Manhattan Sale 2

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MANHATTAN SALE 2

January 4, 2011



Freeman & Sear • Los Angeles

manhattan sale 2 T ue s da y , J a nua r y 4, 2011 a t 7 P. M. Waldorf Astoria Hotel New York, New York Norse Suite, 18th Floor In Conjunction with the 39th Annual New York International Numismatic Convention Freeman & Sear PO Box 641352 Los Angeles, CA 90064-6352 Phone: (310) 450-9755 Fax (310) 450-8865 info@freemanandsear.com www.freemanandsear.com


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Freeman & Sear Manhattan Sale 2


Freeman & Sear • Los Angeles

Lot Vi e wing Sc h e d u le

C on ten ts of S al e

Santa Monica December 14–30, 2010 by appointment Monday–Friday, 10 AM–6 PM Please call (310) 450-9755 to arrange a viewing time.

Part One:

San Francisco December 10-11, 2010 San Francisco Historical Bourse Holiday Inn Golden Gateway Hotel

Other Properties

New York Waldorf Astoria Hotel 301 Park Avenue, 18th Floor Sunday, January 2 - Lexington Suite, 1 PM–7 PM Monday, January 3 - Lexington Suite, 9 AM–6 PM Tuesday, January 4 - Lexington Suite, 10 AM–5 PM

Selections from the Peter Guber Collection....... Lot 1-78 Part Two: Greek Coins............................................... Lot 79-206 Roman Coins............................................ Lot 207-318 Byzantine Coins....................................... Lot 319-381 Migration Period and Medieval Coins...... Lot 382-407 Islamic Coins........................................... Lot 408-410 World Coins............................................. Lot 411-418

Lot P ick up Wednesday, January 5 - Lexington Suite 11 AM–4 PM

A uc t ione e r Herbert J. Kreindler, License No. 820339

W i re Tra nsfe r De t a ils Please contact Freeman & Sear by phone: (310) 450-9755 fax: (310) 450-8865 or email: info@freemanandsear.com

Plac e Your Bid s O n lin e a t w ww.fre e man a n d s e a r .c o m

Freeman & Sear Manhattan Sale 2

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Freeman & Sear Manhattan Sale 2


Freeman & Sear • Los Angeles

T ERMS OF S ALE This is a public auction and mail bid sale conducted by Freeman & Sear. Bidding in the auction constitutes full acceptance of the following terms. 1) The property contained in this auction catalog is offered for sale by Freeman & Sear for itself and on behalf of its consignors. Freeman & Sear may, at its sole discretion, set opening bidding levels, determine bidding increments, reject any bid, reopen a lot in the event of a dispute and withdraw any lot. Freeman & Sear further reserves the right to bid on its own behalf, bid on behalf of the consignor or allow the consignor to bid on his own property. 2) An 18% buyer’s premium will be added to the hammer price of each lot sold. The buyer’s premium will be reduced to 15% if settlement is made by wire transfer, bank draft or personal check within thirty days of the auction date. The same buyer’s fee format is applicable to all purchases of unsold lots after the sale. 3) All property offered herein is guaranteed genuine. Grades, descriptions of condition, assessment of rarity and attribution are the opinion of the cataloguer and in no way imply or express warranty. This auction is not an approval sale. Lots may not be returned for any reason except lack of authenticity or misdescription. Group lots, containing more than one coin, are sold “as is” and may not be returned for any reason. Bidders attending the sale, including those acting as agents for others, are excluded from returning any lot for any reason except for lack of authenticity. Any claim of misdescription, excluding a claim of lack of authenticity, must be made within five days of delivery of the property. Any claim of lack of authenticity must be made in writing by the original purchaser immediately on determining the item is not authentic. The original purchaser then must return the item to Freeman & Sear in the same condition as when purchased. 4) Settlement is due immediately upon receipt of the invoice. Interest charges and late fees of 2% per month, or the highest rate allowable by law, whichever is less, will be applied to invoices not settled within thirty days of the auction date and will accrue from the auction date. Bidders personally guarantee payment for lots purchased in the auction, including those executing commission bids for other parties. Payment by check, cash, money order, bank wire transfer, Visa, MasterCard and Discover are accepted. Checks must be made in US dollars and drawn on a US bank. All successful bidders who choose to pay by bank wire transfer will be charged an additional $25 for bank fees. 5) Title does not pass until payment is made in full. Freeman & Sear reserves the right to maintain possession of all lots and to require full payment before delivery is made. 6) Bidders unknown to Freeman & Sear must establish satisfactory credit prior to bidding or must pay a deposit determined by Freeman & Sear. Bids from those under 18 years of age must be accompanied by the written consent of a parent or legal guardian guaranteeing payment. 7) Estimates printed in this catalog are in US dollars. They are intended only as a guide to bidders and not as statements of value. Selling reserves will apply to all property sold in this auction and are normally placed at, but never less than, 60% of the printed estimates. Therefore, a bid of less than 60% of estimate will not be accepted. 8) Bids must be in even dollar amounts. Freeman & Sear will represent mail bidders and will execute mail bids at approximately 10% above the next highest bid. In the event identical mail bids are received, Freeman & Sear will execute the earliest bid. A mail bid has priority over an identical floor bid. Freeman & Sear accepts no responsibility for errors made in bidding and urges that bid sheets be checked carefully before submission. 9) In the event a successful bidder fails to make payment when due, Freeman & Sear reserves the right to resell the property, or to have an affiliated company do so, and the bidder agrees to pay for the reasonable cost of such a sale and also to pay the difference between the resale price and the previously successful bid. Freeman & Sear also reserves any and all rights that it is entitled to under the California Uniform Commercial Code, including the right to offset any sums due from a successful bidder against any future consignment or purchase or monies or goods in possession of Freeman & Sear or its assigns. 10) Sales tax, postage, handling and insurance are the responsibility of the buyer and these charges will be added to all invoices where applicable. Foreign purchasers are advised to comply with all customs regulations. Freeman & Sear declines any responsibility for consequences arising from contravention of such regulations. 11) Bidders hereby waive any claim for incidental, consequential or exemplary damages arising from this auction. The sole remedy that any bidder shall have for any claim or controversy arising out of the auction shall be a refund of all or part of the purchase price. 12) The rights conferred under these Terms of Sale are personal and may not be transferred to any other person or entity. No third party may rely on any benefit or right granted under these Terms. 13) Any dispute regarding this auction shall be governed by the laws of California and shall be adjudicated by the appropriate courts of law in Los Angeles County, California. All bidders submit themselves to the jurisdiction of these courts for this purpose.

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PE T E R GUB E R Peter Guber has been a force in the entertainment industry for nearly forty years. Gifted with tremendous creativity and business acumen, he has achieved major success in a variety of media, including film, television, music and sports entertainment. Peter was Studio Chief of Columbia Pictures in the early 1970s and, from 1989 to 1995, he held the post of Chairman and CEO at Sony Pictures. After leaving Sony in 1995, he formed Mandalay Entertainment Group, a company he continues to operate and expand. In the course of his career, Peter has personally produced or executive-produced more than thirty films that have garnered more than fifty Academy Award nominations and have earned several billion dollars worldwide. These films include The Deep, Rain Man, Batman, The Color Purple, Midnight Express, Gorillas in the Mist, The Witches of Eastwick and Flashdance. Most recently, his newly-launched Mandalay Vision released the critically-acclaimed box office success, The Kids Are All Right. Whereas Peter is perhaps best known as an executive in the film industry, he has figured prominently in the world of music as well, having co-owned and operated Casablanca Records and Filmworks. Casablanca released top-selling singles and albums in the 1970s by such artists as KISS, Donna Summers and The Village People. Peter also has parlayed his long-held interest in sports into successful business enterprises. His Mandalay Sports Entertainment and its subsidiaries own and operate several minor league baseball teams. In 2010, Peter turned his sights to basketball, purchasing the NBA’s Golden State Warriors with a partner. Despite his myriad responsibilities in the business world, Peter still finds time to share his vast knowledge and experiences with eager audiences. He is a full professor and regularly lectures at UCLA, where he has been a member of the faculty at the School of Theater, Film and Television for more than three decades. He also serves as the chairman of the Founding Board of Advisors for the Center for Managing Enterprises in Media, Entertainment and Sports (MEMES) at the UCLA Anderson School of Management. He has written several articles for noted periodicals and has authored two well-received books. His latest work, Tell To Win – Connect, Persuade and Triumph with the Hidden Power of Story, is scheduled for publication in the spring. In recent years, Peter has moved from behind-the-scenes to become a personality in front of the camera. For six years he co-hosted Shootout, a nationally broadcast television program carried on the American Movie Classics (AMC) cable network. In 2009, he hosted a series of one-hour specials on AMC entitled StoryMakers and, currently, he can be seen as co-host of In the House, a weekly news and interview program, focusing on the entertainment industry, carried on the Encore cable network and NBC. When Peter initially expressed an interest in acquiring ancient Greek coins as an adjunct to his art collection, he was transfixed by their beauty as much as he was intrigued by the stories to be imparted by these seemingly mute pieces of metal. Stories of war, political struggle and the interaction between god and man are all told in the depictions on ancient coins. This is timeless subject matter that continues to fascinate us and, indeed, is the source of some of our most compelling films and entertainment. It is with great pleasure that we offer selections from the Peter Guber Collection of Ancient Coins. 8

Freeman & Sear Manhattan Sale 2


Freeman & Sear • Los Angeles PAR T O N E - S E L E C TI O NS F ROM T HE P ET ER GUBER C OLLEC T ION

1. CELTS IN GAUL . The Parisii. 2nd Century BC. Gold stater (7.23 gm). Class II. Head of Apollo with flowing locks to right; before, double volute / Horse galloping to left; above, ornate wing; below, rosette. Delestrée-Tache 79. Leu 79, lot 64 (same dies). De la Tour 7782. Extremely rare and from the class representing the finest Celtic style. Nearly extremely fine $50,000 Ex Peter Guber Collection. According to Caesar's The Gallic War, the capital of the Celtic tribe known as the Parisii was the village of Lutetia on the marshy island in the Seine. Destroyed by Caesar’s legate Labienus in 52 BC, the city was rebuilt in imperial times with the name of Parisii. In time it would become Paris, capital of France and one of the world’s great cities. The Parisii made their gold staters into works of art, their coins being amongst the finest of all Gallic coinages. Like many Celtic coinages, the types are loosely based on the gold staters of Philip II of Macedon issued centuries before, but as always, the Celtic artisans transformed the design into something uniquely their own. The obverse head of Apollo displays a remarkably modern, nearly cubist conception of line and form. The extraordinarily rich artistic treatment of the reverse horse is characterized by a curvilinear triangular formation above it, the so-called ‘wing,’ containing square compartments, each enclosing a pellet, perhaps representing the canopy of heaven. These gold staters were struck in connection with Caesar’s invasion of Gaul in 59 BC, and the celebrated hoard of 53 staters found at Puteaux in 1950, situated in the banlieu of Paris, confirms their attribution to the Parisii.

2. CALABRIA . Tarentum. Ca. 510–500 BC. Silver stater or nomos (8.03 gm). TARAS (retrograde), Taras astride dolphin right, right hand outstretched, scallop shell below, all within heavy border with dot-and-reel motif / Same type as obverse, reversed and incuse. Fischer-Bossert 16 (V7/R12). Vlasto 68. An exceptional example of this rare archaic coinage. Good very fine $20,000 Ex Peter Guber Collection. According to Greek legend, Taras was the offspring of a liaison between Poseidon and a human female. Taking after his father, he became a sailor, but was caught in a storm and his ship swamped. Poseidon sent a dolphin to rescue the youth, who was carried to the shores of Calabria in southern Italy where he founded a city that later bore his name—Tarentum. The city grew into the most prosperous and powerful of the Greek colonies in Italy. This remarkable silver stater is among the first coins struck in Tarentum, dating to the late sixth century BC. Like most later coins of Tarentum, it depicts Taras riding the dolphin which bore him to his destiny in Italy. The unusual fabric of this piece follows a style peculiar to Greek southern Italy in the archaic period; broad, thin flan, obverse depicted in relief, reverse repeating the obverse motif but in negative relief, or incuse, and reversed. Creating such coins required a high degree of technical skill and quality control. The reasons for the popularity of this fabric are poorly understood; some scholars have postulated a connection to the mathematician-philosopher Pythagoras, who was active in Italy during this period and taught a creed which stressed the duality of mankind’s nature and all existence. Freeman & Sear Manhattan Sale 2

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3. LUCANIA . Sybaris. Ca. 525–510 BC. Silver stater (8.34 gm). Bull standing left, head reverted, VM in exergue / Same type as obverse, reversed and incuse. Schefold, Meisterwerke griechischer Kunst (1960), 442 (this coin illustrated). SNG ANS 830 (same dies). HN Italy 1729. A lovely example. Toned. Extremely fine $7,500 Ex Peter Guber Collection; Monnaies et Médailles 52, 19-20 June 1975, lot 47. The Greek city of Sybaris was located on the “instep” of the Italian boot on a richly fertile plain between two rivers. Founded in 720 BC, it quickly grew rich and prosperous. By about 530 BC, when its coinage commenced, Sybaris had a city wall six miles in circumference and a population rivaling that of Athens. Its people were so luxury-loving that the term “sybarite” came to denote a person devoted to pursuing earthly pleasures. The coins of Sybaris conformed to the unusual relief/incuse fabric popular among the Greek cities of southern Italy in the last decades of the sixth century BC. The powerful bull depicted in relief on the obverse, and incuse (or in negative relief) on the reverse is almost certainly a river god; perhaps the mirror images of obverse and reverse are intended to evoke the rivers Crathis and Sybaris, from which derived the region’s fertility and prosperity. Production of these coins required careful engraving and precise alignment of the dies, and must have been quite time-consuming. Alas, the heyday of Sybaris was doomed to be short. In 510 BC, a revolution swept the city and many nobles fled to nearby Croton. The new ruler of Sybaris took this as a declaration of war and marched against Croton at the head of a large army, but was utterly routed by a much smaller force. Croton and its allies took Sybaris after a siege and subjected it to merciless pillage. The victors even diverted the waters of the river Crathis over the old civic site to ensure it would never rise again.

4. Thurium. Ca. 350–300 BC. Silver distater (15.81 gm). Head of Athena right, wearing pearl necklace, triple pendant earring, and crested Attic helmet ornamented with Scylla throwing rock, SAN in small letters behind neck / QOURIWN, bull butting right, head turned facing, above his back moneyer’s abbreviated signature EUFA, two mullets right in exergue. Noe 18 (same dies). HN Italy 1823. Toned. Nearly extremely fine $10,000 Ex Peter Guber Collection. The earliest Greek colonies in Southern Italy date back to the eighth and seventh centuries BC. The greatest of these was Sybaris, destroyed by its rival Croton in 510. After attempts to rebuild the city proved unsuccessful, Athens in 443 founded a colony near the ruins of Sybaris. This new city, called Thurium, absorbed the old Sybarites and also provided a home for colonists from Athens. Thurium introduced a new iconographic concept to South Italian coinage by importing a mainland Greek practice: the depiction of a deity on the obverse. In this case, the deity was naturally Athena, patroness of Thurium’s mother city Athens. Appropriately the goddess is shown wearing the Attic style of helmet, but the South Italian die engravers did not share the marked conservatism of their Athenian counterparts and devised various elaborate decorations for the helmet, mostly involving the sea monster Scylla in various poses. The reverse type, a rushing bull, derived from the original coin types of Sybaris. It is usually accompanied by fish, a clue that it symbolized the spring Thuria after which Thurium was named. The tiny letters behind the crest of Athena’s helmet are probably the abbreviated signature of the die engraver; the larger letters on the reverse probably identify the mint official in charge of striking the issue. The standard coin of South Italy was the stater. Thurium was one of the few cities to strike distaters, and the only one to do so on a regular basis. This exceptional production was a sign of its wealth and power, and perhaps also of its access to local silver lodes. 10

Freeman & Sear Manhattan Sale 2


Freeman & Sear • Los Angeles

5. BRUTTIUM. Caulonia. Ca. 515–500 BC. Silver stater (8.40 gm). ΚΑVΛ, nude Apollo striding right on dotted ground line, holding laurel branch in raised right hand and extending his left hand to support a small daemon running right with branches in both hands; before the god, on separate dotted ground line, stag standing right, head reverted / Same types, reversed and incuse, but stag’s antlers in relief and daimon with raised outline. Noe 5 (same dies). SNG ANS 142 (same dies). Toned. Extremely fine $20,000 Ex Peter Guber Collection; Freeman & Sear Fixed Price List 11, Spring/Summer 2006, 11. The early Achaean colonies of South Italy produced an archaic coinage with unique characteristics seen nowhere else in the Greek world. Their silver staters are broad of flan and relatively thin, and the devices that appear on the obverse are repeated on the reverse, but reversed and in intaglio. Possibly this unusual fabric was inspired by repoussé metalwork, for precious metal vessels served as a store of wealth before coinage was invented and indeed continued to serve this function, representing multiples of the face values of coinage. The coin type of Caulonia in this early period honors Apollo, the patron of colonies, whose oracle at Delphi authorized the foundation of each colony and suggested its specific location. The details of the design reflect the Delphic myth of the origin of Apollo’s sanctuary. Apollo had to slay a serpent in order to take possession of Delphi. After the combat, he purified himself in the Vale of Tempe in Thessaly, crowned himself with laurel, and took a laurel branch in his hand. The daimon represents the messenger of Apollo who will announce the god’s return to Delphi and will purify the sanctuary with the branches in his hands. The type is considered a punning type, playing on Caulonia’s original name Aulonia and the Greek word for vale or gorge, aulon.

6. Croton. Ca. 350–300 BC. Silver stater (7.94 gm). Eagle with spread wings perched left on olive branch / KPO, tripod-lebes with high neck, fillet on right hanging from loop handle, control letters L above K in right field. SNG ANS 363 (same dies). HN Italy 2173. Struck on an unusually broad flan. Attractively toned. Extremely fine and among the finest specimens known of this variety. $15,000 Ex Peter Guber Collection; R.P. Flieger Collection (Vinchon, 13 April 1985, lot 57). Croton, located on the “ball” of the Italian boot, was founded in 710 BC by Greek colonists from Achaea in the Peloponnesus. The whole colonization movement of the eighth and seventh centuries BC took place under the auspices of the god Apollo in his aspect as Archegetes (the Founder). When a city wished to ease population pressures by founding a colony, it would appoint a leader for the aspiring colonists and seek an oracle from Apollo authorizing the colony and suggesting a location. Not surprisingly, Apollo was the patron god of the newly founded cities, most of which honored him on their coinage. Thus the tripod, a symbol of Apollo’s oracle at Delphi, was the earliest coin type of Croton and came to be recognized as the city’s civic badge. Another tradition of colonies was that they transplanted the major religious cults of their mother cities. Zeus was the national god of the Achaeans, and he is represented here by his sacred animal, the eagle. The olive branch on which the eagle perches may be a topical symbol, alluding to a peace negotiated with the neighboring Italian tribe, the warlike Bruttians. Freeman & Sear Manhattan Sale 2 11


7. Rhegium. Ca. 435 BC. Silver tetradrachm (17.31 gm). Facing lion mask / RECIN—O—N (retrograde), Iocastus seated left on diphros, holding staff in right hand and resting left on back of seat, all within olive wreath border. Herzfelder 42A. Very rare. Good very fine $12,500 Ex Peter Guber Collection. Rhegium was located at the “toe” of the Italian boot, just across the Straits of Messina from Sicily. This location, and the fact that Rhegium had the same mother city as the Sicilian colonies, placed Rhegium in the Sicilian cultural orbit. This explains its monetary behavior: it struck tetradrachms on the Attic weight standard, like the Sicilian cities, while the Italian colonies founded from Achaea struck didrachms. The lion on the obverse of Rhegium’s coinage is the sacred animal of Apollo, patron god of colonization. The seated figure on the reverse has no distinctive attributes that serve to identify him. He is thought to represent Iocastus, the traditional founder of Rhegium, who died from a snake bite. The founders of colonies typically were honored with hero cults, a form of remembrance that involved prayers and offerings without quite raising the founder to fully divine status.

8. Terina. Ca. 410-400 BC. Silver didrachm or stater (7.96 gm). Female head left, hair bound with sphendone, TEPI[N—AIO]N around / Nike seated left on cippus, resting hand on kerykeion. Regling 59 (same dies). Holloway-Jenkins 59. HN Italy 2614. With a beautiful obverse head and a sensitively rendered reverse. Lightly toned. Extremely fine $7,500 Ex Peter Guber Collection; Auctiones 17, 7-8 June 1988, lot 26. Terina, a small Greek city located on the base of Italy’s “toe,” played no conspicuous role in history, but is nonetheless admired for producing some of the loveliest coin designs of antiquity. The exact site of the city remains unknown, but it was believed to have been founded by settlers from Croton in the seventh century BC. All of Terina’s silver coins feature the city’s eponymous nymph on the obverse, with her hair dressed in elaborate ways; these heads were clearly inspired by the image of Arethusa found on contemporary coins of Syracuse. Reverses feature Nike in various charming poses—here, she sits resting one hand on a kerykeion (or caduceus), the staff of Mercury. The numismatist Charles Seltman was so taken by these figures of Nike that he theorized they must have been created by die engravers from Athens, since they “can hardly have been produced save by someone intimately acquainted with the famous Attic Nike balustrade” at the entrance to the Acropolis. 12

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9. Camarina. Ca. 425-405 BC. Silver tetradrachm (17.18 gm). Athena in fast quadriga left, broad S-curved rim (antyx) of chariot, Nike flying right above, double exergual line, heron flying left in exergue / ΚΑΜΑΡΙΝΑΙΟΝ, bearded head of Heracles left in lion’s skin. Westermark-Jenkins 142. Very rare. With a powerful head of the mature Heracles in the finest style. Attractive gray toning. A few minor die breaks. Good very fine $25,000 Ex Peter Guber Collection. The story of Camarina, situated on the southern coast of Sicily, is closely entwined with that of its parent city of Syracuse. Settlers from Syracuse founded Camarina in 599 BC, but within 40 years it had grown so prosperous that its mother city began to regard it as a threat. Destroyed by Syracuse in 553 BC, Camarina was re-founded by colonists from Gela, but its existence remained precarious until the later fifth century BC, when it finally entered into a period of stability under the protective wing of a distant ally, Athens. Initially producing only small-denomination coins, Camarina initiated a remarkable series of silver tetradrachms in 425 BC depicting a Syracusan-style galloping quadriga on the obverse, and on the reverse a powerful and mature head of Heracles wearing the skin of the Nemean lion. A variant reverse type showing Heracles as a young, beardless man became the prototype for Alexander the Great’s coinage of the following century. Despite its alliance with Athens, Camarina came to the aid of Syracuse during the Athenian siege of 415-413 BC. Syracuse returned the favor by sheltering Camarina’s population when Carthage invaded and ravaged southern Sicily in 405 BC. Refounded once again in 339 BC, Camarina ultimately came under Roman control and survived into the ninth century AD. Today only a few stands of ruins hint at the site’s ancient splendor.

10. Catana. Ca. 470-460 BC. Silver tetradrachm (16.82 gm). Man-faced bull (the local river god Amenanos) walking right, satyr above, sea-serpent (ketos) below / KATANAION, Nike walking left, holding diadem in outstretched right hand and her drapery with the left. Rizzo, pl. IX, 12 (these dies). Randazzo 67-68 (same reverse die). Very rare! Insignificant metal flaws and struck from worn reverse die, otherwise extremely fine/good very fine $6,000 Ex Peter Guber Collection; Numismatica Ars Classica Q, 6 June 2006, lot 1165. Located on the eastern coast of Sicily, Catana was originally settled in 729 BC at the foot of Mount Aetna by colonists from another Sicilian city, Naxos. Its system of government and laws were held up as models for other cities in Magna Graecia, but this did not stop the Syracusan tyrant Hieron I from forcing the entire population of Catana to relocate to Leontini in 476 BC. This attempt at consolidation failed, however, and within a few years the citizens of Catana had returned to their original home. Catana remained resentful, if not overtly hostile, toward its powerful southern neighbor from this time on, and when the Athenian army arrived on its expedition against Syracuse in 415 BC, Catana served as its headquarters city. The defeat of Athens meant Catana would pay a terrible price, and in 403 BC Dionysius I of Syracuse captured the city and sold the inhabitants into slavery. But he settled many of his mercenaries on the site and thus guaranteed Catana’s continued existence. It slowly regained its prominence in Hellenistic and Roman times, and today Catania is the second largest city on Sicily. (cont. on next page) Freeman & Sear Manhattan Sale 2

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Lot 10 (Lot 10 cont.) The coinage of Catana is more varied and interesting than that of any other Sicilian city save Syracuse. Several gods and goddesses are honored, most prominently Apollo, Silenus, and Nike. This rare early tetradrachm depicts the river god Amenanos as a man-headed bull, along with the satyr Silenus. The reverse figure of Nike holding a broken diadem probably signifies the death of the Syracusan tyrant Hieron I in 467 BC, which allowed the displaced inhabitants of Catana to return to their ancestral home.

11. Ca. 450 BC. Silver tetradrachm (17.35 gm). Slow quadriga right / KATANAI—ON, laureate head of Apollo right with hair tucked up behind under laurel wreath. Rizzo pl. x, 5 (same dies). Pozzi 410 = SNG Lockett 727 = Boston Supplement 22 (same dies). Very rare. Insignificant flan flaw on obverse. Nearly extremely fine $40,000 Ex Peter Guber Collection. Catana, on the east coast of Sicily under Mt. Aetna, was founded from nearby Naxos. It produced some of the most artistic issues in all of Greek coinage and enjoyed the services of the celebrated Aetna Master as well as several signing artists. Around the middle of the fifth century Catana began a long series of tetradrachms featuring the Sicilian quadriga on the obverse and a head of Apollo on the reverse. Like the nymph Arethusa at Syracuse, the god inspired the Catanian die engravers to create a whole gallery of heads that reflect the development of artistic style and technique, changing styles in hair dressing, and evolving concepts of masculine beauty. Apollo is depicted here with an archaizing hairstyle in which his long, wavy hair is looped loosely at the back of his neck and held in place by his laurel wreath, forming a large roll beneath the wreath and a smaller one above it, with the ends of the hair falling below. Two stylistic features of note are the ogival eye and the rendering of the hair as individual parallel strands.

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12. Ca. 405–402 BC. Silver tetradrachm (16.95 gm). Signed on the obverse by Heracleidas. Laureate head of Apollo facing, inclined very slightly to viewer’s left, hair falling in loose waves on right and blowing away from the head on left; to right, die engraver’s signature ΗΡΑΚΛΕΙΔΑΣ (off flan) / ΚΑΤΑΝΑΙΩΝ, fast quadriga left in three-quarters view, third horse with head turned back, above Nike flying right to crown charioteer, fish left in exergue. Antikenmuseum Basel 337 (this coin). R.R. Holloway, Art and Coinage in Magna Graecia, p. 112 (this coin). Kraay-Hirmer pl. 15, 43 (same dies) and color plate III, 44 (obverse only). Rizzo pl. xiv, 10 (same dies) and xvi, 2 (same dies, enlarged). Gulbenkian 190 (same dies). SNG Lockett 730 (same dies). Very rare. A highly pleasing example of Heracleidas’ masterwork. Lovely cabinet toning. Nearly extremely fine $100,000 Ex Peter Guber Collection; A.D.M. Collection; Numismatica Ars Classica 13, 8 October 1998, lot 337; exhibited at the Antikenmuseum Basel und Sammlung Ludwig in Basel in 1988. In the last decade of the fifth century BC, Catana was influenced by artistic trends emanating from the nearby city of Syracuse. One of those trends was the employment of artists who signed their dies and vied with one another in originality. Another was the creation of the facing head, a device that greatly heightened the aesthetic impact of coins. Syracusan artists had produced two remarkable facing heads, a facing head of Athena signed by the engraver Eucleidas, ca. 410 BC, and a facing head of Arethusa, signed by Cimon, ca. 405 BC. Catana responded by commissioning a facing head of its own patron god, Apollo, for its tetradrachms. The engraver, Heracleidas, evidently envisioned a portrayal of Apollo-Helios, an assimilation of the sun god to the traditional Apollo, god of oracles, music, and law. To this end he emphasized the god’s burning gaze and the fluffy aureole of hair framing his face, its wispy ends suggesting the sun’s rays. Among the many beautiful depictions of Apollo on Catanian coins, there is no other with solar qualities. The racing scene on the reverse is typical of its time and place, in that it employs various artistic devices to convey the excitement of the race. One such device is the wild, chaotic motion of the horses’ legs. Another is the backward glace of the third horse, suggestinig some distraction at a critical moment. The posture of the charioteer, leaning forward and holding up the reins in both hand, also lends a sense of urgency to the scene.

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13. Gela. Ca. 490/85–480/75 BC. Silver didrachm (8.77 gm). Bearded horseman right, nude except for peaked leather helmet, brandishing spear in raised right hand / CELAS, forepart of man-faced bull rushing right. Jenkins Group I. Cf. SNG ANS 9. Extremely fine $7,500 Ex Peter Guber Collection. Gela was a Rhodian colony on the southern coast of Sicily. Like many Sicilian cities, it issued its earliest coinage in the form of didrachms. The obverse type of Gela’s didrachms is invariably an armed horseman, sometimes cuirassed, sometimes naked as here. The type advertises the famous Geloan cavalry, which enabled the local tyrant to take control of most of Greek Sicily—and which was surely paid with didrachms like this piece. The man-faced bull of the reverse is an artistic fantasy invented in Greece to depict the river god Achelous. It was adopted by many cities in the west to represent their own local river gods. In the case of Gela it represents the local river Gelas, which gave the city its name.

14. Himera. Ca. 483-472 BC. Silver didrachm (8.26 gm). Cock standing left, HIMERA before / Crab, seen from above, within circular incuse punch. SNG ANS 158. Attractively toned. Extremely fine $5,000 Ex Peter Guber Collection. Himera, the sole independent Greek city on the north coast of Sicily, was founded by settlers from nearby Messana in 648 BC. It began striking coins in about 520 BC with an unusual obverse type depicting a rooster. The cock’s crow, of course, announces the onset of each day and the type is probably a clever pun on the name of the city, which means “day” in Greek. Initially, the reverse was a simple square punch. By the 480s BC, this had been replaced by a crab, seen from above, closely resembling the reverse type of another Sicilian city, Acragas. Himera’s place in history largely rests on the great battle fought there in 480 BC. An army from Carthage under the general Hamilcar had encamped near Himera in preparation for a general invasion of Sicily, but the allied armies of Syracuse and Acragas launched a surprise attack that virtually wiped out the Carthaginian force. This came within days of the great Greek victory over Persia at Salamis, and both battles were seen as guaranteeing Greek freedom for more than a generation. But in 409 BC, another Carthaginian army arrived outside the walls of Himera, and this time it was the Greeks who were defeated. The general Hannibal sacrificed 2,000 men of Himera to the gods of Carthage to avenge their earlier defeat, and the city was razed to the ground, never to be rebuilt. 16

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15. Messana. Ca. 410-405 BC. Silver tetradrachm (17.04 gm). MESSAN—[A], mule biga guided left by female charioteer (the nymph Messana) holding reigns and kentron, two opposing dolphins in exergue / M—ES—S—ANI—ON (retrograde), hare leaping right over grasshopper right on bunch of grapes with leaf below. Caltabiano 512 (D205/R212). Rizzo pl. xxvi, 7 (same dies). Struck from dies of exceptional artistry and beautifully toned. Extremely fine $25,000 Ex Peter Guber Collection; Gilet Collection; Kunstfreund (Leu/Münzen und Medaillen, 28 May 1974, lot 94). Originally founded as Zankle on the north-eastern corner of Sicily in ca. 725 BC, the arrival of a large number of Greek colonists from the Peloponessian city of Messene ca. 493-488 BC led to the city’s rebirth as Messana. The new coinage of Messana bore an image of a chariot pulled by two mules on the obverse, celebrating an Olympic victory by a mule team from the city. More intriguingly, the reverse bore the energetic image of a leaping hare. In the example seen here, the hare is paired with the secondary symbol of a grasshopper. Aristotle later claimed the hare had been introduced to Sicily by Anaxilas, tyrant of both Messana and Rhegium, located on the Italian mainland directly across the straits. This seems fanciful on the face of it, but Aristotle may have been speaking metaphorically, indicating either that Anaxilas had introduced coins into Sicily bearing the image of a hare or that he established there the cult of Pan, a god popular in Messene. The hare is linked to Pan in the same way that the owl is associated with Athena. Messana continued to strike coins with the leaping hare motif until the Carthaginian invasion of 405 BC brought an abrupt end to the Golden Age of Sicilian coinage.

16. Naxos. Ca. 430 BC. Silver tetradrachm (16.50 gm). Head of bearded Dionysus right, wearing headband adorned with ivy vine / NAXION, nude silenus seated right on ground, head turned left, right hand raising cantharus to lips and left hand holding thyrsus, ivy vine growing to left. SNG Copenhagen 493 (these dies). SNG Lockett 843 (these dies). Rizzo pl. 28, 19 (these dies). Franke-Hirmer pl. 3, 8V and 9R (these dies). Cahn 103 (V66/R85). Extremely rare. Lightly toned. Good very fine $60,000 Ex Peter Guber Collection; Numismatica Ars Classica 23, 19 March 2002, lot 1103. The earliest Greek settlement in Sicily, Naxos was founded about 735 BC from Chalcis in central Greece. The colony occupied a lovely site on the east coast of Sicily, on the fertile slopes of Mt. Aetna. Its principal economic activity was viticulture and this explains its coin types devoted to the worship of Dionysus. Dionysus was not only the god of wine, however, but of wild vegetation and of religious ecstasy. His cult was associated with mountains, where he reveled with his companions, the silenoi (wild men with horses’ ears and tails) and maenads (female devotees). The divine head on the obverse is identified as Dionysus by the presence of ivy, his sacred plant. It is a work of high classical style, combining physical beauty with an element of remoteness and even danger; this was a god known for cruel vengeance against unbelievers, even as he lavished spiritual gifts on his worshippers. The reverse type illustrates that giving: the silenus is unkempt and awkward, yet his ugly face is transformed by a look of reverie as he achieves union with his god through wine. Ivy, the sacred plant of Dionysus, is present in the scene, as is the thyrsus, a scepter tipped with a pine cone and particular to Dionysus. Freeman & Sear Manhattan Sale 2

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17. Ca. 420–403 BC. Silver didrachm (8.25 gm). Signed on the obverse by the artist Procles. NAXION, laureate head of Apollo left, laurel leaf and berry behind neck, die engraver’s initial P under neck truncation / Nude Silenus seated facing on ground, head turned left, right hand raising cantharus to lips, left hand holding thyrsus, ivy vine growing to left, herm standing to right. Cahn 107 (V70/R89). Jameson 682. Rizzo pl. XXVIII, 28. A few minor die flaws, typical of this extremely rare denomination. Good extremely fine $15,000 Ex Peter Guber Collection; Oskar Kokoschka Collection (LHS Numismatik 95, 25 October 2005, lot 508); purchased from Spink in the late 1960s. This didrachm, struck toward the end of the fifth century BC, is the first coin of Naxos to portray a god other than Dionysus. The subject is Apollo Archegetes, worshipped as civic founder at Naxos as at many other Greek colonies. The letter under his neck can be understood as the abbreviated signature of the die engraver Procles, who signed his full name on another didrachm reverse die and on a tetradrachm die at the neighboring city of Catana. The reverse design is essentially that of Naxian tetradrachms, showing Dionysus’ semihuman companion communing with his god through wine. Nevertheless Procles gave the type his personal stamp by adding new details. The staff of the thyrsus is no longer a scepter but a branch, stripped of its leaves and twigs, bringing this wellknown symbol of Dionysus closer to nature. The other object in the right field is a herm, a pillar with a bearded head (and usually a phallus) that was used to mark crossroads. On his other didrachm reverse dies Procles turned the herm at an angle so that the phallus would be visible. It was this allusion to fertility that made the herm a suitable addition to a type honoring Dionysus, who included fertility among his several functions.

18. Selinus. Ca. 417–413 BC. Silver tetradrachm (17.34 gm). [S]ELINONTION, fast quadriga driven right by Nike, laurel wreath above horses, horizontal grain ear in exergue / River god Selinus, nude, standing facing, head left, holding phiale in extended right hand and filleted sapling in left, to his left a lighted altar with a cock standing left before it, to right selinon leaf above statue of bull left on basis. Schwabacher 45 (Q14/R35). Basel 411 (same obverse die). Rizzo pl. xxxiii, 11 (same obverse die). Very rare. Extremely fine $30,000 Ex Peter Guber Collection; Triton X, 9 January 2007, lot 86; Leu 42, 12 May 1987, lot 111. Beginning before the middle of the fifth century nearly all Sicilian cities portrayed the same subject on the obverse of their tetradrachms: a quadriga or four-horse racing chariot, sometimes driven by a deity rather than a human charioteer. The type expressed the extreme popularity of racing among the Sicilian elite, who competed in the Panhellenic games in Greece and celebrated their victories by commissioning odes from the poet Pindar and erecting statues of themselves at Delphi. The laurel wreath above the horses is an emblem of victory, and the charioteer is Nike, the goddess of victory. These details suggest the type may celebrate a victory in international competition (though none is recorded in our sources). Alternatively it may celebrate a military victory, perhaps the victory of Selinus over its rival Segesta in 417 BC, or the victory of Syracuse, in alliance with Selinus, over Athens in 413 BC. The reverse type depicts the local river god in anthropomorphic form, offering sacrifice to himself in his sanctuary. The objects to his right should probably be envisioned as offerings in the temple, but at the same time they are symbols of the god himself: the leaf is the leaf of a local herb called selinon, which gave its name to the river; and the bull is the alternate form of a river god. 18

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19. Syracuse. Ca. 485–480 BC. Silver tetradrachm (17.13 gm). Bearded charioteer walking slow quadriga left, above Nike flying left to crown horses / SVRA—KO—SION, diademed head of Arethusa right, wearing pearl necklace and pearl diadem, hair tucked up behind under diadem, four dolphins around outside legend. Boehringer 76 (V36/R51). Dewing 696. SNG ANS 19. Of exceptional late archaic style. Extremely fine $70,000 Ex Peter Guber Collection; Star Collection. The head of Arethusa on this early Syracusan tetradrachm is a miniature masterpiece of archaic art. It belongs to the period immediately following the arrival of Gelon, tyrant of Gela, who moved his court to Syracuse in 485, making Syracuse the leading city of Sicily. An aggressive military commander, Gelon also presided over a courtly life that involved competition in the panhellenic games (symbolized by the racing chariot on the obverse of his tetradrachms) and artistic patronage. The lyric poet Pindar, who had already written an ode honoring one of Gelon’s in-laws, moved to Sicily in 476 and continued to write poetry for local patrons, including the Syracusan tyrant. The beauty of Gelon’s early Syracusan tetradrachms reflects this same courtly culture of luxury and aesthetic refinement.

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20. Ca. 415 BC. Silver tetradrachm (17.18 gm). Signed on the reverse by the artist Sosion. Fast quadriga left with horses in parallel action, above Nike flying right to crown charioteer / S[URAKO]SIO—N, head of Arethusa left, wearing ampyx, S-shaped earring, and necklace with hanging pearls and central pendant, hair above forehead tightly crimped, hair in back rolled, four dolphins around, die engraver’s signature SWSI / WN in tiny letters on ampyx. Tudeer 2 (1/2). Gulbenkian 272 (same dies). Rizzo pl. xlii, 2 (same dies). Basel 455 (same dies). Very rare. An attractive example with an unusually clear artist’s signature. Lightly toned. Nearly extremely fine $25,000 Ex Peter Guber Collection. This tetradrachm introduces the period of signing artists at Syracuse, a twenty-year span that arguably represents the pinnacle of Greek numismatic art. The reverse die is the first of the Syracusan series to bear an artist’s signature, and the only die signed by Sosion. The subject, traditional for Syracusan tetradrachms, is the local water nymph Arethusa. According to myth her origin was in Elis, but she fled the advances of the hunter Alphaeus, traveling underwater to Syracuse, where she surfaced and transformed herself into a fountain. The fountain of Arethusa can still be seen today, a fresh water spring that bubbles up in the salt water at the edge of one of Syracuse’s two harbors. This unusual configuration explains the dolphins that surround Arethusa on Syracusan coinage.

21. Ca. 415-410 BC. Silver tetradrachm (17.33 gm). Signed on the obverse by Eu(menes?) and on the reverse by Eu(cleidas?). Charioteer driving fast quadriga left, holding kentron in right hand and reins in left, with horses in parallel action, Nike flying right above to crown charioteer, die engraver’s abbreviated signature EY under horses; below heavy exergual line, dolphin chasing fish right / ΣΥΡΑΚΟΣΙΟΝ (N retrograde), head of Arethusa left, hair rolled, wearing necklace and whorl-shaped earring, surrounded by four dolphins, signature EY under neck truncation. Tudeer 31 (11/21). SNG Lloyd 1372 (same dies). SNG ANS 262 (same dies). Lightly toned. Good very fine $7,500 Ex Peter Guber Collection. The later fifth century BC witnessed an unparalleled flowering of artistry in the coinage of Sicily. Leading the way were a cadre of skilled Syracusan die engravers who were proud enough of their creations to sign their dies in the same way non-numismatic artists and sculptors sign their works. The most famous of these, Cimon and Euainetus, produced coins in several denominations. Eumenes, their contemporary, created dies for tetradrachms of a more restrained style that evokes the cool classicism found on the friezes of the Parthenon. On the obverse of this example, the four-horse team pulling the racing chariot is shown in near-military lockstep, though the farthest horse tosses his head in excitement. The reverse head of Arethusa has a serenity and stillness quite distinct from the more vigorous compositions of Cimon and Euainetus, whose goddesses seem to be in perpetual motion.

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Remarkably, Syracuse produced its most beautiful coins at a time when the city’s very existence was under threat. In 415 BC, a task force from Athens arrived in Sicily and laid siege to Syracuse, hoping to gain a strategic base in the west and plunder to finance the ongoing war against Sparta and its allies. With help from Sparta, Syracuse sustained the siege for two years and ultimately won a smashing victory over Athens, then the most powerful Greek state in the world. Freeman & Sear Manhattan Sale 2


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22. Ca. 405–400 BC. Silver decadrachm (43.25 gm). Signed once on the obverse and twice on the reverse by Cimon. Fast quadriga left in three-quarter view, third horse with head lowered, above Nike flying right to crown charioteer, die engraver’s signature ΚΙΜΩΝ in tiny letters on upper side of exergual line, in exergue panoply of arms (shield, cuirass between greaves, and helmet) labeled ΑΘΛΑ / ΣΥΡΑΚΟΣΙΩ, head of Arethusa left, wearing pendant earring and pearl necklace, wavy hair confined by ampyx and netted sphendone, four dolphins around, die engraver’s initial K on the ampyx and full signature ΚΙΜΩΝ on dolphin below neck truncation. Jongkees 3 (A/γ). Rizzo pl. lii, 3 (same dies). Gulbenkian 303 (same dies). Antikenmuseum Basel + Sammlung Ludwig 479 (same dies). SNG Lockett 988 (same dies). A wonderful example of Cimon’s decadrachm, thrice signed by the master engraver. The early stage of a vertical die break over the eye. Extremely fine $150,000 Ex Peter Guber Collection. In the early fifth century BC Sicily was governed by tyrants. The tyrant Gelon (485–478 BC) made his city of Syracuse the greatest power of the Hellenic world. His successors developed a brilliant court life marked by luxury and the patronage of artists. Associated with Gelon by tradition was the first issue of decadrachms in Greek history. According to the historian Diodorus, the decadrachms were struck in 480/79 to celebrate the repulse of a Carthaginian invasion and the coin itself was called the Demareteion in honor of Gelon’s wife, Demerete. In the last decade of the fifth century Sicily was threatened by renewed Carthaginian invasions. An adventurer named Dionysius organized the defense of Syracuse and in 406 BC achieved supreme power in the city, which then became his base for further expansion. Not surprisingly, he sought to evoke the memory of the earlier Syracusan tyrants to legitimize his rule and lend splendor to his reputation. In imitation of Gelon and his Demareteion, Dionysius authorized an important coinage of silver decadrachms. He entrusted their creation to two artists who had signed occasional dies for the Syracuse mint since ca. 410 BC, and who had distinguished themselves as true geniuses in a period that teemed with talented signing artists. One series of decadrachms was produced by Cimon, whose most famous previous work was an issue of Syracusan tetradrachms with the facing head of the nymph Arethusa. The second series of decadrachms was produced by Euaenetus, an engraver notable for his sensuous style. Cimon’s decadrachms emphasize the luxury of Dionysius’ court by presenting the fountain nymph Arethusa as an elegant court lady, her hair elaborately dressed and confined in an ornate net. This particular die is the only die of the series that Cimon chose to sign twice. He also elaborated the traditional Syracusan quadriga type by adding a panoply of arms in the exergue, labeled as prizes for the winner of the race.

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23. Ca. 400–395 BC. Silver decadrachm (43.05 gm). Unsigned dies of Euainetus. Fast quadriga left in three-quarter view, above Nike flying right to crown charioteer, in exergue panoply of arms (shield, cuirass between greaves, and helmet) labeled ΑΘΛΑ (off flan) / SU—RA—K—O—SIWN, head of Arethusa left, wearing triple pendant earring and pearl necklace, wavy hair wreathed with grain leaves, scallop shell behind neck, four dolphins around. Gallatin R.XV/F.VIII. Rizzo pl. liv, 3 (same dies) and pl. lvi, 4 (reverse enlargement). SNG Lockett 991 (this coin). de Luynes 1247 (same dies). Dewing 916 (same dies). Certainly among the finest decadrachms of the Euainetus type. Toned. Extremely fine $150,000 Ex Peter Guber Collection; Lockett Collection (Glendining & Co., 28 October 1955, lot 95). The great series of Syracusan decadrachms at the turn of the fourth century was the work of two signing artists, Cimon and Euainetus. Cimon’s decadrachms culminated the tendency of late fifth century artists to present the nymph Arethusa as a sophisticated court lady, with elaborate hairdressing and accessories. Euainetus sought a contrast by returning to Arethusa’s original character as a nature goddess. She still wears rich jewelry, but her coiffure is uninhibited, and the crown of grain leaves in her hair marks her as a goddess of fertility. The decadrachms of Cimon and Euainetus are both impressive artistic achievements. But the version of Euainetus won greater favor in its own time, probably because the concept of a fertility goddess was widely appealing. Euainetus’ head of Arethusa was imitated during the fourth century B.C. by mints serving the Carthaginians in Sicily, by several mints in Greece, and on tetradrachms of Syracuse itself toward the end of the century. So popular was her image that it was also used in the decorative arts, especially to adorn the center of fine ceramic bowls.

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24. SICULO-PUNIC COINAGE. Carthage. Mhnt (“In the Camp”). Ca. 410-392 BC. Silver tetradrachm (17.17 gm). Forepart of bridled horse left, grain of wheat before, Nike above crowning horse, Punic legend qrthdst (”Carthage”) interrupted by two thymiateria (incense-burners) below / Palm tree with two clusters of dates, Punic legend mhnt (”the Camp”) divided by tree trunk. Jenkins SNR 53 (1974), 36 (O10/R32). McClean 3033. Very rare and one of the finest surviving examples. Extremely fine $20,000 Ex Peter Guber Collection. This handsome tetradrachm belongs to the first series of coinage issued in the name of Carthage. Although they certainly date from around the time of Carthage’s second major invasion of Sicily in 410-405 BC, the actual mint location for this series is controversial. The find spots are almost exclusively Sicilian, but G. K. Jenkins concluded that the legend naming Carthage must indicate the actual place of mintage. Leo Mildenberg, however, argued that the fabric with casting spurs, the irregular die axes, and the exclusive production of Attic-weight tetradrachms all point to an origin in Sicily. Stylistically, the coins are more Punic than Sicilian—the horse forepart referring to Carthage’s superlative cavalry, and the robust palm tree symbolizing North Africa. The answer might be that the coins were struck in Sicily from dies originally engraved in Carthage, perhaps brought over with the first wave of troops.

25. Ca. 410–392 BC. Silver tetradrachm (16.97 gm). Free horse galloping left, above Nike flying left to crown him, below Punic legend qrthdst (“Carthage”) between double exergual lines / Palm tree with two clusters of dates, Punic legend mhnt (“the Camp”) divided by tree trunk. Jenkins, SNR 53 (1974), 39 (O11/R34). Jameson 908. Extremely rare. Nicely toned. Nearly extremely fine $30,000 Ex Peter Guber Collection. The North-African metropolis of Carthage first began minting coinage in connection with a massive invasion of Sicily in 410 BC, intended to expand its foothold on the east end of the island into total control over the Greek sector. The designs of the coinage are of pure Greek style, the work of skilled Greek artists—eloquent testimony to the willingness of individual Greeks to collaborate with their enemies. The horse was a symbol of Carthage, possibly because the city’s foundation legend recorded that its site was marked by a horse’s head. The stallion’s rushing gait and his association with Nike are expressive of the Carthaginian war objectives. The reverse type, a palm tree, represents a pun (in Greek) for Phoenicia, the original homeland of the Carthaginians. The place where these handsome tetradrachms were minted remains a mystery: the obverse legend names Carthage, but the reverse legend means “the camp,” suggesting the operation of a mint at a base of the Carthaginian army in Sicily. Freeman & Sear Manhattan Sale 2

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26. Ca. 310 BC. Silver tetradrachm (16.85 gm). Head of Persephone left, wearing pearl necklace and triple-drop earring, in the style of the die-engraver Euainetus, surrounded by three dolphins / Horse head left, palm tree with two clusters of dates behind, Punic letter M below. Jenkins SNR 56 (1977), 230 (this coin illustrated). A piece of exceptional style, with a magnificent horse head. Beautifully toned. Extremely fine $7,500 Ex Peter Guber Collection; LHS Numismatik 95, 25 October 2005, lot 542; Palermo Hoard of 1958 (ICGH 2208). The century-long struggle between Carthage and Syracuse for dominance in Sicily (ca. 410-307 BC) was an affair that caused untold bloodshed and destruction. Curiously, it also produced some strikingly beautiful coins, including the silver tetradrachm depicted here. By the mid-fourth century BC, Carthage had secured several strongholds in coastal Sicily, including Motya and Panormus, and held varying degrees of control over the inland regions. Inevitably, displaced Greek artisans came to be employed by the Carthaginians, including die engravers from cities such as Himera and Messana which had either been destroyed or evacuated during the fighting. The coins they produced for their new masters bore both Greek and Punic designs. The obverse of this example is clearly patterned on the beautiful silver Syracusan decadrachms of Euainetus, while the reverse, with its vigorous horse head, palm tree and single Phoenician letter, is entirely Punic in character. The multinational coinage was used primarily to pay the similarly polyglot Carthaginian army, composed of mercenaries from all over the Classical world.

27. B’rst (“In the Territories”). Time of the First Punic War, ca. 264–260 BC. Silver decadrachm or 5 shekels (37.61 gm). Head of Tanit left, wreathed with grain ears, wearing single-drop pendant earring / Pegasus flying right, Punic legend b’rst (“the territories”) below. Jenkins, SNR 57 (1978), 440 (02”/R9) (this specimen cited). Jenkins & Lewis pl. 27, 2 (same dies). de Luynes 3758 (same dies). Very rare. Attractively toned. Nearly extremely fine $25,000 Ex Peter Guber Collection; Künker 94, 27 September 2004, lot 483; Kölner Münzkabinett 45, 1987, lot 224; Kricheldorf 11, Stuttgart, 1962, lot 64. Carthage, a Phoenician colony on the coast of North Africa, became a maritime powerhouse in the fifth century BC and challenged the Greek cities of Sicily and southern Italy for control of the western Mediterranean. By the early third century, much of Sicily had fallen under Carthaginian control and mints were established on the island to produce coins used to pay the largely mercenary army. The stage was now set for the collision with Rome, newly dominant in Italy. Starting in 264 BC, Carthage and Rome fought three titanic wars that produced more death and destruction than any other conflict before the 20th century. This large silver five-shekel piece, similar in size and weight to the Greek decadrachm, was struck early in the First Punic War against Rome. A powerful head of the Phoenician goddess Tanit adorns the obverse, while the winged steed Pegasus appears on the reverse. The Phoenician script reads “B’rst,” translated as “in the territories,” apparently meaning Sicily. The Carthaginian stronghold of Panormus on the north coast of Sicily is the likely mint site for this rare and impressive piece. 24

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28. THRACO-MACEDON. The Derrones. Ca. 475–450 BC. Silver dodecadrachm (40.40 gm). Male driver seated in ox cart left, holding goad in raised right hand and reins in left, crested Corinthian helmet left above / Triskeles of human legs, palmettes between legs. Svoronos pl. ii, 4 (same dies). AMNG III/2, pl. xxv, 18 (same dies). Rare. Reverse weakly struck as typical for this series. Very fine $6,000 Ex Peter Guber Collection. The Derrones were one of several Thraco-Macedonian tribes that produced coinage during the archaic period. Most such tribes struck exceptionally large and heavy denominations, and those of the Derrones were the largest of all. The figure in the ox cart is probably the tribal king making a ceremonial tour of the towns of his kingdom. The helmet above the oxen symbolizes one of his aspects, his relationship to the god of war. On the reverse is a figure, composed of three human legs, called a triskeles. It was an ancient solar symbol, also appearing on coinage from southern Asia Minor; here, palmettes between the legs allude to the fertility of the earth blessed by the sun. The very weak strike of the reverse is utterly typical of Derronian coinage. Unusual force was required to strike a coin of this size, and the tribe did not possess the necessary engineering skills to develop a machine for the purpose. The sophisticated cities of Athens and Syracuse both successfully produced silver denominations of this size at about this time, apparently with the aid of some type of mechanical device.

29. PAEONIAN KINGS. Audoleon (315-286 BC). Silver tetradrachm (12.63 gm). Head of Athena in triple-crested Attic helmet facing slightly right, wearing necklace, curl of hair at each side of neck / AYΔΩΛE•—N—T•Σ, free horse trotting right, I before raised foreleg, AY in monogram below belly. BMC 5 var. (no I mentioned). SNG ANS —. AMNG 3 —. An extraordinary example and certainly among the finest known. Good extremely fine $5,000 Paeonia was located directly north of Macedonia and in the mid-fourth century BC its inhabitants were regularly launching raids into the territories of their more Hellenized southern neighbors. Early in his reign, Philip II of Macedon launched a campaign into Paeonian territory, reducing the region to a subordinate semi-autonomous status and initiating the process of Hellenization. By the point the present specimen was struck, Greek artistic trends had permeated deeply into Paeonia’s numismatic output. The delicate facing Athena head is a marvel of early Hellenistic art, the slight tilt of the head a nuance demonstrative of a very skilled celator.

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30. MACEDONIA. Neapolis. Ca. 500–480 BC. Silver stater (9.75 gm). Gorgon’s head facing, hair combed forward and terminating in ringlets, tongue protruding between long fangs / Rough quadripartite incuse square. Svoronos pl. 9, 32. ACGC 524. SNG ANS 405. Babelon, pl. 55. Rare. Extraordinary metal quality. Attractively toned. Extremely fine $7,500 Ex Peter Guber Collection. Neapolis was a colony of Thasos on the Thracian coast near the mineral-rich district of Mount Pangaion. The purpose of this foundation was to protect Thasian mining interests in the region. Not surprisingly, the design on the coinage of Neapolis also performs a protective function. The obverse device is the head of the gorgon Medusa, whose face was so hideous that anyone who looked directly at it would be turned to stone. In myth, the hero Perseus overcame this magic with the aid of Athena, who gave him a mirror and advised him to use it to see Medusa indirectly. Even after Perseus beheaded the gorgon, Medusa’s visage retained the power to petrify those who made the mistake of looking upon it. Thus her image on the coins of Neapolis was intended to ward off all intruders. The rather lumpy appearance of this stater is typical of the earliest coinage, as is the simple reverse. The recessed or incuse pattern on the reverse was caused by a special punch used to force the annealed metal of the flan into the obverse die. The use of a second die for the reverse, with its own artistic design, was a later development.

31. Sermylia. Ca. 480–475 BC. Silver tetradrachm (16.70 gm). ΣΥΡΜΥΛΙΑΟ−Ν, bare-headed warrior on horseback right, brandishing spear above head, pellet behind / Quadripartite incuse with raised mound in each quarter, five pellets at center. Traité I 1667, pl. liii, 2 (same obverse die). AMNG III/2, p. 107, 2, pl. xxi, 4 (same obverse die). Cf. Price pl. v, 24 (pellet lacking). Extremely rare. Lightly porous surfaces. Nearly extremely fine $12,500 Ex Peter Guber Collection; Freeman & Sear Fixed Price List 10, Spring 2005, 25. Sermylia was one of many Greek colonies founded on the Chalcidian peninsula, which extends southeast from Macedonia. Sermylia produced coinage only for a few decades in the early fifth century BC, when the entire Thraco-Macedonian region was awash in silver retrieved from the rich northern mines. Sermylia’s obverse type is a horseman at the gallop, about to hurl his spear. This subject, like the very production of coinage, was an expression of wealth: only a prosperous man could afford to maintain a horse. The typeless reverse, marked only with a quadripartite punch, is entirely characteristic of northern Greek coinage of the archaic period.

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32. MACEDONIAN KINGDOM. Alexander III, the Great (336–323 BC). Silver tetradrachm (17.23 gm). Memphis, under Ptolemy I as satrap, ca. 323 BC. Head of young Heracles right in lion skin headdress, paws tied at neck / ALEXANDROU, Zeus enthroned left, holding eagle and lotus scepter, rose in left field, moneyer’s signature DI—O under throne. Price 1371. Toned. Extremely fine $7,500 Ex Peter Guber Collection; Star Collection. Alexander tetradrachms marked with a rose symbol and the letters DIO have long been admired as the most aesthetically pleasing issue of his coinage. They were struck in Egypt, probably not long after Alexander’s death on 10 June 323 BC. After this traumatic event, Alexander’s generals divided his empire among themselves, taking provinces which they proposed to manage as satraps (governors) for Alexander’s successor, his feeble-minded half-brother Philip Arrhidaeus. Egypt fell to Ptolemy, who immediately saw the potential for establishing an independent kingdom. He removed Cleomenes, the caretaker Alexander had left in place in Egypt, and appropriated the 8,000 talents Cleomenes had accumulated in his treasury. A part of this treasure was turned into new coin, like the present piece, and used to build an army and a navy. During his brief time in Egypt, Alexander had founded the city of Alexandria and had instructed Cleomenes to supervise its construction. Some authorities believe that the first mint of Hellenistic Egypt was located in the new city. However Ptolemy himself set up his court at Memphis, one of Egypt’s old royal cities, and did not move it to Alexandria until ca. 312 BC. The mint too was almost certainly located originally at Memphis and moved to Alexandria at the same time as the court.

33. Philip V (221–179 BC). Silver didrachm (8.32 gm). Pella or Amphipolis mint; Zoilos, mintmaster. Struck ca. 184-179 BC. Diademed head of Philip V right / ΒΑΣΙΛΕΩΣ ΦΙΛΙΠΠΟΥ, horizontal club, mintmaster’s monogram above, two control marks below (ME and BE monograms); all within oak wreath, star to left. Mamroth, Philip 24. SNG Alpha Bank 1053 (same obverse die). McClean 3630. A piece of remarkable artistry and presence. Deeply struck in good metal. Extremely fine $5,000 Ex Peter Guber Collection. Philip V was the most ambitious and opportunistic king of Macedon since Alexander the Great more than a century before. Soon after gaining the throne in 221 BC, Philip began strengthening Macedon’s army and seeking ways to increase his dominance over Greece and the Balkans. Around 215 BC, he observed Hannibal’s early successes against Rome and made a treaty of alliance with Carthage, hoping to seize control of the Roman-protected region of Illyricum. The Romans, who had considered Macedon neutral, viewed this as a stab in the back. But they had their hands full with Hannibal and, for more than a decade, could do little more than check some of Philip’s more aggressive moves. In 200 BC, with Carthage defeated, the Romans moved decisively against Philip under the general T. Quinctius Flamininus. After two years of maneuvering, the Roman legions shattered Macedon’s phalanx at the Battle of Cynoscephalae in 197 BC. Forced to sign a humiliating peace treaty, Philip became a Roman ally and managed to recoup some of his lost territory and prestige over the next decade. Relations with Rome deteriorated throughout the 180s BC and Philip was making plans for another war when he died in 179 BC, leaving his son Perseus the dubious distinction of pursuing the course set by his father and presiding over its disastrous consequences. Freeman & Sear Manhattan Sale 2 27


34. THRACE. Abdera. Ca. 500-480 BC. Silver octadrachm (29.97 gm). Griffin seated left, right foreleg raised, M before / Shallow incuse square divided in quarters (quadripartite). ANMG II 7. May, Abdera 36. An impressive piece, deeply struck in good metal and lightly toned. Extremely fine $12,500 Ex Peter Guber Collection. Abdera, a coastal city in Thrace situated near the mouth of the river Nestos, was supposedly founded by Heracles in mythical times and named for his fallen friend Abderus. Historically, it was founded by settlers from the Ionian city of Clazomenae in the midseventh century BC. In 544 BC, about 100 years after its initial founding, a second group of settlers from Teos in Ionia migrated to Abdera to escape the Persian yoke, more than doubling the city’s population. The civic symbol of Teos, a seated griffin, likewise became the symbol of Abdera and was featured prominently on its coinage, which commenced circa 530 BC. Like several other cities in Thrace and Macedon, Abdera had considerable resources in silver and produced coins of exceptional size and weight, including a silver octadrachm (8-drachm piece) of just under 30 grams and its various fractions. As a prime trading port for the interior of Thrace, Abdera grew quite wealthy and its coins circulated widely through the Greek and Persian worlds. In 513 BC Abdera came under Persian control along with the rest of Thrace, but after the Greek victories of 480-478 BC Abdera broke free of Persia and joined the Delian League headed by Athens. Abdera remained a loyal ally of Athens during the long Peloponnesian War but fell into decline in the fourth century BC, when it was repeatedly sacked during the ascendancy of the Macedonian Kingdom under Philip II and Alexander the Great, and the Wars of Succession that followed Alexander’s death.

35. “The Thracians.” Ca. 88 BC. Silver tetradrachm (16.63 gm), imitating types of Thasos. Head of young Dionysus right, wearing mitre and wreathed with ivy / ΗΡΑΚΛΕΟΥΣ ΣΩΤΗΡΟΣ ΘΡΑΚΩΝ, young Heracles standing left, resting hand on grounded club, lion skin wrapped around left arm, TA monogram in inner left field. Youroukova 146. Cf. AMNG II, p. 1, 1 (M in inner left field). Very rare. Toned. Nearly extremely fine $2,500 Ex Peter Guber Collection; Freeman & Sear Fixed Price List 10, Spring 2005, 34; Leu 79, 31 October 2000, lot 105; UBS 6, 12 September 2004, lot 4248.

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The Pontic king Mithradates VI the Great (120–63 BC) spent his reign trying to drive Rome from the Greek East and seeking to restore the principle of kingship as the basis of legitimate government. His campaigns in Thrace provoked massive issues of coinage, some issued by the island city of Thasos itself but the majority of it crudely imitating the types of Thasos. This particular specimen exemplifies a rare class of imitations naming the Thracians (ΘΡΑΚΩΝ), rather than the citizens of Thasos (ΘΑSIΩΝ), in the reverse legend. The two gods portrayed on the coin are the patron gods of Thasos, but they were inspirational to all Thracians in the context of the Mithradatic Wars. Dionysus appears on the obverse in his youthful aspect, crowned with ivy; he serves as a tacit allusion to Mithradates, who identified himself with Dionysus and even assumed the god’s name as an epithet. The reverse legend names Heracles Soter (the Savior), signifying his power to ward off evils and protect his worshippers from danger. This type too seems to allude to Mithradates’ messianic vision of himself as savior of the Greek world from Rome. Freeman & Sear Manhattan Sale 2


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36. THRACIAN KINGDOM. Lysimachus (323-281 BC). Silver tetradrachm (17.23 gm). Pergamum, ca. 287/6-282. Diademed head of deified Alexander right, with horn of Ammon, K below neck / ΒΑΣΙΛΕΩΣ ΛΥΣΙΜΑΧoΥ, helmeted Athena seated left, holding Victory in right hand and resting left arm on shield decorated with gorgoneion, spear leaned against seat, cult image in inner left field, N in outer left field, crescent in exergue. Thompson 225. Meydancikkale 2679. Müller 286 (symbol). A superb example struck from dies engravd with copious detail. Tiny edge nick (9:00 reverse). Extremely fine $4,000

37. ISLANDS OFF THRACE. Thasos. Ca. 400-340 BC. Silver tetradrachm (14.95 gm). Head of bearded Dionysus left, crowned with ivy / ΘΑΣΙΟ[Ν], Heracles kneeling right, drawing bow, chelys (tortoise-shell lyre) right, all within frame in incuse square. Le Rider 23 (same obverse die). SNG Copenhagen 1022. BMFA 863. A bold piece, with a powerful head of Dionysus. Attractive dark toning. Extremely fine $20,000 Ex Peter Guber Collection; Numismatica Ars Classica 10, 9 April 1997, lot 213; Pixodarus hoard. The island of Thasos possessed fabulous mineral wealth, with productive silver mines on the island itself and both gold and silver lodes in its territories in mainland Thrace. In the center of this mining district stood Mt. Pangaeus, home to a major sanctuary of the god Dionysus. Though he is best known today as the god of wine, he was also the god of wild mountains and religious ecstasy. He appears on Thasian tetradrachms of the fourth century BC in his mature form, bearded and crowned with ivy. On the reverse is the second of Thasos’ patron gods, Heracles, shown kneeling and drawing a bow, with the skin of the Nemean lion draped over his head. Archaeologists found an identical figure decorating the entrance to the Thasian city gates, where it served to protect those within.

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38. THESSALY. Cierium. Ca. 350 BC. Silver stater (11.88 gm). Laureate head of Zeus right / [KIEPIEIΩN], Asclepius seated left on rock, holding staff in left hand, before him tree with snake twined around trunk. Traité IV 508, pl. 289, 21 (same dies). The other two extant examples are: Hess-Leu 45, 12–13 May 1970, lot 161 and CNG 57, 4 April 2001, lot 282, both from the same dies as this specimen. Cf. Traité IV 507, pl. 289 (Asclepius seated left on throne). The finest of four known examples of this type. The reverse struck from a worn die, otherwise extremely fine $30,000 Ex Peter Guber Collection. Located in the center of the southern plain of Thessaly, Cierium was home to a venerable sanctuary of Poseidon, and an ancient temple of Athena Itonia also lay in the neighborhood. As often happens, the coinage of Cierium attests to additional cults not mentioned by ancient authors in connection with the city. Its staters feature a head of Zeus strongly influenced by the tetradrachms of Philip II of Macedon, reflecting the dominant role played by Philip in the mid-fourth century as leader of the Thessalian Confederacy and victor in the Third Sacred War. The reverse depicts the healing god Asclepius, whose cult apparently originated in Thessaly, at Tricca, and spread from there to become one of the most influential of the Hellenistic world. This charming design has a narrative aspect and must surely allude to a myth, perhaps one explaining how the god formed his association with a snake. Asclepius was usually portrayed as a mature, bearded man, but a famous statue at Sicyon, by the sculptor Calamis, showed him young and beardless, as here.

39. BOEOTIA. Tanagra. Ca. 400–350 BC. Silver stater (12.23 gm). Boeotian shield / Forepart of galloping horse right, garlanded with laurel, T—A in upper fields. BMC 29, pl. x, 4. Traité III 334. SNG Delepierre 1339. Extremely rare and seldom offered. Extremely fine $20,000 Ex Peter Guber Collection. The cities of Boeotia were organized as a confederacy, and generally employed a federal coinage produced at Thebes. Tanagra was one of several cities that from time to time minted coinage in its own name. Like all Boeotian cities, it adopted the Boeotian shield as its obverse type. Its reverses typically show the forepart of a galloping horse which may have some connection to the cult of two local heroes, Leucippus (White Horse) and Ephippus (Horseman). On the present coin the horse wears a laurel wreath around its neck. This is not a regular feature of the type, appearing only on staters of the first half of the fourth century BC. Since the laurel wreath was an emblem of victory, the type may celebrate the victory of a Tanagran horse in a racing event at one of the panhellenic games. 30

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40. Thebes. Ca. 425–395 BC. Silver stater (12.01 gm). Beotian shield / QE, infant Heracles seated facing on ground, head right, holding snake in each hand, bow in upper left field. SNG Lockett 1748 (this coin). Traité III 264. Among the finest known examples of this very rare type and boasting an impressive pedigree. Toned. Very fine $15,000 Ex Peter Guber Collection; BCD Collection (Triton IX, 10 January 2006, lot 456); Olga H. Knoepke Collection (Glendining/ Baldwin, 10 December 1986, lot 197); Richard Cyril Lockett Collection (Glendining, 27 May 1959, lot 1594); Clarence S. Bement Collection (Naville-Ars Classica VI, 28 January 1923, lot 1044); Merzbacher, 15 November 1910, lot 466; Frank Sherman Benson Collection (Sotheby, Wilkinson & Hodge, 3 February 1909, lot 516); Hyman Montagu Collection (Sotheby, Wilkinson & Hodge, 23 March 1896, lot 370). The Boeotian shield was the emblem of the Boeotian people and appeared on the obverse of coins issued by their confederacy, as well as coins issued by the individual cities of Boeotia. The reverse illustrates a myth of Heracles, who was specially connected with Thebes. He was conceived there when Zeus made love to the mortal Alcmene. Zeus’s wife Hera, intensely jealous of her husband’s mortal loves, sent two snakes to attack the baby Heracles in his cradle. In a preview of his superhuman strength, he strangled both snakes with his bare hands. The depiction of the Herakliskos (little Heracles) was especially favored on alliance coinages as a promise of victory, but in this case the significance seems to be entirely local.

41. Thespiae. Ca. 400–350 BC. Silver stater (11.98 gm). Boeotian shield / ΘΕΣΠ−ΙΚΩΝ, head of Aphrodite Melainis right, two crescents in field. BMC Boeotia, p. 91, 9, pl. xvi, 8 (same dies). Boston Supplement 94 (same reverse die). Extremely rare. Toned. Extremely fine and among the finest examples known $35,000 Ex Peter Guber Collection. Thespiae was located near the base of Mt. Helicon, home of the Muses, and sponsored a festival with games in their honor. It was a rival to Thebes, the dominant city of Boeotia, and occasionally struck coinage in its own name. Like all Boeotian cities, Thespiae used the Boeotian shield as its obverse type. The reverse portrays Aphrodite Melainis (Aphrodite “the Black”), a local form in which she was worshipped as a moon goddess. Thespiae played an important role in the Greco-Persian wars. Unlike other cities in Boeotia, including Thebes, Thespiae refused to submit to the Persians in 480 BC and sent a contingent of soldiers to hold the pass at Thermopylae, working together with “The 300” led by Spartan king Leonidas. The Persian king Xerxes I responded by burning Thespiae to the ground, but the inhabitants still kept up the fight and supplied 1,800 men to the victorious Greek force at Plataea. Although citizens of Thespiae were called Thespians, the common term for actor derives not from this city but from Thespis, the legendary first actor. Freeman & Sear Manhattan Sale 2

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42. Federal Coinage. Ca. 288–244 BC. Silver tetradrachm (16.69 gm). Laureate head of Zeus right / ΒΟΙ−ΩΤΩΝ, Poseidon seated left, holding dolphin and trident, Boeotian shield decorating throne. Jameson 2065 (same reverse die). BMC Boeotia, p. 38, 63 variant (different division of legend). Extremely rare and seldom offered. Exceptional portrait of Poseidon in high relief. Good very fine $47,500 Ex Peter Guber Collection; Triton VIII, 11 January 2005, lot 298. This tetradrachm, entirely exceptional in the context of Boeotian coinage, emerged from a particular historical situation. The Macedonian king Demetrius Poliorcetes was driven from his kingdom in 288 BC and sought refuge in Greece. In order to bolster his support there, he made a grant of autonomy to Thebes, the principal city of Boeotia. The city responded by striking coinage in the name of the Boeotians, but with types designed to flatter Demetrius. The reverse shows the king’s divine patron, the sea god Poseidon, seated on a throne adorned with a Boeotian shield, the emblem of the Boeotian confederacy. The head on the obverse again arguably represents Poseidon, although it has also been identified as Zeus. Coins such as this may well have been offered as a contribution to Demetrius’ coffers as a gesture of thanks for his benefaction. Today they are exceedingly rare, numbering around half a dozen specimens.

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43. EUBOIA. Eretria. Ca. 180 BC. Silver tetradrachm (16.64 gm). Draped bust of Artemis right, hair tied in knot, bow and quiver at shoulder / ΕΡΕΤΡΙΕΩΝ, cow standing right, horns decorated with fillets, pellet below belly, ΕΠΙΤΕΛΗΣ in exergue, all within laurel wreath. SNG Lockett 1794 (same obverse die) / 1624 (same magistrate). N. Waggoner, “Coins of the W. P. Wallace Collection,” Museum Notes 25 (1980), p. 9. Extremely rare, only one other tetradrachm recorded for this magistrate. Wellstruck on a broad flan. Good extremely fine, with areas of iridescent toning $20,000 Ex Peter Guber Collection; BCD Collection (Lanz 111, 25 November 2002, lot 343). Eretria rarely minted large and showy coins like this tetradrachm. Its purpose was probably to help finance local construction projects, which were especially needed at this time because the city had been sacked a few decades earlier by the Roman general T. Quinctius Flamininus. Depicted on the obverse is the goddess Artemis, twin sister of Apollo. She was often portrayed as a huntress, hence the bow and quiver over her shoulder. This conception reflected her ancient origin as the goddess of wild animals and untamed nature. The cow on the reverse is marked as a sacrificial animal by the fillets (strands of twisted wool) that hang on either side of her head.

44. ATTICA. Athens. Ca. 500–490/482 BC. Silver tetradrachm (17.11 gm). Head of Athena right, with hair in spirals around face, wearing round earring and crested Attic helmet ornamented with small spiral at base of bowl / ΑΘΕ, owl standing three-quarters right, head facing, olive sprig behind, all in incuse square. Seltman Group M, 366 (same obverse die). Kraay, “The Archaic Owls of Athens,” NC 1956, pl. xiii, 1. Asyut Group IVa, 268–271; for obverse style, see also Group IVe, 321–326 (but note different arrangement of olive leaves). Very rare. Toned and without the usual flan defects which affect the archaic Athenian issues. Good very fine $15,000 Ex Peter Guber Collection; Freeman & Sear Fixed Price List 11, Spring/Summer 2006, 38; Numismatica Ars Classica 13, 8 October 1998, lot 574; Antikenmuseum Basel; Ludwig Collection. The Athenian “owl” silver tetradrachm is unquestionably one of the most influential coins of all time. During the fifth century BC, when Athens emerged as the greatest of all Greek cities, owls were the most widely used international coin and helped to spread Greek culture throughout the Mediterranean world. The heyday of Athens, between 510 and 400 BC, witnessed the birth of democracy, the defeat of two Persian invasions, the building of the Parthenon, the emergence of Classical art and sculpture, and the origins of Western literature. Seldom if ever has one city contributed so much to human progress. The basic design of the coin remained unchanged, with Athena on the obverse and her owl on the reverse, for nearly 500 years. On this early example, the helmeted profile of Athena, patron goddess of Athens, is heavily archaic in style, with its frontal eye, exaggerated nose and tight “archaic smile.” Although more fluid and realistic renditions of the human form were beginning to appear, Athens would retain archaic artistic conventions on its coinage for a century, perhaps reflecting the desire for a stable, reliable, unchanging currency. Freeman & Sear Manhattan Sale 2

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45. Ca. 475–465 BC. Silver decadrachm (43.36 gm). Head of Athena right, wearing round earring and crested Attic helmet ornamented with spiral palmette on bowl and three olive leaves above visor / A—Q—E, owl with spread wings standing facing, olive sprig to upper left, all in incuse square. Wolfgang Fischer-Bossert, The Athenian Decadrachm, O13 (same die but altered)/R—. Wolfgang Fischer-Bossert, “More Athenian Decadrachms,” SNR 88 (2009), 20a (same obverse die). Extremely rare: Apparently only the second specimen known from this obverse die state and paired with a previously unpublished reverse die. Extremely fine Estimate on Request Ex Peter Guber Collection. Prior to 1984, the allure of the Athens decadrachm lay in the very small number of extant specimens and in the impression that the exceptional denomination must represent a special issue commemorating some important event. The specimens that have appeared since the 1980s have increased the total number of obverse dies known and have revealed some slight stylistic development. These factors point to a rather substantial output of decadrachms that may not be consistent with the idea of a special commemorative issue. Instead it may be more appropriate to regard the decadrachms as an expression of the great wealth and power of imperial Athens in the 470s and 460s BC, when the city led the Delian League against Persia, culminating in a great victory at the Eurymedon (ca. 467). Viewed in this way, the Athenian decadrachms invite comparison with other sustained issues of decadrachms which evoke the courtly luxury of Syracuse under the tyranny of Dionysius I, and even those commemorating the Ptolemaic queen Arsinoe Philadelphus, which also emanated from an extravagant court. These comparisons remind us that Cimon, commander of the Delian League, was a wealthy noble and leader of the aristocratic faction at Athens. Apparently he created a cultural milieu at Athens somewhat reminiscent of a court, with lavish entertainments, euergetic donations, and a high value coinage suitable for personal presentation or splashy donatives. Such displays undoubtedly exacerbated the hostility of the democratic faction and helped inspire Cimon’s trial on bribery charges in 463.

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46. Ca. 460-455 BC. Silver drachm (4.28 gm). Head of Athena right in crested Attic helmet decorated with three olive leaves above visor and spiral palmette on bowl / ΑΘΕ, owl standing right, head facing, olive sprig behind, all within incuse square. Starr Group IV, 153 variant. An exceptional example of this rare denomination. Gray toning with light golden tones. Good very fine/ nearly extremely fine $5,000 Ex Peter Guber Collection; Leu Numismatics 91, 10-11 May 2004, lot 140. In the Athenian currency system, widely used throughout Greece, a single silver drachm contained about 4.5 grams of silver. A skilled artisan or a soldier in peacetime could expect to be paid one drachm per day; in wartime, a soldier received two drachms per day. Curiously, although Athenian tetradrachms (four-drachm pieces) have been found in considerable numbers in recent times, the same cannot be said for the single-drachm denomination. This disparity is especially pronounced for the so-called “transitional” issues of ca. 475-454 BC, when the relative crudeness of the earliest Athenian “owl” types gave way to a more naturalistic, although still archaic, artistic style. Transitional “owl” issues are the most appealing issues in the Athenian series, particularly in their realistic depiction of Athena’s companion, the owl. The owl seen above fixes the viewer with its alert gaze and seems to have been caught in mid-stride, leaning slightly forward, its tailfeathers splayed out, perhaps preparing to take flight.

47. AEGINA. Ca. 480–450 BC. Silver stater (12.29 gm). Sea turtle / “Skew” incuse. SNG Delepierre 1759. Franke-Hirmer 336. A bit of die rust and light encrustation on reverse. Extremely fine $12,500 Ex Peter Guber Collection. The island of Aegina was the first state of European Greece to issue coinage. Its staters, issued in abundance, were popularly known as “turtles.” They became a vehicle of international trade, circulating as far west as Sicily, as far south as Egypt, and as far east as Syria and even Persia. In some of these places coins were regarded simply as bullion and chopped up at will, but elsewhere the turtle coin type was recognized as a guarantee of the weight and metal quality of the coin. It was perhaps this aspect that caused the Aeginetans to take a conservative attitude toward their coinage, scarcely changing even the details of the turtle over a century. The main evolution occurred on the reverse, where deep punches in varying patterns eventually gave way to the five-part incuse pattern seen here.

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48. CORINTHIA. Corinth. Ca. 475 BC. Silver stater (8.60 gm). Pegasus flying left, koppa below / Head of Athena right, hair in long queue, wearing Corinthian helmet pushed back on head and pearl necklace, within incuse square. Ravel 188 (O110/R144). Rare early version of the soon-to-be ubiquitous Corinthian “colt.” Good very fine/extremely fine $8,500 Ex Peter Guber Collection; Numismatica Ars Classica 5, 25 February 1992, lot 132. One of the earliest and most important Greek city-states, Corinth occupied a strategic site overlooking the Isthmus of Corinth, which commanded the only road linking mainland Greece to the Peloponnese. With ports on both the Aegean and Ionian seas, Corinth swiftly grew into a powerhouse of international trade and founded colonies throughout Magna Graecia. Her industrious merchants produced everything from roof tiles to war galleys. Facilitating this trade was the Corinthian currency system, based on a silver stater of about 8.5 grams. The obverse always bore an image of Pegasus, the mythical flying horse, who was caught by the hero Bellerophon while drinking from the spring of Peirene at Corinth. On this early Corinthian stater, Pegasus has an archaic curled wing and the reverse head of Athena is surrounded by an incuse square. The koppa below Pegasus on the obverse is an early Greek letter which had the same sound as kappa (K), but that replaced the K when it fell before the vowel omicron (O). Koppa eventually fell out of use and was replaced by kappa, but it was still used to identify coins struck in Corinth. On this and future staters, Athena wears a Corinthian helmet, the most popular type employed by the Greeks, which completely encloses the wearer’s head and face, leaving only small almond-shaped eye holes and a narrow opening to allow breathing. When not in battle, soldiers generally pushed the Corinthian helmet back on the head, which is how Athena is wearing it here. Struck by Corinth and its many colonies, Corinthian “colts” rivaled the “owls” of Athens in commercial importance and circulated throughout the Mediterranean.

49. ARCADIAN LEAGUE. Megalopolis. 363-362 BC. Silver stater (12.11 gm). Laureate head of Zeus Lykaios left / Youthful Pan, nude, seated left on rock, head turned to side, grasping lagobolon; syrinx and, in small letters, OLUM at the foot of the rock; APK monogram in left field. Gerin 11, dies 1/c (this coin). Traité III 866, pl. CCXXIV, 2 (same dies). Extremely rare and of exemplary style. Attractively toned. Good very fine $25,000 Ex Peter Guber Collection; BCD Collection (LHS Numismatics 96, 8-9 May 2006, lot 1511); Tripolis Hoard of the 1950s. Arcadia was a mountainous region in the central Peloponnese. It was generally remote from the great affairs of Greece, though it did supply manpower to Sparta. In the fourth century BC, the Theban statesman Epaminondas organized a new Arcadian Confederacy as a counterweight to Sparta and founded the city of Megalopolis to serve as the federal capital. Forty Arcadian villages were abandoned when their inhabitants left to become citizens of Megalopolis. The staters struck at Megalopolis for the Arcadian League feature on their obverse a laureate head of one of the patron gods of Arcadia, the Zeus of Mt. Lykaion. The pastoral god Pan was also worshipped in Arcadia from time immemorial. All mountaintops were sacred to him, as well as grottos and oracles. The particular image on the reverse of the Arcadian staters reproduces the cult statue of Pan in the temple of Zeus Lykaios at Megalopolis, as described by the Greek writer Pausanias. The god, his head adorned with goat horns, sits atop Mt. Lykaion, holding the lagobolon (a stick for throwing at rabbits). At his feet is the syrinx, a reed pipe suitable for country music. The inscription on the rock—only partially legible on this specimen—has caused some confusion. It appears to name Mt. Olympus, a name sometimes applied by the Arcadians to their own Mt. Lykaion. According to another hypothesis, the inscription refers to the 104th Olympiad, celebrated in 364 BC. It has also been interpreted as an artist’s signature. 36

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Lot 49

50. LOCRIS. Opus. Ca. 369 BC. Silver stater (12.11 gm). Head of Persephone right, wreathed with grain leaves, wearing pearl necklace and elaborate “boat” earring with crescent and five pendants / ΟΠΟΝΤIΩΝ, Ajax the Lesser advancing right on “heroic diagonal,” holding short sword and round shield with griffin device on interior, transverse spear behind hero’s legs. SNG Berry 570 (same dies). Gulbenkian 495–496 (same obverse die). SNG Lockett 1693 (same obverse die). Of remarkable beauty. Lovely light iridescent tone. Good very fine $7,500 Ex Peter Guber Collection; Freeman & Sear Fixed Price List 9, Spring 2004, 29; Vicomte Wimbourne Collection (Sotheby’s, 4 April 1991, lot 52); Leu 28, 5 May 1981, lot 102. Ajax the Lesser, depicted on the reverse of this attractive type, hailed from Opus in Locris and led a flotilla of forty ships during the Trojan War. Upon Troy’s fall, he was alleged by Odysseus to have violated a sanctuary of Athena by ravishing Cassandra, who had sought refuge there. He thus brought down the wrath of Athena upon himself and his countrymen. Ajax himself perished on the return voyage, and the rest of the Opuntians reached home only with great difficulty. Nevertheless, they annually honored their former leader by launching a ship fitted with black sails and laden with gifts, which they then set alight. Locrian staters with this particularly beautiful depiction of Persephone are normally placed near the end of the Locrian series, ca. 345–338. Yet the stylistically similar version on the coinage of Pheneus is usually dated soon after the Spartan defeat at Leuctra (371 BC). This exceptional head, with its right-facing orientation and elaborate earring, may in fact be the inaugural type of the Locrian series.

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51. PELOPONNESUS. PHLIASIA. Phlius. Ca. 400-375 BC. Silver drachm (5.80 gm). Bull butting left on dotted ground line, ΦΛΕΙΑ (retrograde) in exergue / Four-spoked wheel in incuse square, Σ−Ι−Ω−Ν (the last retrograde) in corners. BMC 6 (same dies). Very rare. Boldly struck and lightly toned. Good very fine $3,500 Ex Peter Guber Collection; Metropolitan Museum (Part II, Sotheby’s, Zurich, 4 April 1973, lot 433); John Ward Collection 524. Phlius was located in the northwestern Argolid, in the Peloponnese. Although geographically close to Argos, the city became a Spartan ally and a member of the Peloponnesian League. Like many other cities of ancient Greece, Phlius fell into civil strife between a democratic and an oligarchic faction during the fourth century BC. The democratic faction initially gained control and exiled its opponents, but in 380 BC a Spartan army under Agesilaus laid siege to the city for some twenty months, eventually forcing the Phliasians to capitulate and accept oligarchic government. The symbols found on the rare coins of Phlius reflect its devotion to Zeus (referred to by the sacrificial bull) and its reliance on overland commerce, symbolized by the wheel.

52. ARGOLIS. Argos. Ca. 370–350 BC. Silver stater (12.02 gm). Head of Hera right, wearing stephane ornamented with palmettes, necklace with pendant pearls around neck / [A]RGEIWN, two dolphins swimming in opposite directions, vine branch with grape cluster between them. Traité III 621. BMC 38. Extremely rare: only a handful known. The reverse double struck. Good very fine $40,000 Ex Peter Guber Collection. In 423 BC the temple of Hera at Argos burned to the ground, the result of an accidental fire set by her priestess Chrysis. A new temple was constructed nearby and the Argives took the opportunity to commission a cult statue from their most celebrated sculptor, Polyclitus. The statue was fashioned from ivory and gold and was regarded as a companion to the famous statue of Olympian Zeus sculpted by Phidias. Pausanias described the statue of Hera at Argos in considerable detail. He mentioned, among other things, that she wore a stephane ornamented with the Graces and the Hours. The staters of Argos undoubtedly depict the head of the muchadmired cult statue, even though it was necessary to simplify the decoration of the stephane. The two dolphins on the reverse represent a punning allusion to Delphic Apollo, who was also worshipped at Argos.

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53. Epidaurus. Ca. 250-245 BC. Silver drachm (4.73 gm). Laureate head of Apollo right / Asclepius seated left on backless throne, holding long scepter in left hand and extending right hand over snake coiling to his left, dog lying under throne to right, head facing, E in outer right field, ΘΕ under throne. Jameson 2107 (same dies). BMC 7 (same dies). Requier Series III [2], D1/R2, 57 (this coin). SNG Lockett 2508 (same dies). Very rare. A gem-like piece of remarkably delicate style. Lightly toned. Extremely fine $25,000 Ex Peter Guber Collection; ex BCD Collection (LHS Numismatics 96, 8-9 May 2006, lot 1240). Located on the Saronic gulf, Epidaurus was a small city southeast of Corinth. It was reputed to be the birthplace of Asclepius, the god of healing and son of Apollo. Epidaurus was known for Asclepius’ sanctuary situated about five miles from the town, as well as its theater, which is once again in use today. The Asclepieion at Epidaurus was the most celebrated healing center of the Classical world, the place where the ailing traveled in the hope of being cured. Fame and prosperity continued throughout the Hellenistic period and into Roman times. Even after the introduction of Christianity and the silencing of the oracles, the sanctuary at Epidaurus was still known as late as the mid-5th century, although as a Christian healing center. The types of this remarkably beautiful silver drachm, struck during the city’s Hellenistic heyday, reflect the devotion of Epidaurus to Apollo, god of wisdom, and his son Asclepius, god of health and healing.

54. ELIS. Olympia. Ca. 440-430 BC. Silver hemidrachm (2.97 gm). Eagle flying right, with both wings extended, grasping hare by the belly with talons and tearing at it with beak / F—A, thunderbolt with wings below and volutes above. Jameson 2507 (this coin). SNG Berry 825 (same dies). SNG Copenhagen 362 (same dies). Very rare. Deeply struck and beautifully toned. Extremely fine $5,000 Ex Peter Guber Collection; BCD Collection (Leu 90, 10 May 2004, lot 43); M & M Numismatics 1, 7 December 1997, lot 102; R. Jameson Collection; Capt. E.G. Spencer Churchill Collection (Ars Classica XIV, 2 July 1929), lot 277. Olympia was one of the holiest sites in Greece, home to a great temple of Zeus, father of gods and men, and to another great temple dedicated to his consort Hera. Olympia was the site of the quadrennial Olympic Games, held in honor of these gods. Beginning in the fifth century BC the two temples issued money in connection with celebration of the games. Two mint offices, one dedicated to Zeus and the other to Hera, produced coins at four-year intervals to coincide with the influx of competitors and spectators for the Olympics. In a sense, Olympus was one of the first “destination resorts” and catered to a thriving tourist industry. The present coin emanated from the “Zeus” mint and features symbols pertinent to the god. The eagle was his sacred animal, while the thunderbolt depicted on the reverse is a divine attribute reflecting Zeus’ origin as a sky and storm god.

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55. CRETE. Itanus. Ca. 330–300 BC. Silver stater (10.49 gm). Head of Athena left in crested Attic helmet adorned with spiral palmette on bowl / ITANIWN, eagle with closed wings standing left, head turned right, to right sea god placed sideways, raising right hand to shade eyes and holding trident over left shoulder. Svoronos 35, pl. xix, 17 (same obverse die). Le Rider pl. viii, 15 (same dies). Traité III 1433, pl. ccxlv, 4 (same dies). Rare. Struck in magnificent high relief. Extremely fine $9,500 Ex Peter Guber Collection. Itanus was the easternmost city of Crete, named after its Phoenician founder. This Phoenician origin probably explains the sea god, half man and half sea serpent, who appears on the earliest coinage of Itanus in the fifth century BC. A similar marine deity also appears on the coinage of Aradus in Phoenicia, where he is identified as Dagon or Baal Arwad (Baal of Aradus). Our stater belongs to a later period when Greek influence superseded that of Phoenicia. The presence of Athena on the obverse is an expression of gratitude to Athens, which intervened to free Itanus from a tyrant. The eagle of the reverse is the sacred bird of Zeus, who was worshipped in eastern Crete as Zeus Dictaios. This epithet, meaning Zeus of Mount Dicte, referred to a local myth about the infancy of Zeus. His father, Cronos, feared a rebellion by his children and swallowed each of them after birth. Zeus was saved from this fate by his mother, Rhea, who tricked Cronos into swallowing a stone wrapped in swaddling and hid the baby Zeus in a cave on Mount Dicte, where he was cared for by divine agents. (Western Crete had a rival cave on Mount Ida that also claimed to be the secret sanctuary of the infant Zeus.)

56. KINGDOM OF EPIRUS. Pyrrhus (297–272 BC). Silver tetradrachm (16.56 gm). Head of Zeus of Dodona left, wreathed with oak, Q and SE monogram under neck truncation / BASILEWS PURROU, Dione seated left on high-backed throne, holding transverse lotus scepter in right hand and lifting diaphanous drapery with her left, A in exergue. Jameson 1127 (same dies). BMC 6 = Jenkins, Ancient Greek Coins 591–592 (same dies). Babelon, Roi, pl. vii, 1 = de Luynes 1898 (same obverse die). Cf. Gulbenkian 914 (same obverse die, no A on reverse). A magnificent specimen of the highest Hellenistic style. Beautifully toned. Extremely fine $60,000 Ex Peter Guber Collection. In the generation after Alexander the Great, Pyrrhus of Epirus was admired as the most chivalrous of the Hellenistic kings. After failing to win a share of Alexander’s dismembered empire, he courted fame by championing the western Greeks against their barbarian enemies. In 281 he took an army of 25,000 men and 20 elephants to Italy to assist the city of Tarentum in its war against Rome. He inflicted two serious defeats on the Romans and marched close to Rome, but did not succeed in imposing peace. In 278 he crossed over into Sicily to confront the Carthaginians. He nearly expelled them from the island, but abandoned his campaign after two years to return to Italy. There he won a last victory over the Romans in 275. But by this time his army had shrunk by two thirds, and he was forced to withdraw to his own kingdom, bequeathing the term Pyrrhic victory to describe a victory rendered hollow by its excessive cost in blood or treasure. After a few further adventures in Greece Pyrrhus perished in a street fight in Argos. 40

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Lot 56 Pyrrhus’ coinage was as exceptional as his career. It was issued on a very limited scale; it was strikingly artistic; and it did not promote Pyrrhus in the way that his contemporaries used their coinage to advertise their own accomplishments and kingship. His tetradrachm honors the principal gods of Epirus, Zeus Naios and his consort Dione. Zeus was worshipped as the god of thunder, to whom the oak tree was sacred; Dione (whose name is simply a feminine form of Zeus) was perhaps an earth goddess or a double of Aphrodite. Their cult center at Dodona was famous for its oracle, and Pyrrhus founded a festival in their honor called the Naia. The aesthetic qualities and western fabric of Pyrrhus’ silver coinage have led numismatists to posit a western origin, at Locri Epizephyrii in Bruttium. The types of the tetradrachms, however, suggest that they might have been struck in connection with the first celebration of the Naia in Epirus.

57. ISLAND OFF EPIRUS. Corcyra. Ca. 400 BC. Silver stater (10.86 gm). Cow standing left, suckling calf / Ornate double doors decorated with stellate pattern. BMC Corcyra p. 117, 34-44 variant (rhombus and square around central dot in each oblong). Extremely rare! An attractive life study rendered in fine, naturalistic style. Dark toning. Extremely fine $7,500 Ex Peter Guber Collection; R. Maly Collection (Auctiones 13, 23 June 1983, lot 191); G. Bauer (Numismatic Fine Arts-Gans, Mail Bid Sale 16, 19 April 1960, lot 289). A small island located off the coast of present-day Albania, Corcyra was a profitable trade depot between mainland Greece, the hinterlands of Thrace and the rising states of the west. Originally settled by Corinthians, it retained a curious hostility toward its mother city and fought the first recorded Greek naval battle against Corinth in 664 BC. In 435 BC Corcyra sought an alliance with Athens against Corinth, which became one of the casus belli of the Peloponnesian War. Corcyra’s coinage set a pattern for the cities of coastal Illyria, featuring a cow suckling a calf on the obverse and an abstract stellate pattern on the reverse. Corcyra also established the weight standard for the region, based on a silver stater of about 11 grams. The imagery of the obverse, with its charming pastoral depiction of a cow suckling its calf, proves the Greek artisans of this region to be keen observers of nature.

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58. MYSIA. Pergamum. Ca. 334 BC. Gold stater (8.62 gm). Head of young Heracles right in lion skin headdress, paws knotted at neck / Archaistic figure of Athena standing facing, calathus (grain basket) on head, brandishing spear in raised right hand, left hand holding shield with hanging fillet ending in tassel, to lower left crested Corinthian helmet facing right. SNG Paris 1557 = de Luynes 2493. Von Fritze, Die Münzen von Pergamon, pl. 1, 7 = EHC 268. Westermark, “Notes on the Saida hoard” (IGCH 1508), NNÅ 1979-80, nos. 36-37 (the Berlin and Paris specimens). Good extremely fine $100,000 Ex Peter Guber Collection. The city of Pergamum, famous in the Hellenistic period for its court, library, and Great Altar, struck no coinage during the archaic and classical periods and is first mentioned in our sources only in 401 BC. Its earliest coinage very likely comprises gold staters of the present type, which are exceedingly rare. Two examples occurred in a hoard buried at Sidon about 323/320, making it very likely that they were struck during the lifetime of Alexander the Great (336–323 BC). The obverse type, a head of the young Heracles in a lion skin headdress, was the standard type of Alexander’s silver tetradrachms and drachms. The reverse shows a facing Palladion (figure of Athena) of archaizing style, and with unusual attributes. This same Palladion is also depicted on smaller denominations in gold and silver and in a relief found in the temple of Athena at Pergamum. It very probably represents the cult statue of the temple. The absence of a legend naming the issuing authority may be an indication that the staters were struck by the temple authorities on behalf of the goddess, using bullion from the temple treasury. The purpose of such a coinage would have been to finance a festival in honor of Athena, perhaps commemorating some great event such as a visit by Alexander after his entry into Asia Minor. Another example of this practice has been identified at Pergamum in the second century BC, involving silver tetradrachms that name Athena Nicephorus as their issuing authority.

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59. PERGAMENE KINGDOM. Eumenes I (264-241 BC). Silver tetradrachm (16.93 gm). Laureate head of Philetaerus right / ΦΙΛΕΤΑΙΡOΥ, helmeted Athena seated left, holding up crown in right hand, grounded shield behind her upon which she rests her left elbow, bow in right field, ivy leaf in outer left field, A in inner left field. Westermark Group IVA (V.LVII). SNG Paris 1610-1615. Bold portrait in high relief. Extremely fine $7,500 Ex Peter Guber Collection; Semon Lipcer Collection. The eunuch Philetaerus played a canny game of power poker in the years following the death of the Macedonian king Alexander the Great. Entrusted with an immense treasure in the fortress city of Pergamum by Lysimachus of Thrace, Philetaerus soon switched his allegiance to Lysimachus’ rival Seleucus I in return for a promise of autonomy within his own realm. Seleucus defeated and killed Lysimachus at Kauropedion in 281 BC, but was assassinated himself soon thereafter. The Pergamene kingdom officially broke from the Seleucid realm only a few years later. Philetaerus ruled the kingdom from 281-263 BC, and was followed by his nephew, Eumenes I, who honored the dynasty’s founder by continuing to strike tetradrachms with his uncle’s heavily jowled portrait. This would continue to be the practice of other Pergamene kings of the Attalid dynasty until the kingdom’s peaceful transfer to Roman authority in 133 BC.

60. EARLY ELECTRUM COINAGE. Uncertain Mint, probably in Ionia. Ca. 650–600 BC. Electrum stater, Milesian standard (14.52 gm). Flattened surface with parallel striations / Three incuse punch marks, the central punch an elongated rectangle, flanked by two square punches of equal size, all with irregular surfaces. Traité I 16, pl. i, 12 = BMC Ionia p. 183, 1. Cf. Weidauer 5 (trite). Extremely rare. A wonderful example of the earliest phase of coinage. Extremely fine for type $60,000 Ex Peter Guber Collection; ex Triton VIII, 11 January 2005, lot 430. It has long been surmised that the earliest coinage evolved from the use of weighed electrum nuggets in exchange. It followed logically that the first actual coins closely resembled nuggets, having a lumpy shape, a blank surface, and only an incuse punch or punches on the reverse as a sign of human manufacture. The process of adding the punches to the coins was soon made easier by roughening the surface on which this process took place, yielding coins with an irregular rough surface or with a striated surface, like the present stater. This phase of coin evolution was exceedingly brief. Only a little later, such striations became the background for the earliest figural coin types. Full staters of the striated type are exceedingly rare: the present piece is believed to be only the seventh known.

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61. IONIA. Phocaea. Early 5th century BC. Electrum one-sixth stater or hecte (2.56 gm). Head of bridled horse left, mouth open, mane in parallel plaits / Rough incuse of “mill sail” pattern. BMFA 1905. Extremely rare. Extremely fine $8,000 Ex Peter Guber Collection. The city of Phocaea, located on the nothern coast of of Ionia in present-day western Turkey, was founded in the ninth century BC by settlers from Phocis on mainland Greece. By 650 BC, the city had become one of the most important trading centers of the ancient world, with colonies of its own in Egypt, southern Gaul, Corsica, and Spain. In the sixth century BC, Phocaea came under the control of Lydia, the ancient kingdom that invented the concept of coinage. Phocaea fell under Persian rule in 546 BC, but did not rest easy under foreign domination and rebelled repeatedly. In later times, Phocaea found itself under Athenian, Seleucid, Attalid and Roman rule, but always maintained a significant degree of autonomy in its dealings. Phocaea struck its first coins in ca. 600 BC; like those of Lydia, these pieces were struck in electrum, a natural alloy of gold and silver found in the streams of Asia Minor. Denominations included a stater of about 15.5 grams and a range of fractions. The most widely utilized fraction was the sixth-stater, or hecte, a small electrum piece weighing approximately 2.5 grams. In the fifth and fourth centuries BC Phocaea struck an enormous number of hectes with a remarkable variety of obverse designs, many of them featuring the city’s “mascot,” a seal. The hectes became one of the major trade currencies of the eastern Mediterranean. The tiny piece represented here is one of the earliest examples of Phocaea and depicts a bridled horse’s head in vigorous archaic style. As is usual with coins of Phocaea, the reverse is a simple, unadorned punch.

62. The Artists of Dionysus. 2nd Century BC. Silver tetradrachm (16.87 gm). Teos(?), ca. 155-145 BC. Head of young Dionysus right, wearing mitre (headband) and crowned with ivy wreath / ΤΩΝ ΠΕΡΙ ΤΟΝ ΔΙΟΝΥΣΙΟΝ ΤΕΧΝΙΤΩΝ flanking filleted thyrsus, ivy wreath border. Lorber-Hoover, NC 163 (2003), pp. 59-68 (this coin). Unique and unprecedented— a coin struck in the name of an ancient Greek professional guild! Of exemplary style and a true masterpiece of Hellenistic art. Extremely fine $150,000 Ex Peter Guber Collection. Coinage was normally produced on the authority of cities, kings, and dynasts. This is the only known example of a coin struck by a professional guild. The Artists of Dionysus were actors, musicians, and other artists who participated in the festivals and contests that were a prominent feature of the ancient Greek world. In the third century, the Artists of Dionysus organized themselves into three corporate bodies, one at Athens, one in the Peloponnesus, and one in Asia Minor. Members of the Artists wore a purple-and-gold uniform and enjoyed special privileges throughout the Greek world. When Teos passed under Pergamene control after 188, the Artists of Dionysus merged with another troupe of performers at the Attalid royal court to create the group that issued this remarkable and 44

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Lot 62 unique tetradrachm. The presence of a wreath on the reverse links this coin to the so-called wreathed tetradrachms issued by various cities of western Asia Minor, including Cyme, Myrina, Heraclea and Smyrna. These wreathed tetradrachms were produced within a short period, ca. 155–145, establishing the probable date for this piece. At this period, the Artists of Dionysus were quite wealthy and very closely linked to the Pergamene court. Yet the essentially religious role of the Dionysiac Artists is a clue that its function may have been different from that of other wreathed tetradrachms. The lack of control marks points to a one-time, special issue intended to finance or commemorate some event of great importance in the life of the association. Tetradrachms such as this one may have been awarded as prizes in the first festival involving the Attalistai (guild devoted to the Attalid rulers), or presented to foreign guests. The truly exceptional artistry of the obverse portrait of Dionysus is certainly befitting of this unique coin’s origins and importance.

63. CARIA. Cnidus. Ca. 360 BC. Silver tetradrachm (14.22 gm). Head of Aphrodite Euploia left, wearing pendant earring and pearl necklace, hair confined by ampyx and sphendone, K—NI flanking neck, prow of ship behind / Head and foreleg of roaring lion left, below moneyer’s abbreviated name ΛΕΟΣΤΗΕΝ, all in incuse square. Gulbenkian 761 (same obverse die). Traité II 1637, pl. cxlv, 25 (same obverse die). Of exceptional style and possessing a beautiful light gray patina, with some iridescence. Extremely fine $10,000 Ex Peter Guber Collection; Morton & Eden Ltd., 13 December 2005, lot 335. Cnidus was a seafaring city, located on a peninsula of southwestern Asia Minor. It was famous in antiquity as the home of a statue of Aphrodite by Praxiteles, which depicted the goddess at her bath and inspired many copies. Aphrodite was worshipped at Cnidus as Aphrodite Euploia, the goddess of the safe voyage; her principal function was to protect sailors and voyagers at sea. She is portrayed on the obverse of this tetradrachm together with the prow of a ship, making her identity clear. The lion on the reverse is the sacred animal of the god Apollo, the patron of a league of Carian cities to which Cnidus belonged.

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64. DYNASTS OF CARIA. Pixodarus (340–334 BC). Silver tetradrachm (15.23 gm). Laureate head of Apollo three-quarters right / ΠΙΞWΔΑΡΟΥ, Zeus of Labraunda standing right, holding double-bladed axe over shoulder and resting left hand on inverted spear, E in inner right field. Hurter, Pixodarus 153. SNG von Aulock 8047. Featuring an Apollo of fine style, with a powerful gaze. Attractive iridescent gray toning. Minor planchet flaws on chin and nose, otherwise extremely fine. $6,000 Ex Peter Guber Collection. Sotheby’s, Zurich, 26 October 1993, lot 54; Numismatic Fine Arts 16, 2 December 1985, lot 217; Numismatic Fine Arts 8, 6 June 1980, lot 289. The Hecatomnids were a dynasty of local rulers who governed Caria as satraps of the Persian empire during the fourth century BC. The most famous member of the family was Mausolus (377–353 BC), whose name was immortalized by the Mausoleum, a monumental tomb incorporating work by the leading artists of the day. It was planned by Mausolus for himself and completed after his death by his sister and wife, Artemisia. Artemisia was succeeded in turn by two more of her brothers, Hidrieus and Pixodarus. All of these satraps issued coins with the same types. A facing head of Apollo graces the obverse, and the reverse shows a local Carian deity, Zeus of Labraunda. Pixodarus, one of the last dynasts of Caria, ostensibly remained loyal to Persia, but secretly tried to secure the friendship of Philip II, king of Macedon. He offered the hand of his eldest daughter in marriage to Arrhidaeus, the illegitimate son of the Macedonian monarch. The offer was intercepted by the discontented young Macedonian prince Alexander, who offered himself as a suitor in his brother’s stead. The overture was eagerly embraced by Pixodarus, but when Philip found out, he put an end to the whole scheme. Pixodarus died, apparently of natural causes, some time before Alexander’s invasion of Asia in 334 BC.

65. ISLANDS OFF CARIA. Rhodes. Ca. 205-190 BC. Silver tetradrachm (13.34 gm). Radiate head of Helios facing three-quarters right / ΑΙΝΗΤΩΡ, rose with bud on shoot with one leaf to right, P—O divided by stem, butterfly in left field. Ashton, Money Uses 262. SNG Keckman —. Good extremely fine $12,500

66. Ca. 125–88 BC. Gold stater (8.44 gm). Radiate head of Helios facing, inclined slightly to right / P—O, rose with bud on right, grain stalk on left, above moneyer’s signature ANTAIOY, all in shallow incuse square. Jenkins, KME, p. 111 and pl. xxxiv, 203 (this coin). Cf. T. Hackens, “Trésor hellénistique trouvé à Delos,” BCH 89 (1965), p. 525, 5–6. Of the greatest rarity. A few scattered marks, otherwise good very fine $100,000 46

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Lot 66 Ex Peter Guber Collection; Nelson Bunker Hunt Collection (Sotheby’s, Zurich, 19-20 June 1991, lot 403); Bank Leu 30, 28 April 1982, lot 186; Münzen und Medaillen 53, 29 November 1977, lot 116. The island of Rhodes was sacred to Helios, the sun, and all its inhabitants claimed descent from him. Late in the fifth century the Rhodians came together to found a new capital city, also called Rhodes, and it immediately began to issue a national coinage. Because Rhodes became a major power in the eastern Mediterranean, its coinage was abundant and influential and is mentioned in various inscriptions. The sun god was portrayed on the obverse of nearly all Rhodian coins, while the reverse usually featured the national badge, a rose. This constituted a punning type, for the Greek word for rose (like the English) is very close in sound to Rhodes. Although Rhodian silver and bronze coinage are common, gold is very rare. The exceptional production of gold coins around the end of the second century BC and in the early first century has not been explained satisfactorily. One theory holds that this gold coinage may be related to the activities of Mithradates VI of Pontus, who challenged Rome’ domination of the east and besieged Rhodes, unsuccessfully, in 88 BC.

67. CILICIA. Tarsus. Balacrus (333–323 BC). Silver stater (10.90 gm). Baal of Tarsus enthroned left, holding lotus scepter in right hand and resting left hand on back of throne, large grain ear in left field, Aramaic inscription B’ltrz in right field / Lion left attacking bull right above city walls, above club and letter B. SNG Paris 365. An exceptional example of this popular type. Toned. Good extremely fine $6,500 Ex Peter Guber Collection. Tarsus, the principal city of Cilicia, was used as a mint by a succession of Persian satraps during the fourth century BC. When Alexander the Great took the city in 333, he appointed a satrap of his own. The new satrap, Balacrus, continued to strike coinage at Tarsus very much in the manner of earlier satraps. The obverse of this stater depicts the local god of Tarsus, who is usually associated with symbols of fertility (in this case, the grain ear). The reverse type is a borrowing from the coinage the previous satrap, Mazaeus. It shows a lion-bull combat—a typical theme of both Persian and Greek art—above the city walls of Tarsus. The letter B above the lion’s back is the discreet signature of Balacrus. Freeman & Sear Manhattan Sale 2

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68. SELEUCID KINGDOM. Seleucus I (312-281 BC). Silver tetradrachm (16.81 gm). Susa, after 301 BC. Bust of hero right (assimilating King Seleucus I, King Alexander III of Macedon, and the god Dionysus), wearing helmet covered with panther’s skin and adorned with bull’s ear and horn, panther’s skin tied around neck / ΒΑΣΙΛΕΩΣ ΣΕΛΕΥΚOΥ, Nike standing right, crowning trophy of arms, monograms below and in left field. SC 173.4. CSE 1023. Rare. An outstanding specimen, deeply struck from fresh dies in exceptional metal. Perhaps the finest known of this type. Good extremely fine $65,000 Ex Peter Guber Collection; Monnaies et Méadailles 76, 19–20 September 1991, lot 828. The obverse of this tetradrachm bears an image of the deified Alexander the Great. He wears a helmet covered with panther skin and adorned with a bull’s horns and ear. All of these are attributes of Dionysus, the god of wine but also of eternal life, who rode about on a panther and could transform himself into a bull. According to myth, Dionysus conquered India through his mysterious power; thus Alexander, who conquered parts of India by force of arms, could be seen as a second Dionysus. The coin type is yet more complex, because the issuer of this coin, Seleucus I, had repeated Alexander’s exploit of campaigning in western India. Thus he could claim to be a third Dionysus and a second Alexander, and this is undoubtedly implied by the heroic image. Depicted on the reverse is Nike, the winged goddess of victory, crowning a trophy of arms. After a battle, the victors gathered arms from their fallen foes and attached them to a tree trunk to form a quasi-human figure. This trophy became the god of the battlefield, to which prayers of thanksgiving were offered. In this case the trophy probably alludes to the Battle of Ipsus (301 BC), in which Seleucus secured his kingdom with the aid of the war elephants he had acquired through his Indian campaign.

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69. Antiochus II (261-246 BC). Silver tetradrachm (17.12 gm). Sardes. Diademed head of the deified Antiochus I right / ΒΑΣΙΛΕΩΣ ΑΝΤΙΟΧΟΥ, Apollo seated left on omphalos, examining arrow and resting hand on grounded bow, PN and AI monograms in exergue. SC 518d. WSM 1387, pl. lvi 2 (same dies). A masterpiece of Hellenistic portraiture, struck in sculptural high relief. Lightly toned. Good extremely fine $25,000 Ex Peter Guber Collection. Depicted on the obverse of this tetradrachm is Antiochus I (281-261 BC), the second in the line of Seleucid kings who ruled Syria and much of the Hellenistic Near East from the late fourth to early first centuries BC. Antiochus was the first Seleucid to place his portrait on his coinage. Here he is portrayed posthumously on a coin issued during the reign of his son. The thick, curly hair—far more luxuriant than on his lifetime portraits—expresses eternal youth and implies the deification of the late king. The reverse shows the god Apollo, from whom the Seleucid kings claimed descent. This particular representation was another invention of Antiochus I and it became canonical for most of his successors. The god is seated on the omphalos, a sacred stone kept at his sanctuary at Delphi in Greece and considered to be the navel of the world. It represents the god’s oracular aspect. His bow and arrow symbolize his power to send and cure disease, but in the Seleucid context they probably serve to identify him as the protector of the kings and their kingdom.

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70. Achaeus (220–autumn or winter 214 BC). Silver tetradrachm (16.89 gm). Sardes. Diademed and draped bust of Achaeus right, bearded / ΒΑΣΙΛΕΩΣ AXAIOY, Athena Alkis, viewed from behind, advancing left, brandishing spear in raised right hand and holding shield with anchor device on left arm, horse head left in inner left field. Unpublished. Cf. SC 953, WSM 1440, and CSE 608 for two varieties known previously. One of five tetradrachms of Achaeus known. Among the great rarities of Hellenistic coinage. Good very fine with a splendid portrait. $75,000 Ex Peter Guber Collection; Freeman & Sear Fixed Price List 12, Winter 2007, 70; Gemini Auction I, 11 January 2005, lot 204. Achaeus was a kinsman of the Seleucid king Seleucus III (225–222 BC). In 222 Seleucus led an army into Asia Minor, hoping to recover former Seleucid territories that had been lost in the reign of his father. The king was assassinated in the course of this campaign and the troops acclaimed Achaeus as his successor. Achaeus, however, refused the diadem and offered his allegiance to Seleucus’ younger brother, Antiochus III. The new king rewarded Achaeus for his loyalty by appointing him governor of Seleucid Asia Minor. Achaeus swiftly recovered much of the lost territory. Then in 220 he inexplicably reversed his earlier decision and declared himself king. His grand ambitions were thwarted when his army refused to march into Syria. The revenge of Antiochus III was delayed by a war against Ptolemaic Egypt, but in 216 he invaded Asia Minor and besieged the usurper in his capital at Sardes. In late 214 Achaeus was captured while attempting to escape. Antiochus ordered him flayed alive, then beheaded and impaled, as a warning to other would-be usurpers. Achaeus’ tetradrachms are among the greatest rarities of Hellenistic coinage and are particularly admired for the artistic quality of his portrait. He is represented as a seasoned military commander of strong character, with a slightly cruel expression. His reverse type states his claim to the Seleucid succession. The device on Athena’s shield is an anchor, the emblem of the Seleucid dynasty, implying that the goddess and her protégé Achaeus are fighting for the Seleucid cause. The horse head by her feet is another Seleucid symbol dating back to the dynastic founder Seleucus I; it appears on all tetradrachms of Achaeus. Four other tetradrachms of Achaeus exist, including: (1) a specimen from the former collection of R. Jameson, now in the Gulbenkian Museum in Lisbon (WSM 1440 = Gulbenkian 1029); (2) a fragmentary specimen found in the Sardes excavations; and (3) a specimen formerly in the collection of Arthur Houghton (CSE 608).

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71. Tryphon (ca 142/1–138 BC). Silver tetradrachm (16.87 gm). Antioch. Diademed head of Tryphon right / ΒΑΣΙΛΕΩΣ ΤΡΥΦΩΝΟΣ ΑΥΤΟΚΡΑΤΟΡΟΣ, Macedonian helmet adorned with ibex horn, ΠΑ monogram in inner left field, ΔΗ under helmet, all within oak wreath border. Coin Hoards VIII, pl. lxv 3 (this coin). Cf. Seyrig 16–17 (same obverse die, but DI under helmet). Very rare. Nearly extremely fine $12,500 Ex Peter Guber Collection; Arthur Houghton Collection; Tartous hoard, 1987 (CH VIII, 471). Diodotus, a leading administrator under Alexander Balas, raised a revolt against his successor Demetrius II in the name of Alexander Balas’ young son, whom he placed on the throne as Antiochus VI. At the time of his revolt he assumed the name Tryphon, meaning one with the royal qualities of luxury, extravagance, and generosity. This was probably a clue as to his real intentions. Indeed, after about three years Antiochus VI conveniently died, supposedly during surgery, and Tryphon claimed the throne for himself. Tryphon’s baroque portraits are easily the most exotic of the Seleucid series, bordering on the effeminate, with no hint that he owed his diadem to a military success. His personal reverse type, an ornate parade helmet, was a visual emblem of extravagance. His brief usurpation was ultimately brought to an end by Antiochus VII, the brother of Demetrius II, who seized the throne in 138 BC, defeated Tryphon in battle and compelled his suicide.

72. UNCERTAIN LEVANTINE MINT. Silver half shekel or didrachm of Sidonian standard(?) (6.83 gm). Ca. 450 BC or later. Head of Athena with frontal eye right, in crested Attic helmet decorated with three olive leaves above visor, spiral palmette, and pattern on bowl, wearing round earring / A-Θ-E, owl with spread wings standing facing, olive sprig with two leaves and fruit to upper left. Unique(?) and important. Patch of encrustation at obverse edge and scattered deposits on reverse. Extremely fine $3,000 This remarkable coin reproduces the types of the Athenian decadrachm, albeit with a slightly exaggerated archaicization of the Athena head. The assignment of the coin to the Levant is based only on the weight standard and a vague conception of a find spot.

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73. JUDAEA. The Jewish War (CE 66-70). Silver shekel (13.95 gm). Jerusalem, dated Year Three (CE 68-69). Omer cup with pearled rim, the base raised by projections on ends, date “Year 3” above cup, Hebrew inscription “Shekel of Israel” around / Three pomegranates on stem, Hebrew inscription “Jerusalem the holy” around. SNG ANS 444. Hendin 662. Sharply struck in good metal. Good extremely fine $4,000 Ex Peter Guber Collection. In the middle of the first century AD, the Roman Empire ruled over Israel and the entire Middle East with a heavy hand. In AD 66, the people of Jerusalem rose up in revolt and attacked the Roman soldiers and officials who occupied the city. The rebellion spread quickly throughout the Middle East, and thousands of Romans living in the region were either massacred or forced to flee. The leaders of the revolt declared Israel an independent nation and began striking coins in silver and bronze. The silver coins were mainly shekels, like this one, along with a few half-shekels and quarter-shekels. Since the Jews forbade the depiction of the human face or figure in art, there are no portraits or other “graven images” on these Jewish coins. The obverse depicts an Omer Cup, used during Passover, with the Hebrew inscription “Shekel of Israel.” The date, in years from the beginning of the revolt, appears in Hebrew letters over the cup. The reverse depicts three pomegranates on a single stem and carries the inscription “Jerusalem the Holy.” Ultimately, the war against Rome did not go well for the Jews. The Romans assembled a huge army and invaded Israel under the general Vespasian and his son, Titus. They reoccupied the countryside and forced the rebels to take refuge in Jerusalem, where bloody battles broke out between rival Jewish factions. Titus placed Jerusalem under siege in AD 69, and he slowly battered down the city walls while starvation and disease took a terrible toll on the inhabitants. Jerusalem finally fell in September of AD 70, and the Romans took horrific revenge, burning down the Temple and slaughtering thousands. A few rebels fled to the mountain fortress of Masada, where they continued to resist for another four years until it, too, fell. All told, more than a million people died in the Jewish War, and thousands more were sold into slavery. The idea of a free and independent Israel did not die, however, and the coins struck during the Jewish War served as an inspiration for later generations who finally made the dream into reality.

74. GRAECO-BACTRIAN KINGS. Lysias (Ca. 120–110 BC). Silver tetradrachm (16.85 gm). Heroic bust of Lysias viewed from behind, diademed, wearing crested Boeotian helmet covered with panther skin and adorned with goat’s horn, brandishing spear in right hand, back draped with elephant skin with elephant’s head emerging from left shoulder / ΒΑΣΙΛΕΩΣ ΑΝΙΚΗΤΟΥ ΛΥΣΙΟΥ, young Heracles standing facing, crowning himself with right hand and holding club and palm branch in left, left forearm draped with lion’s skin, TAE monogram to lower left, Σ to lower right. Bopearachchi Series 2, A, pl. 38. Qunduz 614. Mitchiner vol. 2, 260. Among the rarest Attic-weight tetradrachms of the entire Bactrian series. Obverse slightly double struck. Toned. Nearly extremely fine $40,000 Ex Peter Guber Collection; Gemini II, 10 January 2006, lot 168. 52

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Lot 74 The far-flung Graeco-Bactrian and Indo-Greek kingdoms grew out of the conquests of Alexander the Great in present-day Afghanistan and northern India. Until the middle of the third century BC, these regions were under Seleucid rule, but circa 246 BC they broke away under the satrap Diodotus I, who assumed the royal title basileus, or king. Under Demetrius I (ca. 195-170 BC), large sections of northern India were brought under Greek rule. During this phase, the orderly succession of kings seems to have splintered, with several regions gaining autonomy under their own lines of rulers. With virtually no surviving written records, modern scholars rely heavily on the remarkable coins of the Greek far east to reconstruct the history of these kingdoms. Like most GraecoBactrian kings, Lysias is known only from his coinage, which points to a close relation with his near-contemporary Antialcidas. Lysias may have claimed descent from Demetrius I, as his Heracles reverse type is a direct quote from Demetrius’ coinage, and his epithet Aniketos (Undefeated) provides another link, since this is the epithet of the deified Demetrius on the “pedigree” tetradrachms issues by Agathocles. The very colorful obverse iconography portrays Lysias as conqueror of the Orient.

75. PTOLEMAIC KINGDOM. Arsinoe II (wife of Ptolemy II, ca. 275-270 BC). Gold mnaieion (octadrachm) (27.77 gm). Alexandria, ca. 253–246 BC. Veiled head of deified Arsinoe II right with ram’s horn, wearing stephane, lotus scepter over far shoulder, Q behind / ΑΡΣΙΝΟΗΣ ΦΙΛΑΔΕΛΦΟΥ, filleted double cornucopiae. Svoronos 460. SNG Copenhagen 134. For the date, see H.A. Troxell, “Arsinoe’s non-era,” ANSMN 28, pp. 35–56. Minor edge marks, otherwise nearly extremely fine $9,500 Ex Freeman & Sear Fixed Price List 11, Spring/Summer 2006, 66; LHS Numismatics 95, 25 October 2005, lot 748. After its conquest by Alexander the Great, Ptolemaic Egypt was the only Greek-ruled kingdom to strike enormous gold coins weighing nearly an ounce, the distant ancestor of today’s double-eagle. This impressive denomination, today usually called an octadrachm, was worth 100 silver drachms, or one mina, a small fortune in ancient times. The Greco-Egyptians called the 100-mina piece a mnaieion (myn-AY-on). Calculating its buying power in modern terms is difficult, but a rough equivalent might be around $4,000. Mnaieions were first struck under Ptolemy II (282-246 BC), who built the famous Library of Alexandria and towering Pharos lighthouse. In 279 BC he married his sister, the beautiful and ambitious Arsinoe, in the manner of the old Egyptian pharaohs. The sibling marriage scandalized Greek society, which gave Arsinoe the nickname Philadelphos, or “sibling-lover.” Arsinoe embraced the term, making it part of her royal title. Arsinoe’s regal profile, veiled and crowned with a jeweled coronet, graces the obverse of most Ptolemaic gold mnaieions. The double-cornucopia on the reverse symbolized both Egypt’s abundance and the joint rule of Ptolemy and Arsinoe. Gold coins bearing Arsinoe’s portrait continued to be struck for centuries after her death in 271 BC. Freeman & Sear Manhattan Sale 2

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76. Ptolemy III Euergetes (246–222 BC). Gold mnaieion (27.74 gm). Alexandria, struck under Ptolemy IV, ca. 217 BC. Radiate, diademed bust of the deified Ptolemy III right, wearing aegis, over shoulder a trident with lotus blossom finial on middle prong / PTOLEMAIOU BASILEWS, radiate cornucopiae bound with royal diadem, DI below. Svoronos 1117. de Luynes 3573 (same obverse die). Extremely fine $12,500 Ex Peter Guber Collection. This impressive gold piece was struck in honor of the deceased Ptolemy III by his son Ptolemy IV (222–205 BC). Its extraordinary portrait endows the king with divine attributes belonging to four different gods. The rays denote a solar deity, Helios for the Greeks, Re for the Egyptians. The trident is an attribute of the Greek sea god, Poseidon, but its lotus finial is unique and evokes the Egyptian god of the dead, Osiris. The aegis is a protective garment associated with both Zeus and Athena. Many interpretations have been proposed for this mix of attributes, but it seems clear that one message of this portrait was to recall the great victories of Ptolemy III in the Third Syrian War, when he invaded the Seleucid kingdom and penetrated as far as Babylonia. This memory was most relevant in the early years of Ptolemy IV, who lost major territories to the Seleucid king Antiochus III, but recovered them in the battle of Raphia in 217. The reverse type of the mnaieion is easier to interpret: the radiate cornucopiae signifies the fertility of Egypt, due both to the Nile inundation and to the radiance of the sun. According to Egyptian royal ideology, adoped by the Ptolemies, this blessed fertility was also attributable to the king, whose very existence ensured the world order.

77. Cleopatra VII and Mark Antony. Rulers of the East, 39-31 BC. Silver tetradrachm (12.95 gm). Syrian (Antioch) or Phoenician mint, ca. 36 BC. BACΙΛΙCCA ΚΛΕΟΠΑΤΡΑ ΘΕΑ ΝΕωΤΕΡΑ, diademed, draped bust of Cleopatra right, wearing pearl necklace / ΑΝΤωΝΙΟC ΑΥΤΟΚΡΑΤωΡ ΤΡΙΤΟΝ [ΤΡΙωΝ ΑΝΔΡωΝ], bare head of Antony right. Svoronos 1897, pl. lxiii, 22–23. RPC 4094. Very rare. Struck in unusually high relief from dies of exceptional style. Toned. Extremely fine $50,000 Ex Peter Guber Collection; M&M Numismatics Auction I, New York, 7 December 1997, lot 268; Hess 252, Lucerne, 1982, lot 192.

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The last Ptolemaic ruler of Egypt, Cleopatra VII succeeded her father Ptolemy XII “Auletes” in 51 BC. Ousted and exiled by her brother in 48 BC, she cannily formed a liaison with Julius Caesar to win her throne back. Caesar returned to Rome in 47 BC and summoned Cleopatra to join him the following year. She was thus in Rome when Caesar was murdered on March 15, 44 BC. Returning to Alexandria, she arranged a meeting with the Triumvir Mark Antony at Tarsus in 41 BC. Once again, a powerful Roman succumbed to Cleopatra’s charms. In 37 BC Cleopatra provided money and supplies in support of Antony’s abortive invasion of Parthia. Antony’s adoption of “barbaric” Egyptian customs, his increasing dependence on Cleopatra and his promise to bestow most of Rome’s eastern possessions upon her and her children led his partner in power, Octavian, to declare war in 32 BC. Antony fought a lethargic campaign and suffered a heavy naval defeat at Actium in September, 31 BC, after which he and Cleopatra fled to Egypt. On Octavian’s approach in 30 BC, Antony committed suicide and Cleopatra followed suit days later, utilizing the poisonous bite of the sacred asp. Freeman & Sear Manhattan Sale 2


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Lot 77 This remarkable silver tetradrachm, probably struck in Syria or Phoenicia during the Parthian campaign of 37-36 BC, clearly shows that neither Cleopatra nor Antony was “good looking” in the modern, Hollywood sense of the term. The talented die engraver has taken particular care to give Cleopatra a powerful, almost masculine profile to complement Antony’s pugnacious portrait. Ancient historians confirm that Cleopatra was not classically beautiful, but her remarkable mind, her musical voice, and her uncanny ability to delight men more than made up for this.

78. CYRENAICA. Cyrene. Ca. 250 BC. Silver didrachm (7.82 gm). Koinon issue. Diademed, horned head of Zeus Ammon right / Silphium plant, ibex horn to upper left, KOI—NON across fields. BMC Cyrenaica p. 68, 1, pl. xxvii 13-15. Very rare. A splendid head of Zeus in high Hellenistic style joined with a detailed depiction of the now-extinct silphium plant. Lightly toned. Good extremely fine $20,000 Ex Peter Guber Collection; Millon & Associés, 8 June 2007, lot 54. Cyrene was a Greek colony in North Africa (modern Libya), founded ca. 630 BC. Within the territory of Cyrene was an oracular shrine of the Egyptian god Amun. The colonists adopted him as their patron deity and assimilated him to the chief god of the Greek pantheon, Zeus. The new syncretic deity, Zeus Ammon, combined the fatherly appearance of Zeus with the ram’s horns of Amun. His oracle at Siwah Oasis came to be regarded as one of the greatest of the Greek world. After Alexander the Great accepted the surrender of Egypt, he traveled west to Siwah to consult the oracle, which obligingly recognized him as the son of Zeus Ammon. This legitimized Alexander as the new pharaoh of Egypt and also allowed him to indulge in divine pretensions vis-à-vis the Greeks. Depicted on the reverse of this coin is a silphium plant, a form of asafoetida that grew only in the territory of Cyrene. It was prized for its medicinal and aphrodisiac properties and was used in the manufacture of perfume. Silphium was, in fact, the principal export of Cyrene. Intense exploitation of this resource, combined probably with climate change, led to the extinction of silphium by the end of the late Roman period.

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PA RT T W O - O TH E R P R O P E R T IES GREEK COIN S 82. CELTS IN SOUTHERN GAUL. Imitating Massalia. Silver drachm (3.34 gm). 2nd century BC. Head of nymph right, crowned with grain, wearing triple-pendant earring and bead necklace / ΛΛ << AA — << in two lines above, lion with open maw and protruding bulbous tongue prowling right. Castelin 1025-1026. BMC II 3-17. Extremely fine $300

79. PU N I C CO I N A G E . Spain. Carthago Nova. Bronze 27 mm (9.69 gm, 1h). 237-209 BC. Head of goddess in triplecrested Attic helmet left, yodh under chin / Unbridled horse standing right, beth under belly. SNG Copenhagen 276 (same dies). Villaronga CNHAA 54. Glossy, greenbrown patina. Some areas of flatness, otherwise good very fine $250

80. Punic Spain(?). Silver half shekel (3.17 gm). 213211 BC. Laureate male head left, perhaps a portrait of Hannibal or another Punic ruler / Elephant right, Punic letter ‘ in exergue. Robinson 8b. SNG Copenhagen 383. Good very fine $1,000

81. CE L T I C B R I T A I N. Corieltauvi. Silver unit (0.97 gm). Hostidius [sic] Type. Ca. 55-45 BC. Boar standing right, not pierced by spear, rings in fields containing one to three pellets / Horse standing left, tail resembling fern, ring-and-pellet motifs before and below, anemone-like design above, radiate sun behind. Van Arsdell 855-5 (this coin). BMC 3200. Dark tone. Good very fine $1,000

83. Silver drachm (3.22 gm). 2nd century BC. Head of nymph right, crowned with grain, wearing triple-pendant earring and bead necklace / ΛΛ << ΛΛ above, lion with bulbous joints, open maw and protruding bulbous tongue prowling right on curving double ground line. Cf. Castelin 1033, 1036. BMC II 3-17. Extremely fine $300

84. Silver drachm (3.11 gm). 2nd century BC. Head of nymph right, crowned with grain, wearing triple-pendant earring and bead necklace / AA ΣΣ ΛΛ above, lion with bulbous joints, open maw and protruding bulbous tongue prowling right on double ground line. Cf. Castelin 1025-1026. BMC II 3-17. Extremely fine $300

Ex Dr. Wm. F. Blank Collection; Freeman & Sear FPL 5, Spring 1998, E29; H. R. Mossop Collection, Glendining’s, 6 Nov. 1991, lot 137.

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85. CELTS IN CENTRAL GAUL. Sequani. Potin 19 mm (5.33 gm). Before 52 BC. Head left, Q: SAM (AM ligatured) behind / Horse left, only near legs depicted, tail transformed into volute containing pellet. LT 5393. Colbert de Beaulieu, Montbéliard, 36. Extremely rare. Green patina. Very fine $400

88. DANUBIAN CELTS. Zangenlorbeer (“Laurel pliers”) Type. Silver tetradrachm (13.42 gm). 2nd-1st centuries BC. Laureate head of Zeus right / Rider left, holding two birds, wavy exergual line below. Göbl, OTA 163. Cf. Kostial 446 (one bird). Struck a bit flatly on beard. Good very fine/ extremely fine $750

Ex Leu 79, 31 October 2000, lot 49; Auctiones 25, 19 June 1995, lot 1303. The inscription is almost certainly associated with the “Q DOCI SAM F” borne on certain silver quinarii of the Sequani.

86. BELGIC TRIBES IN NORTHWEST GAUL. Coriosolites. Billon stater (6.77 gm). Ca. 100-50 BC. Head right, S-shaped curls along temple and cheek, S-shaped designs before and above nose / Rider on androcephalous horse right, lyre below. DT série 365A, 2332. LT pl. XXII, 6703. Of good silver. “25” in ink above obverse head. Very fine $200

87. The Eravisci. Silver quinarius (1.36 gm). From 90 BC. After type of L. Piso Frugi (90 BC). Laureate, draped bust of Apollo right / Victory standing left, holding palm branch over shoulder, dots for rows of feathers on upper part of wing. LT 10114. Cf. RRC 340/2. Very rare. Very fine $200

89. B-Reiter (“B rider”) Type. Silver tetradrachm (11.47 gm). 2nd-1st centuries BC. Laureate head of Zeus right, prominent brow ridge extending across temple / Rider in plumed helmet on dotted ground line left, B in upper right field. Göbl, OTA, pl. 27, 308/2. Kostial 656-657. Toned. Good very fine $400

90. Kroisbach Type variant. Silver tetradrachm (12.63 gm). Burgenland, ca. 100-50 BC. Celticized male head left with hair in scallops / Crested head and draped torso left above Celticized horse pacing left on torque. Unpublished in the standard references. Cf. Freeman & Sear FPL 11, Spring/ Summer 2006, 3. Very rare. Lock of hair above forehead softly struck and minor double striking on obverse, otherwise extremely fine $2,500

Ex Leu 79, 31 October 2000, lot 179.

Lot 88

Lot 90

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91. Silver fraction (0.90 gm). Ca. 100-50 BC. Beardless male head left with aquiline nose, hair outlined with dotted border / Winged horse trotting left on ground line. Unpublished. Cf. Manhattan Sale 1, lot 3 and Gemini III, lot 21, for same denomination with identical types. Extremely rare $500

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92. Silver fraction (0.53 gm). Flower with fifteen petals seen from above / Wheel with six spokes and dotted rim. Dembski —. Kostial —. DT —. Apparently unpublished. Old edge chip. Toned. Very fine $500

shorter and tighter thunderbolt of original, quadriga at apex as little distinguishable from ornaments on raking cornices as on some original dies, taller pediment resembling equilateral rather than isosceles triangle, lock on right half of central double doors missing, traces of legend visible below. Cf. RRC 377/1 & 385/1, RCV 298 & 312. Extremely fine $600

93. Kugelwange (“Ball cheek”) Type. Silver drachm (2.09 gm). 2nd-1st centuries BC. Laureate head of Zeus right, eye and lips formed by single dot, cheekbone globular / Unbridled horse stepping left. Kostial 509. Göbl, OTA, pl. 17, 204/2 var. Good very fine $200

94. Helmschweifreiter (“Helmet tail rider”) Type. Silver fraction (1.05 gm). 2nd-1st centuries BC. Head of unbearded Heracles(?) right, wearing lion’s skin / Helmeted rider left, long crest of helmet extending behind. Cf. OTA 186 rev. (larger denomination). Kostial —. Extremely rare and perhaps unpublished. Nearly extremely fine $300

95. Geto-Dacian imitation. Silver serrate denarius (3.96 gm). From 78 BC. Obverse after serrate type of L. Volumnius Strabo (ca. 81 BC): laureate head of Jupiter right, but crown without berries between paired leaves as on original, strands of hair on far side of forehead broken rather than curving, control letter C behind now turned on face, hair pattern simplified and crude, dotted border superimposed on linear border as originally, somewhat greater irregularity in the serrations / Reverse after type of M. Volteius (78 BC): temple of Jupiter Capitolinus with three sets of shut double doors, tympanum decorated with star-like thunderbolt for 58

96. Silver denarius (3.72 gm). From 77 BC. Obverse after serrate type of L. Volumnius Strabo (ca. 81 BC): laureate head of Jupiter right, but crown without berries between paired leaves as on original, curving strands of hair on far side of forehead now single strand looped over itself, control letter C behind now turned on face and repeated, hair pattern simplified but more natural, dotted border seemingly combined with linear border / Reverse after type of L. Rutilius Flaccus (ca. 77 BC): Victory in biga right, holding crown and reins, but lacking wings, L RVTII (for L• RVTILI) in exergue, but R without loop and letters so run into exergual line that T was shortened to make crossbar evident. Cf. RRC 385/1 & 387/1, RCV 312 & 318. Very fine $300

97. CALABRIA. Tarentum. Silver nomos (6.26 gm). Ca. 425-380 BC. Nude ephebe cantering left, holding bridle with both hands, ΛΕ (retrograde) beneath horse / Dolphin rider right, wielding trident and pointing with left hand. HN Italy 850. Vlasto 319 (same dies). Porous. Edge bump (8:00 obverse) and reverse scratches. Good very fine $300

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98. Silver nomos (6.65 gm). Ca. 280-272 BC. Nude ephebe on horse stepping right, crowning animal, ΑΠΟΛΛ-Ω in small letters beneath belly and foreleg of horse, EY in field above, two amphorae standing on ground line / Dolphin rider left, holding cantharus and trident, [Τ]ΑΡΑΣ below, ΘΙ in left field, B in right field. HN Italy 1010. Vlasto 764. Reverse a little off center. Attractive iridescent tone. Nearly extremely fine $1,000

101. Silver nomos (6.41 gm). Ca. 272-240 BC. Youth on horseback right, wielding spear, ΙΠΠΟΔ[Α] below / Dolphin rider left, holding cantharus and distaff, ΤΑΡΑ[Σ] below, ΔΙ in right field. HN Italy 1040. Vlasto 904ff. Lightly toned. Good very fine $500

Ex New York Sale XVII, 9 January 2008, lot 3. 102. LUCANIA. Heraclea. Silver diobol (1.06 gm). Ca. 432-420 BC. Head of Athena right, wearing crested Attic helmet depicting hippocamp with curved wing / Heracles squatting right, strangling Nemean lion, HE above. HN Italy 1360. Van Keuren 38. A few minor scratches. Extremely fine $250 Ex CNG eAuction 105, 5 January 2005, lot 3. 99. Silver nomos (6.40 gm). Ca. 280-272 BC. Nude ephebe on horse stepping right, crowning animal, AP in ligature behind, ΔΑΜΥ-ΛΟΣ faintly below / Dolphin rider left, holding cornucopiae, trident and shield, [Τ]Α-ΡΑΣ below. HN Italy 1008. Vlasto 750. Head of dolphin rider struck flatly, otherwise extremely fine $600

100. Silver nomos (6.42 gm). Ca. 272-240 BC. Helmeted horseman right, holding spear and shield, AΡΙ[ΣΤΟΚ] below / Dolphin rider left, head facing, chlamys around left arm and flowing behind, shouldering trident and being crowned by Nike, ΤΑΡ[ΑΣ] in field to right, rudder below. Vlasto 903 (obverse), 899-902 (reverse). Cf. HN Italy 1039 (ΘΙ on obverse). Patches of corrosion in right reverse field. Nicely toned. Extremely fine $600

103. Metapontum. Silver stater (7.32 gm). Ca. 400-340 BC. Head of Demeter Hygieia right, wearing earring and hairband, hair in a knot at the back with the ends hanging loose, I-YΓIEIA in minute letters on lower edge of neck / MET, ear of barley with thick left to left. HN Italy 1516. Noe 411. SNG ANS 322 var. A rarer variety in the series. Lightly porous, graffiti in reverse fields. Very fine $250 Purchased in an early Joel Malter auction.

Ex Hirsch 25, 14 February 2008, lot 1323.

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104. Silver stater (7.91 gm). Ca. 331 BC. Head of Leucippus in Corinthian helmet right, head of lion with closed jaws right behind, [AP] ligatured under chin / META, barley grain with leaf to left, club thereabove, AMI therebelow. HN Italy 1575. SNG Copenhagen 1208. Toned. Very fine $400 Ex Lakeview Collection (UBS 59, 27 January 2004, lot 5174).

107. Thurium. Silver stater (7.90 gm). Ca. 443-400 BC. Head of Athena right, wearing crested Attic helmet decorated with olive crown and round earring, Φ before visor / [ΘΟ]ΥΡΙΩΝ, bull walking left, head lowered, bird alighting left below belly, fish swimming left in exergue. HN Italy 1772. SNG Ashmolean 901 = SNG ANS 950. Struck on a short flan. Extremely fine $1,250 Ex NAC P, 12 May 2005, lot 1352.

105. Silver stater (7.46 gm). Ca. 330 BC. Laureate head of Zeus right, [thunderbolt behind] / METAΠON upwards at left, ear of barley with leaf to right, KAΛ above. Johnston A6.3 (same dies). SNG ANS 412 (same dies). Very rare. Some surface roughness, otherwise extremely fine $2,500

106. Paestum. Bronze sextans (3.22 gm, 15 mm). Second Punic War, 218-201 BC. Head of Demeter right, two pellets behind / ΠAIS, wild boar right, crescent and two pellets below. HN Italy 1215. SNG ANS 758 var. (caduceus below). Beautiful olive green patina. Extremely fine $300

The letter Φ, which sometimes also appears on the rump of the bull on the reverse, and on one type (HN 1771) is expanded to ΦΡΥ below the bull, has been interpreted by some as the signature of the Syracusan engraver Phrygillos, especially since the bird on the reverse could represent a finch (φρυγιλος); yet a third type (HN 1773) has neither bird nor abbreviated name below the bull, and Φ can appear on the rump in the presence of the bird on HN 1772.

108. BRUTTIUM. Brettii. Bronze sixth unit or “obol” (1.48 gm, 13 mm). 214-ca. 211 BC. Beardless head of Heracles left, in lion-skin headdress / BRET—TIΩN, club and strung bow crossed. HN Italy 1986. BMC Italy 118. Very rare. Brown patina of attractive style and extremely fine $250

109. Brettii(?). Silver quarter shekel (1.78 gm). By 209-ca. 205 BC (under Hannibal). Head of Demeter or Tanit left, crowned with grain, wearing pendant earring and necklace / Free horse standing right on ground line. HN Italy 2020. Extremely fine $300 South Italian cities, including Locri and Tarentum, have been proposed as the mint site for this variety.

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110. Croton. Silver stater (7.86 gm). Ca. 480-430 BC. Tripod with three ring handles, the central one of pellets, and legs terminating in leonine paws, marsh bird to left, retrograde legend to right / Tripod incuse. HN Italy 2104. SNG ANS 306-307. Cf. SNG Copenhagen 1760. SNG Munich 1427. Toned. Very fine $750

113. Agrigentum. Bronze 20 mm (7.68 gm). Ca. 338-287 BC. Laureate head of Zeus left, AKPA-[ΓΑ] behind and below / Eagle flying left, hare in talons, Δ under near wing. SNG ANS 1113-1114. Calciati 116, Rl 2. Black-green patina. Very fine $350

Ex Sternberg XVI (with Apparuti), 15-16 November 1985, lot 36.

114. Gela. Bronze tetras (3.42 gm). Ca. 420-405 BC. ΓΕΛΑΣ, bull standing left, head lowered, three pellets in exergue / Diademed, horned head of young river god. SNG Copenhagen 284. Calciati 12. SNG ANS 109-110 var. (reverse with legend). Jenkins 273, 504. Calciati III, 11, 14. Green-brown patina. Very fine $100 111. SICILY. Abacaenum. Silver litra (0.58 gm). Ca. 420400 BC. Laureate head of Zeus right, ABAK before / Sow standing right on ground line, AI upward before, NI (retrograde) in exergue. SNG Copenhagen 4-5 var., BMC 4 var. (barley grain above and arrangement of legend on reverse). SNG ANS 896 (obverse). Surfaces rough in places. Extremely fine/good very fine $250 Ex Rauch 74, 7 December 2004, lot 56.

112. Aetna. Bronze hemilitra (16.38 gm, 27 mm). 405-401 BC. AITNAIΩN, head of Athena right wearing Corinthian helmet / Horse galloping right on exergual line, reins loose, M above. Calciati 1. SNG ANS (part 5) 1301. Glossy olive-green patina. A few minor flan flaws on reverse but exceptional for issue. Good very fine $500

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115. Mamertini. Bronze unit (7.33 gm, 20 mm). Ca. 278-264 BC. AΔΡANOU, helmeted head of Adranus left / Dog standing right, Φ above, MAMEΡTINΩ[N] in exergue. Calciati 20. SNG ANS 418. Very rare. Green-brown patina. With a splendid depiction of a dog. Evidence of minor repair in reverse fields, otherwise good very fine $250

116. Messana. Bronze litra (10.65 gm, 26 mm). 317-311 BC. MEΣΣANIΩN, head of nymph Messana left / Biga of mules standing right, driven by Messana holding a palm branch in upraised right hand and reins in left, Δ below ground line. Calciati 18/1-2. Caltabiano 800 (D7/R17). Rare. Brown and green patina. Very fine/good very fine $400 61


117. Syracuse. Time of Dion (357-354 BC). Bronze hemilitron (3.16 gm). [IEΥΣ] ΕΛ—ΕΥΘΕ[ΡΙΟΣ], laureate head of Zeus left / ΣΥΡΑΚΟΣΙΩΝ, octopus. Calciati 75. SNG Copenhagen 731. Very rare. Green and brown patina. Very fine/good very fine $300

120. Agathocles (317-289 BC). Silver tetradrachm (17.19 gm). Head of Arethusa left, three dolphins around, ΦΙ below neck / [ΣΥ]ΡΑΚΟΣΙ[ΩΝ], charioteer driving quadriga left, holding kentron in right hand and reins in left, triskeles above, AI monogram in exergue (off flan). SNG ANS 636 (same dies). Ierardi 82 (O15/R53). Light encrustation before face of Arethusa. Good very fine $1,000

121. Bronze 16 mm (3.21 gm). Period 1, ca. 317-310. ΣΥΡΑΚΟΣΙΩΝ, head of Persephone left, ear of grain behind / Bull standing left, head lowered and facing, dolphin above, NI in exergue. Calciati 107 (Ds95/Rl46). Cf. SNG ANS 603606. Glossy green-brown patina. A few areas of roughness. Nearly extremely fine $250

118. Time of Timoleon (344-317 BC). Gold 30 litrae (1.76 gm). [ΖΕΥΣ] ΕΛΕΥ[ΘΕΡΙΟΣ], laureate head of Zeus left / ΣΥΡΑ[ΚΟΣ]ΙΩΝ, Pegasus flying left, A before, three pellets below. SNG ANS 493. SNG Lockett 995. Good very fine $2,500

119. Bronze dilitron (15.98 gm). ΖΕΥΣ ΕΛΕΥΘΕΡΙΟΣ, laureate head of Zeus left / ΣΥΡΑΚΟΣΙΩΝ, free horse half-rearing left on ground line. SNG ANS 533-541. Calciati 80. Glossy green and brown patina. Some mild obverse roughness. Good very fine $400

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122. Hicetas II (287-278 BC). Bronze litra (7.31 gm). Ca. 283-279 BC. Laureate head of Zeus Hellanios right / ΣΥΡΑΚΟΣΙΩΝ, eagle standing left on thunderbolt, wings spread. Calciati 167. SNG ANS 795. Green-brown patina. Nearly extremely fine $250

123. Hieron II (269-215 BC). Bronze 18 mm (5.27 gm). Head of Persephone left, wearing crown of grain, pendant earring and necklace, cornucopiae behind / Bull standing left, head lowered and facing, club above, NK in ligature in upper field, IE in exergue. Calciati 199 (Ds 41 Rl 2). SNG Copenhagen 870. Green-brown patina. Nearly extremely fine $250 Freeman & Sear Manhattan Sale 2


Freeman & Sear • Los Angeles

124. Hieronymus (215-214 BC). Silver 10 litrae (7.87 gm). Diademed head of Hieronymus left, retrograde K behind / BAΣΙΛΕΩΣ ΙΕΡΟΝΥΜΟΥ above and under horizontal winged thunderbolt, KI between royal title and thunderbolt. Holloway 40 (O21/R32). SNG ANS 1028 (same reverse die). With some minor encrustation and scattered light porosity. Extremely fine $500

128. Chalcidian League. Silver tetradrachm (13.55 gm). Olynthus, ca. 420-417 BC. Laureate head of Apollo left / Χ-Α-Λ-ΚΙΔ-ΕΩΝ, cithara. SNG ANS 469 (same dies). Robinson-Clement A1/P1. Nearly extremely fine $6,500

125. Under Roman Rule. After 212 BC. Bronze 19 mm (7.29 gm). Laureate head of Zeus right / ΣΥΡΑΚΟΣΙΩΝ, Nike driving galloping biga right. Calciati 229. SNG ANS 10721075. Olive-green patina. Very fine $100

129. Terone. Silver tetrobol (2.44 gm). Ca. 400-350 BC. Oenochoe with handle to right, T—E in fields / Quadripartite incuse with granulated surfaces. SNG ANS 751-754. Well struck and with good surfaces. Good very fine $600

126. THRACO-MACEDONIAN TRIBES. “Lete” (Eion?). Silver stater (9.72 gm). Ca. 520/510-490/485 BC. Ithyphallic silenus, with equine ear and tail reduced to nub, running right, with right hand seizing right arm of nymph fleeing and raising left arm in protest, raising left hand to her face, pellet in upper field / Square incuse quartered diagonally. SNG ANS 955-961. AMNG 3.2, 14. Very fine $750

130. MACEDONIAN KINGDOM. Philip II (359-336 BC). Silver tetradrachm (14.28 gm). Pella, ca. 323/2-315. Laureate head of Zeus left / ΦΙΛΙΠ-ΠΟΥ, nude male rider on horse stepping right, holding palm branch, Θ below raised foreleg of animal. Le Rider 436-439. SNG ANS 430. Obverse lightly porous. Toned. Good very fine $2,000

Ex CNG EAuction 104, 22 December 2004, lot 21.

127. MACEDONIA. Acanthus. Ca. 400-350 BC. Silver tetrobol (2.14 gm). Forepart of bull reclining left, head reverted, ΠΕ above / Quadripartite shallow incuse square with granulated fields. SNG ANS 44-45. With nice iridescent tone. Good very fine $200

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131. Alexander III (336-323 BC). Gold stater (8.54 gm). Abydus(?), ca. 310-301. Head of Athena right in triplecrested Corinthian helmet decorated with snake on bowl / ΑΛΕΞΑΝΔΡ[οΥ], Nike standing half-left, holding crown and mast, IME in monogram in left field, scallop shell downward under right wing. Price 1559 var. (ME in monogram). An apparently unpublished variant. Extremely fine $2,000 63


132. Silver tetradrachm (17.16 gm). “Amphipolis,” ca. 320-317. Head of young Heracles right in lion-skin headdress, paws tied at neck / ΑΛΕΞΑΝΔΡ•Υ ΒΑΣΙ-ΛΕΩΣ, Zeus seated left, confronting eagle held in right hand and grasping scepter with left, upright laurel branch before, Π under lower strut between legs of stool. Price 124. Troxell issue J6. Attractively toned. Extremely fine $1,000

135. Silver drachm (4.23 gm). Magnesia ad Maeandrum, posthumous issue, ca. 319-305 BC. Head of young Heracles right in lion-skin headdress, paws tied at neck / ΑΛΕΞΑΝΔΡοΥ, Zeus enthroned left, confronting eagle held in right hand and grasping scepter with left, ΣΩ monogram in left field, ΔΤ monogram beneath throne. Cf. Price 1970 (AT monogram for ΔΤ). Cf. Müller 793. About extremely fine and beautifully toned $250 Ex Freeman & Sear Fixed Price List 2, Summer/Fall 1994, B41.

133. Silver tetradrachm (17.18 gm). “Babylon,” ca. 325-323. Head of young Heracles right in lion-skin headdress, paws tied at neck / ΑΛΕΞΑΝΔΡ[οΥ], Zeus enthroned left, confronting eagle held in right hand and grasping scepter with left, coiled snake in left field, monogram above thin strut between legs of throne, M thereunder. Price 3665. Good extremely fine $1,250

134. Silver tetradrachm (17.21 gm). Magnesia ad Maeandrum, ca. 282-225. Head of young Heracles right in lion-skin headdress, paws tied at neck / ΑΛΕΞΑΝΔΡOΥ, Zeus enthroned left, confronting eagle held in right hand and grasping scepter with left, monogram before, Δ in outer right field, meander pattern under throne. Price —. Good extremely fine $1,800 Ex Gorny & Mosch 146, 6 March 2006, lot 173.

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136. Silver tetradrachm (17.23 gm). Pella, ca. 325-315. Head of young Heracles right in lion-skin headdress, paws tied at neck / ΑΛΕΞΑΝΔΡοΥ, Zeus enthroned left, confronting eagle held in right hand and grasping lotus-tipped scepter with left, Θ under grooved strut between legs of throne. Price 214. In NGC holder and graded “Ch AU; Strike 4/5; Surface 4/5.” Good extremely fine $1,250

137. Silver tetradrachm (17.00 gm). Pella, ca. 275-270. Head of young Heracles right in lion-skin headdress, paws tied at neck / ΑΛΕΞΑΝΔΡοΥ, Zeus enthroned left, confronting eagle held in right hand and grasping lotus-tipped scepter with left, crested Macedonian helmet in left field, ΠΑΛ in monogram under grooved strut between legs of throne, KE monogram in exergue and transgressing ground line. Price 629. Müller 233. Extremely fine $450

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138. Silver tetradrachm (16.74 gm). Mesembria, before ca. 240. Head of young Heracles right in lion-skin headdress, paws tied at neck / ΑΛΕΞΑΝΔΡοΥ ΒΑΣΙΛΕΩΣ, Zeus enthroned left, confronting eagle held in right hand and grasping lotustipped scepter with left, ME monogram above far leg, crested helmet left under strut between legs of throne. Price 978. Nearly extremely fine $400

139. Silver tetradrachm (16.78 gm). Odessus, before ca. 240. Head of young Heracles right in lion-skin headdress, paws tied at neck / ΑΛΕΞΑΝΔΡοΥ ΒΑ-ΣΙΛΕΩΣ, Zeus enthroned left, confronting eagle held in right hand and grasping scepter with left, ΘI under thin strut between legs of throne. Price —. Rare. The obverse of fine style, the reverse struck from worn die. Extremely fine $750

140. Silver tetradrachm (16.89 gm). Odessus, before ca. 240. Head of young Heracles right in lion-skin headdress, paws tied at neck / ΑΛΕΞΑΝΔΡο[Υ] [Β]-ΑΣΙΛΕ[ΩΣ], Zeus enthroned left, confronting eagle held in right hand and grasping scepter with left, KOI above far leg, OΔH monogram under throne. Price 1170. Good very fine $400

Freeman & Sear Manhattan Sale 2

141. Silver tetradrachm (16.89 gm). Callatis, before ca. 240. Head of young Heracles right in lion-skin headdress, paws tied at neck / ΑΛΕΞΑΝΔΡοΥ ΒΑΣΙΛΕΩΣ, Zeus enthroned left, confronting eagle held in right hand and grasping lotus-tipped scepter with left, complex monogram over KA monogram in inner left field, complex monogram under double strut between legs of throne, ear of grain left in exergue. Price —, cf. 937-938. Extremely fine/nearly extremely fine $750

142. Antigonus II Gonatas (277/6-239 BC). Silver tetradrachm (16.99 gm). Amphipolis, ca. 274-255. Horned bust of Pan left on boss of Macedonian shield, lagobolon over shoulder, within double crescents against rim seven stars, one sevenpointed, the rest eight-pointed / ΒΑΣΙΛΕΩΣ ΑΝΤΙΓoΝoΥ, helmeted Athena Alkis walking left, brandishing thunderbolt and carrying shield decorated with Gorgoneion, crested Macedonian helmet before, TI behind. SNG Ashmolean 3260. SNG Copenhagen 1202. Lightly toned. Nearly extremely fine $1,250

143. Aesillas Q(uaestor) (ca. 90 BC). Silver tetradrachm (16.95 gm). ΜΑΚΕΔΟΝΩΝ, head of Alexander the Great right, horn of Ammon encircling ear / AESILLAS Q, portable safe, club, official seat, laurel crown around. SNG Copenhagen 1328-1329. Bauslaugh, Group I. Attractively toned. Nearly extremely fine $750

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144. Autonomous. Silver tetrobol (2.21 gm). Uncertain Macedonian mint under Philip V or Perseus, ca. 185-168. Macedonian shield with flower-like central boss with six petals / MAKE-ΔΟΝΩΝ, stern of ship left. BMC 17-18. Cf. SNG Copenhagen 1289 (four crescent-shaped rays). With areas of light deposits. Nearly extremely fine $250

145. THRACE. Maroneia. Silver tetradrachm (15.89 gm). Ca. 189-45 BC. Head of young Dionysus right, hair knotted at back with central pellet and falling in two long locks toward shoulder, lock of hair visible at far side of neck, wearing mitra (cloth headband) and crown consisting of three upper and two lower lateral ivy leaves and two frontal blossoms / ΔΙΟΝΥΣΟΥ ΣΩΤΗΡΟΣ ΜΑΡΩΝΙΤΩΝ, Dionysus standing half-left, holding bunch of grapes and two narthex wands (stalks of the giant fennel), monograms low in inner fields. Schönert-Geiß 1051-1055. Cf. SNG Copenhagen 637-644 (neither monogram represented). In NGC holder (misidentified as Thasos[!]) and graded “AU, Strike 4/5; Surface 2/5.” Heavily cleaned. Extremely fine $350

147. THRACIAN KINGDOM. Lysimachus (323-281 BC). Gold stater (8.22 gm). Istrus, struck posthumously, ca. 200-150 BC. Diademed head of the deified Alexander III right, with horn of Ammon / BAΣΙΛΕΩΣ ΛΥΣΙΜΑΧΟΥ, Athena seated left, holding Nike in right hand, resting left arm on shield, transverse spear behind, ΔΙ in inner left field, ΙΣ under throne, trident with dolphins in exergue. Cf. SNG Copenhagen 1094 and AMNG 482 (different portrait style). Müller 284-5 var. (monograms). See Triton VIII, lot 263 for similar portrait style (different monogram). Good very fine $1,000

148. Silver tetradrachm (16.94 gm). Cius, before ca. 240. Diademed head of deified Alexander right, with horn of Ammon / ΒΑΣΙΛΕΩΣ ΛΥΣΙΜΑΧΟΥ, helmeted Athena seated left, holding Victory in right hand, spear and shield decorated with gorgoneion leaned against seat, K above herm and ΔI monogram in inner left field, box in bowcase in exergue. Müller —. Meydancikkale —. Mektepini —. Good very fine $600 Ex Freeman & Sear Fixed Price List 14, Winter 2008/2009, 48.

146. Silver tetradrachm (16.47 gm). Ca. 189-45 BC. Head of young Dionysus right, hair knotted at back with central pellet and falling in three long locks toward shoulder, lock of hair visible at far side of neck, wearing mitra (cloth headband) and crown consisting of three upper and two lower lateral ivy leaves and two frontal blossoms / ΔΙΟΝΥΣΟΥ ΣΩΤΗΡΟΣ ΜΑΡΩΝΙΤΩΝ, Dionysus standing half-left, holding bunch of grapes and two narthex wands (stalks of the giant fennel), monograms low in inner fields. Schönert-Geiß 1034-1044. Cf. SNG Copenhagen 637-644 (neither monogram represented). Good very fine $350

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149. Silver tetradrachm (17.13 gm). Uncertain mint, before ca. 240. Diademed head of deified Alexander right, with horn of Ammon / ΒΑΣΙΛΕΩΣ ΛΥΣΙΜΑΧoΥ, helmeted Athena seated left, holding Victory in right hand, spear and shield decorated with gorgoneion leaned against seat, monogram in inner left field. Müller 531. Meydancikkale —. Torso of Athena flatly struck, otherwise good very fine $750 Ex Freeman & Sear Fixed Price List 14, Winter 2008/2009, 51. Freeman & Sear Manhattan Sale 2


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150. MOESIA. Istrus. Silver drachm (4.65 gm). 4th century BC. Joined young male heads facing 3/4-front, one inverted / ΙΣΤΡΙΗ, sea eagle perched left on dolphin, ΑΠ in ligature below. ANMG I 417. BMC Thrace 6. Lightly toned. Small test cut on one chin, otherwise extremely fine $250

151. TAURIC CHERSONESE. Panticapaeum. Bronze 26 mm (13.02 gm). Ca. 340-325 BC. Head of bearded satyr left, with equine ears and snub nose, wearing crown consisting of seven ivy leaves and blossom / ΠΑΝΤΙ, strung bow over arrow. MacDonald 59. SNG BM Black Sea 868. Some tooling. Brown and green patina. Nearly extremely fine $500

152. THESSALY. Larissa. Silver drachm (6.00 gm). 430s BC. Bull wrestler right, grasping bull by horns, hat and cape billowing behind / ΛΑΡ-ΙΣΑΙ, bridled horse jumping right within incuse square. Herrmann IIIF, pl. 3, 2 (obv.)-3 (rev.). Reverse a bit off center, otherwise good very fine $250

154. Phalanna. Silver drachm (5.40 gm). Ca. 400–344 BC. Young male head right / ΦΑΛ-ΑΝΝ-Α-ΙΩΝ, bridled horse stepping right on ground line. Dewing 1414 (same dies). Cf. BMC Thessaly 1, SNG Copenhagen 199, SNG Lockett 1590, and SNG Fitzwilliam 2431–2433. Lightly toned. Good very fine $750

155. Scotussa. Silver hemidrachm (3.09 gm). Ca. 400-367 BC. Bust of bearded Heracles in lion’s skin right / Σ-ΚΟ, forepart of bridled horse right, left foreleg raised, within circular incuse. BMC 2. Cf. SNG Copenhagen 252 (no headdress on trihemiobol). Rare. Good very fine $750 Ex Lanz 123, 30 May 2005, lot 209.

156. ACARNANIA. Leucas. Silver stater (8.31 gm). Ca. 380-330 BC. Pegasus flying right, Λ below / Head of Athena right in Corinthian helmet, Λ above neckpiece, kerykeion behind. Calciati 93 (reverse). Nicely toned. Obverse a little off center. Nearly extremely fine $500 Ex Künker 94, 28 September 2004, lot 789.

153. Silver drachm (6.09 gm). Ca. 430-410 BC. Head of nymph left, wearing earring / [Λ]ΑΡΙ-Σ-ΑΙ-A, bridled horse galloping right. SNG Fitzwilliam 2396 var. (legend). Good very fine $350

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157. BOEOTIA. Thebes. Federal Coinage. Silver drachm (4.78 gm). Ca. 225-171 BC. Laureate head of Poseidon right / BOIΩTΩΝ, Nike standing left, holding wreath and resting against trident, monogram in left field. BCD 130. SNG Copenhagen 393. Head, Boeotia p. 90 corr. (Poseidon, not Zeus). With some original find encrustation adhering to surfaces. Good very fine $150

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158. Haliartus. Silver stater (12.34 gm). Ca. 500-480 BC. Boeotian shield, upper and lower rim divided into four segments / Archaic aspirate (symbol for the h-sound) in center of incuse mill-sail pattern. SNG Copenhagen 188. BMC 3-4. Rare. Very fine $1,000 Ex BCD Boiotia, Triton IX, 10 Jan. 2006, lot 154; Bonham’s, 15 April. 2003, lot 685.

159. ATTICA. Athens. Silver tetradrachm (17.04 gm). Ca. 454415 BC. Head of Athena right with frontal eye, wearing crested Attic helmet decorated with three olive leaves above visor and spiral palmette on bowl, round earring with central boss, and wire necklace / ΑΘΕ, owl standing right, head facing, olive sprig and crescent moon behind, in square incuse. Starr pl. xxii, 6’. Minor die flaws on obverse. Toned. Good very fine $600

161. Silver tetradrachm (16.75 gm). New Style, ca. 108/7. Head of Athena right in triple-crested Attic helmet decorated with palmette on neckguard and bowl and sculpture of Pegasus on arch, foreparts of four horses visible above visor, wearing pendant earring / Α-ΘΕ, owl standing right, head facing, on overturned amphora marked E, officials ΔΑ­-ΜΩΝ, ΣΩΣΙΚΡΑ-ΤΗΣ and ΘΕΟ-ΔΩΡ, capped quiver with shoulder strap and strung bow in right field, ME below, olive crown around. Thompson 727c. Nearly extremely fine $1,000

162. ACHAEA. Achaean League. Elis. Silver drachm (4.54 gm). ca. 2145/240-210 BC. Eagle flying right, grasping the back of a running hare / F A, thunderbolt, with flames and pomegranate above and volutes and pinecone below. BCD 234 (same dies). Schwabacher Group I, 4 (same dies). Toned. Very fine $250 Ex Empire Coins Auction #4, 9 November 1985, lot 92.

160. Silver tetradrachm (16.90 gm). Ca. 454-415 BC. Head of Athena with frontal eye right, in crested Attic helmet decorated with three olive leaves above visor and spiral palmette on bowl, wearing round earring and bead necklace / AΘE, owl standing right, head facing, olive sprig and crescent moon behind, all in square incuse. SNG Copenhagen 31. Dark tone with earthen patina in recesses. Nearly extremely fine $1,250

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163. AEOLIS. Cyme. Silver tetradrachm (15.94 gm). Ca. 155-145 BC. Head of Amazon Kyme right, wearing simple hairband and no jewelry, hair gathered into bun / KUMΑΙΩΝ, bridled horse standing right, raising left foreleg, cup with handle to left, with wide rim thereunder, ΚΑΛΛΙΑΣ under ground lines, laurel crown around, tied below and with figure-ofeight between ends above. Oakley (ANSMN 27, 1982) 37 (pl. 7). SNG Copenhagen 103. SNG von Aulock 1636. Nicely toned. A few light marks. Nearly extremely fine/very fine $600

166. Rhodes. Silver didrachm (6.77 gm). Ca. 250-230 BC. Radiate head of Helios facing three-quarters right / ΜΝΑΣΙΜΑΧOΣ, rose with bud on shoot with five leaves to right, P—O divided by stem, helmeted Athena standing left beside, confronting aphlaston. Ashton, Money Uses 208. SNG Keckman 537-539. Nice iridescent tone. Extremely fine $1,750

Ex John Seeger Collection, CNG 76 part 2, 12 September 2007, lot 3064. Of 38 coins of Kallias depicted by Oakley, only two have the figure-of-eight design on the reverse, and none shows the handle of the cup on the left.

164. IONIA. Magnesia on the Meander. Silver hemidrachm (1.53 gm). Ca. 350-320 BC. Helmeted rider charging right with couched spear, cape billowing behind / ΜΑΓΝ, bull butting left, head turned to left, meander pattern below, ear of grain behind, ΣΚΥΘΟΥ in exergue. SNG Kayhan 414. SNG Copenhagen 808. Very scarce. Tiny flaw above horseman. Nearly extremely fine $500

167. PSEUDO-RHODES. Imitation minted for Rhodian mercenaries in Thessaly. Silver drachm (2.68 gm). Ca. 175–170 BC. Facing head of Helios inclined slightly to right / Rose with bud on right, ΕΡΜΙΑΣ above, Z—Ω flanking stem. Price, KME, pp. 241–242 (attributed to northern Greece, not excluding Macedonia). SNG Keckman vol. 1, 793–795 (attributed to Thessaly). SNG Copenhagen Suppl. 358 (attributed to Rhodian Peraea). Beautifully toned. Good extremely fine $550

Ex Tkalec, 9 May 2005, lot 75.

165. ISLANDS OFF CARIA. Cos. Bronze 11 mm (1.08 gm). Ca. 300-190 BC. Head of Heracles in lion-skin headdress right, paws tied below neck / KΩΙΟΝ, crab seen from above, EPICTPATH[C] below. BMC —. SNG von Aulock —. Cf. SNG Copenhagen 646-648 (shortened ethnic, different magistrates). Very rare. Good very fine $200 Freeman & Sear Manhattan Sale 2

168. Silver drachm (2.56 gm). Thessaly, ca. 175-170 BC. Facing head of Helios inclined slightly to right / Rose with bud on right, ΕΡΜΙΑΣ above, Z—Ω flanking stem. Price, KME, pp. 241–242 (attributed to northern Greece, not excluding Macedonia). SNG Keckman vol. 1, 793–795 (attributed to Thessaly). SNG Copenhagen Suppl. 358 (attributed to Rhodian Peraea). Extremely fine $500

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169. LYCIA. Oinoanda. Silver stater (8.15 gm). Ca. 2nd century BC. Laureate head of Zeus right, scepter terminating in lotus blossom and A behind / Eagle with closed wings standing right on winged thunderbolt, head turned toward viewer, OI—NO-AN across fields. Ashton, “The Coinage of Oinoanda,” NC 2005, 20 (A2/P1). Nicely toned. Good very fine $650

170. Silver stater (7.62 gm). Laureate head of Zeus right, scepter terminating in lotus blossom and B behind / Eagle with closed wings standing right on winged thunderbolt, Γ and grape bunch before, OINOAN[-ΔΕΩΝ] in two lines below. Ashton, “The Coinage of Oinoanda,” NC 2005, 20 (A4/P9). Toned. Good very fine $500

173. Silver tetradrachm (16.29 gm). Ca. 183–175 BC. Head of Athena right in triple-crested Corinthian helmet / Nike alighting left, holding crown with depending ties, pomegranate (σιδη) on straight stem with lateral shoot before, abbreviated name KΛE-VX across lower fields. GCHT 588-589 (same obverse die). Toned. Good very fine $350

174. CILICIA. Nagidus. Silver stater (10.74 gm). Ca. 400-385/4 BC. Aphrodite enthroned left, sacrificing from phiale over garlanded and lighted altar, crowned by naked Eros standing left on pedestal behind / ΝΑΓΙΔΕΩΝ (N retrograde), bearded Dionysus standing left, holding vine branch with bunch of grapes and resting on thyrsus, AO monogram in upper left field. Lederer 26 (same dies). SNG France 21 var. (control marks). Struck from slightly worn dies, otherwise extremely fine $600

171. PA MPHYLIA. Side. Silver stater (10.90 gm). Ca. 490-400 BC. Pomegranate, head of lion facing left to upper right / Head of Athena right in crested Corinthian helmet, wearing choker, all in square incuse. SNG France 626. Atlan 24. Struck from worn obverse die as is typical of the issue, otherwise nearly extremely fine $2,000

172. Silver tetradrachm (16.41 gm). Ca. 183–175 BC. Head of Athena right in triple-crested Corinthian helmet / Nike alighting left, holding crown with depending ties, pomegranate (σιδη) on straight stem before, abbreviated name KΛE-VX across lower fields. GCHT 436-437 (same obverse die). Toned. Good very fine $350 70

Lot 175 Freeman & Sear Manhattan Sale 2


Freeman & Sear • Los Angeles

175. LOT OF THREE CILICIAN SILVER OBOLS. Tarsus. Mazaeus (361-334 BC). (0.70 gm). Baal of Tarsus enthroned left, holding barley ear and vine branch in right hand and grasping scepter with left / Lion attacking deer. SNG Paris 329. SNG Copenhagen 316-318 (different reverse types). Uncertain mint. 4th century BC (2), (0.64 gm) female head (Hera?) facing slightly left, wearing polos decorated with palmette, pendant earrings, and necklace / Head of Arethusa left, crowned with reeds, wearing triple-pendant earring and bead necklace. SNG Levante 243 and (0.54 gm) bearded male head right, wearing tiara decorated with lateral circles and circular earring / Forepart of Pegasus with curved wing right. SNG Paris 482-484 (headwear called “calathos”). SNG Levante 232 (“diademed”). THREE COINS IN LOT. The first and third darkly toned. The second with scattered scratches. All nearly extremely fine $250

176. CA PPADOCIAN KINGDOM. Ariarathes V Eusebes (ca. 163130 BC). Silver drachm (4.22 gm). Year 33, ca. 131/130 BC. Diademed head of Ariarathes V right / ΒΑΣΙΛΕΩΣ ΑΡΙΑΡΑΘΟΥ ΕΥΣΕΒοΥΣ, helmeted Athena standing left, holding Nike in right hand and grasping with left spear and shield decorated with gorgoneion, monograms in outer left, inner left, and outer right fields, date ΓΛ below. Simonetta p. 23, 13a. SNG Copenhagen Suppl. 645-646. Nearly extremely fine $200

177. In the name of Antiochus VII (138-129 BC). Silver tetradrachm (16.36 gm). Uncertain mint, ca. 130-80. Diademed head of Antiochus VII right, fillet border / ΒΑΣΙΛΕΩΣ ΑΝΤΙΟΧΟΥ ΕΥΕΡ-ΓΕΤοΥ, helmeted Athena standing left, holding Nike in right hand and grasping with left spear and shield decorated with gorgoneion, primary controls ΔΙ over A in outer left field and secondary control Δ in inner right field, laurel crown border. SC 2144.4. Nearly extremely fine $350 Freeman & Sear Manhattan Sale 2

178. SELEUCID KINGDOM. Seleucus I (312-281 BC). Gold stater (8.53 gm). Babylon, ca. 311-300, in the name and types of Macedonian King Alexander III. Helmeted head of Athena right / BAΣΙΛΕΩΣ ΑΛΕΞΑΝΔΡ[ΟΥ], Nike standing facing, head left, holding wreath and stylis, MI below left wing, monogram under right wing. SC 81.2. Price 3748. Good very fine $1,750

179. Antiochus I Soter (281-261 BC). Silver tetradrachm (17.14 gm). Seleucia on the Tigris. Diademed head of Antiochus I right / ΒΑΣΙΛΕΩΣ ΑΝ-ΤΙΟΧΟΥ, Apollo seated left on omphalos, right thigh draped, examining arrow and resting hand on grounded bow, primary control AP monogram in outer left field, secondary control ΔΩΡ monogram in outer right field. SC 379.3d. ESM 157. Nearly extremely fine $600

180. Antiochus II Theos (261-246 BC). Silver tetradrachm (16.79 gm). Lampsacus. Diademed head of Antiochus I right / ΒΑΣΙΛΕΩΣ ΑΝΤΙ-oΧoΥ, Apollo seated left on omphalos, right thigh slightly draped, examining arrow and holding grounded bow, primary control IΣ in outer left field, secondary control MP monogram in exergue. Cf. SC 485 (same obv. die and primary control). Scarce. Reverse struck from worn die. Very fine $300

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181. Seleucus II Callinicus (245-225 BC). Silver tetradrachm (16.84 gm). Uncertain mint, probably in Commagene. Diademed head of Seleucus II right, long lock of hair before ear / ΒΑΣΙΛΕΩΣ ΣΕ-ΛΕΥΚoΥ, nude Apollo standing left, examining arrow and resting arm on tall tripod, NA monogram in right field. Cf. SC 727.1 (NA in left field). Rare. Good very fine $400

182. Antiochus VII Euergetes (138-129 BC). Silver tetradrachm (16.67 gm). Antioch. Diademed head of Antiochus VII right, fillet border / ΒΑΣΙΛΕΩΣ ΑΝΤΙoΧoΥ ΕΥΕΡ-ΓΕΤοΥ, Athena standing left in crested helmet, holding Nike and resting hand on grounded shield, spear propped against arm, primary controls ΔΙ over A with dot for crossbar in outer left field, A in inner right field, laurel crown border. SC 2061.4f. SMA 287. Tiny nick behind mouth on portrait. Good very fine/very fine $250

183. Antiochus VIII Epiphanes (121-96 BC). Silver drachm (4.00 gm). Antioch, second reign, 112-111/10. Diademed head of Antiochus VIII right / ΒΑΣΙΛΕΩΣ ΑΝΤΙΟΧoΥ — ΕΠΙΦΑΝοΥ[Σ], sacrificial tripod decorated with three upright laurel branches, ΦΙΛ monogram over N in left field. SC 2304. Lightly toned. Extremely fine $300

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184. JUDAEA. Bar Kochba Revolt (CE 132-135). Silver zuz (3.18 gm). Year Two, 133/4. Palaeo-Hebrew inscription of three letters (Sh-I-M) in triangular form, crown with four lateral almonds on each side, branches intertwined at top, ties loose at bottom / Palaeo-Hebrew legend around (Year two of the freedom of Israel), fluted pitcher with handle to left, palm branch before. Hendin 692. Mildenberg 22. Very fine $250

185. NABATAEAN KINGDOM. Obodas III (ca. 30-9 BC). Silver drachm (4.53 gm). Jugate busts right of Obodas, diademed and draped, and draped queen, wearing stephane and choker, letter behind / Diademed bust of Obodas right, legend before, [letter and date behind]. BMC (Arabia, Mesopotamia and Persia), p. 4, 2-3 and pl. I, 7-8. SNG ANS —. Very fine $750

186. BACTRIAN KINGDOM. Diodotus I and II (ca. 250-230 BC). Gold stater (8.05 gm). Diademed head of Diodotus I right / ΒΑΣΙΛΕΩ[Σ] ΔΙοΔοΤοΥ, Zeus, nude, seen from behind, advancing left, holding thunderbolt in right hand and aegis over left arm, eagle standing left before, crown in inner left field. Bopearachchi Series 5, A. Test cut repaired; edge damage and a few surface flaws. Nearly extremely fine $1,000

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187. Eucratides I (ca. 170-145 BC). Silver tetradrachm (16.97 gm). Diademed, draped, cuirassed bust of Eucratides I right in crested helmet decorated with horn and ear of bull, fillet border / ΒΑΣΙΛΕΩΣ ΜΕΓΑΛoΥ ΕΥΚΡΑΤΙΔοΥ, Dioscuri rearing right, stars above piloi, holding spears couched and shouldering palms, monogram below farther horse. Bopearachchi Series 6, U. A few areas of porosity. Toned. Good very fine $600

190. PARTHIAN KINGDOM. Mithradates I (165-132 BC). Bronze octachalkon (8.41 gm). Diademed bust right / Bow in bowcase. Sellwood 12.11. Very rare. Light brown/red patina. Very fine $400

191. Bronze dichalkon (3.15 gm). Bust left, wearing tiara / Horse standing right. Sellwood 8.2. Shore 22. Very rare. Brown patina. Very fine $400 188. Menander I Soter (ca. 165/155-130 BC). Silver drachm (2.24 gm). ΒΑΣΙΛΕΩΣ ΣΩΤΗΡοΣ ΜΕΝΑΝΔΡοΥ, diademed bust of Menander I left, seen from behind, one tie falling across right shoulder blade, wearing aegis on left shoulder and brandishing spear / Helmeted Athena Alkidemos seen from behind, standing left, brandishing thunderbolt in right hand and holding shield covered with aegis (head of Gorgon in middle of goatskin) on left arm, wearing aegis (stole with central portion made from goatskin) over himation (mantle) above chiton (tunic), Kharosthi legend around, monogram in lower right field. SNG ANS 723-732. Bopearachchi Series 7, A. Extremely fine $100

189. Archebios (ca. 90-80 BC). Bronze quadrangular (11.26 gm). ΒΑΣΙΛΕΩΣ ΔΙ-ΚΑΙοΥ ΝΙΚΗΦο-ΡοΥ ΑΡΧΕΒΙοΥ, elephant walking right / Kharosthi legend, owl standing right, head facing, monogram below. Bop. 12B. Green patina. Lightly smoothed in fields. Good very fine $250

Freeman & Sear Manhattan Sale 2

192. Bronze dichalkon (2.47 gm). Bust left, wearing tiara / Goddess standing half-left. Sellwood 7.2. Shore 21. Extremely rare. Dark brown and red patina. Very fine $500

193. Mithradates II (121-91 BC). Silver tetradrachm (15.86 gm). Diademed bust left, wearing round earring and torque / ΒΑΣΙΛΕΩΣ ΜΕΓ-ΑΛΟΥ ΑΡΣΑ-ΚΟΥ ΕΠΙΦΑΝΟΥΣ, diademed archer seated right on omphalos, examining bow, ΔΙ in inner left field, TY in second line in exergue. Cf. Sellwood 24.6, Shore 68. Toned. Nearly extremely fine $750

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194. Silver drachm (4.19 gm). Ecbatana. Bust of Mithradates II left, wearing diademed, domed tiara decorated with star and embellished with side flap and neckguard, torque with shorter upper ring terminating in pellet around neck, and elaborate robe / ΒΑΣΙΛ-ΕΩΣ ΒΑΣΙ-ΛΕΩΝ ΜΕΓΑΛοΥ ΑΡΣΑΚοΥ ΕΠΙ+ΑΝΥ/ [sic], diademed archer, with striped sleeves and trousers, in laced boots, seated right on throne, holding bow. Sellwood 28.3. Shore 97. Toned. Extremely fine $300

197. Osroes II (ca. AD 190). Silver drachm (3.70 gm). Bust of Osroes II left, wearing diademed and crested tiara, double rings of torque of equal length / Diademed archer, with striped sleeves and trousers, in sitting position right, as if on throne, holding bow, chair leg moved up as throne back behind, legend in Parthian and degraded Greek framing picture, AT monogram under bow, Δ below missing chair. Sellwood 85.1 var. (arrangement of legend). Shore —. Extremely fine $150

Ex Triton II, 1-2 December 1998, lot 558.

195. Vologases III (ca. AD 105-147). Silver drachm (3.78 gm). Ecbatana. Diademed bust of Vologases left, wearing earring and torque with triple rings of equal length / Diademed archer, with striped sleeves and trousers, enthroned right, holding bow, legend in Parthian and degraded Greek framing picture, AT in monogram with dot below crossbar under bow. Sellwood 78.7. Shore 416. Toned. Extremely fine $100

196. Phraates II (132-126 BC). Silver tetradrachm (15.46 gm). Diademed bust right / ΒΑΣΙΛΕΩΣ ΑΡΣΑΚΟΥ, Apollo seated left on omphalos, examining arrow. Sellwood type 14. Pakzadian, Elymais Coins, Tehran 2007, p. 24, no. 34. Of the greatest rarity. One of four known examples. The coin is accompanied by a handwritten letter from Dr. Farhan Assar discussing the three other examples and their whereabouts. The fields burnished, scratched and with a few pits. Very fine $10,000

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198. KUSHAN EMPIRE. Vima Kadphises (ca. 100-127/8). Gold dinar (7.92 gm). BACIΛEVC OOH—MO KAΔΦICHC, diademed, crowned bust right on clouds, holding mace in right hand, flames on far shoulder, tamgha behind / Kharosthi legend, ithyphallic Siva standing half-left, grasping head of trident with affixed ax and holding skin of he-goat, tamgha to left, Buddhist triratana to right. Göbl 18. Nearly very fine $800

199. Huvishka (ca. AD 152-192). Gold dinar (7.72 gm). ÞAoNANOÞAO O — OhÞKI KOÞANo, diademed, crowned bust left on clouds, holding mace in right hand and grasping hilt of sword with left / ΦΑΡΡο, nimbate Pharro (Hermes) standing half-right, wearing petasus with wings above, holding [purse] in right hand and grasping filleted scepter with left, tamgha in right field. Göbl 141/7. Fine $400

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200. Gold quarter dinar (1.98 gm). ÞAoNANOÞAO [O] — OhÞKI KOÞANo, diademed, crowned bust left on clouds, holding mace in right hand and grasping hilt of sword with left / MIIPO, Miiro (Mithra) with radiate nimbus standing half-left, extending right arm and resting left hand on hilt of sword, tamgha before. Mitchiner 3201. A few scratches. Good very fine $650

201. GUPTA EMPIRE. Samudragupta (ca. AD 335-380). Gold dinar (7.67 gm). Nimbate Chandragupta I standing half-left, grasping scepter and offering object to nimbate Kumaradevi, standing half-right / Nimbate Lakshmi seated facing on lion reclining left, feet resting on lotus, holding diadem and cornucopiae, tamgha to left. BMC Guptas pl. iii, 5 (obverse) and 1 (reverse). Nearly very fine $900

202. HUNNIC TRIBES. Kidarites (ca. AD 300-400). Gold quarter stater (1.98 gm). King standing facing, low altar to left / Siva standing facing before bull, grasping trident. Mitchiner 3632. Good very fine $750

Lot 206

Freeman & Sear Manhattan Sale 2

203. PTOLEMAIC KINGDOM. Ptolemy VIII Euergetes II (145-116 BC). Cyrene. Bronze 44 mm (38.51 gm). Head of Zeus right, horn of Ammon at temple, wearing taenia / [ΕΥ-ΕΡΓΕΤoΥ] ΒΑΣΙΛΕΩΣ ΠΤoΛΕΜΑΙoΥ, eagle standing right with spread wings on thunderbolt, Φ before. Svoronos 1641. Very rare. Green and earthen patina. Very fine $1,000

204. CYRENAICA. Cyrene. Gold litra or tenth stater (0.87 gm). Ca. 435-331 BC. Head of Carneius right with ram’s horn, linear border / Female head (Cyrene?) right, hair confined by spendone, ear covered by circular disk, linear border. SNG Copenhagen 1194. BMC 68, pl. vii, 29. Very fine $400

205. ZEUGITANIA. Carthage. Silver quarter shekel (1.86 gm). Second Punic War. Ca. 220-205 BC. Wreathed head of Tanit left / Horse standing right. SNG Copenhagen 335. Jenkins & Lewis pl. 28, 4. Flan crack. Dark tone. Good very fine $200

206. NUMIDIAN KINGDOM. Juba I (60-46 BC). Silver denarius (3.83 gm). Utica. REX• IVBA, diademed, draped, cuirassed bust right, hair in three rows of ringlets with more ringlets radiating from crown, scepter over near shoulder / NeoPunic legend, octastyle temple or portico entrance with narrow staircase and narrow pedimental roof raised above entablature. SNG Copenhagen 523-524. Mazard 84. Beautiful dark tone. Extremely fine $750 75


ROMA N REPUBLICA N COINS

207. ROMAN REPUBLIC. Quadrigatus. Silver didrachm (6.76 gm). Sicily, ca. 214 BC. Laureate head of Janus, annulets in hair above / Jupiter in quadriga driven by Victory right, wielding thunderbolt and holding scepter, ROMA in relief in rectangular frame below, grain ear below raised forelegs of team. RRC 42/1. RSC 24a. Rare. Very fine/good very fine $900

208. Quadrigatus. Ca. 216-215 BC. Silver didrachm (6.41 gm). Laureate head of Janus with softly indented neck truncation, small locks of hair at jawbones, and some folds of skin on neck perceptible, dotted border / Jupiter standing in quadriga driven by Victory right, wielding thunderbolt and holding scepter, ROMA incuse and in relief on raised trapezoidal tablet below, linear border. Sydenham 64c. RSC 23a. Good very fine $500

210. Quadrigatus. Ca. 215-214 BC. Silver didrachm (6.43 gm). Laureate head of Janus with slightly curving neck truncation and whiskers in sideburns smaller and farther apart, two larger annulets at top of head partially obscured by hair, dotted border / Jupiter standing in quadriga driven by Victory right, wielding thunderbolt and holding scepter, ROMA in relief in trapezoidal frame below, linear border. RRC 28/3. RSC 24. RCV 33. Struck from slightly worn obverse die. Good very fine $500

211. Mn. Fonteius. Ca. 104 BC. Silver foureé denarius (3.14 gm). Jugate laureate heads of Dioscuri right, stars above, mark of value XVI in monogram below chins / MN• FoNTEI (MN and NTE in monogram), galley under oar three-quarters right, gubernator with hand on rudder seated right in stern, control letter R before starboard oars, control mark (three vertical dots) above port oars. RRC 307/1d. RCV 184. Metal breaks in upper reverse field revealing copper core. Nearly extremely fine $250

212. L. Piso Frugi. Ca. 90 BC. Silver denarius (3.96 gm). Laureate head of Apollo right, control symbols (Victory on globe) behind / Nude jockey with palm right, L PISO FRVGI – XXIII in two lines thereunder. RRC 340/1. RCV 235. Lightly toned. Nearly extremely fine $200 209. Quadrigatus. Ca. 215-214 BC. Silver didrachm (6.64 gm). Laureate head of Janus with slightly curving neck truncation and whiskers in sideburns larger and closer together, two larger annulets at top of head partially obscured by hair, dotted border / Jupiter standing in quadriga driven by Victory right, wielding thunderbolt and holding scepter, ROMA in relief in trapezoidal frame below, linear border. RRC 28/3. RSC 24. RCV 33. A few surface marks. Patch of corrosion at reverse edge (9:00). Nearly extremely fine $400

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213. Silver denarius (3.96 gm). Laureate head of Apollo right, control symbol (palm and crown viewed from above) behind / Nude jockey with palm right, L PISO FRVGI – ROMA (MA ligatured) in two lines thereunder, control numeral CXXXXVI above. RRC 340/1. RCV 235. Extremely fine $300 Freeman & Sear Manhattan Sale 2


Freeman & Sear • Los Angeles

214. C. Norbanus. Ca. 83 BC. Silver denarius (4.08 gm). Diademed head of Venus right, wearing pendant earring and bead necklace, C• NORBANVS along edge below, control numeral XXXIII behind / Grain ear on stem with two leaves and caduceus on either side of fasces with securis affixed below by cord wound twice around rods and above by special tie. RRC 357/1b. RCV 278. Nearly extremely fine $200

215. M. Aemilius Lepidus. Ca. 61 BC. Silver denarius (3.80 gm). Laureate and diademed head of Roma(?) right, palm branch behind / Equestrian statue of M. Aemilius Lepidus (Cos 187 and 175) right, M LEPIDVS below. RRC 419/1c. RCV 371. Iridescent tone. About extremely fine $250

217. Q. Servilius Caepio Brutus (M. Junius Brutus). 54 BC. Silver denarius (4.01 gm). Rome. Bare head of L. Junius Brutus (consul, 509 BC) right, BRVTVS behind / Bare head of C. Servilius Ahala (master of horse, 439 BC) right, AHALA behind. RRC 433/2. RCV 398. Toned. Very fine $400 Ex Frederick H. Rindge Collection (Malter, 22-24 March 1985, lot 536).

218. L. Hostilius Saserna. 48 BC. Silver denarius (3.93 gm). Head of captive Gallic warrior (Vercingetorix?) right, chain around neck, shield behind / Naked Gallic warrior in biga driven right by charioteer, L HOSTILIVS above, SASERN below. RRC 448/2a. RCV 418. Toned. Very fine $1,000

Ex Freeman & Sear Mail Bid Sale 8, 5 February 2003, lot 386.

R O M A N I M PE R A TO R I A L CO I N S 216. Q. Servilius Caepio Brutus (M. Junius Brutus). 54 BC. Silver denarius (4.00 gm). LIBERTAS, head of Libertas right, with hair rolled back and loose strands falling over her neck, wearing cruciform earring and pendant necklace / The consul L. Iunius Brutus (second from right), walking left between two lictors shouldering fasces, all of whom are preceded by an attendant (accensus), BRVTVS in exergue. RRC 433/1. RCV 397. Flan slightly bent. Extremely fine $400

219. Julius Caesar (†15 March 44 BC). Silver denarius (3.73 gm). Northern Italy-Spain, 49 BC. CAESAR, elephant walking right, trampling on dragon / No legend, simpulum, sprinkler, axe and apex. RRC 443/1. RCV 1399. CRI 9. Good very fine $400 Ex Frederick H. Rindge Collection (Malter, 22-24 March 1985, lot 542).

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220. Silver denarius (3.61 gm). Rome, 42 BC. Head of Caesar right, wearing corona aurea / L• MVSSIDIVS• LONGVS, rudder, globe, cornucopiae, caduceus, apex. RRC 494/39a. CRI 116. Light scratches in obverse fields. Good very fine $1,500

221. Silver denarius (3.84 gm). Rome, 40 BC. Head of Caesar right, wearing corona aurea / Q VOCONIVS VITVLVS Q DESIGN, bull-calf walking left, S—C in field. RRC 526/4. RCV 1428. CRI 331. Numerous surface marks. Toned $400

222. Mark Antony and Octavian (Triumviri r.p.c. 43-33). Silver quinarius (1.90 gm). Military mint with Octavian in Gaul, late 39 BC. Veiled and diademed head of Concordia right, III• VIR• — R• P• C around / Clasped right hands, caduceus with shaft terminating in arrow head behind, M ANTON — C• CAESAR around. King 81. RRC 529/4b. CRI 304. A very nice example of this desirable quinarius $500

223. Mark Antony († 30 BC). Silver denarius (3.51 gm). Patrae(?), autumn 32-spring 31 BC. Galley right, ANT AVG above, III VIR R P C below / Legionary eagle between two standards, LEG III across lower field. RRC 544/15. CRI 350. With dark tone. A few scratches between eagle and right standard. Very fine $300

224. Silver denarius (3.64 gm). Patrae(?), autumn 32-spring 31 BC. Similar to preceding, but with LEG V on reverse. RRC 544/18. CRI 354. Test cut above galley. Very fine $250

225. Silver denarius (3.31 gm). Patrae(?), autumn 32-spring 31 BC. Similar to preceding, but with LEG VIIII on reverse. RRC 544/22. CRI 360. Very scarce. With an unusually well-detailed depiction of the galley. Dark iridescent tone. A few light scratches. Good very fine $600

226. Silver denarius (3.81 gm). Patrae(?), autumn 32-spring 31 BC. Similar to preceding, but with LEG X on reverse. RRC 544/24. CRI 361. Iridescent tone. Good very fine $400

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Freeman & Sear • Los Angeles R O M A N I M PE R I A L A N D PR O V I N CI A L CO I N S 227. Silver denarius (3.69 gm). Patrae(?), autumn 32-spring 31 BC. Similar to preceding, but with LEG XII ANTIQVAE on reverse. RRC 544/9. CRI 363. Very scarce. Iridescent tone. A few minor surface marks. Very fine $500

228. Silver denarius (3.37 gm). Patrae(?), autumn 32-spring 31 BC. Similar to preceding but reverse has three standards, each decorated with two wreaths and model of a prow, CHORTIS SPECVLATROVM around. RRC 544/12. CRI 386. Scarce. Flatly struck in areas and with several light scratches. Very fine $250

229. Mark Antony and Cleopatra († 30 BC). Silver denarius (3.23 gm). Alexandria, autumn 34 BC. ANTONI ARMENIA DEVICTA, bare head of Antony right, Armenian tiara behind / CLEOPATRAE REGINAE REGVM FILIORVM REGVM, diademed, draped bust of Cleopatra right, prow before. RRC 543/1. CRI 345. The obverse struck a bit off center. Toned. Very fine $2,000 Ex Numismatic Fine Arts XXVIII, 23 April 1992, lot 1054.

230. Deified Augustus (†AD 14). Brass dupondius (12.43 gm). AD 80-81. DIVVS AV—*GVSTVS PATER, radiate head of Augustus left, star above / IMP T VESP AVG — REST, Victory alighting left, holding shield marked S P – Q R in two lines, S—C in fields. RIC 448. CBN —. Komnick 37.0. RCV —. Very scarce. Dark green patina. Good very fine $600

231. Nero (AD 54-68). Brass sestertius (24.33 gm). Lugdunum, ca. 65. NERO CLAVD CAESAR AVG GER P M TR P IMP P P, laureate head of Nero right, globe at point of bust / PACE P R TERRA MARIQ PARTA IANVM CLVSIT, one front of the unroofed shrine of Ianus Geminus, garland hung across closed double doors to right, latticed window above low side wall to left, entablature extending all around rectangular building above, S—C in fields. RIC 438. CBN 73. RCV 1958. Glossy green and brown patina. Fields smoothed. Reverse double struck. Good very fine $800

232. Galba (Apr. AD 68-Jan. 69). Silver denarius (3.14 gm). Ca. Dec. 68-15 Jan. 69. IMP SER GALBA CAESAR AVG P M, laureate head of Galba right / DIVA — AVGVSTA, Livia standing half-left, holding patera and grasping scepter. RIC 224 (R2). CBN 101. RCV 2102. Toned. Very fine $500 Freeman & Sear Manhattan Sale 2

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233. Vespasian (AD 69-79). Silver denarius (3.16 gm). Spanish mint, ca. 69-70. IMP CAESAR VESPASIANVS AVG, laureate head of Vespasian left / VICTORIA IMR — VESPASIANI, Victory alighting left on globe, holding crown and palm. RIC 1340 (R) w. n. 32. Cf. RCV 2260. Rare. Struck from worn dies. Light scratches before and behind head of Victory. Good very fine $300

234. Silver hemidrachm (1.63 gm, 12h). Caesarea in Cappadocia. AVTOKP KAICAP OVECΠACIANOC CEBA, laureate head of Vespasian right / Nike alighting right, holding up crown with depending ties and shouldering palm. Metcalf 17. RPC 1659. Toned. Very fine $350 Ex Triton III, 30 November-1 December 1999, lot 785.

237. Trajan (AD 98-117). Bronze 26 mm (9.78 gm). Laodicea ad Mare, AD 115/116 (year 163). AYT[O]KP NER TRAIANOC APICT KAIC CEB ΓEP ΔAK ΠΑΡ, laureate head of Trajan right, far shoulder draped / IoΥΛΙΕΩΝ ΤΩΝ ΚΑΙ – ΛΑΟΔΙΚΕΩΝ ΓΞΡ, turreted, veiled, and draped bust of Tyche right, wearing triple-pendant earring, M-KO in two lines before neck. BMC 48. SNG Copenhagen —, cf. 346 (different control, preceding year), 348 (obverse legend without ΠΑΡ). Cf. GIC 1080 (different control, preceding year). Light brown patina. Good very fine $400

238. Silver denarius (3.54 gm). 117. IMP CAESAR TRAIAN HADRIANVS AVG, laureate head of Hadrian right, with drapery on left shoulder / P M TR P COS II, Pietas, veiled, standing left, raising right hand, left holding drapery, PIE— TAS across field. RIC 22. BMCRE 82. Dark tone. Nearly extremely fine $150

235. Copper as (10.75 gm). AD 76. IMP CAESAR VESP AVG COS VII, laureate head of Vespasian right / Spes walking left, carrying flower and gathering up garment, S—C in fields. RIC 894. CBN 757. RCV —. Dark green patina. Smoothed. Good very fine $400

236. Titus as Caesar (AD 69-79). Brass dupondius (12.93 gm). July-ca. Dec. 72. T CAESAR VESPASIAN IMP III PON TR POT II COS II, radiate head of Titus right / ROMA — VICTRIX around, S—C in exergue, Roma in crested helmet seated left on cuirass, confronting Victory held in right hand and grasping spear with left, shields behind. RIC 483 (R2). RCV —. Rare. Olive-green patina. Good very fine $400

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239. Silver cistophorus (10.04 gm). Nicomedia, ca. 128-138. IMP CAES TRA — HADRIANO AVG P P, laureate, draped bust of Hadrian right / COM BIT, tetrastyle temple on podium of three steps, statue of Hadrian standing half-right within, grasping scepter and holding Victory, ROM S P AVG on entablature. RIC 459c (R2). Metcalf B7. Cf. RCV 3436. Rare. Of bold style $1,000

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240. Silver cistophorus (10.23 gm). Asia, ca. 128-132. HADRIANVS — AVGVSTVS P P, laureate head of Hadrian left / COS — III across fields, legionary eagle between two standards. RIC 517 (R). Metcalf 125. Overstruck on a cistophorus of Mark Antony. Good very fine $600

244. Silver denarius (3.56 gm). Ca. 134-138. HADRIANVS — AVG COS III P P, laureate head of Hadrian right / SALVS — AVG, Salus standing half-left, emptying patera over garlanded and lighted altar and holding scepter. RIC 268. RCV —. Extremely fine $250

Ex CNG 51, 15 September 1999, lot 1297.

241. Silver denarius (3.43 gm). Ca. 119-122. IMP CAESAR TRAIAN — HADRIANVS AVG, laureate head of Hadrian right / P — M TR P — COS III, Aequitas standing half-left, holding scales and cornucopiae. RIC 80. RCV 3520. Toned. Extremely fine $300

245. Silver denarius (3.31 gm). Ca. 134-138. HADRIANVS — AVG COS III P P, bare head of Hadrian right / ROMAE AE—TERNAE, helmeted Roma seated left, holding Palladium and grounded spear, shield alongside. RIC 265. RCV 3537. Nearly extremely fine $200

Ex Peus 374, 23 April 2003, lot 707. 246. Silver drachm brockage (2.89 gm). Amisus, AD 134-135. AVT KAI TRA AΔPI—ANOC CEB Π Π VΠΓ, laureate bust of Hadrian left / Incuse of obverse (instead of reverse dated to year 165). BMC 91. Good fine $100 Ex CNG 54, 14 June 2000, lot 1101. 242. Silver denarius (2.81 gm). Ca. 125-128. HADRIANVS — AVGVSTVS P P, laureate head of Hadrian right / COS — III, Roma seated right on cuirass, grasping scepter and holding sheathed short sword, shield behind. RIC 162 var. (no P P on obv.). Cf. RCV 3472. Iridescent tone. Extremely fine $300

243. Silver denarius (3.44 gm). Ca. 134-138. HADRIANVS — AVG COS III P P, bare head of Hadrian right / SALVS — AVG, Salus standing half-left, feeding snake coiled around altar from patera and holding grounded scepter. RIC 269 (S). RCV —. Extremely fine $250 Freeman & Sear Manhattan Sale 2

247. Billon tridrachm (10.11 gm). Aegeae in Cilicia, 117/8. AYTOKP KAIC TPAIANOC AΔPIAN, laureate bust of Hadrian right, left shoulder draped / ETOYC ΔΞΡ — ΑΙΓΕΑΙΩΝ, young male head right, wearing taenia, goat under neck truncation, dated to year 164. Prieur 715. SNG Paris 2326. Lorber-Michaels 66 (this coin). Scarce. Good fine $200

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248. Billon tetradrachm (13.51 gm). Aegeae in Cilicia, 133/4. AYTOKP KAIΣ — TPAIA AΔPIANΟ ΣΕΒ ΠΠ, laureate bust of Hadrian right in cuirass and cape, seen from front / ETOYΣ• ΠP — ΑΙΓΕΑΙΩΝ, eagle standing three-quarters left on harpe, head right, recumbent goat right in exergue, dated to year 180. Prieur 721. SNG Levante 1719. LorberMichaels 358 (this coin). Very fine $250

251. Silver denarius (3.31 gm). 140-144. ANTONINVS PI — VS P P TR P COS III, laureate head of Antoninus Pius right / AVRELIUS CAESAR — AVG PII F COS, bare head of Marcus Aurelius right. RIC 417a. RSC 15. Lightly toned. Nearly extremely fine/extremely fine $400

252. Silver denarius (3.26 gm). Dec. 156-Dec. 157. ANTONINVS AVG — PIVS P P IMP II, laureate head of Antoninus Pius right / TR POT XX — COS IIII, Annona enthroned right, holding cornucopiae with both hands, filled modius at feet. RIC 262. RCV —. Extremely fine $200

249. Bronze drachm (23.20 gm). Alexandria, 134-135. AVT KAIC TPAIAN — AΔPIANOC CEB, laureate, draped, cuirassed bust of Hadrian right / Serapis seated left on throne in temple, modius on head, date L (in exergue) ENN (to left) — EA K Δ (to right). Emmett 1036. Cf. Milne 1469 (division of legend). Red-brown and green patina, slightly smoothed. Nearly extremely fine $750

250. Antoninus Pius (AD 138-161). Silver denarius (3.23 gm). 140-144. ANTONINVS — AVG PIVS PP, laureate, draped bust of Antoninus Pius right / TR POT— COS III, Italia, wearing turreted crown, seated left on globe, holding cornucopiae in right hand and scepter with left, ITALIA in exergue. RIC 98d. BMC 250 var. Toned. Extremely fine $600 Ex Münzen und Medaillen 86, 3-4 June 1998, lot 163.

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253. Brass sestertius (22.66 gm). AD 145-161. ANT—ONINVS AVG —PIVS P P TR P, laureate head of Antoninus Pius right / C—OS — II—II around, PA—X — AVG across fields, Pax standing half-left, setting fire with torch to heap of arms and holding cornucopiae. RIC 777. RCV 4201. Dark green patina. Nearly extremely fine $650

254. Copper as (10.06 gm). AD 140-144. ANTONINVS AVG PI—VS P P TR P COS III, laureate head of Antoninus Pius right / A—NNO—NA AVG around, S—C in fields, Annona standing half-right, holding grain ears and cornucopiae, filled modius to left, prow to right. RIC 597. RCV —. Green patina. Surfaces lightly smoothed. Good very fine $250

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255. Marcus Aurelius as Caesar (AD 139-161). Ca. 145-147. Silver denarius (3.18 gm). AVRELIVS CAE—SAR AVG PII F, bare head of Marcus Aurelius right / CO—S — II, Spes walking left, holding flower and lifting garment. RIC 431. RCV 4783. Extremely fine $200

259. Marcus Aurelius as Augustus (AD 161-180). Silver denarius (3.10 gm). 167-168. M ANTONINVS AVG — ARM PARTH MAX, laureate head of Marcus Aurelius right / TR P XXII IMP IIII COS III, Aequitas standing facing, head left, holding scales in right hand and cornucopiae with left. RIC 178. RSC 892. A pleasing example. Lightly toned. Extremely fine $400

256. Dec. 153-Dec. 154. Silver denarius (3.34 gm). AVRELIVS CAE—SAR AVG PII FIL, bare head of Marcus Aurelius right / TR POT VIII — COS II, Genius Exercitus standing half-left, sacrificing from patera over altar and holding aquila. RIC 461 (S). RCV —. Extremely fine $250

257. Dec. 155-Dec. 156. Silver denarius (3.26 gm). AVRELIVS CAESA—R AVG PII FIL, bare head of Marcus Aurelius right / TR P—OT X — COS II, Aequitas standing half-left, holding scales and grounded scepter. RIC 466b var. (obverse legend ending F). RCV —. Extremely fine $250

260. Faustina II (AD 147-175/176), wife of Marcus Aurelius. Silver denarius (3.45 gm). Ca. 161-175. FAVSTINA — AVGVSTA, draped bust of Faustina II right / DIANA — LVCIF, Diana standing half-left, holding lighted transverse torch with both hands. RIC 674. RCV 5250. Lightly toned. Extremely fine $200

Ex Lanz 109, 27 May 2002, lot 490.

Purchased from Numismatic Fine Arts in 1992.

258. Brass sestertius (24.48 gm). AD 145. AVRELIVS CAES— AR AVG PII F COS II, bust of Marcus Aurelius right, drapery on far shoulder and across back / S—C, Minerva standing half-right, grasping spear and holding grounded shield. RIC 1245 (S). BMCRE 1779. Brown patina. Smoothed. Extremely fine $2,500

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261. Deified Faustina II (†AD 175/6). Silver denarius (3.48 gm). Ca. 176-180. DIVA FAV—STINA PIA, draped bust of Faustina II right / CON—SECRA—TIO, altar-enclosure decorated with horns, door in front. RIC 746. RCV 5217. Dark tone. Extremely fine $200

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262. Lucius Verus (AD 161-169). Silver denarius (3.26 gm). 166-167. L VERVS AVG— ARM PARTH MAX, laureate head of Lucius Verus right / TR P VII IMP IIII COS III, Victory walking left, holding wreath and palm branch. RIC 574 (MA). RSC 295. Lightly toned and attractive. Extremely fine $500

265. Commodus as Augustus (AD 177-192). Silver denarius (3.66. gm). 185-186. M COMM ANT — P FEL AVG BRIT, laureate head of Commodus right / NOBILIT AVG P M TR — P XI IMP VIII COS V P P, Nobilitas standing right, holding scepter in right hand and statuette (Minerva?) in left. RIC 139 (MA). RSC 382. Lightly toned. Good very fine $300 Ex Spink Numismatic Circular, December 1996, 5884.

Ex Vecchi Nummorum Auctiones 8, 4 December 1997, lot 284.

263. Lucilla (AD 164-182), wife of L. Verus. Silver denarius (3.35 gm). Ca. 164-169. LVCILLA — AVGVSTA, draped bust of Lucilla right / IVNO — R—EGINA, veiled Juno standing half-left, holding patera and grasping scepter, peacock before. RIC 772. RCV 5487. Small flan flaw on neck of empress. Good very fine $100

266. Pertinax (1 January-28 March AD 193). Silver denarius (3.26 gm). IMP P CAES HELV – PERT AVG, Laureate head of Pertinax right / OPI DIVIN — TR P COS II, Ops seated left, holding two ears of wheat in right hand. RIC 8a. RSC 32. Very fine $300

Ex Classical Numismatic Auctions XX, 25 March 1992, lot 762. 267. Didia Clara (Mar.-June AD 193), daughter of Didius Julianus. Silver denarius (3.10 gm). DIDIA CLA—RA AVG, draped bust of Didia Clara right / HILAR T—EMPOR, Hilaritas standing half-left, grasping long palm and holding cornucopiae. RIC 10 (R4). RCV 6086. Rare. Very fine $750

264. Commodus as Caesar (AD 172-176). Silver denarius (3.42 gm). 175-176. COMMODO CAES AVG FIL GERM SARM, bare-headed draped bust of Commodus right / PIETAS AVG, knife, aspergillum, capis, lituus and simpulum. RIC 613 (MA). RSC 401. Scarce. A particularly nice example. Extremely fine $500 Ex Harlan J. Berk Buy or Bid 112, 13 January 2000, lot 435.

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268. Clodius Albinus (AD 193-197). Silver denarius (3.10 gm). 194-5?. [D CLOD SEPT] — ALBIN CAES, bare head of Clodius Albinus right / [MINER] PA—CIF COS II, Minerva standing facing, head left, holding olive branch in right hand, shield with left, spear leaning against left arm. RIC 7. RSC 48. Reverse struck a bit softly, otherwise good very fine $200 Freeman & Sear Manhattan Sale 2


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269. Septimius Severus (AD 193-211). Silver denarius (3.07 gm). Laodicea ad Mare, ca. 202. SEVERVS — PIVS AVG, laureate head of Septimius Severus right / COS — I—I—I — P — P, Victory alighting left, holding crown and palm. RIC 526. RCV —. Lustrous. Extremely fine $100

270. Silver denarius (3.27 gm). Ca. 207. SEVERVS PIVS AVG, laureate head of Septimius Severus right / AFR—ICA, Africa, wearing elephant-skin headdress, standing half-right, recumbent lion at feet. RIC 253 (S). RCV 6260. Nearly extremely fine/very fine $100

271. Julia Domna (AD 194-217), wife of Septimius Severus. Silver antoninianus (5.11 gm). Ca. 211-217. IVLIA PIA — FELIX AVG, diademed and draped bust of Julia Domna right, crescent behind shoulders / LVNA LVCIFERA, Luna in biga of horses left, cloak billowing in semicircle behind head. RIC 379a. RCV 7096. Extremely fine $400

272. Bronze 29 mm (17.26 gm). Ancyra in Galatia. IOVΛIA — CEBACTH, draped bust of Julia Domna facing, head right / ΜΗΤΡοΠοΛ — ANKVPAC, Demeter standing half-left, holding grain ears downward and grasping lighted long torch. BMC 15 var. (longer reverse legend). SNG Copenhagen —. SNG von Aulock —. Rare. Dark green patina. Very fine $250

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273. Silver denarius (3.30 gm). AD 200. ANTONINVS — AVGVSTVS, laureate, draped, cuirassed bust of Caracalla right / PONTIF — TR P III, diademed hero standing facing, head left, nude but for chlamys over left arm, shoulder strap and hilt of parazonium visible, holding globe and grounded spear. RIC 30. RCV 6857. Toned. Extremely fine $100

274. Caracalla (AD 198-217). Silver antoninianus (4.82 gm). AD 215. ANTONINVS PIVS AVG GERM, radiate, draped, cuirassed bust of Caracalla right / P M TR P XVIII — COS IIII P P, nude Jupiter walking right, holding thunderbolt and scepter. RIC 258 (S). Extremely fine $200

275. Silver denarius (3.12 gm). AD 215. ANTONINVS PIVS AVG GERM, laureate head of Caracalla right / P M TR P — XVIII — COS IIII P P, Pax standing left, holding branch and grounded scepter. RIC 268. RCV 6841. Toned. Extremely fine $150

276. Macrinus (AD 217-218). Silver antoninianus (5.25 gm). IMP C M OPEL SEV MACRINVS AVG, radiate, cuirassed bust of Macrinus right / SECVRITAS TEMPORVM, Securitas enthroned left, grasping scepter and leaning head on hand, lighted altar in background. RIC 95 (R). RCV 7325. Rare. Good very fine/very fine $350

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277. Silver denarius (3.29 gm). IMP C M OPEL SEV — MACRINVS AVG, laureate, draped bust of Macrinus right / A—EQVITAS AVG, Aequitas standing half-left, holding scales and cornucopiae. RIC 53 (S). RCV 7329. Nearly extremely fine $250 Ex Coin Galleries Mail Bid, 18 July 2001, lot 246.

280. Elagabalus (AD 218-222). Silver denarius (2.47 gm). IMP ANTONINVS PIVS AVG, laureate, draped bust of Elagabalus right / VICTORI—A — AVG, Victory alighting left between two shields, holding open diadem in both hands, star in right field. RIC 161. RCV 7554. Dark tone. Extremely fine $200 Ex Coin Galleries Mail Bid, 12 July 2000, lot 192.

278. Silver denarius (3.22 gm). IMP C M OPEL SEV MACRINVS AVG, laureate, cuirassed bust of Macrinus right / FELICITAS TEMPORVM, Felicitas standing half-left, holding short caduceus and grounded scepter. RIC 62. RCV 7331. Toned. Nearly extremely fine $250 Ex Lanz 112, 25-26 November 2002, lot 709.

279. Diadumenian as Caesar (AD 217-218). Silver denarius (2.88 gm). M OPEL ANT DIADVMENIAN CAES, draped and cuirassed bust of Diadumenian right / PRINC IVVENTVTIS, Diadumenian standing, head right, holding standard and scepter, two standards to his right. RIC 102. RSC 3. Toned. Good very fine/very fine $350 Ex CNG 72, 14 June 2006, lot 1588.

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281. Julia Maesa (AD 218-ca. 225), grandmother of Elagabalus and Alexander. Brass sestertius (21.56 gm). IVLIA MAESA — AVGVSTA, diademed, draped bust of Julia Maesa right / PIETAS AVG around, S—C in fields, veiled Pietas standing half-left, sacrificing incense over altar with right hand from box (acerra) held in left. RIC 414 (S). RCV 7763. Pretty deep green patina, with olive-green patches on reverse. Nearly extremely fine $1,000

282. Severus Alexander (AD 222-235). Silver denarius (2.86 gm). Ca. 222-228. IMP C M AVR SEV ALEXAND AVG, laureate, draped, cuirassed bust of Severus Alexander right / IOVI CONSERV—ATORI, Jupiter standing half-left, cloak visible behind and draped over right arm, holding thunderbolt and grasping scepter. RIC 141. Extremely fine $100

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283. Silver denarius (3.98 gm). AD 228. IMP C M AVR SEV — ALEXAND AVG, laureate, draped, cuirassed bust of Severus Alexander right / P M TR P VII — COS II P P, Aequitas standing left, holding scales and cornucopiae. RIC 78. RCV —. Good extremely fine $200

284. Brass sestertius (23.64 gm). AD 229. IMP SEV ALE— XANDER AVG, laureate bust of Severus Alexander right, left shoulder slightly draped / P M TR P VIII COS III P P around, S C in exergue, Alexander in triumphal quadriga right, holding eagle-tipped scepter. RIC 495 (R). RCV 7997. Glossy green-brown patina. Very fine $300

287. Philip I (AD 244-249). Billon antoninianus (5.44 gm). Eastern mint, ca. 244-245. IMP C M IVL PHILIPPVS P F AVG P M, radiate, draped, cuirassed bust of Philip I right / PAX FVN—DATA CVM PERSIS, Pax standing half-left, holding branch upward and transverse scepter. RIC 69 (S). RCV 8941. A few scattered deposits on reverse. Extremely fine $150

288. Billon antoninianus (4.92 gm). AD 247. IMP M IVL PHILIPPVS AVG, radiate, draped, cuirassed bust of Philip I right / P M TR P IIII COS II P P, Felicitas standing half-left, grasping long caduceus and holding cornucopiae. RIC 4. RCV 8946. Lustrous. Extremely fine $100 Ex Freeman & Sear Mail Bid Sale 7, 22 February 2002, lot 547.

285. Balbinus (AD 238). Silver antoninianus (3.92 gm). IMP CAES D CAEL BALVINVS AVG, radiate, draped and cuirassed bust of Balbinus right / FIDES MVTVA AVGG, clasped hands. RIC 11. RSC 6. Nearly extremely fine $400 Ex Freeman & Sear Mail Bid Sale 11, 23 November 2004, lot 391.

286. Pupienus (AD 238). Silver antoninianus (3.66 gm). IMP C M CLOD PVPIENVS AVG, laureate, draped and cuirassed bust of Pupienus right / PAX PVBLICA, Pax seated left, holding branch in right hand and scepter in left. RIC 4. RSC 22. Reverse a bit weakly struck. Nearly extremely fine $350 Ex CNG Sale 72, 14 June 2006, lot 1644. Freeman & Sear Manhattan Sale 2

289. Billon antoninianus (3.82 gm). Antioch, ca. 248. IMP M IVL PHILIPPVS AVG, radiate, cuirassed bust of Philip I left / SAECVLVM NOVVM, hexastyle temple containing seated statue of Roma. RIC 86a (R2). RCV —. Rare. Good very fine $400

290. Billon antoninianus (4.20 gm). Ca. 247-249. IMP PHILIPPVS AVG, radiate, draped, cuirassed bust of Philip I right / FIDES EXERCITVS, four fixed standards, second from right a legionary eagle. RIC 62. RCV 8930. Good extremely fine $150 87


291. Bronze sestertius (13.89 gm). Ca. 248. IMP M IVL PHILIPPVS AVG, laureate, draped bust of Philip I right / SAECVLVM NOVVM around, S—C in exergue, octastyle temple containing seated likeness of Roma. RIC 164 (R) corr. RCV 9015. Green patina. Extremely fine $600

292. Otacilia Severa (AD 244-249), wife of Philip I. Billon antoninianus (4.42 gm). Ca. 244-246. MARCIA OTACIL SEVERA AVG, diademed and draped bust of Otacilia Severa right, crescent behind / PVDICITIA AVG, Pudicitia enthroned left, drawing veil from face and grasping transverse scepter. RIC 123c. RCV 9159. Extremely fine $150 Ex CNG 60, 22 May 2002, lot 1825 (part of); Monetarium List, December 1995, #24.

293. Trajan Decius (AD 249-251). Billon antoninianus (4.36 gm). IMP C M Q TRAIANVS DECIVS AVG, radiate, draped, cuirassed bust of Trajan Decius right / PA— NNONIAE, two Pannoniae standing half-left, veiled heads turned outward, raising right hands, the one on right holding standard, the one on left beside fixed standard. RIC 21b. RCV 9378. Extremely fine $80

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294. Deified Mariniana (†by AD 253), wife of Valerian. Billon antoninianus (3.91 gm). Ca. 253-254. DIVAE MARINIANAE, veiled and draped bust of Mariniana right, crescent behind shoulders / CONSECRATIO, peacock standing facing, head left, its tail in splendor. RIC 3 (S). RCV 10067. Rare. Good very fine $300

295. Aurelian (AD 270-275). Billon antoninianus (3.78 gm). Serdica. IMP C L DOM AVRELIANVS P F AVG, radiate, cuirassed bust of Aurelian right / RESTITVT OR—BIS, goddess standing right, presenting crown to emperor standing left, holding grounded scepter, KA•Γ in exergue. RIC 291 (S) var.; MIR 47, 261k var. (both with officina B and star in central field). Mouchmov 677 var. (officina Γ not separated by interpunct and with star in central field). CBN — (this obv. legend missing). Cf. Mouchmov 66768 (PROVIDEN DEOR) and 669 (RESTITVT ORBIS) for reverse types without star in central field. Extremely rare. Some silvering. Isolated areas of light roughness. Extremely fine $300

296. Severina (AD 274-275). Bronze reduced sestertius or as (7.24 gm). Ca. 275. SEVERINA AVG, diademed and draped bust of Severina right / I—VNO R—EGINA, Juno standing half-left, holding patera and scepter, peacock standing left before, officina mark Z (=7) in exergue. RIC 7 (S). CBN 319. RCV 11711. Scarce. Green-brown patina. Very fine $250

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297. Tacitus (AD 275-276). Billon antoninianus (4.70 gm). Siscia. IMP C M CLA TACITVS AVG, radiate, draped, cuirassed bust of Tacitus right / AEQVITAS AVG, Aequitas standing half-left, holding scales and cornucopiae, P in exergue. CBN 1720-1721. RIC 181 var. (officina letter in r. field). RCV —. Extremely fine $100

298. Florian(AD 276). Billon antoninianus (4.50 gm). Cyzicus. IMP FLORIANVS AVG, radiate, draped and cuirassed bust of Florian right / CONCORDIA MILITVM, Victory holding palm and presenting wreath to emperor, grasping scepter, T in exergue. RIC 116. CBN 1982-1983. RCV 11853. With much original silvering. Extremely fine $200

299. Probus (AD 276-282). Billon antoninianus (3.74 gm). Ticinum. VIRTVS PROBI A—VG, radiate, cuirassed bust of Probus left, wearing crested helmet and holding spear and shield / VIRTVS — AVG, Mars walking right, holding transverse spear and shouldering trophy, PXXT in exergue. RIC 430. RCV —. With underlying silvering. Extremely fine $100

301. Silver argenteus (2.90 gm). Siscia, ca. 295. DIOCLETI— ANVS AVG, laureate head of Diocletian right / VICTOR— IA AVGG, four tetrarchs sacrificing before archway in six-turreted enclosure, *SIS in exergue. RIC 56 (R4) var. (division of obv. legend). Extremely fine $700

302. Maximian (AD 286-305). Silver argenteus (2.97 gm). Ticinum, ca. 295. MAXIMIA — NVS AVG, laureate head of Maximian right / VICTORIA SARMAT, tetrarchs sacrificing over tripod before six-turreted enclosure. RIC 16b. RSC 548d. A few deposits on reverse. Extremely fine $550

303. Silver argenteus (3.35 gm). Serdica, ca. 303-305. MAXIMIA—NVS AVG, laureate head of Maximian right / VIRTVS — MILITVM, three-turreted enclosure with open archway, •SM•SDε• in exergue. RIC 1b (R4). Rare. Extremely fine $900

300. Diocletian (AD 284-305). Silver argenteus (2.93 gm). Siscia, ca. 294-295. DIOCLETI—ANVS AVG, laureate head of Diocletian right / VIRTVS — MILITVM, four tetrarchs sacrificing before archway in eight-turreted enclosure. RIC 43a (R2). Nearly extremely fine $600

Freeman & Sear Manhattan Sale 2

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304. Silver argenteus (3.32 gm). Antioch, ca. 296. MAXIMIA— NVS AVG, laureate head of Maximian right / VIRTVS — MILITVM, three-turreted enclosure with open archway, H in right field, ANT in exergue. RIC 35b (R4). Rare. Extremely fine $900

307. Constantius II (AD 337-361). Silver siliqua (1.61 gm). Constantinople, 355-361. DN CONSTAN — TIVS P F AVG, diademed, draped and cuirassed bust of Constantius II right / VOTIS / XXX / MVLTIS / XXXX in wreath, C•B below. RIC 133. RSC 342-3v. Nicely toned. A few minor flan flaws. Good very fine $250 Ex CNG 72, 14 June 2006, lot 1800.

305. Galerius as Caesar (AD 293-305). Silver argenteus (2.35 gm). Ca. 295-299. MAXIMIA—NVS CAES, laureate head of Galerius right / VIRTVS MILITVM, four tetrarchs sacrificing over tripod before open arch in six-turreted enclosure, officina Z (=7). RIC 42b (S) var. (obv. legend without NOB attested only with lighter aurei, RIC 8b [R2]). RSC 219b (w. correction to RIC not noted). Cf. Sisak Hd. 83, 86, 88 (3rd, 6th officinae). Nearly extremely fine $500

306. Helena (†ca. AD 330). Æ 3 (3.10 gm). Trier, ca. 327-328. FL HELENA — AVGVSTA, diademed, draped bust of Helena right / SECVRITAS — REIPUBLICE, Securitas standing half-left, holding branch downward, •STRE. RIC 515 (R4). Reverse struck a little flatly. Nearly extremely fine $100

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308. Julian II, the Philosopher (AD 360–363). Silver siliqua (2.19 gm). Lugdunum, 360. FL CL IVLIA — NVS P P AVG, pearl-diademed, draped and cuirassed bust of Julian II right / VOTIS / V / MVLTIS / X in wreath, LVG below. RIC 218. RSC 163†a. Extremely fine $300 Ex CNG 72, 14 June 2006, lot 1810.

309. Silver siliqua (2.23 gm). Lugdunum. FL CL IVLIA — NVS P P AVG, pearl-diademed, draped and cuirassed bust of Julian II right / VOTIS / V / MVLTIS / X in wreath, SLVG below. RIC 227. RSC 163b. Flan crack. Extremely fine $200 Ex Freeman & Sear Mail Bid Sale 11, 11 February 2004, lot 493.

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310. Valens (AD 364-378). Silver siliqua (1.83 gm). Treveri, 367378. D N VALEN — S P F AVG, pearl-diademed, draped and cuirassed bust of Valens right / VRBS — ROMA, Roma seated left on cuirass, holding Victory on globe in right hand and inverted spear in left, TRPS• in exergue. RIC 27b and 45a. RSC 109†6. Attractively toned. Good very fine $200 Ex CNG 72, 14 June 2006, lot 1824.

313. Honorius (AD 395–423). Gold solidus (4.29 gm). Ravenna, 402–423. D N HONORI — VS P F AVG, pearl-diademed, draped and cuirassed bust of Honorius right / VICTORI—A AVGG G, emperor standing facing in military attire, head right, holding labarum and Victory on globe, resting foot on prone captive, R—V across field, COMOB in exergue. RIC 1287. DO 735–736. Depeyrot 7/1. C. 44. Very fine $400 Ex Freeman & Sear Mail Bid Sale 11, 23 November 2004 lot 462.

311. Gratian (AD 367-383). Silver siliqua (1.91 gm). Treveri, 367-378. D N GRATIA — NVS P F AVG, pearl-diademed, draped and cuirassed bust of Gratian right / VRBS — ROMA, Roma seated left on cuirass, holding Victory on globe in right hand and inverted spear in left, TRPS• in exergue. RIC 27f and 45c. RSC 86†a. Toned. Very fine $150 Ex CNG 72, 14 June 2006, lot 1839.

312. Arcadius (AD 383–408). Gold solidus (4.46 gm). Constantinople, 397–402. D N ARCAD — VS P F AVG, helmeted, cuirassed bust of Arcadius three-quarters right, holding shield, spear over shoulder / CONCORDI—A AVGG Δ, Constantinopolis enthroned facing, holding scepter and globus Nicephorus, foot on prow, CONOB in exergue. RIC 7. Depeyrot 55/1. Cf. DO 207–217 (every officina but Δ). Minor surface marks. Nearly extremely fine $450 Ex Freeman & Sear Mail Bid Sale 10, 11 February 2004, lot 496.

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314. Theodosius II (AD 408-450). Gold tremissis (1.48 gm). Constantinople, ca. 408-429. D N THEODO—SIVS P F AVG, pearl-diademed, draped and cuirassed bust of Theodosius II right / VICTORIA AVGVSTORVM, Victory walking to right, head left, holding crown with depending ties and globus cruciger, CONOB in exergue. RIC 213 (S) or 249 (S). Toned and attractive. Extremely fine $350

315. Marcian (AD 450-457). Gold solidus (no wt. given). Constantinople. D N MARCIA—NVS P F AVG, cuirassed bust of Marcian facing slightly right, wearing crested, pearldiademed helmet, holding spear over right shoulder and shield on left arm / VICTORI—A AVGGG Z (=7) around, ConoB in exergue, Victory standing half-left, grasping long jeweled cross, star in right field. RIC 510 (S). In NGC holder and graded “Choice Uncirculated.” Nearly mint state $1,250

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316. Leo I (AD 457-474). Gold solidus (4.26 gm). Constantinople, ca. 462-466. D N LEO PE — RPET AVG, pearl-diademed, helmeted, cuirassed bust of Leo I facing three-quarters right, holding spear over right shoulder and shield with horseman motif on left arm / VICTORI—A AVGGG E, Victory standing left, holding long, jeweled cross, star to right, CONOB in exergue. RIC 605. Slightly wavy flan. Very fine/good very fine $350

319. Anastasius I (AD 491-518). Gold solidus (4.47 gm). Constantinople. D N ANASTA—SIVS P P AVC, cuirassed bust of Anastasius I facing three-quarters right, wearing crested helmet with pearl diadem over trefoil ornament, holding spear and shield / VICTORI—A AVCCC A, Victory standing half-left, holding reversed long staff surmounted by XP-monogram, star in left field, CONO—B interrupted by left foot of Victoria in exergue. BCV 5. DO 7a. Good extremely fine $750

317. Leo II & Zeno (Feb.-Nov. AD 474). Gold tremissis (1.40 gm). Constantinople. D N LEO ET ZENO P P AVG, pearldiademed, draped and cuirassed bust of Leo II right / VICTORIA AVGVSTORVM, Victory walking to right, head left, holding crown with depending ties and globus cruciger, CONOB in exergue. RIC 807 (R3) var. (star below globe in right field). Of barbarous style. Some minor striking flatness. Extremely fine $600

318. Basiliscus (AD 475-476). Gold tremissis (1.47 gm). Constantinople(?). D N bASILIS—CUS P P AVG, pearldiademed, draped, and cuirassed bust of Basiliscus right / VICTORIA AVGVSTORVM, Victory walking to front, head left, holding crown with depending ties and globus cruciger, star in lower right field, CONOB in exergue. RIC 1008 (R3). Nearly extremely fine $750 Ex CNG 67, 22 September 2004, lot 1825.

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320. Justin I (AD 518-527). Gold solidus (4.48 gm). Constantinople. D N IVSTI—NVS P P AVG, cuirassed bust of Justin I facing three-quarters right, wearing crested helmet with pearl diadem over trefoil ornament, holding spear and shield / VICT[ORI]—A AVGGG Δ, Victoria standing facing, holding long cross grounded and globus cruciger, right foot extending forward over ground line, star in right field, ConoB in exergue. BCV 56. DO 2d. Grafitto “E” in upper right reverse field. Extremely fine $450

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321. Justin I & Justinian I (Apr.-Aug. 527). Gold solidus (4.46 gm). Constantinople. D N IVSTIN ET IVSTINIAN P P AVG, nimbate emperors with trefoil ornament on heads seated facing, each holding globus, cross above, ConoB in exergue / VICTORI—A AVGGG S, Victoria standing facing, holding long cross grounded and globus cruciger, right foot extending forward over ground line and left foot in profile before same, star in right field, ConoB in exergue. BCV 120. DO 5c. Very rare. Slight double striking. Extremely fine $4,000 Ex Triton VIII, 11-12 January 2005, lot 1300.

323. Bronze 40 nummi (39 mm, 22.99 gm). Constantinople, 539/40. D N IVSTINI—ANVS P P AVG, cuirassed bust of Justinian I facing, wearing crested helmet with pearl diadem over trefoil ornament and pendilia, holding globus cruciger and shield, cross in right field / Mark of value M, officina letter Δ within, cross above, regnal year A-N-N-O — X-III downward in fields, CoN in exergue. BCV 163. DO 38d. Dark brown patina. Nearly extremely fine $300

324. Bronze 20 nummi (8.17 gm). Nicomedia, Aug. 550-Aug. 551. D N IVSTINI—ANVS P P AVG, cuirassed bust facing of Justinian I in crested helmet, holding globus cruciger and shield, cross in right field / Mark of value K, regnal year A-N-N-O XX-II-II vertically in left and right fields, cross above, NI below. DO 151. BCV 203. Brown patina with a few red patches $150

322. Justinian I (527-565). Bronze 40 nummi (22.17 gm). Carthage, Aug. 539-Aug. 540. D N IVSTINI—ANVS P P AVG, cuirassed bust of Justinian I facing in crested helmet, holding globus cruciger and shield, cross in right field / Mark of value M, regnal year A-N-N-O X-III vertically to left and right, cross above, S within, CAR in exergue. DO 292a. BCV 261. Light brown patina. Very fine $500

325. Bronze 2 nummi (0.70 gm). Thessalonica. [D N IVS]TI P P AVG, diademed, draped and cuirassed bust of Justinian I right / Mark of value B, A—P in fields. DO —. MIB 177. BCV 196a. Very scarce. Good fine $200 Ex CNG 66, 19 May 2004, lot 1702.

Ex Freeman & Sear Mail Bid Sale 6, 6 October 2000, lot 22.

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326. Tiberius II Constantine (578-582). Gold solidus (4.36 gm). Constantinople. O M TIb CONS—TANT P P AVC, cuirassed bust of Tiberius II facing in crown with pendilia, holding globus cruciger and shield / VICTORI—A AVCC A, cross potent on base on four steps, CONOB in exergue. DO 4. BCV 422. Good very fine $300

327. Gold tremissis (1.51 gm). Ravenna. D M COSTAN—TINVS P P A, pearl-diademed, draped, and cuirassed bust of Tiberius II right, heavy annular border / VICTOR TIbERI AVS, cross potent, CONOB beneath, heavy annular border. BCV 470. DO 64. Extremely fine $600

329. Ceremonial siliqua (1.86 gm). Constantinople. o N MAVRi—ci P P AVC, helmeted, pearl-diademed, draped and cuirassed bust of Maurice Tiberius facing, head right / Cross potent between two palm branches. BCV 489B-C (varying legend). Extremely rare. A few pits and a bit softly struck, otherwise good very fine $1,000

330. Bronze 4 pentanummia (6.70 gm). Cherson. XEP—CONOC around, emperor and empress standing facing, both nimbate, emperor holding globus cruciger, empress holding cruciform scepter / Mark of value Δ, Theodosius, son of emperor, standing facing, nimbate, holding staff surmounted by chirho, cross in upper field. DO 301. BCV 610. Rare. Brown patina. Nearly very fine $250 Ex Freeman & Sear Mail Bid Sale 6, 6 October 2000, lot 53.

328. Maurice Tiberius (582-602). Gold solidus (4.33 gm). Constantinople. C N TIbER M—AVRIC P P AV, cuirassed bust of Maurice Tiberius facing, wearing crown with frontal cross, pearl diadem over trefoil ornament and pendilia, holding globus cruciger and shield / VICTORI—A AVCC H, Victoria standing facing, holding grounded long staff surmounted by XP-monogram and globus cruciger, right foot extending forward over ground line and left foot in profile breaking same, ConoB in exergue. BCV 476. DO3b. Extremely fine $400

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331. Bronze 40 nummi (10.97 gm). Theoupolis (Antioch), 595/96. d N MAUΓI — CN P AUT (d N and P under marks of contraction), bust of Maurice Tiberius facing in consular robes, wearing crown with trefoil ornament, holding mappa and eagle-tipped scepter / Mark of value M, officina letter E within, cross above, regnal year A-N-N-• — X-IIII downward in fields, tHEUp’ in exergue. BCV 533. DO 166c. Dark brown patina. Extremely fine $350

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332. Phocas (602-610). Gold solidus (4.57 gm). Constantinople. DM N FOCA—E PERP AVG, draped and cuirassed bust of Phocas facing, wearing crown with frontal cross and pendilia, holding globus cruciger / VICTORI—A AVGG H, Victoria standing facing, holding grounded long staff surmounted by XP-monogram and globus cruciger, right foot extending forward just over ground line, CoNoB in exergue. BCV 617A. DO —. Extremely fine $750

334. Revolt of the Heraclii (summer 608-Nov. 610). Bronze 40 nummi (10.37 gm). Alexandretta, 610/11. dMN ERACLIO CONSULII, facing bearded busts of son and father in consular robes, cross in upper field / Mark of value M, officina letter A within, cross above, indictional year A-NN-o — X-IIII downward in fields, AΛE)(ANΔ in exergue. BCV 722. DO 16. Rare. Green-brown patina. Good very fine $2,000 Ex Gemini V, 6 January 2009, lot 869.

335. Heraclius & Heraclius Constantine (613-641). Gold solidus (4.37 gm). Constantinople. dd NN hERACLIUS ET hERA CONST P P A, facing busts in crowns with frontal cross on circlet, cross in upper field / VICTORIA —AVGU E, cross potent on base on three steps, CONOB beneath. BCV 749. DO 26e. A few light marks on reverse. Extremely fine $350 333. Gold solidus (4.50 gm). Constantinople. d N FOCAS — PERP AVG, draped and cuirassed bust of Phocas facing, wearing crown with frontal cross, holding globus cruciger / VICTORIA AVGU Z, Victoria standing facing, holding grounded long staff surmounted by XP-monogram and globus cruciger, both feet extending forward over ground line, CONoB in exergue. BCV 620. DO 10g. Extremely fine $400 336. Gold solidus (4.49 gm). Jerusalem(?). dd NN hERACII[US ET hERA] CON P, facing busts in crowns with frontal cross, son in background, cross in upper field / VICTORIA — AVGU IΠ, cross potent on base on three steps, ConoB beneath. BCV 852. Rare. Weakly struck at obverse legend. Extremely fine $750 Although the stylistic characteristics of these solidi suggest they are the product of an irregular mint, evidence linking them to Jerusalem is scant. Alexandria, Cyprus and an undefined “military mint” have been put forth as alternative attributions.

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337. Silver half-siliqua (0.69). Carthage. D N ERAC—ΛIO P P AV, draped and cuirassed bust facing in crown with pendilia / Crowned, draped facing busts of Heraclius Constantine and Martina, cross above. DO 233. BCV 871. Some areas of deposits and a few light scratches. Very fine $150

338. Heraclius, Heraclius Constantine & Heraclonas (638641). Gold solidus (4.44 gm). Constantionople. Emperors standing facing, each holding globus cruciger, senior emperor and elder son wearing crown with frontal cross, younger son wearing cap-like crown surmounted by cross / VICTORI—A —AVGU Z (officina letter reversed), cross potent on base on three steps, monogram in left field, E in right field, conoB beneath. BCV 770. DO 44e var. (Z not reversed). Extremely fine $400 Ex UBS 64, 24-26 January 2006, lot 314.

340. Constantine IV Pogonatus, Heraclius & Tiberius (668-681). Gold solidus (4.29 gm). Constantinople. d N CONST—ANIUS C COS, draped facing bust in crown with frontal cross on circlet, holding globus cruciger / VSCTORI A—VGU Γ, cross potent on base on three steps, crowned brothers of senior emperor standing facing on either side, each holding globus cruciger, CoNoB beneath. BCV 1147, cf. DO 1b-c (this officina not listed). Very rare and apparently unrecorded with this officina. Nearly extremely fine $1,500

341. Justinian II (first reign, 685-695). Gold solidus (4.29 gm). Constantinople. D IUSTINIA—NUS PE AV, draped facing bust in crown with frontal cross on circlet, holding globus cruciger / VICTORIA — AVGU E (each A inverted), cross potent on base on three steps, CoNoBΓ beneath. BCV 1247. DO 6 (this officina not listed). A few minor die breaks in the fields. Extremely fine $700

339. Constans II (641-668). Silver hexagram (6.51 gm). Constantinople. [d] N CONSTAN—TINUS P P AC, draped facing bust in crown with frontal cross, holding globus cruciger / dEUS [ADIUT]A ROMANIS, cross potent on base above globe on three steps. BCV 991. DO 50. Usual striking weakness, otherwise nearly extremely fine $400

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342. Bronze 40 nummi (9.55 gm). Constantinople, 685/6. [IVSTINIA]NVS P, crowned bust facing, holding globus cruciger / Mark of value M, officina A within, regnal year ANNO — I downward along sides, CON in exergue. Berk 752.A. DO 18, BCV 1260 (no examples of year 1 noted). Possibly only the second specimen of year 1 known. Overstruck. Very fine $1,000 Ex Christov Family Collection; CNG 61, 25 September 2002, lot 2259.

343. Leontius (695-698). Gold solidus (4.44 gm). Constantinople. D LEO—N PE AV, facing bust wearing crown with frontal cross on circlet and loros, holding akakia and globus cruciger / VICTORIA — AVGU E (second A inverted), cross potent on base on three steps, CoNoB beneath. BCV 1330. DO 1e. Scrape at left shoulder of emperor. A few light surface marks. Very fine $1,250

Lot 344

345. Philippicus (Bardanes) (711-713). Gold solidus (4.43 gm). Constantinople. D N FILEPICUS — MUL—TUS AN, facing bust wearing crown with frontal cross on circlet and loros, holding globus cruciger and eagle-tipped scepter surmounted by cross / VICTORIA — AVGU I, cross potent on base on three steps, CoNoB beneath. BCV 1447. DO 1j. Rare. Matte surfaces with light marks. Nearly extremely fine $750

346. Anastasius II Artemius (713-715). Gold solidus (4.42 gm). Constantinople. d N ARTEMIUS A—NASTASIUS MUL, draped facing bust in crown with frontal cross on circlet, holding globus cruciger and akakia / VICTORIA — AVGU S, cross potent on base on three steps, CoNoB beneath. BCV 1463. DO 2e. Rare. Matte surfaces. A few reverse marks. Extremely fine $1,250

344. Justinian II & Tiberius (705-711). Gold solidus (4.43 gm). Constantinople. [d N] IhS ChS REX — REGNANTIUM, bust of Christ facing, raising right hand in benediction and holding book of Gospels, cross behind head / D N IUSTI[NIANUS ET TIbER]IUS P P A— (D reversed), halflength bust of emperors facing, each wearing crown with cross on circlet and holding with right hands cross potent on base and two steps. BCV 1414. DO 2a. Minor areas of flatness. Lustrous. Good extremely fine $1,500

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347. Theodosius III of Adramytium (715-717). Ceremonial silver hexagram (3.62 gm). Constantinople, struck with solidus dies. d N ThEOdO[SI]US MUL A, facing bust wearing crown with frontal cross on circlet and loros, holding patriarchal cross on globe and akakia / VICTORIA — AVGU E, cross potent on base on three steps, CoNoB beneath. BCV 1491. DO 2 n. Rare. Struck a bit flatly. Nearly extremely fine $2,000

348. Bronze 40 nummi (1.96 gm). Syracuse. Facing crowned bust, holding patriarchal cross on globe and akakia / Mark of value M, X within, monogram above, SCL in exergue. BCV 1495 var., DO 8 var. (star for X on rev.). Extremely rare. Green and light brown surfaces. Good very fine $400

349. Constantine V Copronymus & Leo IV (751-775). Gold solidus (3.56 gm). Constantinople. COnSTAnTI[nOS S] LEOn O nEOS, draped facing busts, each wearing crown with frontal cross on circlet, small pellet between faces, cross in upper field / C — LE—ON P A MUL•, facing bust of Leo III (†741) wearing crown with frontal cross on circlet and loros, holding cross potent. BCV 1551 var., DO 2 var. (rev. legend ending in letter). Clipped and with a few surface marks. Nearly extremely fine $450

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350. Theophilus (829-842). Gold solidus (3.78 gm). Syracuse, ca. 831-842. ΘE—OFILOS (F inverted), facing bust wearing crown with frontal cross submerged in triangle and loros, holding cross potent / ΘEO—FILOS (F inverted), facing bust wearing crown with frontal cross submerged in triangle and chlamys, holding globus cruciger. BCV 1670. DO 24 (reversing sides). A few light marks. Extremely fine $400

351. Basil I (867-886). Bronze follis (7.08 gm). Constantinople, ca. 879-886. +bASILIO—S — bASILEVS*, emperor seated facing on throne with upholstered canoe-shaped back, wearing crown with frontal cross and pendilia, holding labarum, left arm extended across torso / bASIL-IOS En ΘEO - bASILEVS - ROMEOn in four lines. BCV 1709. DO 12. Green and earthen brown patina. Good very fine $150

352. Leo VI (886-912). Bronze follis (6.36 gm). Constantinople. +LEON bAS—ILEVS ROM’, crowned bust of Leo VI facing, holding akakia in left hand / +LEOn – En ΘEO bA–SILEVS R-OMEOn in four lines. DO 8. BCV 1729. Deep green patina. Very fine $100 Freeman & Sear Manhattan Sale 2


Freeman & Sear • Los Angeles Virgin, placing crown with frontal cross and pendilia on facing bust of emperor, wearing loros and holding patriarchal cross with left hand, M Θ above former, manus Dei above latter. BCV 1785. DO 3. Nearly extremely fine $750 353. Constantine VII Porphyrogenitus & Romanus II (945959). Gold solidus (4.39 gm). Constantinople. +IhS XPS REX REGNANTIUM, facing bust of Christ with nimbus cruciger exhibiting three pellets in each limb of cross, raising right hand in benediction and clasping book of Gospels with left / COnSTAnT’ CE ROMAn’ AUGG I R, facing busts in crowns decorated with top of trefoil cross, father wearing loros, son clad in chlamys, holding long patriarchal cross. BCV 1751. DO 15. Good very fine $700

354. Gold solidus (4.54 gm). Constantinople. +IhS XPS REX REGNANTIUM, facing bust of Christ with nimbus cruciger exhibiting two pellets in vertical limb of cross and three in horizontal limbs, raising right hand in benediction and clasping book of Gospels with left / COSTAnT’ CE ROMAn|b• AIGG b, facing busts in crowns decorated with top of trefoil cross, father wearing loros, son clad in chlamys, holding long patriarchal cross. BCV 1751. DO 15. Good very fine $700

355. John I Zimisces (969-976). Gold histamenon nomisma (4.40 gm). Constantinople. +IhS XIS REX REGNANTInM, facing bust of Christ with nimbus cruciger exhibiting one pellet in upper limb of cross and two in side limbs, raising right hand in benediction and clasping book of Gospels with left / +ΘEOTOC — bOHΘ’ Iω dES, facing bust of nimbate

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Lot 355

356. Basil II Bulgaroctonus & Constantine VIII (976-1025). Gold histamenon nomisma (4.41 gm). Constantinople. +IhS XIS REX REΓNANTInM, facing bust of Christ with nimbus cruciger exhibiting one large pellet at end of each limb of cross, raising right hand in benediction and clasping book of Gospels with left / + bASIL [C] COnSTAnTI b R, facing busts in crowns decorated with top of trefoil cross and pendilia, senior emperor wearing loros of lozenge pattern, brother clad in chlamys, holding long patriarchal cross. BCV 1796. DO 2e. A few flat spots. Extremely fine $750

357. Romanus III Argyrus (1028-1034). Gold histamenon nomisma (4.42 gm). Constantinople. +IhS XIS REX — RESNANTIhM, Christ with nimbus cruciger enthroned facing, resting book of Gospels on knee / ΘCE bOHQ’ — RωMAnω, nimbate Virgin standing facing, placing crown with frontal cross and pendilia on emperor standing facing, wearing loros and holding globus cruciger in left hand, six pellets on fold of robe beneath, M Θ under marks of contraction in upper field. BCV 1819. DO 1b.6. Extremely fine $450

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360. (cont). The two stars flanking the emperor are thought to represent Supernova SN1054, an event recorded by astronomers of various cultures in 1054. 358. Gold histamenon nomisma (4.38 gm). Constantinople. +IhS XIS REX — REGNTInm, Christ with nimbus cruciger enthroned facing, resting book of Gospels on knee / ΘCE bOHΘ’ — RωmAnω, nimbate Virgin standing facing, placing crown with frontal cross and pendilia on emperor standing facing, wearing loros and holding globus cruciger in left hand, four pellets on fold of robe beneath, M Θ under marks of contraction separated by pellet in upper field. BCV 1819. DO 1d. Good very fine $400

361. Isaac I Comnenus (1057-1059). Gold histamenon nomisma (4.42 gm). Constantinople. +Ih( XI( RCX — RESNANTIhM (initial h reversed), Christ with nimbus cruciger seated facing, raising right hand in benediction and holding book of Gospels on knee with left / +ICAAKIoC RA—CIΛEVC [Rω]M, cuirassed emperor standing facing, wearing crown decorated with top of trefoil cross and pendilia, holding drawn sword in right hand and resting left on scabbard. BCV 1843. DO 2. Extremely fine $600

359. Michael IV (1034-1041). Gold histamenon nomisma (4.41 gm). Constantinople. +IhS XIS REX — RESNANTIhM, facing bust of Christ with nimbus cruciger exhibiting quincunx with central square and dots at corners in each arm, raising right hand in benediction and clasping book of Gospels with left / +mIX—A—HL bASILEUS Rm, facing bust in crown decorated with trefoil cross and pendilia, grasping labarum surmounted by diamond of four dots and holding globus cruciger, manus Dei in upper left field. BCV 1824. DO 1a, c. Minor flan break at edge. Very fine $650 Ex UBS 61, 14-16 September 2004, lot 4669.

360. Constantine IX Monomachus (1042-1055). Gold histamenon nomisma (4.41 gm). Constantinople, 10541055. XI XIS REX — REGNANhM, facing bust of Christ with nimbus cruciger, raising right hand in benediction and clasping book of Gospels with left / +cωnstanT—nos bas—i—Leus Rm, facing bust in crown decorated with trefoil cross and pendilia, wearing jeweled chlamys, holding globus cruciger and hilt of sword, eight-pointed star in left and right fields. BCV 1831. DO 4a. Very rare. Flan creased. Vertical scrape and minor flan break on reverse. Extremely fine $2,000

362. Michael VII Ducas (1071-1078). Electrum histamenon nomisma (4.35 gm). Constantinople. Facing bust of Christ with nimbus cruciger, raising right hand in benediction and holding book of Gospels with left, IC — XC under marks of contraction in fields / +ΜΙΧ-ΑΗΛ – ΡΑCIΛ Ο Δ, crowned bust facing, holding labarum with pellet on shaft and globus cruciger with central pellet in cross. BCV 1868 var., DO 2 var. (no pellet in cross). A rare variety. Edge roughness at 3:00 (obverse). Very fine $300

Ex CNG 81, 20 May 2009, lot 1213. 100

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363. Nicephorus III (1078-1081). Electrum histamenon nomisma (4.25 gm). Constantinople. Christ seated on bench facing, head surrounded by nimbus cruciger, raising right hand in benediction and holding book of Gospels with left, IC and XC under marks of contraction in upper fields, double dotted border / + NIKHΦ ΔΕCΠ — Τω ROTANIAT’, crowned emperor standing facing on footstool, holding labarum with X on staff and globus cruciger, double dotted border. DO 3. BCV 1881. Very fine $250

364. Alexius I Comnenus (1081-1118). Electrum histamenon nomisma (4.08 gm). Thessalonica, 1081-1092. +KE RΘ ΑΛΕΖ (Z reversed), bust of Christ with nimbus cruciger facing, holding book of Gospels with both hands, IC — XC under marks of contraction over shoulders / ΔI-MI-T o and Δ-EC-Π-T-T downward in fields, nimbate St. Demetrius with sword standing facing, head right, presenting labarum to emperor standing facing in crown with frontal trefoil cross and pendilia, wearing loros. BCV 1904. Nearly extremely fine $500

365. Silver histamenon nomisma (4.38 gm). Thessalonica, 10811092. +KE RΘ ΑΛΕΖ (Z reversed), facing bust of Christ with nimbus cruciger exhibiting pellet in each arm, holding book of Gospels with both hands, IC — XC under marks of contraction over shoulders / Δ-MI-T-I and [Δ-EC-Π-I-T] downward in fields, nimbate St. Demetrius with sword standing facing, head right, presenting patriarchal cross on globe with base to emperor standing facing in crown with frontal trefoil cross and pendilia, wearing loros. BCV 1905. Flan a little rough at obverse edges. Reverse struck softly. Nearly extremely fine $400

366. John II Comnenus (1118-1143). Gold hyperpyron (4.34 gm). Constantinople. KE - RO-HΘ-ΕΙ, Christ with nimbus cruciger enthroned facing, holding book of gospels on knee, IC — XC under marks of contraction in upper fields / Emperor holding globus cruciger and nimbate Virgin standing facing, latter crowning former, MHP and ΘV under marks of contraction to right and upper left of Virgin, Iω under mark of contraction over ΔEC-ΠO-TH to left of emperor. BCV 1940. Area of flatness on obverse. Portion of edge a bit crinkled. Extremely fine $300

367. Manuel I Comnenus (1143-1180). Gold hyperpyron (4.33 gm). Constantinople. +KE RO-HΘΕΙ, bust of Christ with nimbus cruciger exhibiting quincunx in each arm enthroned facing, raising right hand in benediction and holding scroll in left, IC — XC under marks of contraction at shoulders / MA-NA-HΛ C•-Π (second A inverted) and T-Π-P-V-I downward in fields, emperor standing facing in crown with top of trefoil cross to front and pendilia, holding labarum and globus surmounted by patriarchal cross, manus Dei in upper right field. BCV 1956. Irregular flan. Nearly extremely fine $250 Freeman & Sear Manhattan Sale 2

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368. Andronicus I Comnenus (1183-1185). Gold hyperpyron (4.11 gm). Constantinople. Nimbate Virgin enthroned facing, holding nimbate head of infant Christ facing, MP — ΘV under marks of contraction in upper fields / [ΑΝΔΡΟ]ΝΙΚ – ΔΕCΠΟΤΗC, emperor holding labarum and globus cruciger and Christ with nimbus cruciger holding Gospels standing facing, latter crowning former, IC and XC under marks of contraction on either side of nimbus. BCV 1983. Rare. Areas of flatness. Light grafitti in left reverse field. Good very fine $800

371. Michael VIII Palaeologus (1261-1282). Gold hyperpyron (4.08 gm). Constantinople. Bust of Virgin praying within city walls fortified by six groups of towers, trefoil pattern to upper left and right / X - M - ΔE-ΠO (X under mark of contraction) downward on left, X - IT - Λ downward on right, nimbate Christ seated facing behind emperor in crown with pendilia kneeling facing, nimbate St. Michael standing facing to right, star in lower right field. BCV 2242. DO 7. An unusually well-struck reverse. Obverse weakly struck as usual. Grafitto in left reverse field. Good very fine $500

369. Isaac II Angelus (1185-1195). Gold hyperpyron (4.25 gm). Constantinople. Nimbate Virgin enthroned facing, holding in lap head of infant Christ facing, MP — ΘV under marks of contraction in upper fields / Isaac and nimbate Archangel Michael standing facing, holding between them sword in sheath, emperor holding cruciform scepter and being crowned by manus Dei above, IAAKIOC [sic] beside emperor, O beside halo, X M beside leg of archangel. BCV 2001. Areas of flatness. Grafitti in upper-left reverse field. Good very fine $250

370. Alexius III Angelus-Comnenus (1195-1203). Gold hyperpyron (4.39 gm). Constantinople. KE RO-HΘΕΙ (KE under [mark of contraction]), Christ with nimbus cruciger exhibiting quincunx in arms standing facing, raising right hand in benediction and holding book of Gospels in left, IC — XC under marks of contraction in upper fields / Emperor, holding akakia, and nimbate St. Constantine standing facing, each in crown decorated with top of trefoil cross and pendilia, together holding long patriarchal cross, ΠO in upper left field. BCV 2008. Areas of flatness. Extremely fine $500 102

372. Andronicus II Palaeologus & Michael IX (1294-1320). Gold hyperpyron (3.34 gm). Constantinople. Nimbate bust of Virgin praying, city walls with four groups of towers around / A[V]TOKP[A]TOP[EC PωMA]IωN, Christ standing facing, crowning co-emperors kneeling facing, IC and XC under marks of contraction in upper fields. DO —. BCV 2396. Some flatness. Very fine $200

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Freeman & Sear • Los Angeles

373. Gold hyperpyron (3.04 gm). Constantinople. Nimbate bust of Virgin praying, city walls with four groups of towers around, privy marks (monogram and reversed B) on either side of bust / Blundered legends AVTOKNI on right, NOAPKIMUH retrograde on left, Christ standing facing, crowning co-emperors kneeling facing, IC and XC under marks of contraction in upper fields. DO 471. BCV 2396. Some flatness. Very fine $200

374. Copper assarion (2.37 gm). Constantinople. + KVPIE Cω[CON] TOV NCIΛΕΙC (OV in ligature, N retrograde), facing bust of Christ with nimbus cruciger / Three-quarter length figures of emperors standing facing, holding labarum. BCV 2436. DO 681-682. Brown patina. Very fine $100

375. John V Palaeologus & John VI Cantacuzenus (13471353). Gold hyperpyron (5.34 gm). Constantinople. Nimbate bust of Virgin in attitude of prayer within city walls with four groups of towers / Christ standing facing crowning emperors kneeling facing, identifying legend around, IC and XC under marks of contraction in upper fields. BCV 2526. Rare. Struck flatly. Nearly very fine $400

Freeman & Sear Manhattan Sale 2

376. Manuel II Palaeologus (1391-1423). Bronze tornese (1.60 gm). Constantinople. Nimbate St. Demetrius on horseback right, brandishing sword / Nimbate bust of emperor facing, pellet in left field and Palaeologan monogram in right field, double border of dots. DO 1601. BCV 2558. Brown patina. Good fine $100 Ex Elsen Auction 90, 9 December 2006, lot 494.

377. John VIII Palaeologus (1425-1448). Silver stavraton or half-hyperpyron (6.51 gm). Constantinople. Nimbate bust of Christ facing, IC under mark of contraction to left, X to right / Nimbate bust of emperor facing, Ο ΠΑΛΕΟΛ in outer rim. DO 1746. BCV 2563. Some flatness. Very fine $200

378. EMPIRE OF NICAEA. John III Ducas-Vatatzes (1222-1254). Gold hyperpyron (4.02 gm). Magnesia. Christ enthroned facing, [I]C — XC under marks of contraction in upper fields / John standing facing, grasping scepter, crowned by Virgin standing half-left, ΘV under mark of contraction in upper right field. BCV 2073. Nearly extremely fine $350

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M I G R A TI O N PE R I O D A N D M E D I E V A L CO I N S

379. Gold hyperpyron (4.50 gm). Magnesia. Christ with nimbus cruciger enthroned facing, IC—XC under marks of contraction in upper fields, pellet in right field / Emperor grasping labarum and nimbate Virgin standing facing, latter crowning former. BCV 2073 var. (cross for pellet in obverse right field). Flan crack. Good very fine $200

382. UNCERTAIN GERMANIC. In the name of Theodosius II. Gold tremissis (1.45 gm). After ca. 439. D N THEoDo— SIVS P F AVG, pearl-diademed, draped bust right / VICTORI—A — AVG—VSTORVM, Victory walking to right, head left, holding crown with depending ties and globus cruciger, CONOB in exergue. Cf. RIC 278 (R2). Scratches. Nearly extremely fine $500 Ex CNG 69, 8 June 2005, lot 1912.

380. EMPIRE OF TREBIZOND. Andronicus I Gidon (1222-1235). Silver aspron trachy (2.96 gm). Nimbate Virgin standing facing with arms to right, MHP (in ligature) and ΘV under marks of contraction high in fields / Christ Chalkites standing facing, head surrounded by nimbus cruciger, holding book of gospels, IC and XC under marks of contraction in upper fields, O X-A-Λ — K-H-TH-C (TH in ligature) vertically in fields. S. Bendall, NCirc 115, Feb. 2007, Var. 2, 4 (this coin). DO IV, pl. xxxvii, 1 (Nicaea). BCV 2148 (Nicaea). Rare. Grafitti in left reverse field. Good very fine $900

381. Andronicus III (1330-1332). Silver asper (2.04 gm). Emperor, wearing crown with pendilia, turned toward viewer seated on horse walking right, holding scepter, AN-ΔP (AN in ligature) in two lines behind, M before / Nimbate St. Eugenius seated on horse walking right, holding cross, EV behind. BCV 2620 (sides reversed). Striking weakness. Very fine $150

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383. GEPID KINGDOM. In the name of Justin I (518-527). Silver quarter siliqua (0.56 gm). Radiate bust right, legend ending P AV (AV in ligature) around / Theodericusmonogram, cross above, star below, garbled legend around. Metlich, pp. 43-44. Cf. MEC, p. 36. Rare. Toned. Very fine $500 Ex CNG 76 part 1, 12 September 2007, lot 1710.

384. LOMBARD KINGDOM. In the name of Maurice Tiberius (582-602). Gold tremissis (1.43 gm). Diademed bust right, garbled legend around / Victory standing facing, head left, holding open crown with depending ties and globus cruciger, garbled legend around, IONO—I partly under short exergual line. Bernareggi 1. Cf. MEC 305-306. Extremely fine $1,000 Ex CNG 66, 19 May 2004, lot 1762; Garth Drewry Collection.

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Freeman & Sear • Los Angeles

Lot 384

387. VISIGOTHIC KINGDOM. In the name of Anastasius. Gold tremissis (1.50 gm). Under Alaric II or Amalaric, Narbonne or Arles. D N ANASTA—SIVS P F AVC, pearldiademed, draped, and cuirassed bust right / VICToRIA A—VCvSTORVM, Victory striding right in profile, holding crown upward, CoNoB in exergue. Cf. MEC 178-181. Very rare. Very fine $1,000

385. OSTROGOTHIC KINGDOM. In the name of Anastasius. Gold tremissis (1.48 gm). Under Theoderic, Rome. D N ANASTA—SIVS P F AVC, pearl-diademed, draped, and cuirassed bust right / VICTORIA AVCVSTORVM, Victory advancing right, head left, holding crown with depending ties and globus cruciger, star in right field, COMOB in exergue. MEC 114-115. Extremely fine $750

388. In the name of Justin. Gold tremissis (1.44 gm). Under Amalaric, Narbonne or Arles. C N IVSTI—NVS P P AVc (initial C reversed), pearl-diademed, draped bust right, cross on robe / VICToRIA A—CV—SToRVΛ, Victory striding right in profile, holding crown upward and shouldering palm, CoNoB in exergue. Tomasini 211. Cf. MEC 188. Unusually nice for type. Extremely fine $1,250

386. Anonymous. Bronze 40 nummi (12.88 gm). Rome, period of Theoderic (493-526) or Athalaric (526-534). NIVICT—A ROMA, helmeted and draped bust of Roma right / Eagle standing left, head right, mark of value L-X (L retrograde) in column before, [•]E[•] in exergue. MEC 102-106. Dark green patina. Very fine $250

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389. In the name of Justin II (565-578). Gold tremissis (1.41 gm). Under Athanagild, Liuva I, or Leovigild, Narbonne or Arles. C VIΛV—ΛNI VC (initial C and N reversed), diademed, draped bust right, cross on robe / VTV—IIΛIV, Victory striding right in profile, holding crown upward and shouldering palm, COIIO in exergue. Cf. Tomasini 430, MEC 203-205. Good extremely fine $2,000

390. VISIGOTHIC KINGS. Sisebut (612-621). Gold tremissis (1.38 gm). Eliberri. +SISEBVTVS RE, facing draped bust / +PIVS ELIBERI:, facing draped bust. CNV 217.4. MEC — (mint not listed for Sisebut). Nearly extremely fine $600

393. Chintila (636-639). Gold tremissis (1.32 gm). Sevilla. + CHI°NTIL° Λ RE, draped facing bust / + ISPΛL*IPI°VS, draped facing bust. CNV 370.6. MEC 250 var. (interpuncts). Rare. A little weakly struck. Good very fine $750

394. Tulgan (639-642). Gold tremissis (1.47 gm). Córdoba. + TVLGΛN RE, facing bust / + CoRΛoIΛ PIVS, facing bust with cruciform torso exhibiting pellet at end of each arm of cross. CNV 392.2 var. (rev. legend CoRΔoBΛ PIVS, no pellets). MEC — (mint not listed for him). An unpublished variant. Extremely fine $2,000 Ex CNG 82, 16 September 2009, lot 1141.

391. Swinthila (621-631). Gold tremissis (1.49 gm). Mérida. + SVINTHILΛ REX, facing bust / + EMERI—T—Λ PIVS, facing half-length figure. CNV 327. MEC 238. Extremely fine $750 Ex Triton XII, 67 January 2009, lot 854.

392. Gold tremissis (1.53 gm). Córdoba. + SVINTHIIL• RE (N retrograde), facing bust / + CoRDoBΛ PIUS (S retrograde), facing bust. CNV 285.10. Cf. MEC 236. Extremely fine $1,000

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395. ANGLO-SAXON. Continental sceattas (ca. 695-740). Silver sceat (1.17 gm). Series E. Frisian mint. Plumed bird with pellets before head, under neck and under belly, X before body / Geometric pattern, cross above. SCBC 789. North 49. Toned. Good very fine $400

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396. Secondary sceattas (ca. 710-760). Silver-plated(?) sceat (0.93 gm). Series J, type 37. Two confronted heads nose-tonose, long cross on base in background / Small central cross pommée, at end of each arm bird standing right in profile. SCBC 792. North 135. Toned. A few breaks in metal. Good very fine $350

397. Silver sceat (0.81 gm). Series Q, types QII-IVd. Bird standing left, cross before / Quadruped with trefoil-tipped tail standing left, jaws open. SCBC 836. North 138. Toned. Extremely fine $500

398. Hybrid. Silver sceat (1.13 gm). Ca. 710-760. Southeast England, Rhine area or Frisia. “Wodan” head facing / Circle with central pellet within four angles arranged in square within dotted square. Mule of secondary sceat obverse (type 30) and continental sceat obverse (type 8) as reverse. SCBC 844/840. Rare. Very fine $300

Freeman & Sear Manhattan Sale 2

399. Aethelred II (978-1016). Silver penny (1.34 gm). Winchester, by Brunstan, ca. 1003-1009. +ÆDELRÆD REX ANG, armored bust left in radiate helmet / +BRV— NSTA—N M•O — PINT, long cross voided with limbs terminating in three crescents before concave-sided abacus with trefoil at corners. North 775 var. (obv. legend terminating –LO). SCBC 1152. Slightly rough surfaces. Good very fine $200

400. Cnut (1016-1035). Silver penny (1.14 gm). Thetford, by Brunstan, ca. 1029-1035/1036. +CNV—T — •REC•X:, diademed, armored bust left, scepter terminating in lis before / +BRVNSTAN THEOD: (TH in ligature), short cross voided within circle, with central circle enclosing pellet. North 790. SCBC 1159. Toned. Very fine $200

401. VIKING NORTHUMBRIA. Cunnet(t)i. Silver penny (1.42 gm), York. C-N-V-T at opposite ends of limbs of patriarchal cross, R-E-X around outside first three quarter-sections, three dots in row in upper right field, three dots in triangular pattern in upper left field / + CVN—NETI —, small central cross pattée with pellet to upper left and lower right, aligned with these in outer rim four pellets arranged in shape of diamond. North 501 (sides reversed) var., SCBC 993 var. (name ending –TTI). Nicely toned. Good very fine $600

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402. MEROVINGIAN KINGDOM. In the name of Justinian I. Gold tremissis (1.27 gm). Pseudo-imperial, ca. 500-580. D N IVSTIN—NIANVS R, cuirassed bust right, seen from front, wearing pearl diadem surmounted by dot within crescent / VICTORIA A—VCOSTOR, Victory standing facing, holding crown with depending ties and globus cruciger, CONO in exergue. MEC 356 var. (legends, lettering, diadem). Very fine $500

405. UNCERTAIN BALKAN OR TURKIC. Imitating Nicephorus III Botoniates (1078-1081). Electrum histamenon nomisma (3.88 gm). Christ with nimbus cruciger seated facing, raising right hand in benediction and holding book of Gospels with left, IC —CI under marks of contraction in fields / +HIoHU) H — ωPUUIIHII, emperor standing facing, wearing crown with pendilia and loros, holding labarum with X on shaft and globus cruciger with teardrop-shaped object underneath. Cf. BCV 1881, DO 3b. “Dimple” in right obverse field. Very fine $250

403. MEROVINGIAN FRANCE. Rouen. Silver denier (1.02 gm). Ca. 700-725. Facing radiate head with open mouth / ….FOGN…., flower blossom seen from above. ProuBougenot, RN 11, 1907, 14=Depeyrot, Denier 2 (this coin). Extremely rare. Toned. Very fine $2,000 406. SILK ROAD. Imitating solidus of Justinian I. Gold bracteate (0.59 gm). 6th-8th centuries. Cuirassed bust facing slightly left, wearing crested helmet with pearl diadem, holding shield, legend in fields / Incuse of obverse. Cf. Göbl, Dokumente z. Gesch. d. iranischen Hunnen 3, pl. 87, B1. Rare and fascinating. Two flan cracks. Good very fine $500

404. CA ROLINGIAN FRANCE. Charles the Bald (840-877). Silver denier (1.64 gm). Poitiers. +CARLVS REX (S retrograde) R [sic] around, central cross within circle / +METxVLLO around, KAROLVS-monogram within central circle. MEC 10. Iridescent tone. Good very fine $200

407. VANDALIC KINGDOM. In the name of Honorius. Silver siliqua (1.39 gm). Struck under Gaiseric (AD 428-477) or Huneric (AD 477-484). Carthage. D N HONO[RI—VS P F AVG], diademed, draped, cuirassed bust right with overlarge eye / [VRBS] — ROIIA, [helmeted] Roma seated left on cuirass, holding [Victory on] globe and grasping scepter, RVPS in exergue. Morrisson-Schwartz, ANSMN 27, 1982, 22 (this coin). MEC 3. BMC Vand. 6-9. Struck off center and with a few scratches. Toned. Very fine $200

The obverse legend should terminate in FR or F.

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Freeman & Sear • Los Angeles ISLA M IC COINS

408. TURKISH DYNASTS. Artuqids of Mardin. Qutb al-Din Il-Ghazi II (1176-1184). Bronze dirham (15.33 gm). 1183. Two draped busts facing, date AH 579 / Royal name and titles. S&S type 32.3. Deep green patina. Good very fine $200

WO R L D CO I N S

411. CANADA. 25 cents. 1874-H. Victoria. KM-5. NGC graded AU 55. $150

412. 1 cent. 1909. Edward VII. DES under bust for designer of obverse, G. W. DeSalles. KM-8. NGC graded MS 65 RB. $150 409. MONGOL EMPIRE. Chinggis (Genghis) Khan (1206-1227). Bronze jital (4.32 gm). Ghazna type. Imperial titles (without name) / Name of caliph al-Nasir within embellished square. Nyamaa 6. Album 1969. Brown patina. Very fine $150

413. 5 cents. 1925. George V. KM-29. NGC graded AU 55. $200

410. OTTOMAN EMPIRE. Süleyman I (1520-1566). Gold sultani (3.50 gm). Dimashq, 1520. Arabic legends on both sides. Dated AH 926 (1523). Sultan 1074. Album 1317. Very fine $100 414. 50 cents. 1946. George VI. Initials H P for designer Thomas Humphrey Paget below neck truncation on obverse, initials K G for designer George Kruger Gray flanking crown on reverse KM-36. NGC graded MS 63. $100

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415. 1 dollar. 1955. Elizabeth II. Voyageur Dollar. Unlicensed fur trader (voyageur) and nude Indian paddling canoe containing two bundles of furs, the forward one labeled H B for “Hudson’s Bay (Company),” below stern initials of designer of reverse, Emanuel Hahn. Classed “Arnprior” by PCGS and graded PL 66. $200

418. NETHERLANDS. Overijsell. “Rider” Ducaton. 1734. Knight charging right above provincial arms / Dutch arms and supporters. KM 80. Good very fine $250

END OF S ALE 416. JAPAN. 10 sen. 1873. Meiji-6. Type II, characters connected. KM-Y23. NGC graded MS 65.

$250

417. MEXICO. Ferdinand VI (1746-1759). Silver 8 reales (“pillar dollar”). Mexico City, 1756. FERDND• VI• D• G• HI—SPAN• ET IND• REX, coat of arms of Castilla y León, represented by castle and lion, respectively, under Spanish royal crown, mark of value 8 between blossoms to right, assayers’ initials M M (for senior assayer Manuel de León and junior colleague Manuel Azorin) between pellet and blossom to left / VTRAQUE VNUM, contiguous hemispheres representing Old and New Worlds on promontory above waves between Pillars of Hercules, all topped by crowns, PLUS — VLTR on banners encircling pillars, date below, mintmark Mo (in composition) between blossoms on each side. KM 104.2. Nicely toned. Nearly extremely fine $650

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Freeman & Sear • Los Angeles ABBREVIATIONS AMNG I/2 AMNG III/2

B. Pick and K. Regling, Die antiken Münzen Nordgriechenlands, vol. I, pt. 2: Die antiken Münzen von Dacien und Moesien. Berlin, 1910. H. Gaebler, Die antiken Münzen Nordgriechenlands, vol. III: Die antiken Münzen von Makedonia und Paeonia, part 2. Berlin, 1935.

Atlan

S. Atlan, Untersuchungen über die sidetischen Münzen des V. and IV. Jahrhunderts v. Chr. Ankara, 1967.

Bauslaugh

R.A. Bauslaugh, Silver Coinage with the Types of Aesillas the Quaestor, Numismatic Studies 22. New York, 2000.

Bopearachchi

O. Bopearachchi, Monnaies gréco-bactriennes et indo-grecques: Catalogue raisonné. Paris, 1991.

BMC

A Catalogue of the Greek Coins in the British Museum. London, 1873-1927. 29 vols.

BMCRE

H. Mattingly et al., Coins of the Roman Empire in the British Museum. London, 1923-1962. 6 vols. in 8 parts. Reprinted, with revised 2nd ed. of vol. V, London, 1965-1975.

Calciati

R. Calciati, Corpus Nummorum Siculorum: La monetazione di bronzo/The Bronze Coinage. Milano / Mortara, 1983–1987. 3 vols. R. Calciati, Pegasi. Mortara, 1990. 2 vols.

Caltabiano

M. Caccamo Caltabiano, La monetazione di Messana, con le emissioni di Rhegion dell’età della tirannide, Antike Münzen und Geschnittene Steine XIII. Berlin, 1993.

Castelin

K. Castelin, Keltische Münzen: Katalog der Sammlung im Schweizerischen Landesmuseum Zürich. Bern, 1985.

CBN

J.-B. Giard, Bibliothèque Nationale: Catalogue des monnaies de l’empire romain, vol. 1: Auguste, Paris, 1976; vol. 1I: De Tibère à Néron, Paris, 1988; vol. III: Du Soulèvement de 68 après J.-C. à Nerva, Paris, 1998. S. Estiot, vols. XII.1.1-2: D’Aurélien à Florien, Paris 2004.

CRI

D. R. Sear, The History and Coinage of the Roman Imperators 49–27 BC. London, 1998.

Dembski

G. Dembski, Sammlungskataloge des Kunsthistorischen Museums Wien, Vol. I: Münzen der Kelten. Wien, 1998.

DT

L.-P. Delestrée and M. Tache, Nouvel atlas des monnaies gauloises. I: De la Seine au Rhin. II: De la Seine à la Loire moyenne. Saint-Germain-en-Laye, 1992.

ESM

E.T. Newell, The Coinage of the Eastern Seleucid Mints from Seleucus I to Antiochus III, Numismatic Studies 1. New York, 1978, reprint of original 1938 edition with summary of recent scholarship by O. Mørkholm.

GCHT

M. Arslan and C. Lightfoot, Greek Coin Hoards in Turkey: The Antalya Archaeological Museum and the C.S. Okray Collection with Additional Material from the Burdur, Fethiye and Sinop Museums. Ankara, 1999.

GIC

D. R. Sear, Greek Imperial Coins and Their Values: The Local Coinages of the Roman Empire. London, 1982.

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Göbl, OTA

R. Göbl, Ostkeltischer Typen-Atlas. Braunschweig, 1973.

Göbl, MK

R. Göbl, Münzprägung des Kusanreiches. Wien, 1984.

Head

B.V. Head, On the Chronological Sequence of the Coins of Boeotia. London, 1881.

Holloway

R.R. Holloway, The Thirteen Months Coinage of Hieronymos of Syracuse, AMuGS III. Berlin, 1969.

HN Italy

N.K. Rutter, ed. Historia Numorum. Italy. London, 2001.

Ierardi, AJN 7–8

M. Ierardi, “The tetradrachms of Agathocles of Syracuse: A preliminary study,” American Journal of Numismatics 7–8 (1959–96), pp. 1–73.

Jenkins

G.K. Jenkins, The Coinage of Gela, Antike Münzen und Geschnittene Steine II. Berlin, 1970.

Hendin

D. Hendin, Guide to Biblical Coins, Fourth Edition. New York, 2001.

Jenkins-Lewis

G.K. Jenkins and R.B. Lewis, Carthaginian Gold and Electrum Coins, RNS Special Publication 2. London, 1963.

King

C. E. King, Roman Quinarii from the Republic to Diocletian and the Tetrarchy, Oxford, 2007.

Komnick

H. Komnick, Die Restitutionsmünzen der frühen Kaiserzeit. Berlin, 2001.

Kostial

M. Kostial, Kelten im Osten. Gold und Silber der Kelten in Mittel und Osteuropa: Sammlung Lanz. München, 1997.

Lederer

P. Lederer, Die Staterprägung der Stadt Nagidos. Berlin, 1932.

Le Rider

G. Le Rider, Le monnayage d’argent et d’or de Philippe II frappé en Macédoine de 359 à 294. Paris, 1977.

LT

H. de la Tour, Atlas de monnaies gauloises. London reprint, 1968.

Lorber-Michaels

“Silver Coinage of Aegeae in the reign of Hadrian.” Numismatica e Antichità Classiche 36, 2007, 205-43.

Macdonald

D. MacDonald, An Introduction to the History and Coinage of the Kingdom of the Bosporus, Classical Numismatic Studies 5. Lancaster, 2005.

Mazard

J. Mazard, Corpus Nummorum Numidiae Mauretaniaeque. Paris, 1955.

Mektepini

N. Olçay and H. Seyrig, Le Trésor de Mektepini en Phrygie, Trésors monétaires Séleucides I. Paris, 1965.

Metcalf

W. E. Metcalf, The Cistophori of Hadrian, Numismatic Studies 15. New York, 1980.

Metcalf

W. E. Metcalf, The Silver Coinage of Cappadocia, Vespasian-Commodus. New York, 1996.

Meydancikkale

A. Davesne and G. Le Rider, Gülnar II: Le Trésor de Meydancikkale (Cilicie Trachée, 1980). Paris, 1981. 2 vols. Freeman & Sear Manhattan Sale 2


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Mildenberg

L. Mildenberg, The Coinage of the Bar Kokhba War, Typos VI. Aarau, 1984.

Milne

J.G. Milne, Catalogue of Alexandrian Coins in the Ashmolean Museum, Oxford. Oxford, 1933, reprinted with supplement, 1971.

Mitchiner

M. Mitchiner, Indo-Greek and Indo-Scythian Coinage. London, 1975–1976. 9 vols.

Mouchmov

N. A. Mouchmov, Les monnaies et les ateliers monétaires de Serdica. Sophia, 1926 [in Bulgarian].

Müller

L. Müller, Die Münzen des Thracischen Königs Lysimachus. Copenhagen, 1858.

Price

M. Price, The Coinage in the Name of Alexander the Great and Philip Arrhidaeus. Zürich / London, 1991. 2 vols.

Prieur

M. and K. Prieur, A Type Corpus of the Syro-Phoenician Tetradrachms and Their Fractions from 57 BC to AD 253. Lancaster / London, 2000.

RIC

The Roman Imperial Coinage, eds. H. A. Mattingly, E.A. Sydenham, R. A. G. Carson, and J. P. C. Kent. London, 1923-1994. 10 vols. in 13 parts. Vol. I2 by C. H. V. Sutherland, London, 1984. Vol. II.12 by I. A. Carradice and T. V. Buttrey, London 2007.

RCV

D. Sear, Roman Coins and their Values. 3 vols. London, 2000–.

Robinson

E.S.G. Robinson, “Carthaginian and other South Italian coinages of the Second Punic War,” Numismatic Chronicle 1964, pp. 37–64.

Robinson-Clement

D.M. Robinson and P.A. Clement, Excavations at Olynthus, vol. IX: The Chalcidic Mint and the Excavation Coins Found in 1928–1934. Baltimore, 1938.

RPC I

A. Burnett, M. Amandry, and P. P. Ripollès, Roman Provincial Coinage, vol. I: From the Death of Caesar to the Death of Vitellius (44 BC–AD 69). London / Paris, 1992. A. Burnett, M. Amandry, and P. P. Ripollès, Roman Provincial Coinage, Supplement I. London / Paris, 1998. A. Burnett, M. Amandry, I. Carradice, Roman Provincial Coinage, vol. II: From Vespasian to Domitian (AD 69–96). London / Paris, 1999.

RPC Suppl. I RPC II RRC

M. Crawford, Roman Republican Coinage. London, 1974. 2 vols.

RSC

D. Sear et al., Roman Silver Coins. 5 vols. London, 1978–1987.

Schönert-Geiß

E. Schönert-Geiß, Die Münzprägung von Maroneia, Schriften zur Geschichte und Kultur der Antike 26. Berlin, 1987. 2 fascicules.

Sellwood

D. Sellwood, An Introduction to the Coinage of Parthia. 2nd ed., London, 1980.

Simonetta

B. Simonetta, The Coins of the Cappadocian Kings, Typos II. Fribourg, 1977.

SC

A. Houghton and C. Lorber, Seleucid Coins: A Comprehensive Catalogue, Part I: Seleucus I through Antiochus III. New York/Lancaster/London, 2002. Part II: Seleucus IV through Antiochus XIII, with O. Hoover, 2008.

SMA

E.T. Newell, “The Seleucid Mint of Antioch,” American Journal of Numismatics LI (191718), pp. 1-151.

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SNG ANS

Sylloge Nummorum Graecorum: The Collection of the American Numismatic Society. New York, 1969+. 9 fasciscules.

SNG Ashmolean

Sylloge Nummorum Graecorum, Vol. V: Ashmolean Museum, Oxford. Evans Collection. London, 1951–1976. 3 fascicules.

SNG BM Black Sea

Sylloge Nummorum Graecorum, Vol. IX. British Museum, Part I: The Black Sea. London, 1993.

SNG Copenhagen

Sylloge Nummorum Graecorum, The Royal Collection of Coins and Medals, Danish National Museum. København, 1942+. 42 fasciscules. Sylloge Nummorum Graecorum, The Royal Collection of Coins and Medals, Danish National Museum, Supplement: S. Schultz and J. Zahle, eds., Acquisitions 1942–1996. København, 2002.

SNG Cop. Suppl.

114

SNG Fitzwilliam

Sylloge Nummorum Graecorum, Vol. IV: Fitzwilliam Museum, Cambridge. London, 1940–1971.

SNG Kayhan

Sylloge Nummorum Graecorum, Turkey, Vol. I: K. Konuk, The Muharrem Kayhan Collection. Istanbul, 2002.

SNG Keckman

Sylloge Nummorum Graecorum, Finland. The Erkki Keckman Collection in the Skopbank, Helsinki, Part I. U. Westermark and R. Ashton, Karia. Helsinki, 1994. Part II. R. Ashton, Asia Minor except Karia. Helsinki, 1999.

SNG Lockett

Sylloge Nummorum Graecorum, Vol. VIII: The Lockett Collection. London, 1957. 5 fascicules.

SNG München

Sylloge Nummorum Graecorum, Deutschland: Staatliche Münzsammlung München. Berlin, 1969+. 7 fascicules.

SNG Paris

Sylloge Nummorum Graecorum, France 2: Cabinet des Médailles. E. Levante, Cilicia. Paris, 1993.

SNG Levante

Sylloge Nummorum Graecorum, Switzerland, Vol. I: E. Levante, Levante—Cilicia. Bern, 1986.

SNG von Aulock

Sylloge Nummorum Graecorum, Deutschland: Sammlung von Aulock. Berlin, 1957+. 18 fasciscules.

Starr Svoronos

C.G. Starr, Athenian Coinage 480–449 B.C. Oxford, 1970. J.N. Svoronos, Ta nomismata tou kratous ton Ptolemaion. Athens, 1904–1908. 4 vols.

Sydenham

E. A. Sydenham, The Coinage of the Roman Republic. London, 1952.

Thompson

M. Thompson, The New Style Silver Coinage of Athens, Numismatic Studies 10. New York, 1961. 2 vols.

Troxell

H.A. Troxell, Studies in the Macedonian Coinage of Alexander the Great, Numismatic Studies 21. New York, 1997.

Van Arsdell

R. D. van Arsdell, Celtic Coinage of Britain. London, 1989.

Villaronga, CNHAA

L. Villaronga, Corpus Nummum Hispaniae ante Augusti Aetatem. Madrid, 1994.

Vlasto

O.E. Ravel, The Collection of Tarentine Coins Formed by M.P. Vlasto. London, 1947. Freeman & Sear Manhattan Sale 2



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