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NTUA_ Harvard GSD _ Fani Christina Papadopoulou_ selected works, 2015


ABOUT ME. fpapadopoulou@gsd.harvard.edu fanychristina90@gmail.com 617-548-3750

A few words about me:

I am an Architect- Designer. I graduated with a Masters in Architectural Enginnering from the National Technical University of Athens, where I was a student from 2008 to 2014. I am a Candidate for the M.Arch.II Post Professional Degree at the Harvard Graduate School of Design. Design across scales fascinates me, from the object to urban planning,. I have engaged in academic and professional projects that negotiate space and form, in architecture, landscape and urban design, product and industrial design, branding and marketing strategies and inquisitive theoretical research.


CONTENTS. LONDON’S ARTISTIC HUB

p. 04-13

MIAMI ART BASEL PAVILION

p.14-17

PRINCETON LINK

p.18-23

THESSALONIKI’S PORT

p.24-33

KIPSELI‘S PUBLIC LIBRARY

p.34-43

ATHENS’ MARKET SQ

p.44-49

TENSEGRITIES AT SCALE

p.50-53

PUBLIC MIDDLE SCHOOL

p.54-57

MATHEMATICAL EXPERIMENTS

p.58-63

TERRACOTTA BRICKS

p.64-69

MAYA RAIN INSTALLATION

p.70-73


6

The design competition for the “Olympicopolis” is an ambitious vision of four prestigious institutions of London to come together and share one building, creating a hub for culture and education for the Queen Elizabeth Park in London. The proposal creates a public realm design that seamlessly connects the site to the rest of the Park.

LONDON’S ARTISTIC HUB


Harvard GSD Option Studio Project, fall 2014 project tutors: Farshid Moussavi, James Khamsi personal work: design+illustrations by Fani Christina Papadopoulou


“Olypmpicopolis� Masterplan

I. identify institutions

II. shared space axes


Promoting social cohesion, paying particular attention to the design and execution of areas accessible to the public, is one of the essential tasks of public authorities. And it is precisely in the achievement of this social aspect that the contribution of architecture lies – in its ability to produce a synthesis between the complexity of a context, a programme and research into collective well-being.

This building tackles the issue of engaging with the community, as much as it does with the users of the builing itself, by 1. acting as a circulation node, repairing accessibility and circulation problems that occured with the building of the Stratford City Bridge and the Aquatic Center 2. providing space that can be used on different occasions by the general public, responding to the landscape and the site.

III. atrium axis

IV. spine axis


Ground floor plan

First floor plan


Fifth floor plan

Third floor plan


The Stepped Ascension


Public buildings of this magnitude should no longer be conceived as objects that push the formal limits of architecture. There are so much more at stake than branding an organisation with an extravagant formal identity. Public buildings of that scale and importance have a mission: to engage the public in social interaction, to be ta catalyst for all kinds of social events and impromptu happenings in the public realm. A building that responds to the landscape and the urban context invites the public to explore possibilities, not spaces.


The atrium core


The Courtyard

View from the Olympic Bridge


16

In the spirit of the Miami Art Basel and inspired by the vibe of Miami Beach, the “Carousel� celebrates both the event and the city-host. It provides a space for lounging and resting for visitors, a street-level billboard for the hosts to attract visitors, an exhibition space, and a balcony to enjoy views of the vibrant Miami Beach.

MIAMI ART BASEL PAVILION


Harvard GSD Superficial Spaces, spring 2015 project tutors: George Legendre design and illustrations in collaboration with Royce Perez


GSD EXHIBITION WALL | SPACE

DESIGN MIAMI SIGNAGE

INFORMATION CENTER

Exploded Axonometric section

PUBLIC SEATING

PAVILION ENTRANCE

PAVILION CIRCULATION

PAVILION EXIT


Carousel Section

33’

33’

DN UP

Carousel Plan


20

The Princeton link operates between the landscape and architecture fields to give the Princeton campus a flexible space, in contrast to all the grand starchitect buildings on campus. In an understated manner, the link invites both the students and the community, to engage in all sorts of fun activities and interactions.

PRINCETON LINK


Harvard GSD Option Studio Project, fall 2015 project tutors: Rick Joy personal work: design+illustrations by Fani Christina Papadopoulou


initial Sketch of the “link� in context. The Steven Holl complex is directly adjacent to the project.


Waiting for company from the Dinky station, while enjoying a cup of coffee.


1 4

3

2

link’s plan above ground

1

5

4

2

link’s plan underground


on the Blair Walk new Bridge

The “link Tunnel”


26

This project aims to rejuvenate the area and install residential and commercial uses in a way that utilizes the water in alternative ways that have to do with the acoustic effects and the mystic effect of proximity to water. Connecting the new area with the existing city and continuing the coastal esplanade are also key factors.

THESSALONIKI’S PORT


National Technical University of Athens Architectural Design Studio 9: Urban Design, winter 2013 project tutors: Babalou Paraskevi. Vozani Ariadni, Parmenidis Georgios design in collaboration with: Sophie Alisandratou, Lydia Karagiannaki; all illustrations done by Fani Christina Papadopoulou


Concept collage: the port as a theatrical framing device.


Map of the metropolitan area of Thessaloniki.

Pier Design


Port Masterplan + Uses


s ec tion

I

s ec tion

II

s ec tion

III

s ec tion

IV

s e c t io n

Pier Plan - sections on next page

V


Pier Visualization


section I

section II

section III

section IV

section V

The design of the pier is the most prominent element in the proposal. The two central piers are based on the same philosophy, although a hierarchical order appears, because of the connecting axes that pass through the first pier. The one side is formed by a building “wall”, a linear expansion of a reinvention of the greek “polykatoikia”. Its relation to the water is strict and narrow, as opposed to the opposite side, where the scale is lowered and a sense of blocks is achieved through the layout and orientation of the buildings. The difference in scale is met by a difference in the interaction with the water element.


C

Î’ D

Α

The row of buildings that forms the side of one pier is further investigated in its form possibilities. Although the leaning walls are showing inspiration from the sea environment and the old port, they serve well to create a variety of spaces in the interior of the apartments. The section of those buildings is designed with the goal to provide a multiplicity of apartment layouts and sizes, to appeal to a wider range of users. Circulation is pushed towards the edges and all the apartments are oriented towards the sea on the one side and the esplanade on the other. Among the many different layouts and combinations that can arise from this particular design, one instance is given in those drawings.


Plan Typology A

Plan Typology B

Plan Typology C

Plan Typology D

The apartments offered range from large family 4-bedroom apartments, to studios around 50 sq.m. , suitable for students and couples. The variety is not just a formal manipulation, as a result of the sectional qualities of the “building wall�. It is meant to invite a mix of different incomes and different social classes to the same building complex and enhance interaction and intermingling.


36

The philosophy of the design proposal lies in the belief that reading is an act of introspection. The library proposed in this case embraces that philosophy, providing a space that’s introverted, lit from above, that welcomes the users and encourages the undistracted act of communicating through the written speech.

KIPSELI’S PUBLIC LIBRARY


National Technical University of Athens Architectural Design Studio 7&8, winter+summer 2011-2012 project tutors: Tsiraki Sofia, Karadimas Konstantinos design in collaboration with: Sophie Alisandratou, Marirena Kladeftira; all illustrations done by Fani Christina Papadopoulou


program: stacks - inventory and storage space reading space offices department for kids with learning disorders


I. pierce through the site

II. mimic the natural slope

The characteristics of the area of Kipseli and of the particular site form the fundamental elements of this proposal. The site is transformed from a natural hill, to a man made slope, a green roof that mimics the natural acclivity of the ground. All uses are located underneath the slope, with natural lighting coming primarily from above. The public library is highlighted as a beacon of knowledge with the “tower�, a 13m vertical architectural object. III. highlight as landmark


The project design experiments with the ways the construction demands of a building can help shape its form, with the structural elements ultimately being an integral part of the building’s design. In the library, all vertical load bearing elements are walls that not only serve a structural purpose, but they also define the spaces, navigate the users and enclose certain spaces without the need of any extra partitions.


Exploded Structural Diagram


Plan at +15.00 m

Plan at +08.00 m


Detailed Section

The tower encloses the reading space almost in its entirety. The walls are all concrete, with the occasional small apertures letting light in, in a controlled fashion. The mezzanines are arranged in a way that no more than 30 people can sit down and read at the same time, in the spirit of an introverted, secluded reading space.


Construction Detail 3

Construction Detail 4

Construction Detail 1

Construction Detail 2

The structural details of the tower’s interior are meant to be an elegant light structure of aluminum beams and timber floors. This decision is a stark antithesis to the tower’s exterior shell: a heavy monolithic concrete shell. The play between different materialities and lightness-heaviness is also in synch with the introverted nature of this building.


46

“Agora” has a double meaning in greek. It means market, but it also carries an ancient meaning of a “forum”, a meeting place, where people gather to interact and exchange both goods and opinions. In this project, the redesign and rejuvenation of Athens’ central market sq. asks for both meanings of “agora” to be incorporated into the design.

ATHENS’ MARKET SQ.


National Technical University of Athens Architectural Design Studio 8A, summer 2012 project tutors: Moraitis Konstantinos, Haniotou Eleni design in collaboration with: Mirto Hasourou, Nikos Gaitanopoulos; all illustrations done by Fani Christina Papadopoulou


V E G E TA B L E - F R U I T M A R K E T

Q U I C K PA S S A G E “ S T R U C T U R A L”

I N G o o r am p h AT E D S E AT d CONY-ELEV out VE B A L ET GE RK A TA M BL IT C A F E U E FR LEIS ACE URE G PL LY P ETIN AS SING-ME it h e a

E L E V AT E D S E AT I N G S PA C E

tre

V E G E TA B L E - F R U I T M A R K E T

“ S T R U C T U R A L”

Q U I C K PA S S A G E

I. Enrich Uses

VEGETABLE+FRUIT MARKET

CENTRAL ATHENS MARKET

VEGETABLE+FRUIT MARKET

II. Access+Connections

VE

GE

KE

TA B

LE

AR IT M

RU

+F

T CENTRAL ATHENS MARKET


The program of the square calls primarily for a sheltered space for the fruit and vegetable market to operate in. The location of the square ensures a steady and considerable pedestrian flow, that needs to use the space of the square either to pass through, or to relax, take a break, shop, meet and interact. This program, along with the design criteria dictates the final proposal:


soft ground-structural green

the “foliage” roof

urban equipment

ground treatment

Exploded Programmatic Diagram - Concept and Layers

The ground is lifted so as to create a double space, an “agora”. Underneath the earthen roof, the market flourishes, while on top of it, people can sit, relax, enjoy the urban movement. The gesture of the lifting of the ground echoes a sinking of the ground as well, where a public cafe and an amphitheatre find their place.


This experimentation with the generative process of design is at the same time an experimentation with a structural system that has not seen widespread use in the architectural practice, tensegrity. The aim of this project is to investigate the form of tensegrity and explore the different possibilities in terms of scale, position, distances.

TENSEGRITIES AT SCALE


National Technical University of Athens Digital Documentation and Information Management in Design and Construction, winter 2013 project tutors: Papalexopoulos Dimitrios design in collaboration with: Mikaela Psarra, Sophie Alysandratoy; all illustrations done by Fani Christina Papadopoulou


This instance of the code presents the final proposal for a large scale installation. The final model was created to test the durability and actual integrity of the design, whereas many models preceded the final one to test the module in terms of constructability.


56

Architecturally, the elementary school poses a challenge. The complex needs to be child friendly, playful, create opportunities for the little students to play and have fun, but at the same time instill in them a sense of responsibility. These are architecturally feasible goals: the educational environment shapes the child’s character.

PUBLIC MIDDLE SCHOOL


National Technical University of Athens Architectural Design Studio 5, winter 2010 project tutors: Gyftopoulos Stavros design in collaboration with: Marirena Kladeftira; all illustrations done by Fani Christina Papadopoulou


ground floor plan


section along the classroom axis

section of the gym+amphiteater volume


60

“The banal box becomes an apparatus supporting and suspending these functions inside the Block. The interior space remaining on the ground floor allows visitors and passengers to travel through the Block to both ends of the site.�

MATHEMATICAL EXPERIMENTS


Harvard GSD Option Studio Project, fall 2015 project tutors: George Legendre design+illustrations in collaboration with Royce Perez


Axonometric Section at +21 m

Axonometric Section at +18 m

Axonometric Section at +9 m

Axonometric Section at +3 m


Iteration III-a  *rejected U:4

height : 43

V:3

U:5

height : 43

Taxonomy of experiments with their mathematical values. height : 43

V:6

U:7

height : 43

V:3

U:6

height : 43

Iteration I-c  *rejected

U:5

Iteration II-c  *rejected

V:4

Iteration III-c  *rejected

V:5 Iteration I-b  *rejected

height : 43

Iteration II-b  *rejected

Iteration I-a  *rejected U:7

Iteration III-b  *rejected

Iteration II-a  *rejected V:3 V:3

U:3

height : 43

V:6

U:4

height : 43

V:5

U:7

height : 43


GSD

Spring 2015

iteration 1 ITERATION 1

iteration 2 ITERATION 2

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ITERATION 4

Iterative Mathcad Refinement Process - from pure to compositional Papadopoulou + Perez


The Wedge Balconies

The Ribbon

The Slots

the ground Promenade

the ground floor

Exploded Diagram of Design Elements


66

A series of screens, each consisting of specially designed terra cotta bricks. Although they are stackable, stable, and inexpensive, they are not your typical rectangular box. Each brick has been specially designed to both hold water and allow air to pass through. adapts that same process to an easily installed, stackable system.

TERRACOTTA BRICKS


Harvard GSD Material Practice as Research, fall 2014 project tutors: Leire Asensio-Villoria and Felix Raspal design+illustrations in collaboration with Annapurna Akinneni, Alexander Jacobson and Joshua Schecter


Installation Photographs


A

after approximately 4 mins

after approximately 2 mins

B

after approximately 6 mins

Water Distribution linearly from one unit to the next.

4"

Filling up the wall with water

3/4"

Structure

after approximately 10 mins

6"

1/4"

3/4"

Sections and Plan: Geometry, Stacking, Water Distribution


A foam positive was milled as two halves.

Each half was cut out and sanded.

Each part was removed one by one to avoid ripping

The finished piece is left on the top so it can harden before being moved


All of the pieces were tightly bundled together for pouring

The mold parts were slowly shifted to release the piece

Then we split the mold down the middle, creating a 9 part mold

Splitting it into 8 parts reduces the amount of surface contact with any once part


72

This workshop has formal exploration at its core, using the Autodesk Maya software. The formal exploration was stimulated by the topic of energy, which in this project was perceived as sustainability.

MAYA RAIN INSTALLATION


Design Workshop summer 2012 project advisors: Eric Carcamo, Nefeli Chatimina individual work


system diagram: collectors, connectors and binders

multiplication of units in plan


rain collection diagram

rain flowers


Thank you, you can contact me: fanychristina90@gmail.com fpapadopoulou@gsd.harvard.edu 617-548-3750


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