to customize our search,” President Dr. Hank Gmitro said at the Sept. 13 board meeting. Doyle Valdez, a former school board president in Austin, endorsed HYA at the meeting. “I understand the role and the pressures and the work that needs to be done and I know that each one of you in a few years from now, you’re gonna look back and this decision making wil be one of the most important decision making during your tenure,” Valez said. “So it’s going to be hard work but it’s definitely going to be worthwhile working with this district.” The firm’s basic search is a four-step process. The first two steps are planning and creating a profile of what kind of individual the district is looking for and recruiting a number of candidates who match that profile. The next two steps are narrowing the field to five candidates and extensively interviewing each one a perform a background check on each potential replacement candidate. If that candidate meets the boards requirements, he or she will be the new superintendent of LISD. This process will take place anywhere between five and six weeks. “It is your search,” Gmitro said. “We are here to assist you.”

Interested in what’s going on in the district? Get first-hand information and keep track of the superintendent search at the monthly school board meetings: Oct. 18 Nov. 8 Dec. 13

Giving back

In this section we will feature volunteer opportunities in the community. The Farmers’ Harvest believes that it is important for teenagers to be involved in making their community a better place for themselves and others.

Keep Lewisville Beautiful

189 Elm Street, Suite 106 Lewisville, Texas 75057

Upcoming Activities:

Oct. 9: Household Hazardous Waste collection 9 a.m. - noon. Oct. 23: Make A Difference Day, daffodil planting. 9 a.m. - noon “The mission of KLB is to empower the citizens of Lewisville to take greater responsibility for enhancing their community environment. You can help by participating in a cleanup, adopting a spot or serving on a committee.”

For more information about Keep Lewisville Beautiful, go to keeplewisvillebeautiful. org or contact them at 972- 436- 5100. 5Compiled by Daniel Manrique


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Farmers’ Harvest | Lewisville High School | Lewisville, Texas |October 15, 2010

News

New assistant principals share common goal Gore, Owens join school with hopes of making campus better place for students, teachers KELSEYLYNCH reporter Along with new teachers, coaches and other staff, there are two new faces on the administrative team this year with new assistant principals Stephanie Gore and Melvin Owens. Gore was a cheer coach and English teacher for nine years at Dewitt Perry Middle School in the Carrollton-Farmers Branch ISD, when she said she decided to start making a bigger impact on kids’ lives by getting more involved with the entire school instead of just the kids in her classroom. “I had been teaching middle school for a while, so I was ready to try high school,” Gore said. She said she hopes to be a principal of a middle school someday, but she feels she needs to work her way through the education system before she becomes principal. Gore described her administrators when she was in high school as very positive and very caring, which is one reason she decided to become an assistant principal. She saw how the administration influenced students and that’s what she decided she wanted to do for a living. She said that her high school administrators were like a second family to her, and that’s what she hopes to do while she is here. “[I like] the relationships I get to build with the students and helping them grow up into successful young adults,” Gore said. Gore has always made it a point to get involved in her schools. Here she can be found attending football games, volleyball games, and school-sponsored events, and really trying to be a part of this school. And when she’s not focusing on work,

Gore said she likes to go dancing and bake desserts. She can often be found walking around the school with large batches of cookies in her hands. Melvin Owens, an avid golfer in his free time, came here after working at Uvalde in South Texas for four years as an administrator. Owens said he believes it is always best to be involved in his school, and to never turn a child away in his or her hour of need. Owens has an open door policy, meaning he will always be available to listen to a student if they ever need help or comfort. He said all students deserve to have someone to be there for them and he will help them any way possible. When Owens was a high school student in DeKalb, Texas, the administration was very strict and consistent with their discipline. But they were also very caring and helpful when it came to the students’ situations. Owens said the administration there believed that if the teachers didn’t help the students, the students wouldn’t want to learn. Owens said he likes the many opportunities students have to get involved through a variety of organizations and clubs here. “If you can’t find an organization at this school to be plugged into, you just don’t want to be plugged in,” Owens said. Even though being an administrator has a lot of upsides, there’s one thing both Gore and Owens agree is a major challenge for the assistant principal position: disciplining the students. They both feel that having to discipline a student is easier said than done. “I try to make it as positive as I can,” Owens said. “But sometimes, that’s not possible.”

Celina Berzoza Photo

Assistant principals Melvin Owens and Stephanie Gore direct students from their busses into the school with smiles on their faces. Gore was a former English teacher and cheerleading coach at Dewitt Perry Middle School, and Owens was an administrator at Uvalde before coming to Lewisville.

Seniors raise flags, pride WHITNEYWHITE reporter They can be seen everywhere, in front of houses, businesses, schools, and governmental buildings. They are saluted, pledged, respected, and honored. They’re the representations of this country and this state, and hold extra meaning to those who have fought for this nation. And every morning, while many students are spending their time getting some extra sleep, meeting up with friends before school, and getting breakfast, seniors Jeff Pacheco and Xuan Yen Lac are up and early taking time to raise the flags on the flag poles at the new Career Center East [CCE]. Like all members of Navy Junior Reserved Officer Training Corps [NJROTC], every student is thoroughly taught and disciplined when it comes to posting flags. A sign of disrespect can be shown by the smallest amount of carelessness.

“It’s just knowing that I would be the person doing it the right way,” Pacheco said. “They expect you to do it... people have died for that flag.” Principal Brad Burns initially recognized the pair for their service. “[I am] very proud of our students,” Burns said. “It is great to see LHS students take initiative.” It’s not as easy as it sounds. The smallest touch to the ground is not acceptable. The flag must be properly folded and flown. Another pair of students take the flags down at the end of the day. “The flags represent our country and state and it is nice to see that our students have respect for the symbol of our freedom,” CCE Principal Adrian Moreno said. “These four students take pride in this responsibility and handle it properly and respectfully. I am very proud of the job they are doing and am thankful to have students like them at the CCE.”

Did we miss something? Send us a letter with your suggestions to letters2farhar@yahoo.com


News

Farmers’ Harvest | Lewisville High School | Lewisville, Texas |October 15, 2010

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Marching to the beat of a drum corps

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Seniors spend summer learning technique, skill with professional musicians ANNABRADY reporter Standing in front of hundreds of thousands of spectators in one of countless cities on tour, the adrenaline begins pulsing throughout the bodies of the 150 performers. Endless hours of demanding and intense rehearsal have been a prelude to this very moment. With the knowledge that for the next nine to eleven minutes the crowd is theirs, they take the field dedicating themselves to bringing pride to past generations, and inspiring generations yet to come. The intensity of performing, the 14 hours of practice a day for seven days a week, and waking up in a new city every day was a dream come true for two band members who were elected to spend their summers marching with professional drum and bugle corps. “I just loved it overall; the intensity, the practice, just everything,” said Ivan Maristan, junior drum line and former Forte Drum and Bugle Corps member. Maristan had been influenced to march with a corps by his seventh grade music instructor who had shown him videos of the Blue Devils, motivating him to strive to be that good one day. Due to its proximity Maristan joined Forte, an openclass corps from Grand Prairie that was on its pioneer tour this past summer, and ranked in the top 12 of their division with its show, “Stargazing.” “We’re a first year corps,” Maristan said. “It was the first time we fielded, ever. Before corps I actually wasn’t that good, I thought [Forte] would be somewhere good to start at.” For Kevin Ebersole, senior trumpet player and Crossmen Drum and Bugle Corps member, drum corps was in his blood, having a father who marched corps for 11 years mostly in the 1970’s. Crossmen, founded in 1975, is the only world-class corps in Texas. The group toured with its show “Full Circle” this past summer. Ebersole chose this corps because of its proximity, but was captured by the rich sense of tradition that the corps has.

Thi Nguyen Photo

Senior Kevin Ebersole [right] sports his Crossmen jacket he earned over the summer while marching with a professional drum corps. Junior Ivan Maristan [left] stands nearby with his bass drum, the instrument of choice that landed him a spot in the Forte Drum and Bugle Corps’. “My favorite tradition that we had is called ‘Unity’,” Ebersole said. “In ’76 our corps got disqualified, so what happened was they went on just for fun since they couldn’t compete. They were walking in twos to the first show after they got disqualified and the two people in the front started holding their hands and they put them over their heads. Everybody in the rest of the horn line started doing it, and

we’ve been doing that ever since.” But aside from tradition and a love for marching, drum corps members learn life lessons that can be applied both on and off of the marching field. “It taught me how to work with people at a certain level of intensity, like figure out how people work and how hard they can push,” Ebersole said.

‘Golden ticket’ program promotes values with prizes Advisory class teaches positive monthly character trait, encourages students MARRISAGODINEZ reporter Demonstrating positive character traits in school could win a prize according to the new “Golden Ticket” program begun this semester. The “Golden Ticket” is a result of the Safe and Civil Schools Committee which is made up of about 10 faculty members who work in different areas of the school. “It was an idea from many choices in the Safe and Civil program,” committee member and teacher Shunta Thomas said. “We hope that it will create an air of safety in our building and also life skills for our students.” Thomas said she hopes the new program will have a positive effect on students. “I want it to transform their future in ways that they have sensitivity to others,” Thomas said. “Whether that’s caring for

others, caring for others differences, showing signs of respect. Like I said, the academic part is important, but character is critical.” Junior Samantha Evans said the “Golden Ticket” is a good idea. “Kids will now get rewarded for acting good and showing signs of certain things,” Evans said. “Now that a reward is involved, the students may want to act better in order to get it. They’re probably going to make sure that they’re doing the right thing.” Spanish teacher Sandra Medrano agreed. “I think the golden ticket is a good idea if all the staff participates in it,” Medrano said. “I would hope that it improves the students’ attitude toward school and their peers and toward their teachers as well.” Medrano stressed the importance of teachers leading by example. “We’re the teachers, and if we’re teaching

a student how to respect, we have to show them how to do it,” Medrano said. “It’s like we always say, if you want to be respected, you should show respect.” Thomas said she’s received e-mails from teachers saying they’ve recognized student behavior. “One e-mail explained to me how a student helped a new student in our school and just took charge and guided her through the building and showed her around,” Thomas said. “We’re looking for students being nice to each other. Just treating each other well and recognizing each others differences and loving and respecting each other.” Thomas said October’s focus is leadership. She added that clubs, teams and organizations provide great opportunities to learn leadership skills. “The goal here is we want our students to be involved in some extra-curricular activi-

Faculty is looking for student who display leadership characteristics this month. Students will win a “golden ticket” and be entered into a drawing. ties in our school,” Thomas said. “We think that when they get involved, they’re more committed to education and obviously we want our students committed to education. And hopefully they get involved in something that they think they want to do for the rest of their lives.”


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Scratch that

Farmers’ Harvest | Lewisville High School | Lewisville, Texas | October 15, 2010

Entertainment

Senior overcomes nerves, makes music WHITNEYWHITE reporter

Concerts Deftones The Palladium Ballroom - Oct. 18 $38 Maroon 5 Superpages.com Center - Oct. 21 $36-50 Ghostland Observatory The Palladium Ballroom - Oct. 30 $31-41 Wiz Khalifa House of Blues Dallas - Oct. 29 $25-34

Movies Red (PG-13) Oct. 15 Bruce Willis and Morgan Freeman Alone in the Dark 2 (NYR) Oct. 31 Rick Yune and Rachel Specter Due Date (NYR) Nov. 5 Robert Downey Jr and Zach Galifinakis MegaMind (NYR) Nov. 5 Will Ferrell and Brad Pitt

Albums Kings of Leon Come Around Sundown Oct.19 Taylor Swift Speak Now Oct. 26 Elvis Costello National Ransom Nov. 2 Matt and Kim Sidewalks Nov. 2 Rhianna Loud Nov. 16

5Compiled by Crystal Keiffer

He walked into the music store with his head down, looking down at his feet, but he was on a mission. He was surrounded by strangers playing different instruments; their level of experience ranged from qualified to not a clue. He avoided eye contact and approached the object for which he had been looking. There were hundreds of them- knobs, switches and buttons, all over the place. He was nervous and overwhelmed, but that didn’t stop him. The thought of being the life of a party was worth the obstacles of learning. Every day, he would look up Internet articles and research the purposes of every single button and knob, then return to the store and practice. Wikka wikka. The sound of early hip-hop DJ’s scratching on records sparked a flame in his interests. Christmas came around and everyone was getting what they wanted. As his turn came around, the large box filled his eyes with joy; his mother, noticing his interest in learning bought him his own turntable. Now a senior in high school, Austin Clay has played for school fashion shows and for his friend’s parties. He now makes “EP’s” or extended plays for his band “Locals” by himself on his website, and he also plays drums for his band “Generald’ with 2010 graduate Tommy Klecka.

All Eyes On You Featuring Junior

Ashleigh Pope If you could eat one thing for the rest of your life, what would it be and why? Ramen noodles because they are like awesome all the time. If you were a superhero, who would you be and why? Spider woman, because I want to swing from webs on buildings because it just looks really fun.

“We have so much chemistry just being the two of us” Clay said. “I think we came together because neither of us knew people that were as into music as each other. I didn’t know anyone that was as into playing music in my age group besides him. We kind of just clicked.” As a skateboarder, scrapes and scratches come all too easy for Clay. Skateboarding went from his life to his hobby in a short amount of time. Music quickly became the top priority for Clay, and nothing could get in the way of that. “Skateboarding can get tiring and if you get hurt, then you can’t skate.” Clay said. “Music, you can do it anytime. I think I would be pretty bummed if I couldn’t play music. I couldn’t imagine doing anything else for a living. Even if it was teaching, I would be into being a guitar teacher.” However, his hobby has become secondary to his band “Generald,” and he is busy booking shows and balancing school. Clay doesn’t want DJ-ing and parties to become a lifestyle. Instead he hopes being a DJ becomes a side job to pay for college as well as something to do in his free time. “It just sounded really fun like the idea that being responsible for a party being fun or not, that’s a pretty cool obligation,” Clay said. “All I’ve wanted is just to get people hyped and be like “Yeah I love this song.’”

What is something few people know about you? That I’ve been in dance for 11 years. If you could fix one global issue what would you fix and why? World hunger, because it’s so sad that I have something to eat everyday and some people don’t and they’re dying. Do you have any phobias? I am scared of spiders, sharks, snakes, and bugs. What is something embarrassing that has happened to you at school? I was in the band hall and after morning rehearsal, and my foot got caught in the strap of someone’s backpack and I fell into the doorway and just kind of laid there for a second. If you had the choice to be one cartoon character, what would you want you be and why? Scooby Doo, because it would be awesome to be a talking dog who could solve crimes. 5Compiled by Whitney White

Neil Geisel Photo

Senior Austin Clay stands in front of his turntable, creating beats and mixing music. He has DJ’d events such as the Art Club Thrift Store Fashion Show and the Prom Runway for Research Fashion show.


Entertainment

Farmers’ Harvest | Lewisville High School | Lewisville, Texas |October 15, 2010 Page 7

Scare tactics

Parker House adds new attractions, ghouls DANIELMANRIQUE reporter The Parker House has come a long way since its inception as a few decorations in owner and founder Marc East’s front yard. “I started decorating my yard and having 1,000 plus people on Halloween night come by to see all the stuff we had done,” East said. “After doing that for years, we just thought it would be more fun and more feasible to do it for a full month or six weeks than just for one night.” Since its opening three years ago, the Parker House has expanded into a fullfledged haunted attraction pulling in 5001,000 visitors a night at $18 a pop for the six weeks a year that it’s open. In the planning stages, which start around March, all of the senses are taken into consideration in order to make the scariest, gut-wrenching haunted house possible. Tight spaces are used to terrorize the claustrophobic. Dark lighting is used for its disorienting effect, along with the constant turn arounds the path through the house goes through, putting visitors past places that they have already seen and doubling back on itself. Also prevalent is the gore factor, with bodies hanging and actors dressed up as all kinds of classic horror movie staples. The overgrown graveyard is haunted by a few ghouls; watch out for them behind

the tombstones. When walking through the cabin, a giant wolf lurks, waiting for you to walk by. In the kitchen another wolf feasts on some questionable meat. Scattered around the house, volunteers wait to jump out and scare guests, and some aren’t alone. With half of the house being completely changed, the other half being revamped, and a whole new attraction, “The Carnival of Carnage,” added, the Parker House won’t be the same bag of tricks this time around. The Carnival of Carnage is separate from the main house; it’s a circus-themed maze with carnies and clowns hiding around every corner. “We’ll dump 20 to 30 people into a big maze and give them a specific time to find the way out and if they do they’ll receive their money back,” East said. After walking through the house and seeing the walls lined with creepy 1940s-50s era paintings, a freezing cold meat locker filled with corpses, the autopsy room with eviscerated bodies lying on the beds— some missing organs, some proudly displaying them— and the garden being watched over by a menacing 10-foot tall skeleton, it’s hard to believe that the whole thing is a charity operation. “All of the profits are donated to the Heroes of Denton County and select booster clubs within [the school district],” East said.

Travis Irick Photo

Senior April Rogers is in full make-up and costume on the opening weekend of the Parker house. The newest attraction, the Carnival of Carnage, is advertised as one of the scariest exhibits yet. “[The Heroes of Denton County are] a good foundation. They support the families of fallen firefighters and police officers around Denton County.” The Parker House is open from Sept.

24-Oct. 31 on Fridays, Saturdays and Sundays. The attraction is also open the entire week of Halloween except for Monday. Their hours are from 7 to 10 p.m. on weekdays and 7 p.m. to midnight on weekends.

Cast prepares to raise curtain for ‘Once Upon a Mattress’ JUSTINGILBERT reporter

In the Great Hall festooned with garland and the look of elegance, fast-paced dancing and jiving fills the room and as everyone eventually collapses, only one individual remains and she is the kingdom’s last hope. The theater department will be performing “Once Upon a Mattress” as its fall musical, a comedy based off the fairy tale The Princess and the Pea. In a kingdom struck by tragedy and ruled by an evil queen, Queen Aggravaine, no one is allowed to marry until her son, Prince Dauntless is wed. The task may sound simple; however, the queen sets up impossible tasks for anyone who wishes to marry him. Meanwhile on the other side of town, Sir Harry and Lady Larken find that they are expecting and cannot marry under the Queen’s rule, so Harry sets off and brings back the most unlikely candidate the kingdom has ever seen. “Once Upon a Mattress” is pop-

ular among high school theater as it is age appropriate for all audiences, theater teacher Wendy Barrett said. Senior Brianna Boyd plays the part of Princess Winnifred with junior Joy Piers as Queen Aggravaine, and sophomore Michael Jiminez as Prince Dauntless. Boyd said she can relate to her character’s eccentric traits. “I’m kind of crazy and spastic sometimes myself,” Boyd said. Barrett and the cast expect the production to have a great turnout. “I enjoy the journey to the final product,” Barrett said. There will be various fund raisers throughout production including ad and candy sales to support the costly budget of producing the musical. Barrett said it can costs can run in the thousands of dollars. The production will be taking place Oct. 21 at 7 p.m., Oct. 23 at 2 and 7 p.m., Oct. 24 at 2 p.m., Oct. 28 at 7 p.m., Oct. 31 at 2 p.m. Student and adult ticket prices will be $8. Children 12 and younger can see the show for $5.

Nicole Collins Photo

Senior Brianna Boyd [center] stands in costume as sophomores Dylan Ator and Connor Denton [left] and seniors Dylan Altom and Dylan Goodson [right] dance around her during an act in the school musical, “Once Upon a Mattress.” The cast and crew have been working on the production for two months, and casting was held back in June.


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Farmers’ Harvest | Lewisville High School | Lewisville, Texas |October 15, 2010

Hurricane Katrina

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courtesy

Jasmine Hart

After Hurricane Katrina struck the coast of Louisiana, streets and neighborhoods were lined with debris, fallen trees, and the smell of mold filled the air. New Orleans and its surrounding parishes suffered severe flooding, and thousands of houses were destroyed, leaving many people to find refuge in other states. A

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brown Build-A-Bear sat on her bed, waiting to say “I love you.” The new pair of shoes he just bought sat in his closet. He didn’t want to get them dirty while he was away. Pictures held their places on the shelves and mantles. Everything was kept in place. “We weren’t expecting any kind of damage,” senior Miranda Duplessis said. “We only packed three days worth of clothes thinking we were just going to be going on a mini-vacation, and coming back to our normal lives a couple of days later.” But when Hurricane Katrina hit on Aug. 28, 2005, it was more than just a little tropical storm that the people of New Orleans and its surrounding parishes and towns were used to. The category 3 storm was forecasted to make landfall in Florida, but when it didn’t, the three-day vacations turned into permanent relocations. “The adults didn’t really let us kids watch TV,” sophomore Jordan Meyers said. “It’s not like we could watch CNN and know what’s going on. I

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packed a few things, and we went up to Monroe, [La.] for a few days like we did every year. But then my mom told me we weren’t going back.” Two more students and their families made their way into northeast Texas, far away from the Gulf region. They stayed with family, friends, in hotels and were constantly moving around while trying to figure out what to do and where to go. “I was in a house with 17 other people at first,” Meyers said. “Me and most of my family went to stay with my auntie in Flower Mound after we left Monroe.” But one of their biggest concerns was what they were going to see if and when they went back to their hometowns. And when they saw their houses, or heard about the destruction from their families, they knew there was no going back. “About two months after Katrina, we went back to look at our house,” junior Jasmine Hart said. “The smell in the city was awful. It wasn’t the New Orleans I had remembered. When we stepped into our house, I could see

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mold all over our furniture and on our walls. We had to wear gloves and masks because it was so toxic. It was so horrible and unreal. It was like a movie.” Hart, Duplessis, Meyers and senior Nia Green’s families all started to clean up their houses in Louisiana to sell. After the storm, they all decided to stay in Texas. And it was their decision to stay that changed their lives more than the storm itself. “We lost the entire bottom half of our house,” Green said. “Most of our personal belongings were on the second floor, so we were able to salvage a lot of it. But it was pretty much a miracle to sell our house and find a new place to call home.” As they transitioned from hotel beds and relative’s couches and floors to apartments, rental homes and houses, they also had to transition into a new school, with new faces and a new atmosphere. “It was so weird at first,” Duplessis said. “I thought it was kind of funny how everyone talked, and y’all really like to hug. It took a lot of getting

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used to. But everyone was so nice and welcoming, a lot different from [St. Bernard Parish]. There was so much crime and violence back in Louisiana, and it was so cool to come to a school that was so clean and that you weren’t scared to walk into.” Besides the differences in behavior and appearance, they knew they also had to cope with the fact that whether they liked it or not, everyone knew the reason why they were here. Whether it was from the news, or the mouths of principals or teachers, their fellow classmates knew that they and their families were “Katrina refugees.” “I used to be real shy,” Meyers said. “When I got here, my teacher knew I was a refugee and all, so she’d take me to Mavericks games and stuff. It helped a lot that I knew that someone cared, and you know, wanted to help.” But others like Green didn’t want the reputation and negative connotation that came from being a refugee. “Moving was definitely a chance to have a fresh start, a chance that most people don’t get,” Green said. “But I didn’t want to have friends because of


years later Five

Farmers’ Harvest | Lewisville High School | Lewisville, Texas | October 15, 2010

Counting the cost

Page 9

Hurricane Katrina took a toll on the Gulf Coast after it hit. The economy, population, geography and people were all drastically affected by its aftermath.

1 million people had evacuated New Orleans and its surrounding parishes before Katrina hit.

100,000 people had no access to transportation out of New Or-

leans and were forced to stay and endure the hurricane.

When Katrina made contact with land, a surge of water 30 feet high

hit the Mississippi coast, and a surge 19 feet high hit New Orleans. Levees crumbled and eroded by over-flowing water, resulting in

80% of the city flooded with water 10 feet deep. 60,000 people were rescued after the storm. 1,833 deaths were caused directly or indirectly by Katrina in 5 states. 200 bodies were left unclaimed or unidentified 300,000 homes were unavailable to live in or completely destroyed by the hurricane. 90,000 square miles of land was dam-

aged by flooding and high winds.

The estimated economic blow from Hurricane Katrina is $125-$150 billion. All information and more can be found at http://www.livescience.com/environment/hurricane-katrinanew-orleans-aftermath-infographic-100824.html

Compiled by Nicole Collins Photo Courtesy NOAA

pity, or because they thought I was a refugee. I didn’t want to be Nia, the refugee. I just wanted to be Nia, and my friends [at Durham] made that possible for me.” Texas also opened up a lot of possibilities for clubs and activities to find comfort in, and to find themselves in. Hart and Green joined choir, where they settled into the family atmosphere first nature, and even confided in each other. “I met some of my best friends in choir,” Hart said. “I loved to sing, so I picked it up when I first came to Lewisville in middle school, and went on to do it in high school. It’s always going to be one of my happiest memories.” Duplessis joined the track team, saying that it helped to cope with a lot of what was going on. Her friends and family both here and in Louisiana have supported her through everything which, she said, has helped to make her a stronger person. “In some way, I’m kind of happy that Katrina happened,” Duplessis said. “I’ve met so many great people,

and found something that I love to do. I’d still be in the parish right now, and I don’t know what person I’d be.” And Meyers has found comfort in his teammates on the varsity football team, something he never imagined he’d do. “Louisiana was a basketball state,” Meyers said. “Like Texas loves their football, we loved basketball, and that’s what I played. I would’ve never even thought about playing, especially not on a varsity team. Being out on that field is one of the big things that keeps me going.” Five years ago, their lives changed. They moved to new city and enrolled in a new school. The faces seen in the hallways no longer register as Katrina victims and refugees, but rather an athlete, a singer, a student, a best friend, a Fighting Farmer. “Most people think of Katrina as a disaster,” Green said. “But I think it’s more of a blessing in disguise. I wouldn’t live in this house, have the friends or chances that I have here. I was given the opportunity to start over, and I wouldn’t go back.”

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Jasmine Hart

About two months after Hurricane Katrina, junior Jasmine Hart and her family went back to visit their house in New Orleans. Everything they owned had been destroyed, but five years later, they have started over in Lewisville with the help of friends and family.


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Opinions

Farmers’ Harvest | Lewisville High School | Lewisville, Texas | October 15, 2010

Mother’s past shapes daughter’s present What’s up, Chuck By Charlie Brusko

She shared a room with six others and slept on a pillowcase full of shoes. I have my own room and bed with a goose-feather mattress and $50 down comforter. She disappeared for three days to go to a concert without anyone even

knowing she was gone. I have to be at home by midnight on weekends, and 10 on weeknights. She rode a bus from California to Arkansas by herself; a two-day adventure. I flew on an airplane with my family to get from Lewisville to San Antonio; a 30-minute flight. She never went to the same school for more than a year. I have been attending school with the same people my entire life. She wore clothes her grandmother made out of Clorox bottles or a lime green tablecloth. I have a shopping spree every two weeks at the mall.

She once had gum stuck in her hair and decided to put mayonnaise in it to get the gum out-- she didn’t completely wash it out and had to go to school the next day with excessively greasy hair. I dye my hair once a month and get my hair cut professionally at a salon. She ate fried Spam and uncooked macaroni noodles for dinner. I eat a three-course family dinner almost every Sunday. She once was forced to pick the branch off of a tree with which she was then hit. I have been spanked just twice, lightly, when I was a small child. She fluctuated between her grandmother’s house-- shared with 11 people, and her mother’s house, which was from Arkansas to wherever her mom was at the time. I go back and forth between my parents’ houses, both living no more than five miles apart. She was raised in a highly segregated town, and was never allowed to play with kids from another race--though she did anyway. I was raised in a culturally-diverse area, and have never been told who to be and not be friends with.

Farmer Feedback Check most news sources and you’ll find that bullying and cyber-bullying, or bullying on the Internet, is a hot topic right now. The debate rages over whether bullying is a crime, or just part of growing up, as well as what parents and schools should do about the issue.

So what do you think about the issue of bullying in schools and online? “I think it shouldn’t be done but I think those people should get in trouble or get consequences for what they’re doing because they’re tearing people down emotionally, and mentally, and physically, so you don’t know what that could lead to.”

“I actually think that’s it’s kind of pointless. What’s the point of picking on somebody for some kind of difference? I’ve been bullied since I was little I can’t stand to watch someone getting hurt by words. People think it doesn’t hurt as much but it does.” Senior Casi Perry

“I think it’s really wrong because people don’t think it affects other people but it really does. It can really change peoples’ lives. People can wind up getting affected by it really seriously and ending their lives over it. It really needs to stop.” Senior Marissah Swift

“It’s not right. People should really just try and not put information out there and make sure what they are putting out there isn’t hurtful or dangerous to anyone else.” Sophomore Dylan Ator

“I think it shouldn’t be done because there’s kids that only use the internet for education and they don’t need to be bullied, especially by people who don’t know them.” Junior Vlad Otvos

“I don’t think that people need to make other people feel inferior just to make themselves feel superior.” Senior Amber Senasack

Junior Xavier Walker

5Compiled by Daniel Manrique

Photos by Neil Geisel, Thi Nguyen and Nicole Collins

She never went to the doctor, because her grandmother firmly believed that “a shot of whiskey would do the trick.” I have regular check-ups with both my doctor and my dentist every six months. She spent most of her time babysitting, and if she wanted to go anywhere, she brought her youngest sister with her. I’ve babysat twice, over the summer, four years ago. She witnessed multiple crime scenes and actual murders on the streets of Los Angeles from the ages of 4 to 8. I get grossed out watching Law and Order or Criminal Minds. She never really knew her mom-- “mother-daughter” time was limited. I have a great relationship with my mom, we get along great and can finish each other’s sentences. She is my mom, who is just trying to make my life better than what she had. I don’t always understand her rules and sometimes I forget she’s never had it as easy as me, but deep down I appreciate everything she’s done and love her for giving me the life I have. She had to learn to be the person she is the hard way. I have her right by my side everyday, encouraging me.

FARMERS’

HARVEST Editor-in-Chief Crystal Keiffer Photo Editor Nicole Collins Opinions Section Chief Thi Nguyen Sports Section Chief Charlie Brusko Photographers Travis Irick, Celina Berzoza, Neil Geisel, Thi Nguyen

Staff Writers Kelsey Lynch, Tiffany Harris, Anna Brady, Daniel Manrique, Justin Gilbert, Jordan White, Marrisa Godinez, Whitney White Artist Travis Irick Adviser Corey Hale Principal Brad Burns

Editorial Policy

The Farmers’ Harvest is a student-produced newspaper which strives to represent the student voice. Editorials reflect the staff opinion and may not reflect the views of the school administration. The Farmers’ Harvest is a member of Interscholastic League Press Conference, Texas Association of Journalism Educators, Association of Texas Photography Instructors and the Journalism Education Association. All original materials are copyrighted. We will strive to report all news relevant to Lewisville High School and its student body without bias to race, religion or social creed. Views expressed by columnists are their own personal opinions and do not necessarily represent the views of the entire staff. We reserve the right to edit letters to the editor for inappropriate content and space issues. Students’ opinion may be sent to letters2farhar@yahoo.com. The newspaper’s mailing address is: Farmers’ Harvest Newspaper c/o Lewisville High School, 1098 W. Main St., Lewisville, 75067. For any advertising inquiries, subscriptions, questions or other concerns please contact us at Farmers_harvest1@yahoo.com. Subscriptions are $15 for the full school year mailed to any U.S. postal address. The Farmers’ Harvest and its staff have been the recipients of the ILPC Silver Star Award and Award of Distinguished Merit, the Dallas Morning News Journalism Day Best Paper Award, TAJE Best of Show, and CSPA Gold Medal and Gold Circle awards.


Opinions

Farmers’ Harvest | Lewisville High School | Lewisville, Texas | October 15, 2010

Page

11

Don’t hide your Farmer Pride EDITORIAL

Spirit is more than just homecoming, football The first nine weeks of school, known mainly as football season, are dedicated to school spirit. From coordinated dress-up days to hallways decked in maroon and white streamers, posters, and window paint, it looks as though Farmer Pride runs deep. But once football season ends, that pride doesn’t seem to be as prominent. Much like the spirit of the holidays, people show the love and generosity that should be shown year round, within one month. The good feelings and joy that come with it are nothing negative, but definitely something that should be distributed evenly every day, rather than one period of time. As a high school in Texas, with a huge love for those “Friday Night Lights” we seem to favor the football team when it comes to

school spirit, becoming a little less excited about other sports and extracurricular activities. Every student and teacher is a Fighting Farmer, not just the football team, not just the cheerleaders or Farmerettes. The girl who sits across from your table in the cafeteria is a Fighting Farmer. The boys who sit by their cars in the mornings, listening to music in the parking lot are Fighting Farmers. The alumni whose pictures are posted in the Hall of Fame in the foyer are still Fighting Farmers. And we should all be proud of that our entire high school career. Yes, the beginning of the school year, with new faces and activities is a call for celebration, but what about when the track team makes it to state?

Letters to FarHar

An old friend remembered The receipt hasn’t left my bathroom mirror. It has yet to abandon its post. Its ink has not faded and its edges have not torn. It has been a faithful yet painful reminder of the loss of a good friend. Someone who was once more than a picture in an album. Someone that was more than a smile on my face. Someone that lived and breathed and dreamed. No more than a small piece of white paper, the receipt is not a visual masterpiece. It has a picture of a Japanese arch accompanied by the date- Jan. 24, 2010, the time- 12:45 p.m., and the total price- $4.50. But the day on which I acquired it was more than wonderful. The laughter and smiles swept over smooth stone paths and wound through great stalks of bamboo. Fountains trickled with the sound of peace and comfort. Flowers accompanied our every footstep in the garden that seemed to be something out of a dream. But the most spectacular of all the places in the garden was the koi pond. We leaned so close to the water that we almost fell in. We made faces at the fish and one another and even told tales of the fish and what their social lives must be like. I spent a day with Carson Brooks that will stay with me forever. I never could have imagined that the person that so softly whispered with the breeze would choose to put out the light that shone brightly and brilliantly from his heart. His body is now one with the earth and his soul is free to wander wherever he pleases. But in my heart and in my mind, Carson will always be there in the garden; knelt by the koi pond creating ripples on the water with his finger tips and smiling softly at me with kindness that would put any angel to shame. Warmest regards, Megan Smith Senior

Or when the debate team wins a competition? Or even when someone gets a 5 on an AP test? These are all causes for celebration as well, but we don’t dress up festively, with cheerleaders chanting “WE ARE. LEWISVILLE!” With Farmerettes waving their poms, and the drum line marching through the hallways in a cadence. But we shouldn’t need days themed with crazy outfits to show our spirit. Clubs and organizations shouldn’t have to decorate the hallways for rivalry football games for us to feel Farmer Pride. We shouldn’t stop at just recognizing spirit with the awards given out at the eight or nine pep rallies we have a year. These things are what makes Farmer Pride so much fun. But they aren’t what

make us have pride. Our pride should stem from the support we have in our community, the traditions that have shaped us into what we are and what we are shaping our school to be when our pictures are hung in the hall of fame and the class of 2060 is looking at them. As each school day begins, walk through the doors with your head held high. Let the decorated hallways and peers in the themed dress remind you to show your spirit. Don’t let those be the only moments you show it. Motivate those around you. Congratulate fellow students in everything they do, and show your school the pride it deserves, year round. We are all Fighting Farmers, all year. We are Lewisville.

Be strong for me, I’ll be strong for you Age, complications, fears prove to be no obstacle for mother “We should be able to talk about stuff like this, Crystal.” But I didn’t want to talk. I wanted her to drop the subject and the tears in By Crystal Keiffer my eyes to disappear. I wasn’t willing to accept the fact that she’s getting older, and with her age comes complications. “If I was in a serious car wreck tomorrow, would you pull the plug? I want you to, I don’t want you to see me suffering, and I don’t want to live like a vegetable, and make you throw away your life to take care of me.” I didn’t like anywhere this conversation was going. I wanted her to take it all back. This couldn’t be happening. Not to my mom. Not cancer. The doctors suspected two forms of cancer. They are both treatable, but I was literally worried sick. I couldn’t eat, or even sleep at night. I had awful migraines, and my stress levels were sky-rocketing like Apollo 13, hoping for a safe return back to normal. The pain was unreal, because it always hurts the worst when it’s the ones you love the most. But I could only imagine the pain she was feeling. To be so young and to feel like you’re falling apart. But the scariest part was that she

Keiffin’ it real

never showed fear. She seemed so indifferent, so strong. As October neared, she was having tests run on her of all types; cat scans, x-rays, ultrasounds. And at the same time, campaigning for cancer awareness began. Products of all sorts took a pink spin, people threw events to raise money for breast cancer foundations, women took early morning walks in groups of 20 to practice for the three-day Walk For The Cure. And as October approached, I knew that I needed to put my own fears and frustrations aside, and be as strong for her as she has been for me these past 16 years. Whether it be picking up soup and water for her when she can only have liquids, going on a midnight ice cream run when she has a small craving, or just calling her to tell her I love her. She’s more than a single parent who tries her hardest to give her kids everything they need. She’s more than another patient at the hospital, and a certified apartment manager. She’s more than the beautiful woman who wakes me up every morning with a smile. She’s my best friend, the strongest person I know, the woman I aspire to be when I grow older. And I know she’ll be here to see it all happen. Because she’s more than just giving up and giving in. She’s stubborn, hard-headed, and a fighter. You can talk to me about this kind of stuff, mom. Because I’ll be strong for you.

Want your voice to be heard? Then send us a letter to the editor. E-mail us at letters2farhar@yahoo.com or drop one by room 2000.


Page 12

Team by choice, family by nature Farmers’ Harvest | Lewisville High School | Lewisville, Texas | October 15, 2010

Sports

Olin builds brotherhood in preparation for tonight’s homecoming game CHARLIEBRUSKO section chief

Editor’s Note: Jordan White contributed to this story. The football team faces a homecoming challenge tonight in Flower Mound, which brings a 4-2 record, a high-flying offense, and backto-back upset wins over Marcus and Plano into Goldsmith Stadium. “They’ve got a tremendous offense and their defense really isn’t that bad,” head coach Dick Olin said. “Our kids are doing everything that we ask, they’re playing hard, [and] we’re so much better than we were a year ago and we’re going to continue to get better.” The Jaguars have averaged 53 points per game this season, led by senior quarterback Paul Millard’s 2,569 yards passing and 27 touchdowns to just three interceptions. FMHS has a 2-1 district record with its only loss coming to Hebron, 69-47. “[Millard is] a good player and hes going to get his yards, theres no doubt. but i dont think I’d be intimidated,” Olin said. “I’m definitely impressed with him, he’s a great quarterback, makes good decisions, and he really does a good job.” Not to be outdone for the Farmers is junior quarterback DeAndre Grimes. Grimes has combined for more than 1,800 yards rushing and passing and has had a hand in 24 touchdowns. The Farmers are 3-3 and averaging 33 points per game. But the team is 1-2 in district, scoring just 21 points total in losses to Allen and Hebron after winning its opener on the road at Plano West, 55-49. Olin said district 8-5A was the toughest in the state and third toughest in the nation, but that doesn’t scare Grimes. “I’m confident we’re going to win,” Grimes said. “It’s going to happen, I’m expecting to upset a lot of teams and upset a lot of people.” Senior kicker Mason Hale said Olin has worked to create a sense of family with the team. “Olin really did try [making us into a family] again,” senior kicker Mason Hale said. “It’s what a team really should be, and we haven’t

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Based on their games this season, fans can expect some offensive fireworks from both teams tonight. here are 3 of the Farmers' most productive offensive players. 5Compiled by Charlie Brusko

Nicole Collins Photo

Senior Cody Kovach [52] and senior Josh Turner [13] run alongside junior Humberto Ortega [8] as he makes the first Farmer touchdown of the night on a 26-yard pass from DeAndre Grimes against Allen at Max Goldsmith Stadium on Oct. 1. The Farmers lost to the Eagles, ranked 4th in the state, 49-14, their first loss in district 8-5A. really been putting that into motion the last couple of years, but now that we know what it takes to win, we’re starting to work on it.” Because the team is becoming headstrong and is beginning to work harder together, Grimes said the team’s confidence as well as his own is growing at a progressive rate. “As long as we execute and we practice hard, I have a lot of confidence in the team,” Grimes said. “Last year, there wasn’t much confidence, and this year there is. Everyone believes in us, and we believe in each other on the football team.” Hale has noticed a definite difference be-

tween this season and last year’s 2-8 team. “Last year, it kind of seemed like everyone [on the team] was trying to do it on their own [and] trying to make everybody focus on ‘me’ instead of everybody did this to get to the win,” Hale said. “It’s definitely made us feel a lot better knowing we’re doing a whole lot better this year. “We try not to focus on the last year and just focus on what’s coming up next.” Grimes credits some of the improvement to more time spent studying opponents on film in the new fieldhouse. “Ever since we got our new fieldhouse, it

DEANDRE GRIMES:

JOSH TURNER:

312 Rush Yds. 10 rush td's

38 Receptions 606 receiving yds. 6 touchdowns 15.9 yds. per catch 73 yds. passing

72.5% Completions

1,546 Pass Yds. 14 tD passes

will be like practice then film [and] then more film,” Grimes said. “But, it really does pay off. Whatever [the opposite team does] they’re going to be wrong, we learn a lot from [the films].” Although there have been many changes in strategies and multiple new faces added to the varsity team, one thing has remained the same: the desire to make it to playoffs. “I’m expecting to go to state but we’re really hoping to overcome some of the losses we had last year,” Hale said. “Definitely win some more games and all around more success. As a team, we’re just trying to beat everybody. No losses.”

DEANDRE BROWN: 288 rushing yds. 1 Rush TD 6.26 yds. Per Run 13 receptions 67 receiving yds. photos by

Nicole Collins and Thi Nguyen


Sports

Farmers’ Harvest | Lewisville High School | Lewisville, Texas | October 15, 2010

Sweat, tears conquer black belt fears

Page 13

Hours of nerves, years of practice lead to martial arts victory The announcer calls my name over the loudspeaker, and I step into the middle of the gymnasium floor with By Kelsey Lynch the other probationary black belts. A feeling of dread comes over me, like when a teacher calls on you even though your hand’s not raised. “Just two more tests,” I tell myself. If I pass this one, I’ll move from a probationary belt, the first level black belt, to a recommended second level. Receiving my black belt would be as remarkable for me as making varsity on the basketball team, or being crowned prom queen. I remember my last test: forming, sparring, and breaking boards. I remember trying to break the plastic Bend-and-Break boards that didn’t live up to their name. I fractured my wrist and failed my test. The feeling of dread returns.

Swims the ocean

When I started Taekwondo four years ago, I made a promise that I would keep going until I got my black belt. Through the injuries and pain, I will strive to achieve my goal, and it will be something nobody will ever be able to take away from me. I get into ready stance. First up, forms. The choreographed blocks and stances that show the judges your skills, and help them evaluate whether or not you pass your test. I’m nervous. Maybe it’s because I’m in the front row, in perfect view of all the instructors. I do my form slowly and steadily. I feel it could’ve been better, but that was probably just nerves. Like turning in a paper at the last minute because you didn’t know what to write. I could’ve spent more time on my form. The announcer calls out people to redo their forms. He emphasizes each name clearly. I give out a long sigh of relief, he didn’t call me. He dismisses the rest of us and I hustle back to my bag. My sparring gear rubs against my legs and

they start sweating from the heat of the gym. It feels as if I’m under a blanket in the Texas heat. I slip on my helmet and shove in my mouth guard. Sparring’s never easy; and I’m not the best at it. The first match was a simple warm-up. But now it’s time to step it up a notch, or four. It’s a second-degree black belt and she wants trouble. I take some kicks and punches, and after a minute an announcement tells everyone to stop. The sparring is over. I sip water as I watch lower belts break their boards. Once they finish I stand up and grab my boards. The announcer points me towards the two men holding for breaks. I stand in line patiently and wait for my turn. Finally, I’m up. I start with a side kick, a clean sweep directly to the middle. The board snaps and I spin to the next one. This is an elbow break. I give out a yell and hit the board. I hear the board break. Success. I’ve passed the test, the test I’ve strived to reach since I joined Taekwondo four tremendous years ago.

‘Team behind team’ receives new coaches Clark, Melson get warm welcome from student trainers NICOLECOLLINS photo editor

A convoy of students sporting collared shirts and khaki pants can always be seen monitoring the sidelines of the football field, navigating through and observing players and the sidelines on game night, or observing a basketball game on the edge of the court. Led by two coaches, they are typically seen helping out injured and dehydrated athletes at games, practices, and tournaments for every sport here. But these students are more than just the bearers of water and ice packs. They are athletic trainers. “We are the team behind the team, that’s what we call ourselves,” junior Tori Mumme said. As a group of people with similar interests working towards a common goal, the trainers spend a large amount of time together every day and have created a tight bond. “The other trainers, I love them all,” Mumme said. “I couldn’t ask for a better group. We are best friends. We are family.” This year there are two new members introduced to the sports training “family”: head athletic trainer Sheridan Melson and assistant head athletic trainer Nicholas Clark. Melson had 10 years of sports training under her belt from Odessa Permian before coming here, and is enthusiastic about the new group of trainers she was introduced to. “This group of student trainers has been a blessing because with both us [Clark and I] coming in and being brand new, they helped so much,” Melson said. “They knew how things had been done; they knew what things had worked, what didn’t work. They know the

coaches, while we are still learning the coaches and their quirks and personalities and how to handle things. “They have been able to help us learn more information about some of the kids. They help when we are evaluating personalities and situations. This group has been huge, huge for us.” Clark taught sports medicine at Carrollton Ranchview for one year before becoming Melson’s assistant head athletic trainer. Student trainers have meshed well with the new leadership, helping them learn the ropes. “They are new, and they are amazing,” Mumme said. As the team behind the team, athletic trainers focus on being behind the scenes at sporting events. Melson believes that this is the reason so many people are unaware of the role the training program plays in the athletic department here, and don’t realize that what they do in front of the public is only a fraction of the responsibilities the take on each day. On the sidelines, student trainers are the eyes and ears for the coaches, medical doctors, practitioners and head athletic trainers. Football is the most involved sport for the athletic trainers this season. On game day alone, sports trainers take care of equipment set up on the field and in the fieldhouse, help with pre-game treatments and evaluations, taping of any problem areas for the athletes, and tending to the water and Gatorade set-ups in the locker rooms. During the game they follow the assignments listed on their schedule, from water assignments to monitoring the athletes. Senior Jordyn English said that the trainers

are almost as involved in the game as the players are, actively watching each play and how the players act afterward in order to monitor any signs of injury. “It’s great to have them on the sidelines because we can’t be everywhere even with the two of us and two doctors on the sidelines,” Melson said. “We can’t see up and down the sidelines the whole time, and it’s great to have them in between all the players and they can see all those things and be watching their behavior on the bench.” But a trainer’s jobs doesn’t end when the game does. In addition to the practices they attend after school, the students assist the head athletic trainers in several rehabilitation practices held each week. Mumme estimates that they attend to at least 20 injured athletes in the morning before school and about 8 to 10 during the athletic periods in school. Therapy includes treatments such as electric STEM, an electrical stimulation process that rehabilitates injured muscles, ice massages to reduce any inflammation or pain, and ultrasound. According to English, a typical day for an athletic trainer usually runs from about 7 in the morning to about 7 at night. Through all the time and work spent together, Clark feels as though the new head trainers have taken on a parental role in the sports medicine program. “A lot of times I become kind of a father figure,” Clark said. “Not only am I teaching them athletic training, I’m also helping them with life decisions and teaching them the kind of qualities they need to have to be successful in the real world.”

UPCOMING GAMES: Varsity Football

Tonight vs. Flower Mound Oct. 22 vs. Plano Oct. 29 Axe Game vs. Marcus @SMU Nov. 5 Plano East-Senior Night

Cross Country Oct. 30 District 8-5A Championship

Nov. 6 Region I-5A Championship Nov. 13 State Championship

Varsity Volleyball Oct. 19 vs. Plano

Oct. 22 vs. Flower Mound, Marcus Oct. 26 vs. Plano West

Golf

Oct. 26 Liberty Nov. 9 Creekview

Tennis

Oct. 19-22 District Tournament Oct. 29-30 Regional Tournament


Page 14

Farmers’ Harvest | Lewisville High School | Lewisville, Texas | October 15, 2010

Lady Farmers to face Jaguars tonight

Sports

Despite tough district, team remains positive ANNABRADY reporter With their brand new lineup of defensive players, new defensive strategies, and coach Jay Samide’s new “hands-off” coaching strategy, the Lady Farmers have been working hard this season against one of the most challenging districts in Texas. The team faces district foe Flower Mound on the road tonight. “They’re playing hard, most of the time,” Samide said. “I think this year’s team is able to adjust things a little more quickly than last year’s team did. So I think this year’s team improvement has been on the rise.” This season has been full of hard work for the squad that has been competing against what Samide considers one of the toughest districts. According to the Dallas Morning News, Hebron ranks number one in area with Marcus second. “Last season we had a bunch of seniors, returners, so it was a lot different from this year,” Samide said. “This year we had to bring along other players and build them [while] Hebron and Marcus, who both went to the regional tournament last year, have most of their players back. Our district is pretty much solid.” Samide also changed up his coaching this season with the hope that it would help the team further improve. “I’ve been a little bit more hands off with the team, letting them do a lot of the things in the practice,” Samide said. “And I think that’s kind of improved our team, because they’re having to take responsibility for what goes on in practices a little bit more.”

But the difficulty of district play has made it hard to measure improvement. The Lady Farmers were 0-9 in district at press time, with a record of 13-24 overall. Samide said the team is focused on making adjustments with each game, working on limiting their errors and “being aggressive.” “This year we just need to pull it together and play as a team,” senior Nikki Garcia said. “We need to be more consistent, and just finish the game.” Garcia, who has been playing volleyball since seventh grade, was made the Libero for the varsity team this year, meaning she is the team’s most aggressive passer. “I like being on varsity,” Garcia said. “But I had to work to get on there. I’m all about winning; I’m so competitive it’s not even funny. I’m like the best defensive player.” Garcia isn’t the only standout player on the team this season, as junior Brandi Nickelson ranks third in area for kills, according to the Dallas Morning News, with 493. Junior Tami Leranth ranks fifth with 465. In addition to their strategies of being aggressive, defensive, and competitive, the varsity girls also do a ritual dance before playing each game. “It’s just tradition,” Garcia said. “We all pick a dance we’re going to do, in our circle, and then we do it and everyone else copies us, just to pump us up before the game.” Despite the tough competition, Samide has been consistent in his message to his players. “My words of encouragement: stay positive, work hard, and things’ll go your way.”

Nicole Collins Photo

Senior Morgan McFadden jumps in attempt to block a volley against Marcus on Sept. 28. McFadden is the outside hitter and middle blocker for the Lady Farmers.

White anticipates constant progression New faces, strategies keep team hopeful for regionals KELSEYLYNCH reporter

Thi Nguyen Photo

Senior James Edlebrock competes at the Sept. 18 Flower Mound Invitational. Edlebrock later placed 34th at the Jesuit Cross Country Classic on Oct. 9.

The majority of the boys and girls cross country teams this year are young and untested, but coach Ray White said he anticipates that each meet this year will prepare the younger runners and give time for them to get adjusted to how the squad works, so eventually they will improve at a steady pace throughout the year. “Because we’re so young, we just have to gain experience by actually running in meets,” White said. Both teams will be in action Saturday at Lake Park for the Rick Neill Memorial meet. Last year the girls were 7th place and the boys finished 6th. The boys team placed fifth in district last year, and the girls team took sixth. This year, the cross country teams hope to get to Lubbock for regionals, and maybe even send one of the runners all the way to Georgetown or Round Rock where the annual state meets are held. White usually tries to come up with strategies to help his runners do better, such as asking two boys to run together during the races. “We’ll say, ‘In this group we want these two guys to run together, and you three girls we want you to stay together the whole time and try to run a faster time and to pull each other along,’” White said. “More teamwork strategy.” White said major keys for team success this year are to gain skill by going to meets, and to eat healthy before races. He said eating something before races, with the exception of

fried and fast food, can really help improve how they run. Each year White hands out a nutrition packet to each runner, and encourages them to eat healthy each and every day. A major source of motivation this season, are the varsity captains. “They usually tell us things like ‘Good Job,’ or ‘Keep going,’” sophomore Jeanina Salguero said. Captains also help with the workouts, including leading stretches, and setting a good example for the other runners. Their practices consist usually anywhere from five to seven miles a day. Some days they run in Highland Village, and some days they do long road runs, and treat themselves on Fridays to Chick-fil-a for an end-of-the-week special. “The meets are like rewards for working so hard during practice,” junior head captain Brittany Ator who placed said. The cross country team competed on Saturday, Oct. 9 at the Jesuit Cross Country Classic with the girls finishing in 10th place and the boys placing 7th. “I thought we ran real well on a very tough course,” White said. “[Junior] Wesley Turner once again had a great race [finishing 6th] and [senior] James Edlebrock [finishing 34th] ran well also. “Brittany Ator [finishing 15th] and [freshman] Alexis Hopkin [who is on Varsity, finishing 47th] ran well on the girl’s side.”


Advertisement Farmers’ Harvest | Lewisville High School | Lewisville, Texas |October 15, 2010 Page 15


Page 16

Farmers’ Harvest | Lewisville High School | Lewisville, Texas | October 15, 2010

A group of students get involved with the school and community through the sports medicine program every year. They get to know the coaches and athletes on a personal level in a challenging hands-on program. “You have to learn to adjust to different personalities and different attitudes from sport to sport. Each sport has [its] own little kind of persona,” head athletic trainer Sheridan Melson said. “You have to be able to adjust to different

personalities on a whim.” A relationship has been established between the trainers and the athletes that are the recipients of their care, especially the football players. Senior Jordyn English refers to them as big brothers with which they have created a tight bond. Athletes even return the love received from the trainers, offering care in their own special way.

Last Shot

“The players, they protect us because we do so much for them,” junior Tori Mumme said. “They are there for us just as much as we are there for them.” Sports medicine also keeps students who are not able to perform at the athletic level to stay involved with their favorite sports. “They may not be participating,” Melson said. “But they are still a big part of it behind the scenes.”

PHOTOS, STORY AND PAGE DESIGN BY NICOLE COLLINS For more information on the sports medicine program and the new head athletic trainers, read ‘Team behind team’ receives new coaches on page 13. TOP LEFT Assistant head trainer Nicholas Clark explains to senior Allie Hacic different types of hand injuries and demonstrates how to detect them. The trainers deal with a wide variety of problems on the field, and therefore must be well acquainted with signs of injury and appropriate treatments. MIDDLE CENTER Senior Jaymi Villatoro listens to a football player describe the status of his wrist as she wraps it with reinforcing athletic tape before third period practice. At the beginning of the period, the fieldhouse is bustling with athletes being assisted by trainers. MIDDLE RIGHT Senior Jordyn English fills water bottles in preparation for football practice. Athletic trainers are at every practice, game, and tournament to make sure all athletes stay hydrated. BOTTOM CENTER Junior Tori Mumme wraps a football player’s arm during third period. The trainers are also available to assist athletes before school for rehabilitation treatments, at after school practices, and at any games and tournaments. BOTTOM RIGHT Junior Meredith Miller attaches the wires for the STEM treatment, an electrical stimulation process that rehabilitates injured muscles.

Color in this issue courtesy of The Farmer yearbook, Room 1180

Volume 61 Issue 1  

Farmers' Harvest

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