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AUGUST 2021 ISSUE 126

FRANCOIS VEDEMME

Fashion's WOW factor Distributed to the communities of Ballito, Durban North, Gateway, La Lucia, Mt Edgecombe, Prestondale, Somerset Park, uMdloti, uMhlali, uMhlanga Ridge, uMhlanga Rocks, Zimbali


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*ed's letter

Hope for tomorrow T

here was an outcry in our home last year when HP sauce disappeared from supermarket shelves. How would we survive? How could this happen in our lifetime? I mean, it’s not like we were living in wartime or even in postapocalyptic times. To make matters worse, scouring the sauce aisle revealed there were no alternatives to fill this void. Fast forward a year and HP sauce is the last thing on our minds. Who would have thought we would find ourselves queuing to get into shops to buy essential food items – never mind HP sauce. That petrol stations would be closed. Shopping centres standing empty, but guarded. Businesses trying to

TALK TO US

lorna.king@ famouspublishing.co.za www.theridgeonline.co.za W Ridge Magazine

keep things ticking over. I feel that if I pinch myself hard enough I’ll wake up from a bad dream. But it’s not a dream. This is 2021. This is our beloved KwaZulu-

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Natal. And this is very real. When thinking about what to write for this column, it was extremely difficult to find a positive spin to what is/was going on. But then it struck me. Over the last few days there has certainly been a powerful sense of community spirit pouring out to protect families, property and our neighbourhoods. If we didn’t know our neighbours before, we certainly do now. It is immensely encouarging to realise we all have the same goals for our loved ones and will stand together in times of adversity. Talking to a friend we both agreed that having residents armed with firearms, cricket bats and the like securing our neighbourhoods was both so right, yet so wrong at the same time. The sad aspect of the lawlessness we have witnessed, is that we have taken our foot off the pedal with regards to fighting the “unknown” enemy amongst us. Any progress we were making on

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the vaccine roll-out campaign has taken a back seat and has been replaced by a “survival mode” attitude. We salute the many frontline workers in the health sector who have done everything possible over the past 16 months to fight the pandemic. It’s a long road – but we will get there. With Women’s Month just around the corner, let’s celebrate the millions of women – wives, mothers, grandmothers, sisters, daughters, aunts and colleagues – who work tirelessly to keep the family unit together, to bring peace into their homes, to guide, feed and educate their families for a better tomorrw. I hope that by the time you read this, calm has been restored to our beautiful province – a province that is rich in diversity, history, culture, and opportunity. Stay safe. Until next time …

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in this issue*

GROUP EDITOR Doody Adams EDITOR Lorna King 078 750 9669 DESIGNER Kyle Griffin SALES CONSULTANT Lynda Kapsimalis 082 379 9912 DISTRIBUTION Mphumzeni Thusi ACCOUNTS & DISTRIBUTION QUERIES Meghan Dewet 083 533 5898 ONLINE EDITOR Sarah Mackintosh CONTRIBUTORS Katrine Anker-Nilssen, Gareth Bailey, Darrel Bristow-Bovey, Cathy Clark, Alan Cooper, Lee Currie, Ant Ellis, Joanne Hayes, Kate Hoare, Shirley le Guern, Sarah Mackintosh, Anne Schauffer Copyright: All material in this issue is subject to copyright and belongs to Famous Publishing unless otherwise indicated. No part of the material may be quoted, photocopied, reproduced or stored by an electronic system without prior written permission from Famous Publishing. Disclaimer: While every effort is taken to ensure the accuracy of the contents of this publication, neither the authors nor the publisher will bear any responsibility for the consequences of any actions based on information contained herein. Neither do they endorse any products/services advertised herein. Material which appears under ‘Advertorial’ is paid for.

* To the people of uMhlanga, La Lucia, Zimbali, Mount Edgecombe, Ballito, Gateway, La Lucia Mall, the Crescent, the office parks, the residential estates and, of course, all our advertisers, thank you for your continued support

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COMMUNITY DESIGNED TO LAST

LIFESTYLE 12

Francois Vedemme – adjusting to the "new normal"

FASHION & THE COVID FACTOR Published by Famous Publishing www.famouspublishing.co.za Printed by Novus Managed distribution by Vibrant Direct

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LEGACY LIVING

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REGULARS

Tech options to keep data flowing

PAYING IT FORWARD

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Helping the less fortunate The ABC logo is a valued seal of trust, providing measurement, compliance and auditing services which protects the way advertising is traded. The Ridge is ABC audited and certified.

WE ALSO PUBLISH

In compliance with the Protection of Personal Information Act 4, if you do not want to receive The Ridge magazine for free, please email sarah.mackintosh@famouspublishing.co.za For more information visit: www.famouspublishing.co.za

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TRUE INSPIRATION

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Grobbelaar & Cass – restoring lives

A BRIGHT FUTURE

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Passion for the visually impaired

RIDE & EXPLORE

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KZN's 10 best mountain bike trails

LOOK AFTER YOUR TEETH

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Dental care for the whole family

PUDS TO PLEASE

50

Two favourites for winter nights

ADAPTING TO CHANGE Our changing property market

EASY LIVING

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Luxury sleepwear

Making a difference to local artists

STAYING CONNECTED

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Fashion must-haves

Fashion trends are alive and well

THE PENCIL ART FOUNDATION

WINTER LOOKS

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Decor for intentional lifestyles

ED’S LETTER TAKE NOTE TRENDING LAST WORD

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take note*

KEEPING YOU IN THE LOOP Thinking OUT THE BOX One thing Covid has taught us is that to survive businesses need to reinvent their offerings. And the Durban Country Club (DCC) has done exactly that. According to Gerard Metzer, GM of the DCC, they have come up with an irresistible “Country Membership” offering. At a whopping 70% off, this once-in-a-lifetime opportunity is specifically for golfers who live more than 50km outside of Durban and enables them to join as full golfing members for only R2 400 (a massive saving of R6 000). As golf does not appeal to everyone, and to ensure that more families are able to exercise and relax in a

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safe environment, Gerard says they have introduced the “Sports Membership” – granting families full access to exclusive sporting and leisure facilities that include six all weather tennis courts, six squash courts, kids’ zones, a swimming pool, and even a newly-built sports bar. All this for only R1 500 a year. While the new Grimaldi’s restaurant and Champions Bar might for now be closed depending on the Covid status of the day, there’s still a limited Grab and Go menu for the Halfway House and Verandah, as well as a fabulous pizza and pie takeaway service until 5pm daily. FOR MORE INFO

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Clinton Holcroft – NEW EO PRESIDENT Encouraging and supporting entrepreneurs during the economic turbulence caused by the impact of the Covid-19 pandemic is a priority for the newly appointed president of the Durban Chapter of the Entrepreneurs’ Organization (EO), Clinton Holcroft. CEO of Serco – one of South Africa’s leading truck body and trailer building companies – Clinton assumes the presidential mantle at a demanding time with the impact of Covid-19 still being felt by commerce and industry sectors grappling to get back on track following lockdowns throughout the country and the rest of the world. “Entrepreneurs play a critical role in creating growth and employment which are among our greatest challenges in South Africa. So organisations such as EO, which supports entrepreneurs on their journeys, helping them to be successful, are highly valuable. One of our core values is: Together we Grow – which refers to entrepreneurs working together to learn and grow personally to be better leaders and thus run more successful businesses.”

C in


E MAGAZ DG

Few aromas can match that of bread being baked. In fact, it’s regarded as a powerful trigger, with some supermarkets “manufacturing” the smell to encourage shoppers to spend more. However, while the heady scent can tantalise our taste buds, the proof is in the eating. To this end Durban North baker Stuart Armit is rapidly proving his worth as a creative baker offering a range of delicious artisanal breads – all available in our neck of the woods. “A strong, healthy starter (ferment) is vital for crafting great bread,” agrees Stuart who was an engineer before being bitten by a baking bug. “The wild yeasts, bacteria and time work together with delicious effect. I named my starter Higgins after the butler

rosemary sourdough. I steam the sweet in the TV series Magnum. It’s ironic that potatoes and use the pulp in place of I spend a lot of time looking after him, water resulting in a soft delicious loaf, the having nearly lost him twice!” rosemary raising it to the next level.” Stuart’s most popular breads include For a wine pairing at Buxton’s Wine Store, ciabatta and sourdough, “They’re good with Stuart created a mouth-watering marbled all meals, and make fantastic, crispy, chewy baguette. “It consisted of two separate toast. My own favourite is my classic French doughs; one had dark chocolate chips in baguette made with golden syrup and yeast. a vanilla infused dough, the other cocoa Think BLT or sausage and mustard! Then enriched, loaded with roasted walnuts.” there’s pain de campagne, a French country Stuart named his business Delicious sourdough, the star of its own show, and best Monster Cafe as he plans to take to the enjoyed with a glass of good wine.” road in a mobile cafe. “I’m constantly experimenting with new ideas, most of which end • THE R FOR MORE INFO: Stockists: I ET up at my table at uMhlanga W www.facebook.com/DeliciousFarmers’ Market on Wednesday Monster-Café-104922604509229 or Whatsapp 060 872 7762. mornings. I’ve recently made Pictures: Ryan Joffe Designs an orange sweet potato and

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take note*

KEEPING YOU IN THE LOOP

JUST PEACHY Cafe

Tyler Duncan and Michael Joubert have recently opened Just Peachy Cafe in Glenashley – so now there’s no excuse for not being tempted to try out their delicious cakes. Offering a selection of amazing cakes, cupcakes, coffees, breakfasts and light meals, there’s parking right outside, a kiddies area, and idyllic sea views. FOR MORE INFO: 35 Newport Ave, Glenashley; phone 066 168 8918 for takeways

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advertorial*

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cover story*

Designed to LAST

LONGEVITY, PASSION AND STAYING POWER ARE THE HALLMARKS OF THIS RENOWNED DURBAN DESIGNER’S CAREER, CELEBRATING 25 YEARS IN BUSINESS THIS YEAR ... BY SIMPLY STAYING IN HIS LANE AND STICKING TO WHAT HE DOES BEST, WRITES JOANNE HAYES

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ard to believe, but Francois Vedemme, one of Durban’s foremost couturiers, is a trained lawyer, with a BProc from the University of the OFS. After doing his national service, he headed to the big smoke of Johannesburg, where he joined Liberty Life as a junior legal advisor. “The job didn’t make my heart sing,” says Francois, “so I decided to make a complete change and headed to London and then to Hawaii, to work in a bar for a friend who I knew from Jozi, who’d set up a business there. “It was in idyllic Hawaii that I started sketching fashion. I’d never drawn a thing before that; I had no previous training or even interest, but those sketches became my first portfolio.” After a year he decided to head home – he was 29 years old, with a law degree and not much of a portfolio to speak of. A friend then introduced him to Tony Aboud, head of fashion at the Durban Technicon, with a view to getting a place in the class. He’d never touched a sewing machine or

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pictures aik christodoulou photography and jono nienaber/ pure photographic studio

Mutual trust is paramount with my clients. I need to be able to use my creativity freely, with not too much prescription”

threaded a needle, and his portfolio was not a great advert for his ability, so he didn’t expect much. He got into the course and the rest is history. Francois started his studies at Durban Technicon in March 1991, selling his car to fund his education. After graduating in 1993, he set himself up in a bachelor flat, living in one half of the room and sewing in his kitchen. In 1995, he was joined by his first seamstress who traded places to sew in the kitchen, while he cut out patterns on his bed. It wasn’t long before he expanded his “empire” to a two-

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bedroom flat and an additional handworker/ beader joined the duo. “The very stylish Debbie Davidson was one of my first clients,” Francois remembers, “and it was through her that I became involved in the Durban July Showcase fashion competition.” He entered it for the first time in 1994 and won every category, subsequently winning it another three times, as well as a number of other top accolades including the Durban Designer Collection and Rare Designers at the J&B Met. Another mentor of his is the doyenne of Durban fashion, Sandy Day. “Over 25 years I have grown my client base one person at a time, by sticking to FASHION my unique style. I’ve always been TIPS FOR 2021 detailed in the way I work, starting  Monochrome sets with my sketches and showing  Big florals  Splashes every detail of the final garment. »

of colour  Yellow  Grey  Scarves  Masks

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cover story*

I love working with beads and other embellishments, layering one thing upon another to achieve the final effect I’m after. “I realised early on I was never going to make my mark as a ready-to-wear designer – I was always striving for the WOW Factor!” Francois says the way he works has changed over the years. In the past he’d look for influences, sketch, and then find the fabric. Now he finds the fabric first, which inspires his design. “Mutual trust is paramount with my clients. I need to be able to use my creativity freely, with not too much prescription.” When Covid struck in March 2020, Francois had just opened a stylish new studio on the Berea designed by Frank Strydom, and shows in Paris and London were on the slate for the year ahead. For the first month of lockdown, the gorgeous new atelier de mode stood empty, but then a small glimmer of hope – a chance

to get the staff back to work producing winter coats and clothing, a percentage of the sales going to a charity, feeding vulnerable families. Francois credits his success over 25 years to the generosity of clients and friends, many of them supporters for almost as long as he’s been in business. An exciting new development, the culmination of hours in lockdown and surplus pent-up creative energy, is the addition of a Preta-Porter collection, to complement the couture and bespoke offering. Thanks to Frank’s imaginative social media activity, posting new garments and stories every week, awareness of Francois Vedemme in the past 12 months has gone from strength to strength, with Instagram

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followers growing from 400 to 10 000 and the client base almost doubling. Adapting to the “new normal”, the team also set up an e-commerce capacity for ordering and buying online, and the grand plan – once things return to normal – is to host fashion shows, ladies days and special events in the beautiful courtyard. Until then, Francois says he’s immensely grateful to everyone who has been there for him over the years, most especially over the past year. 2021 has ushered in new challenges, fashion directions, a range of fragranced candles and room sprays, specially created for Francois Vedemme. “We had to diversify to survive,” says Francois, “and that’s why I’m still here, doing what I love.”

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*


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fashion*

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t’s hard to think fashion trends when your top level meeting features you in slouchy PJ bottoms, topped with a natty business shirt and full make-up. The Zoomattire trend was somewhat unexpected. Clearly Covid has had a strong impact on fashion and trends, not only because of our lockdown lethargy and Home Is Office/University/ School status, but wariness of spending on “luxury goods” when future incomes are precarious. Most are comfortable buying a standard tracksuit online, but haute couture, not so much, not so simple, and hey, when and where would we wear it? Kiara Gounder lectures at DUT’s Department of Fashion & Textiles. She talks the bigger picture: “Fashion is a cultural phenomenon – it’s only natural the pandemic would impact this industry. Consumer needs shifted, with an increased demand for work leisurewear

FASHION

& the Covid factor

IN THIS CRAZY STOP-START SCARY WORLD IN WHICH WE’RE LIVING, IS THERE REALLY SUCH A THING AS FASHION AND TRENDS? ACCORDING TO OUR LOCAL BRANDS, DESIGNERS AND THOSE IN THE KNOW, THERE SURELY ARE, WRITES ANNE SCHAUFFER

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(work-from-home attire) and loungewear. The ‘home’ has become the primary work location for many, and the fashion industry has tried to cater to the increased demand for ‘online and offline-wear’. Above-the-keyboard dressing remains a priority.” She added, “Comfort is still key, even in post-lockdown nations. Consumers are prioritising functional, practical and comfortable clothing.”


What we wear, to a certain extent, affects our mood and productivity.” Few in the industry have escaped the Covid effect on fashion and trends, and for local designer Bianca Warren who focuses largely on event and evening wear, Covid bit deep. But adaption is the key, and she did just that. But Bianca saw the Covid writing on the wall and created an online range of leisurewear: “It was a huge trend,” she says, “and we had record sales.” Kiara touched on online shopping and your social media image: “Consumers are prioritising classic, core clothing items that are transseasonal and have a longer shelf life. With ‘Instagram’ and ‘flex culture’, many who used to ‘partake’ in fashion prior to the pandemic are still, and even more so, following consumer fashion at an alarming rate. Online platforms are the new way of being ‘seen’ – this includes the pressure to engage with fashion trends and communicate them digitally through social media.” Cathy van Rooyen of Willow has always had her designing eye on trends, but won’t be a slave to them. Her ranges have mainly concentrated on loose comfort, so she was spot on: “We’re drawn to classic pieces with a touch of detail, with a play on trends. We love looser cuts and relaxed pieces that make women feel confident and elegant. We’re all about understated chic and pieces »

LEFT TO RIGHT: Scotch & Soda; Willow; and Bianca Warren. Yes, oversized has become a major trend, whether it’s for ease of movement, a coverup of Covid curves, or couch comfort, but, says Kiara, comfort isn’t everything. “High fashion items have not been entirely abandoned. Haute couture provides a sense of drama and escapism a lot of people yearn for. The culture and ‘ritual’ of dressing up is still something many people engage with from home. You don’t necessarily need to be going somewhere in order to dress up. There’s a psychology behind fashion and appearances – often it’s just the act of dressing up that makes us feel better. Some may need to dress up in order to be productive from home.

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fashion*

that suit our relaxed Durban lifestyle.” She describes her upcoming summer range as: “Inspired by the warmth, sunshine and vibrant colours of Provence – they remind us about what we love about our own country where nature and beautiful landscapes abound.” Athleisure is the big buzz word. “South Africans are having a love affair with athleisure at the moment,” she says. “All ages are enjoying the loungewear trend with sneakers – trendy loungewear and knits fly out of our stores.” What about dresses? “Durbanites love their dresses! Long flowy dresses are very popular; so too, short ones, but nothing too tight fitting – it’s definitely about tiers and layers that skim the figure. From soft rayons in shifts and tier dresses, to beautiful cotton prints in loose fitting tunics and beautiful linen dresses, our customers can’t get enough,” says Cathy. Lisa Yuille of Lula Clothing sees spring dresses with some frills, wrap skirts with frills, and jumpsuits. “Trends are short or long frill dresses with three-quarter sleeves for spring and summer. No matter what size or shape you are, you look good in them.” She says oversized tops and jeans are also in: “Oversized tops hide a multitude of sins.” When it comes to colours, designs and fabrics, Cathy’s customers are in love with

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We’re seeing loads of zips, four-way stretch fabric that breathes, and hidden pockets mustard and citron/chartreuse colours: “Green in various hues is also very popular. We’re seeing a lot of sage green and muted shades of pink too.” She adds, “We’re always drawn to botanicals. Animal prints are like the new black.” Kiara sees a surge in bright, bold and printed colour palettes: “This taps into a sense of post-

Covid positivity as more of the local population is vaccinated. That being said, the recent third wave of infections will cause a resurgence in cocooned silhouettes and protective wear.” Dutch-based brand Scotch & Soda’s Lisa Armitage adds that, “As far as fabrics are concerned, responsible design remains a focus. Swimwear is made from Econyl and recycled yarns.” The eco-trend is a driving factor for Laurie and Gary Holmes of South African brand Holmes Bros. As Laurie says, “We try hard to use cottons which are not as impactful on the environment. Our fabrics are knitted and woven

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in SA, and 85 percent of our merchandise is made locally. “At the moment, there’s a big technical trend led by Nike and Adidas, so it’s utilitarian fashion. Brands which were exclusively about mountain climbing, hiking, running and outdoor action, have taken those elements into day wear. We’re seeing loads of zips, four-way stretch fabric that breathes, and hidden pockets.” He laughs, “People go to the mall and feel as if they’re climbing Mount Everest. “Covid has people dressing more casually. Previously guys felt they had to wear a button-up shirt and leather shoes to work, now they’ve taken it down a notch to


LEFT TO RIGHT: Lula

Clothing; Holmes Bros.

chinos with a T-shirt.” Does all this mean we’ve pressed pause on high fashion? Most feel Yes, but not so according to Scotch & Soda: “If there’s no reason to dress up, it doesn’t mean you can’t keep it for when you can. We’ve seen our most fashionable items to be in high demand despite lockdown restrictions.” Lisa describes Scotch & Soda’s summer 2021 collection as “being defined by a free-spirited mood inspired by Simone Melchior, the trailblazing 1950s sea explorer. Drawing on her colourful life, the collection heroes an individual and personal approach to dressing built on an eclectic blend of colours, prints and classics. Standout prints are present in both collections, featuring sea life from neon starfish to lobsters, to hand-sketched scenes of farmhouses and florals. “Summer tailoring is recast in pastels mirroring colours of the sea, with unexpected strength and softness. The idea of season-less dressing is key, anchored in modern classics and denim influenced by the utilitarian practicality of ‘mariniere’ uniforms.” And oversized comes into play of course. “For women, a play on volume is explored in a multiplicity of silhouettes, from structured puff-sleeved dresses to fluid wide-leg cargo trousers

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– cropped shapes, high waists and full A-lines further experiment with proportions. The joyful colour palette takes on the hues of the countryside and sea: tones of sienna, sand, ecru and French blue with bursts of orchid pink, marigold, salmon and foam green.” And then … what about jeans? Baggy rules? Cathy feels: “Skinny jeans are always popular especially if they fit well. Dark blue always looks smart and is more slimming, and m om jeans are having a fashion moment.” Kiara’s take is, “Loose, straight leg in vintage light washes and fits, and jeans with cotton and elastane blends. Wide leg denims have also dropped in retail stores. The looser silhouettes echo the desire for the less restrictive athleisure and loungewear.” Laurie says they’re loosening up: “Overseas, really baggy trousers are coming through. People push it as far as they can in one direction, so skinny jeans … and now we’re getting looser again.” Little doubt that trends as well as spending and buying habits have been affected by the pandemic. Kiara summed it up: “Covid has greatly influenced how we make, sell and consume fashion.” But a trend is never forever – hopefully, neither is this pandemic – so we’ll be out of our elderly PJs and tired tracksuits before we know it?

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fashion*

KEEP THE COLD AWAY:

LIGHT AND FRESH:

Perfect for cooler evenings, this LIVE lettered cropped sweatshirt will keep the cold at bay, Lacoste.

Blue and white patterned short flair dress with detailed and puffed sleeves, R700, Girl Zone.

JUST JEANS:

The very latest style and look in denim jeans, Armani Exchange.

Winter

LOOKS

BEAT THE WINTER BLUES WITH THIS COLLECTION OF THE LATEST FASHION LOOKS IN STORE *All fashion available from Gateway Theatre of Shopping

ON TREND:

Get the look this winter. Full skirted mini dress, R3 500; Tumbled leather trainer, R2 200; Oversized puffer nylon tote, R2 600, Ted Baker.

FAB AND FEMININE:

Yellow and black patterned dress with belt detail, R700, Girl Zone.

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*advertorial

I

am the player I am today because of all the teams I have been a part of, all the coaches who invested their time in me, all the family and friends who supported me, and all the youngsters I have mentored,” says Gareth May – a DPHS Old Boy and currently a DPHS Grade 6 staff member. For Gareth, his water polo journey started in Grade 5 when he heard the older boys talking about the sport. “I was in the swimming team and one of the top swimmers in my age group, so thought I would give water polo a go. In my first game I started as a wing and managed to score a couple of goals. I loved every minute of the game – and fell in love with the sport, thanks to Mike Samuel who taught me the basics of the game. In Grade 7, I then converted to goalkeeper.” Gareth was then selected for the KZN U13 team as a non-travelling reserve, which disappointed him. “This made me work harder the following year, which resulted in me being selected for the KZN U14 team.” For high school Gareth attended Clifton College and chose water polo over cricket. The water polo programme at Clifton was a strong one run by Brad Rowe, who Gareth says he is grateful to because without him he would not be where he is today. “I made the water polo 1st team at the end of Grade 10, and went on to win many school tournaments. I then

ABOVE: Gareth May in the goals. BELOW: Gareth in action as water polo coach at DPHS.

left out of many teams over the years and each time was disappointed. I could have given up, but I didn’t. I continued to chase my dream and am so happy all my hard work has paid off. Remember to always give 100% at every practice, and keep pushing yourself to the limit.” Any parting words before heading to the Olympics? “I will play my heart out for South Africa and for the DPHS boys watching. Achieving your dreams is possible – so never give up.”

Chase your

DREAM

FOR GARETH MAY, THE ROAD TO THE OLYMPICS HAS NOT BEEN EASY. BUT AFTER MUCH HARD WORK AND DEDICATION, HE IS PROUD TO BE PART OF THE SOUTH AFRICAN MEN’S WATER POLO TEAM TO COMPETE AT THE 2020 (2021) TOKYO OLYMPIC GAMES played for KZN from U14-U18, winning many inter-provincial tournaments, before being selected for the SA U18 team as well as the SA schools team in 2014 (matric year),” says Gareth. “My message to young players is to never give up on your dreams. I have been

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Gareth’s tournaments representing South Africa 2015: U20 World Champs, Kazakhstan 2017: World Students Games, Taiwan 2017: EU Nations Men’s Water Polo Championships, Poland 2018: EU Nations Men’s Water Polo Championships, Czech Republic 2019: EU Nations Men’s Water Polo Championships, Czech Republic 2021: Olympic training squad 2021: Olympic team

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community*

The PENCIL Art Foundation A PENCIL AND A DREAM CAN TAKE YOU ANYWHERE. IT’S TRUE. ASK THE FOUNDERS OF THE PENCIL ART FOUNDATION, AND THE HUNDREDS OF ARTISTS WHO BENEFIT FROM THAT DREAM, WRITES ANNE SCHAUFFER pencil, at first glance, is ordinary, even pedestrian, hardly collectible. But think about it, and it’s a fascinating little tool that’s been around for centuries, accessible to everyone. It’s the instrument via which iconic buildings have been designed, masterpieces sketched, great novels written, and inventions drawn. That little tool is a collaboration all on its own. In short, it’s a marvel. So, too, is the Pencil Club, and its NPO,

The Pencil Art Foundation, an initiative currently playing out on the walls of the top two floors of The Residences’ building, at the very highest point of eThekwini. It’s not like anything else you’ve seen or been to. The Pencil Art Foundation comes from a good place in the hearts and minds of the Pencil Club and its founder, Renzo Scribante and director, Keegan Daniel (also general manager of the Pencil Club). The vision for the members-only Pencil Club was about providing an exceptional

ABOVE: Michelle Davidson and Renzo Scribante. LEFT & RIGHT: Some of the many artists at work at both the Pencil Club, and its NPO, The Pencil Art Foundation.

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and existing artistic talent in South Africa is beyond anything imaginable. Michelle Davidson is the dynamic, young curator and the art director of The Pencil Art Foundation. She’s highly experienced in the art world and has worn hats of both artist and gallery owner. The philosophy behind the Foundation dovetails perfectly with her own: “I’m passionate about upliftment of artists, and finding ways to achieve that sustainably.” The gallery space evolved, to uplift and launch new artists, by displaying their works in a highend space, with a discerning audience. Brass plaques with QR codes accompany all paintings, providing information of the artist, the work, the price, and medium, with links to purchasing the said works. The Pencil Art Foundation is about identifying upcoming artists, uplifting talented, often impoverished artists, and providing opportunities to grow. There’s an enormous generosity of spirit here, not » platform for like-minded people to network – an exclusive, interactive series of spaces providing everything an exclusive private club should. From restaurants and conference rooms to small, quiet and private spaces, the Pencil Club is extraordinary. Nor is it static. As members join, new concepts develop, clubs within the Club become established – it’s constantly evolving. And that’s how The Pencil Art Foundation was born. With a group of passionate individuals, banding together with the common interest in “making a difference to the surrounding community”. They decided the Club needed to feature artwork, but in a more meaningful way than wall decor. By brainstorming and exploring different models, a unique concept for a foundation emerged, one which would uplift the community and indeed, the art world. The wealth of emerging

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community*

only from the Foundation, but as Michelle explains, “From established artists too. There are a number of our well-known artists, who actively assist or donate to ensure other deserving artist’s work can be seen. We’re about working together.” One of the advantages for Michelle in her role, was the very long list of new artists with whom she came into contact: “The art world in South Africa is so vast, yet so small,” she laughs. “Many of these artists work in collaborative settings, studios or residencies, so word of mouth about the Foundation means I get about 100 emails from artists every week.” Like the Pencil Club, the Foundation is a dynamic entity, constantly seeking

The Pencil Art Foundation is an exhilarating concept, and an extraordinary experience for both artists and art lovers. innovative ways to promote the arts and artists. Renzo’s mom was passionate about the arts, and in her memory, he created the Corrie Scribante Gallery, a public forum of The Pencil, to display work, hold workshops, promote and sell art supplies to the public. Their workshops have been both successful and fully subscribed. A potential dream going forward, is to add bursaries, residencies, donation of art materials, and solo exhibitions. In other words, to find new ways to continue promoting the arts and the artists. Currently, the Foundation has 78 artists exhibiting between the two spaces. Michelle has a portfolio of over 300 artists with whom she has worked, and

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LEFT AND BELOW: The Pencil Club portrays a feast of exquisite paintings and sculptures from artists – newcomers as well as established – from all over South Africa.

at the opening exhibition, 284 pieces were installed. The Foundation does not only display the work of new artists, but established ones too – they also have an investment portfolio of artwork. What is so revolutionary here, is that newcomers can hang alongside Pierneefs, Gregoires, and Pembas. “Some established artists are wary as to whom they exhibit with – there’s the perception that artists of a similar standing should exhibit together. We’ve flipped that on its head.” Shattered Ceilings is the upcoming exhibition at The Pencil, and although there are innumerable interpretations of this theme, the idea of shattering previous notions about how a gallery should be, and who should be next to whom, works well. Walking into the Pencil Club, you’re instantly submerged in this stimulating space. The artworks are not part of the

Glorious art everywhere from the “Ladies” to the lobby – unknown artists rising and rubbing shoulders with well-known names, exhibitions, auctions, residencies decor, deliberately so, and never match the wallpaper. One of the unexpected joys for Michelle is how, increasingly, the members “own” the Foundation: “It’s become an integral part of being a member, whether you’re an art fundi or not. The art is now an ongoing conversation – new pieces are

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noticed, pointed out and talked about.” Much of the art is sold and leaves the gallery; other pieces are bought by members, but left in the club as their support for the artists. The Pencil Art Foundation is an exhilarating concept, and an extraordinary experience for both artists and art lovers. Glorious art everywhere from the “Ladies” to the lobby – unknown artists rising and rubbing shoulders with well-known names, exhibitions, auctions, residencies ... the Foundation is all about taking art to places it hasn’t been before. Keegan, Michelle and their team, are excited to welcome new artists, invite local and national artists to participate in this space, and continue to uplift and stimulate a love for the arts in Durban and surrounds.

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FOR MORE INFO Michelle: 083 951 3747; michelle@thepencilartfoundation.com

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advertorial*

It's PASSION, or nothing LET YOUR CHILDREN DO WHAT THEY LOVE AND ARE NATURALLY GOOD AT. IT’S A GUARANTEED RECIPE FOR A SUCCESSFUL AND MEANINGFUL FUTURE

T

The world is evolving every day. Our survival is now about being agile. We are experiencing a major shift that is challenging us to rethink our old ways and to envision a future that is better than we had ever imagined. This is the very future we need our kids to be prepared for and get excited about. A global pandemic creates new opportunities, as uncomfortable as it may feel. Professions and jobs appear and disappear with time, we should aim to make ourselves indispensable. So how do we support and prepare our kids for the future? What our world needs more of are creative solution seekers – the ones who see things differently, ideas people who are not afraid to dive deep into a complex problem with

he year 2020 was a tough one to navigate for our world, our country and, closer to home, for our families. Life as we knew it, has changed. Parents are trying to keep things together, and as parents we want to know that ours kids are going to be fine. Thinking about their future can be daunting, especially while things are challenging in the now. The pandemic restricted us in so many ways, forcing us to do things differently. Thinking and planning for

As Darwin stated: It is not the strongest of the species that survives, nor the most intelligent; it is the one most adaptable to change our kid’s future, requires the same. People usually don’t like change; people want comfort and stability. Life on the other hand, is about change. Being able to manage our way through change is what makes us resilient. Change is about being able to evolve, to grow and to move forward. As Darwin stated: It is not the strongest of the species that survives, nor the most intelligent; it is the one most adaptable to change.

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analytical thinker, systems thinker, abstract, creative or divergent thinker. The second telling factor – and this is where parents need to listen and observe more carefully – is to understand what matters to them. Passion and a sense of purpose are the drivers for ongoing motivation. It charges us, gives us energy, propels us – it gives us direction. If you love something, it should be a part of your everyday life.

5 TIPS FOR PARENTS

ABOVE: Naretha Pretorius is a dedicated Campus Navigator (IIE-Vega Durban) with a passion for facilitating creative and critical thinking. the ability to find innovative solutions, and to do so with a sense of passion and purpose. Combining this with encouraging them to decide on their own path, is a winning formula. It is their future after all. If they want to make a living playing with words, let them be copywriters; or creating games, let them be game designers; or solving brand problems, let them be strategists. If they want to help save the world, let them be innovators. Let them be. Parents have a responsibility and role to play in this decision-making process. But how do you know it’s the right decision and direction they should go into? The answer is two-fold: Know how they are “wired”; and know what matters to them. Professor Zak Nel, Career Counsellor and Counselling Psychologist, suggests that traditional aptitude and IQ tests are outdated. To understand how you are “wired”, a neuroscientific career and study counselling assessment is a more telling factor; this indicates the dominant thinking style and how an individual processes information. These assessments provide a deep measurement for the mode of thinking, whether your child is an

Open Day Saturday August 28 The IIE Vega School is sponsoring the Career Counselling for the New World of Work, a virtual discussion with Professor Zak Nel on August 5 at 6pm. Ideal for Grade 9-12 learners and parents/guardians, facilitated by Naretha Pretorius, Campus Head (Durban Campus). To reserve your seat contact dbn@vegaschool.com. FOR MORE INFO For study guidance book a consult with a Vega Contact Navigator: 031 569 1415, visit www.vegaschool.com. Vega School is an educational brand of The Independent Institute of Education (The IIE).

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 Give them the freedom and liberty to become who they are meant to be; encourage them to do what they love, and they will make a success from it.  Explore with them, not for them. Encourage them to make their own study and career choices. Start exploring from early on, let them envision their future.  Don't shy away from the creative world; they have superpowers and abilities that can make a real and meaningful difference in our world. The greatest innovators, business owners and entrepreneurs are all highly creative can-do collaborators.  Seek diverse advice from career counsellors and counselling psychologists, industry professionals in the field of their interest, and alumni from institutions of their choice.  It's passion or nothing. Trust their decision and choice. If they are charged with passion, then they will find their purpose. Many parents tend to prioritise certain career paths over others they might deem less lucrative. This gives young people the impression that they can’t earn a living from following their passions and doing what interests them. Don’t settle for a path that isn’t their own – the easy way. Don’t settle for a career where they want to snooze the alarm on. If it doesn’t set their soul on fire, keep searching. At IIE-Vega, we deliver qualifications that are as much about passion as they are about design, brand and business, with a clear path to a purpose-driven career.

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technology*

Staying

CONNECTED ALAN COOPER TAKES A LOOK AT THE LATEST TECH OPTIONS TO HELP YOU BEAT LOAD SHEDDING BLUES

W

ith working from home and load shedding likely to be facts of life for many South Africans for the foreseeable future, staying productive, powered up, and connected to the internet has never been as important, or as challenging, as it is today. The good news is that there’s now also more technology than ever before to help keep the lights on and the data flowing.

Beyond generators Petrol or diesel fuelled generators are the go-to option for people who want to keep multiple devices and appliances running during power outages. But they have their disadvantages – most notably, they’re noisy and can’t be run indoors. For home-based professionals who just need to keep their computers and internet routers running during shorter periods of downtime, solar, battery and inverter technology – or a combination of the three – may be a better solution.

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Elon to the rescue One of the slicker batterybased power options on the market is the Powerwall from Elon Musk-run electric power pioneer, Tesla. The latest model, the Powerwall 2, recently became available in South Africa. It comes with 13,5kWh of usable capacity, and a continuous power output of 5kW, or 7kW peak power output for short durations. According to local distributors Rubicon SA (Rubiconsa.com), this makes it suitable to provide power to the average South African household for almost 12 hours on its own when fully charged. The Powerwall can be connected to both the Eskom grid and solar panels to charge. Prices start at R159 000, which includes the Powerwall and an inverter, which converts battery (DC) electricity into wall (AC) electricity.

PC power options For those with more modest budgets or needs – like keeping a computer running during load shedding – an uninterruptible power supply (UPS) will probably suffice.

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At its core, a UPS comprises a battery, charger for the battery and an inverter, and provides continuous power to devices that would normally plug into a wall outlet in the event of a power outage. You’ll want one with enough oomph to power a PC as well as a few extras like a monitor and desk lamp for several hours between charges. The Mecer Winner


Pro 3000VA UPS fits the bill nicely and comes with a variety of features to protect equipment including an automatic volt regulator (AVR) to keep the voltage constant, monitoring software, and builtin surge protection. It is also compatible with generators. At the time of publishing, it’ll set you back R5 299 from wootware.co.za, or for more from other online sources.

ABOVE: The Mecer Winner Pro 3000VA UPS – an ideal PC power option. RIGHT: A mini UPS from Vizia. BELOW: The Tesla Powerwall 2.

Another option, especially if you’re in the market for a new computer, is to buy a laptop, which unlike a desktop PC, comes with its own power cell. Do make sure, however, that this battery has plenty of capacity – eight to 10 hours at minimum. Do an internet search for the model and read reviews rather than trust the manufacturer’s claims. Also check that it has

the processing power and storage to meet your work requirements and that the screen and keyboard are big enough. If you’re buying a Windows (rather than Macintosh) device, make sure it’s compatible with Microsoft’s recently announced Windows 11 operating system.

Staying online Keeping your computer juiced up when the power is down is one thing. Staying connected to the internet in an era of video conferencing and virtual workspaces can be just as important. If you access the web with a fixed line connection like ADSL or fibre, you’ll need to power your router. In the case of fibre, you’ll need a second power source for the optical network terminal (ONT) – that white plastic gizmo that connects the fibre box installed outside of your house to your modem. A mini-UPS, like one of several starting at around R650 from Vizia (viziatech. co.za), should meet your needs. Choose the one with the biggest battery capacity you can afford and if you’re on fibre, make sure it has the jacks to power at least two devices. If your primary internet connection is fixed LTE, which is delivered via a cellular network, you may still need a mini-UPS to power your router, »

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technology*

Making Maths as easy as 1, 2, 3 ...

plugged into a wall socket to run and most will keep going for hours on a single charge. Keep a portable power bank on hand to top it up if the power stays down for longer than expected. If all else fails, you can turn your smartphone into a Mi-Fi device by enabling the “personal hotspot” feature. Be warned, this could cost you a fortune unless you have a generous mobile data package.

WE ALL KNOW HOW TRICKY IT CAN BE TO KEEP UP WITH A TEACHER IN CLASS, LET ALONE REMEMBER EVERYTHING THAT WAS MENTIONED IN A LESSON AFTER A LONG DAY OF SCHOOL.

That’s where Maths Online comes along. Give your child access to video lessons, online tutors as well as quizzes and worksheets for Grades 8-12 at only R300 a month! Maths Online is different from other online learning platforms because a human is only a click of a button away. Use the code MO-RIDGE-21 at checkout for 10% off 6-months access* to Maths Online. Visit www.advantagelearn.com/ maths-online to find out more. *Terms and conditions apply.

info@advantagelearn.com 071 500 4951

LED there be light

TOP: LED emergency bulb – a lifesaver for most families – and affordable too. ABOVE: A Mi-Fi device – also known as a portable Wi-Fi router – will keep going for hours on a single charge. although some models come with their own battery backup.

Go mobile Even if you have a batterypowered backup for your fixed line or LTE internet connection, a portable Wi-Fi router (also known as a Mi-Fi device) paired with a prepaid data Sim card is a prudent fallback option. Thanks to their built-in batteries, they don’t need to be

Candles may be romantic the first few times the lights go out, but they quickly lose their charm when regular load shedding sets in. Apart from being less than ideal to work or cook by, they also pose a fire hazard. Wouldn’t it be great if regular lightbulbs came with their own battery packs, so they’d keep on working for hours after a power cut? Now they do, thanks to Light Emitting Diode (LED) technology. Because LED bulbs draw significantly less power than old-fashioned incandescent bulbs – and even the florescent “energy saving” bulbs that largely replaced them – they’ve become increasingly popular in recent years. A new breed of lightbulbs with built-in, rechargeable batteries make LED’s an even better choice. The Lightworx brand is available from Makro from just over R100 a bulb. Alternatively, type “rechargeable emergency lightbulb” into your search engine for a variety of online options.

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*


*advertorial

SOLAR

that pays you A QUALITY SOLAR SYSTEM, WELL DESIGNED AND INSTALLED, WILL PAY FOR ITSELF – AND THEN SOME

I

n South Africa, there’s a common perception that going solar is a high price to pay for convenience. The reality is that if you make the right choices, it is a very sound investment guaranteed to deliver a return. As Warwick Chapman of Sensible Solar explains: “You need your solar installation to pay for itself during the warranty period, and put money in your pocket for the rest of its service life.” How does that work? Warwick outlines the three elements to ensure success: right equipment, long warrantees, and critically, a high-quality installation. “The perfect solar installation is a low-risk investment which gives you convenience in the

short term, but long term, puts money in your back pocket,” says Warwick. Sensible Solar achieves that goal for all their clients. “It begins with the quality systems we use, and the accompanying warrantees. Our power equipment – inverter and solar chargers – comes with a ten-year warranty; the battery a ten-year warranty; the solar panels a twelve-year warranty. On top of that, we guarantee our installation workmanship for ten years.” For Sensible Solar, your solar installation journey is about their relationship with you, beginning with their first visit to your home: “One of the first things we do is create

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a WhatsApp group between you, the client, and ourselves. That remains in place for the duration of our commitment – ten years and more – and forms a record of your service experience with us.” “A relationship with Sensible Solar usually starts with indicative system pricing being exchanged to establish whether we’re in the right ballpark as far as expectations are concerned. Thereafter, we perform an on-site assessment of the roof, the installation location, and the cable routing. We may also install power metering if required, to give us an idea of the size of the system on which to quote,” says Warwick. Once the proposal is approved, much of the work takes place off-site. “Once ready, the system is transported to the premises, installed, connected to the household electricity, and the solar commissioned. Tests are conducted to make sure all is working and complies with safety standards.” Throughout, the WhatsApp group is used to keep clients informed of the progress, and once the system is handed over, the WhatsApp group becomes the channel for ongoing support. Sensible Solar often alerts clients if they notice any issue with the system: “We monitor systems as a courtesy to our clients – no monthly

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charge associated with that – it’s just part of the service.” Sensible Solar is a team of professionals comprising qualified electricians and solar installers who train with the industry body, PQRS. They are accredited Victron and Freedom Won installers: “Our core recipe is Victron for the power equipment, Freedom Won for the lithium battery and Canadian Solar for the panels. We only work with companies that have bricks and mortar, so turnaround time is excellent.” Warwick adds, “This combination of brands is not the cheapest, but it’s absolutely the right investment decision. Essentially, the right system, designed well and installed correctly, will pay for itself within its warranty period. For the rest of its life, it will make you money. That’s the premise upon which we operate.” Sensible Solar is a specialist team focused on creating a successful, long-term relationship with their clients. They do this with world-class products with solid warrantees and SA based operations, and they provide a personal commitment to superb service. FOR MORE INFO Warwick: 083 779 7094; WhatsApp 072 952 9212; info@sensible.co.za; www.sensible.co.za

SOLAR 31


advertorial*

Unravel your

FLAVOURS KRISTY KEATING, CEO AND DIRECTOR OF BLACKSUITS, DISCUSSES THE RIGHT COMBINATION OF PEOPLE TO TAKE YOUR BUSINESS TO THE NEXT LEVEL

A

ny recipe is only as good as the combination of ingredients and passion put into cooking the dish – and a memorable meal no doubt leaves one speaking well of the establishment. Is this not the result we all want from our businesses? Some free flowing vive voce? Ever tasted paprika alone? It’s downright awful! But paired with the right combination of ingredients, and it enhances the overall flavour of the dish. It is interdependent – just like our human resources.  Consider this analogy.  People – our talent – are the flavour of our business, and no matter how good your core ingredients (resources) are, if you don’t have herbs and spices to bring them together, your “recipe” is no better than any other. Our leadership style is our cooking method, and no matter how good your recipes are, if you use the incorrect cooking method, your recipe may be ruined.  When the public experience your business

ABOVE: Kristy Keating, CEO and director of Blacksuits. (for example, dispatch, sales or finance departments), they must want to applaud you. We all, within reason, have access to the same resources, however without the unique “flavours” (human resources or talent), this means nothing. Human resources are your “company flavours”, your cooking method is your leadership style. As a leader take the time to analyse your resources, identify their strengths and weaknesses, what they pair well with and how their flavours are optimised with various cooking methods. Understand your flavours, how to pair them

with other ingredients. Understand which are unique and which are easily replaceable. Understand what flavours work well in many recipes, and which only work well in a few – but are crucial. This information is invaluable in your succession planning. By understanding your staff thoroughly, their skills and capabilities, their emotions and behaviours, your succession planning, skills development, motivational “carrots” all become more relevant. Conduct assessments on your staff, use the feedback to allow them to understand themselves and each other better. In the HR field there are many areas such as BBBEE, Employment Equity and Skills Development which are merely “tick box” exercises. It’s time to put the heart back into HR, to focus on your “flavours”. Make this your competitive advantage for 2021. FOR MORE INFO Kristy Keating: 082 312 6114; www.blacksuits.co.za


Designed for the

sophisticated

Izinga freehold stands from R3.195 million

Located on the beautiful North Coast of KwaZulu-Natal, Izinga Hills boasts expansive North facing views of the Indian Ocean and is perched above the bustling hub of Umhlanga. Blending exclusivity, Izinga Hills has unlocked a private domain where you can discover a like-minded community and an environment designed for high-end family living.

Izinga Hills presents spacious freehold stands starting from R3.195 million. These stands allow you and your family to build a legacy home and experience open spaces unlike any other residential opportunities within the neighbourhood. Enjoy access to the holistic premium estate facilities that promote family-friendly time within this secure estate.

Clubhouse

Pool

Kid’s play area

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Prepare for the

FUTURE

• Online and in person language lessons • IEB and Cambridge preparation and assessment • Certified translators and interpreters n073 852 2482 (Instant response) 031 563 7633 Eladante@dantedurban.com

LOOKING TO WORK OVERSEAS? LEARN A NEW LANGUAGE WITH DANTE DURBAN TO HELP YOU OPEN MANY DOORS IN YOUR CAREER

T

he story of Dante Durban is a success story that began 15 years ago and has benefitted many students in our city, allowing them smooth access to university to further their studying and careers. One such student is Laura De Villiers, who, after studying Spanish online for a year, passed her Spanish IEB with merit. In 2022 Laura will spend a month in Barcelona on a fully paid bursary attending a partnered language school of Dante where she will have the opportunity to perfect her Spanish and enjoy their lifestyle. “Studying online with Dante has been an amazing experience! I’m totally immersed in the Spanish language, and have enjoyed

the lessons with my nativespeaking teacher, Rocio. In fact, when I was interviewed with the Spanish academic institution for the bursary, I could confidently express myself in Spanish,” says Laura. “I have now started my academic path at UCT in Cape Town and have chosen Spanish as one of my subjects. As my level was already so high, I did not have to put in much effort to achieve a distinction.” Dante is currently preparing 21 online and inperson students for IEB and Cambridge (both IGCSE and AS level) exams in Italian, Spanish, Portuguese, French and German, as well as teaching foreign languages to more than 6 000 students in Africa. In addition, Dante also

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teaches Japanese, Russian and Mandarin, among the other languages. Kimmyka, a Japanese student, has recently completed her JLCAT exam thanks to a sponsorship by the Japanese Government that partners with Dante, and will soon be heading off to the Land of the Rising Sun. “By choosing a language course with Dante, there’s no need to worry about your or your child’s future. Dante is a promising foundation for a successful future,” says Kimmyka who is ready to start her professional path in Japan.” “We have many projects we are developing with the local community,” says the Teaching Co-ordinator of Dante, Giulia De Lorenzi. “We are working with educational institutions to make education more accessible. Co-operation includes scholarships, students and team member exchanges, as well as profit sharing with schools. Indeed, I take this opportunity to invite interested schools to contact us because we have many opportunities for scholarships for 2021 and 2022 which will expire soon.”


*profile

LEFT: Jodie Torlage – the drive behind Connected,

helping the homeless make something of themselves.

Paying it

FORWARD

WEEK AFTER WEEK CONNECTED PAY IT FORWARD WITH COMPASSION AND SELFLESSNESS, MAKING AN ENORMOUSLY POSITIVE IMPACT ON THE DAILY LIVES OF MANY LESS FORTUNATE PEOPLE

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t’s easy for us to get caught up in the “daily grind” and routine of life with little thought or time for others. Paying it forward is the connecting and helping of another without the expectation of anything in return – where acts of kindness and compassion make a real difference to the life of another, with the hope of triggering a chain reaction of kindness.  Meet Jodie Torlage, a busy Kloof mother of two who runs her own corporate clothing and gifting business by day, and in her personal time

story and pictures kate hoare

Kindness costs nothing but can change the world for someone” A U G U S T

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passionately helps many less fortunate make something of themselves. In 2018 Jodie, on her own, started distributing food to the homeless in the Durban Umbilo area, and on Sundays would take a group of them to church. Friends started joining her and in 2019 Connected was launched, a small non-profit outreach programme operating from informal hubs like Grace Family Church in Riverside, Durban North and other similar places in the Upper Highway area. After busy day jobs and family commitments, Jodie and her team would venture out into the Durban night to improve and change the lives of those society had excluded. What began as simply handing out food to people in shelters and on the streets, has developed into relationships and trust, with the team helping the homeless secure ID documents, CVs, skill development and job placements. After three years Jodie and her team know each person by name, and understand their struggles and what’s lead them to living on the streets. Connected works passionately and tirelessly to help the homeless heal, as well as sponsoring many of them on Alpha courses or reuniting others with family – with the ultimate aim of getting as many homeless people off Durban’s Umbilo streets as possible. “I feel strongly that everyone has a passion and a purpose and when those coincide one has the power to enrich the lives of others. Kindness costs nothing but can change the world for someone!” says Jodie. The harsh reality is that unemployment is the biggest contributor to our homeless situation and South Africa’s unemployment rate is now nearing 30%. During lockdown, Jodie and her team became increasingly aware they were helping people with enormous skill and potential to earn an income. In partnership with Lovemark and Together for Durban, and in collaboration with The Wellness Centre Trust, Connected has recently run its first skills development course, which includes basket making, beading, sewing, crocheting and woodwork with the aim of »

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profile*

advertorial*

ABOVE & RIGHT: Mondli’s kaftans, hats,

masks and bags are proudly South African, available online at Encouraging Eco and at Claire’s Concepts in Mackeurtan Avenue in Durban North.

providing many homeless people with a sustainable way of earning a living and getting back into society. To support those attending the workshops, Connected recently launched its online e-commerce platform, Encouraging Eco, where products made at the workshops are sold. “Connected’s ultimate hope is that Encouraging Eco becomes an online shop for local gifts, giving us an opportunity to support local entrepreneurship and upliftment,” adds Jodie. As Connected has grown, so have their success stories. Two years ago Mondli was living on the streets. Today he is a chef at 9th Ave Bistro, with his own clothing and accessory range on the side. Mondli was the first to get a job, get off the streets and now is one of the Connected team. Although his life has changed and improved dramatically, he still visits his friends on the streets and doesn’t ever feel he is better than them. Connected passionately believes that

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Boitumelo Sebambo CEO OF 3SIXTY BIOMEDICINE

through their upskilling workshops and selling of locally made products, proverty can be alleviated. But, Connected needs the community to support their efforts to make it a success. By giving a hand up rather than a handout, Connected’s initiatives really have the power to bring many out of homelessness and allow them a more dignified and decent life.

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How can you help?  Do you have a skill you could teach at a workshop?  Do you have space to become a stockist (a hairdresser, coffee shop)?  Do you have materials to donate (beads, needles, threads, material)?  Can you donate a Thursday evening meal, books or blankets?  Support the homeless on Encouraging Eco or at Claire's Concepts.

FOR MORE INFO W Follow Connected, Encouraging Eco and Claire’s Concepts

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Boitumelo Sebambo is the CEO of one of South Africa’s most exciting and dynamic companies in the healthcare sector, 3Sixty Biomedicine. Apart from continuing the legacy of positioning the business as experts in herbal based and natural medicinal products, this accomplished businesswoman also has aspirations to put African traditional medicine on the global map. Boitumelo has risen through the ranks, having first joined 3Sixty Global Solutions in 2019 when it was still known as 3Sixty Financial Solutions. During her threeyear journey, she has seen the company transform from a purely financial group into the powerhouse it is today – a company that is committed to creating global solutions across the spectrum, all the way from financial services to biotechnology. Boitumelo is proud of the work 3Sixty Biomedicine has achieved to date, providing more natural solutions to the SA market with one of their ranges, Salome, focusing on management of common women’s health issues.


Inspiring

WOMEN

Janna Strang

OWNER AND DIRECTOR OF PROMOTE COMMUNICATION This owner and director of the dynamic one-stop communications company, Promote Communication, accepted a Crisis Communication PRISM award in 2020 for their exceptional efforts for Tsogo Sun Amashova Durban Classic’s 2019 race. This year she followed that award up with a special mention for their outstanding PR campaign to launch the new Salome range of products in the 2021 PRISM Awards. Born and raised in Durban, Janna said her communication-focused degree at UCT is where her 19-year love affair with PR and communications started. Janna leads a team with experience in reputation management, marketing, crisis management, advertising and design, and although based in KZN on the North Coast, they work with clients and media all over South Africa and abroad. Although most of their clients are diverse in industry and nature, Janna believes the common thread is the passion and belief she shares with her clients in their products and stories.

THIS WOMEN’S MONTH WE CELEBRATE FOUR SUCCESSFUL WOMEN FROM OUR COMMUNITY AND SHARE THEIR STORIES

Noleen Turner AUTHOR, PROFESSOR OF AFRICAN

LANGUAGES AND OWNER OF ONLINE BUSINESS ZULU ZONKE A retired African languages professor after 32 years of active teaching and now a current Honorary Research Professor for UKZN, Noleen is also a published author and owner of a successful business – Zulu Zonke. In 2020 her business took to digital platforms to offer interactive online Zulu courses, teaching conversational Zulu and providing insights into Zulu culture for the business sector and society in general. In addition, she still offers translation services from English into Zulu for businesses. Noleen’s latest book, Zulu Bird Names, is based on ground-breaking research in the ornithological and linguistics fields. The initial Zulu Bird Names project initiated by Professor Turner in the early 2000s and recently converted into a book, is deemed to be “the first project of its kind globally” by past Chairman of Birdlife International, John Fanshawe. Published by the John Voelcker Bird Book Fund.

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Donna McCulloch

DEALER PRINCIPAL OF CMH MAZDA, SUZUKI AND ISUZU UMHLANGA Wonder Woman has nothing on our superhero Donna McCulloch, who won the CMH Group Dealer Principal of the Year award for the second year in a row while running a multi-franchise dealership based on uMhlanga Ridge. To be a top-class Dealer Principal requires the mastering of several varied business disciplines – warehousing and distribution (parts), production (workshop), sales and marketing (vehicle sales) – along with the PR, HR and financing issues that come with these disciplines. Donna has mastered these skills through hard work, attention to detail and ensuring her staff follow the systems and procedures that make a dealership successful. Donna started with the CMH Group 15 years ago as a F&I Manager, then became Sales Manager before being promoted to Dealer Principal. Not only has she won the Dealer Principal of the Year award twice, but has also won overall CMH Dealer of the Year on two occasions. Away from work Donna is a wife and mother of two young boys.

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advertorial*

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referring to live life looking forward, I pause to reflect on the goosebump moments of the past year, which, we all agree, has indeed been a year like no other. A colleague described it as our generation’s equivalent of World War II, but I believe what we faced – and sadly continue to face – is a different type of enemy. This enemy has no address, it does not discriminate, we are its target – and for too long now it has held the world in its grip. Out of adversity, and at times lawlessness, inevitably emerges some good – some goosebump moments that remind us of the immense capacity and generosity of spirit that exists within us. This is what emerged following that Monday night, March 23, 2020, when our President announced the hard lockdown. Disbelief and fear were the emotional yardsticks of that address, but the goosebump moment for me was his closing comment which characterised many “family meetings” that were still to come: “May God bless our country and keep her people safe.” Last month I was permitted to register for the vaccine which I did at the first opportunity. Two hours in a queue late on a Friday afternoon in the corner of a carpark of a local shopping centre did little to quench my enthusiasm, however, my goosebump moment was not getting the vaccine itself. It was the moment when the nurse – who had been on her feet all day administering injections to hundreds of people – smiled at me and said, “Thank you so much for coming – thank you for helping to keep us all safe.” As we celebrate Women’s Month, we at Garlicke & Bousfield salute the women who reached out and connected beyond the safety of computer screens, in whatever way they could, to help others in fighting the effects of this pandemic and the tragic lawlessness that we have just survived, the feeding schemes

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Goosebump

MOMENTS

AS WE CELEBRATE WOMEN’S MONTH, YVONNE BODEN, CEO OF GARLICKE & BOUSFIELD INC, REFLECTS ON THE PAST YEAR AND CONSIDERS HER MOST MEMORABLE GOOSEBUMP MOMENTS

ABOVE: Yvonne Boden, CEO of Garlicke & Bousfield Inc.

May the lessons we have learnt in the past year make us a better version of who we were these women initiated, the selfless care and courage they demonstrated. We salute the employers who dug deep to avoid retrenchments, the entrepreneurs who reinvented themselves and launched new businesses, providing employment

where optimism was sorely challenged. We salute the law enforcement agencies and frontline workers – the doctors, pathologists, testing station staff, the laboratory employees, nurses, and those who are so often overlooked – the people involved in the “end of life” work, who tried to maintain dignity and compassion despite the grim daily reality they faced. Covid may not be defeated, but may we never again experience the anarchy we have recently confronted. May the lessons we have learnt in the past year make us a better version of who we were, and may God bless our country and keep her people safe.

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e don’t just fit limbs, we fix lives, says Darryl Grobbelaar, founder of one of the country’s top orthotics and prosthetics practices. The Durban-based business, which started in a small office at the Kings Park Sports Medicine Centre, is now a high-end practice that compares with some of the best in London and New York. The difference, says Darryl, is that while those practices fit limbs that are reminiscent of science fiction robotics on a daily basis, their practice only supplies this once every four months. That’s because there’s a lack of funding for prosthetics in South Africa. “You battle to get the primary prosthesis funded. People are under the perception that medical aid will pay – but that’s not always the case. People also think you come in and buy a leg and you have it forever. What ends up happening is that the shape and volume of a residual limb constantly changes, and you have to adapt the prosthesis to ensure the fit remains right,” he says. Although the practice has fitted a number of sophisticated sporting blades, the practice has funded them all. This is in marked contrast with the US where military injuries have not only driven ultra-high tech advancements, but where amputees have access to these as a matter of course. One of the recipients was

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True

A PASSION FOR OFFERING LIFECHANGING SOLUTIONS TO HELP PATIENTS RESTORE THEIR LIVES IS WHAT DRIVES GROBBELAAR & CASS, WRITES SHIRLEY LE GUERN

INSPIRATION triathlete Mhlengi Gwala. Brutally attacked by men wielding a chainsaw while out cycling in 2018, he ultimately lost the bottom portion of his right leg. Darryl and his partner, Luvan Cass, have supplied limbs suited to running, cycling and training in the gym and are celebrating his successes as a talented para-athlete who is working towards qualifying for the Paralympics. “But we also have everyday heroes – a woman who has a disabled child and deals with an above-knee amputation. Her prosthetic limb enables her to plant food for her family at home. Another of our patients – who also cannot afford expensive prosthetics – just wants a hook on the end of his arm so he can plant food and do a bit of woodwork. That’s true inspiration. These are

the people who have almost nothing, but they just try to get on with life,” Luvan explains. Darryl continues: “It’s easy if you can drive here in your Mercedes and park in the disabled parking. But what about the guy who has to travel from more than 300km

People are under the perception that medical aid will pay – but that’s not always the case away? The taxi that was meant to depart at 5am is only full enough to leave at 9am and he arrives in the afternoon for his morning appointment. Then he has to walk all the way. His foot

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breaks and he’s walking on a pole by the time he gets here.” Often Darryl and Luvan help those patients sleep over at a local bed and breakfast rather than sending them home to be dropped off in the middle of nowhere in the middle of the night. That’s because, they explain, theirs is more of a calling than a profession. It is about creating relationships and building trust with patients who are struggling with both the physical and psychological impacts of their injuries. Darryl’s own grandfather was an amputee and probably the reason why, after being a military diver for four years, he decided to study and then open his own one-man practice. He saw patients in the morning and manufactured prosthetics in his loft at home at night.


A year after setting up shop, his father-in-law – a respected businessman – stepped in to help him begin to grow the practice. Luvan, who has a passion for special needs children and amputees, joined the

ABOVE FAR LEFT: Darryl

Grobbelaar and Luvan Cass. ABOVE LEFT: In 2018 Mhlengi Gwala was attacked by a gang wielding a chainsaw – today he wears a sporting blade and is training for the Paralympics. ABOVE RIGHT: Shaping a limb so it fits just right.

practice eight years ago and recently became a partner. He handles day-to-day operations and is responsible for many innovations. “It’s a remarkable business. These are not shelf items. Patients can buy the exact

same components, but they may not have the same result. It’s how you treat people that matters,” they agree. Today, the practice includes highly skilled staff who manufacture prosthetics and assist with the rehabilitation as well as orthotics which includes upper and lower limb bracing, splint manufacturing, treatment of sports injuries and support innersoles for foot ailments as well as the assembly of mobility solutions, specialised cerebral palsy seating and manual and electronic wheelchairs.

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community*

A bright

FUTURE

THE BRIGHT EYES CENTRE FOR THE VISUALLY IMPAIRED RUNS ON PURE PASSION AND STUBBORN LOVE, WRITES KATRINE ANKER-NILSSEN

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stablished in 2009 to meet a critical need – caring for, educating and supporting visually impaired children and their carers in Durban – the Bright Eyes Centre has unique skills and philosophies. “With the assistance of our donors and supporters, we have achieved some amazing things and will continue to strive and push as hard as we can to change the world as we know it,” says Carron Strachan – who co-founded the NPO together with Cathryn Aylett. Cathryn is a qualified foundation phase teacher pursuing her honours in inclusive education, and always knew she wanted to help make education accessible for all. “I never dreamt I would be involved at grass roots level in a sector that is desperately in need of reform,” she says. Carron has over 20 years’ experience working with the visually impaired. “As a visually impaired person who navigated the mainstream school setting, I want to give each and every visually impaired child the best chance at success. “I know first-hand how it feels to be visually impaired in a world that is not designed for us, and I have made it my mission to pass on my life lessons to the parents and children we serve.” The NPO’s primary goal is to provide highly specialised and adapted intervention and foundational strategies to ensure the optimal

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and naturally healthy physical, cognitive and emotional development of visually impaired young children – all within a supportive and nurturing environment. The centre serves as a source of comfort, support and vital information for families and caregivers – encouraging children to explore the world they live in confidently and competently so that they never grow to internalise their disability and fall behind the expected standard of their peers. On average one in four children under five and one in 20 children overall has an undetected vision disorder. The Bheka Project, started in October last year, is a Bright Eyes drive to ensure that children in vulnerable communities receive essential early intervention services and vision screenings from as early as six months old. The earlier a vision disorder is detected, the more effectively it can be treated.

Signs for parents to look out for, for early intervention • Does your little one frequently bump into objects or trip and fall? • Do they squint their eyelids when focusing on an object? • Do they sit too close to the TV or hold their books to their nose? • Short attention span for their age, avoidance of detailed activities • Rubbing or covering of eyes

RIGHT: The Plusoptix Vision screener in action.

FAR RIGHT: Cathryn Aylett and Elmarie Grendele.

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“The pandemic highlighted the urgent need for us to extend our project, providing follow-up care to children in the form of offering an optometrist consultation for accurate decision making on further referral – including referral to ophthalmologists and providing assistive devices to those who have been identified as having vision disorders,” says Carron. Elmarie Grendele qualified as an optometrist in 2007 and is passionate about ensuring children have the best possible opportunities to learn and develop. “I have followed Bright Eyes for several years and am inspired by the amazing work they do. I got involved with The Bheka Project a year ago, assisting with mass screenings on children,” she explains. “We are reaching children who normally would never have been able to receive this care and are unaware that they have a problem. It is

FACTS

• 80% of all consciousness and functionality is obtained through your eyes • 1/3 of the mass of your brain is dedicated to vision • 95% of squints (strabismus) are also refractive errors • 59% of the general public wear glasses • 7% of people will have a blind eye because they weren’t prescribed glasses early, when their vision impairment was correctable and avoidable

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extremely rewarding to give them and their parents hope for a bright future.” Witnessing that moment when a mother and child connect for the first time is another hugely rewarding part of the work Carron and Cathryn do. “As a sighted person you don’t realise how much you depend on eye contact for communication in the baby years,” says Cathryn – adding that their biggest challenge is education. “Teaching parents and caregivers how to care for a visually impaired child is crucial.” Bright Eyes is desperately in need of further funding to keep the project going, and always welcome donations or occupational therapists, speech therapists, psychologists and physio therapists who are willing to donate an hour of their time weekly. FOR MORE INFO www.brighteyes.co.za

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adventure*

RIDE

& explore 10 OF THE BEST MOUNTAIN BIKE TRAILS TO EXPLORE ON THE KZN SOUTH COAST

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ith its variety of dense coastal forests, cliffs, gorges, valleys and farmlands, the KZN South Coast is the setting for the most incredible naturebased sporting activities, with mountain biking topping the list. There are many well-maintained trails traversing the natural landscape, providing entry-level options for novices and extending to the more demanding trails for professional competitors. Here are 10 of the best for you to explore.  Rocky Bay Resorts: This iconic South Coast location forms part of the sani2c and joberg2c competitions as cyclists pass through on the way to the coastal town of Scottburgh. The mountain biking trails include 9km, 12km, 19km and 40km courses, as well as the 4km, 6km, 8km and 10km running trails that are clearly marked. The trails are suited to cyclists of all levels.  Umdoni Park Trust Golf Club & Nature Reserve: This stunning nature reserve is home to a variety of trails that can take anywhere between 15 minutes and two hours, depending on the cyclists’ preference and endurance level. The trails wind around the Umdoni Park Golf Course and restaurant overlooking the ocean.  Burry Stander Bike Park: Established in memory of the South Coast’s olympic cyclist,

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The KZN South Coast is the setting for the most incredible nature-based sporting activities, with mountain biking topping the list

Burry Stander, this Umtentweni-based bike park was opened in 2014 to both honour him and develop cycling among local youth. The bike park consists of a 2km cross-country track or a 5km farm track with an on-site Kiddies Zone and coffee shop.  Lake Eland Game Reserve: Lake Eland Game Reserve has a number of biking trails, ranging in length from 4km to 45km, crossing four distinct ecosystems. Among the African wildlife, cyclists can enjoy quality mountain biking trails that include gorge rides and climbs. Bikers can enjoy an easy cycle of wildlife viewing, through to the more strenuous Dunstone’s Pass.  ANEW Resort Ingeli Forest: Found inland near Harding is the beautiful Ingeli Forest, an indigenous forest that consists of a variety of mountain biking trails, from 18km to 30km.

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Water the gift of life

- and now available from Phuza Water Ballito

We specialise in personally branded bottled water for restaurants, businesses and events, as well as water refills, water cooler machines and sparkling water.

WE DELIVER TO THE DOLPHIN COAST, DURBAN AND HILLCREST AREAS. We offer quality bottled water at affordable prices and good customer service.

t o d s u ay! y rT These cross forest streams and waterfalls for a truly invigorating cycle.  KwaNzimakwe Experience: Traversing the Mpenjati River Valley, the KwaNzimakwe multi-trails range from 4km to 22km, with incredible views as well as wildlife and birdlife. The trails are also suited to hiking, birdwatching and 4x4 excursions.  Beaver Creek Coffee Estate: This Port Edward-based biking destination is the southernmost coffee estate in the world which has quality coffee to match its quality trails. For the children, there is the 400m Chocochino Route around the coffee shop, followed by the 2,5km Espresso Route through the Beaver Creek coffee fields. Finally, there’s the advanced 8,5km Stoney Creek Route through Beaver Creek and surrounding farms.  Clearwater Trail Centre: Just outside

Southbroom on the banks of Mtamvuna River is Clearwater Trails. There are five routes, beginning with the easy 2km green route trail and extending through to the 16km route. The bike trails end with the Coffee Bean Uphill and finish at Clearwater Cabins.  Red Desert Nature Reserve: Located in Port Edward is the world’s smallest desert, which is not only home to archaeological wonders, but also great mountain biking trails.  Umtamvuna Nature Reserve: This exquisite nature reserve – home to riverine forests and rocky cliffs – consists of a range of wellmaintained biking routes. The joberg2c and sani2c, plus the 5-stage South Coast Fever MTB series, all pass along this reserve.

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FOR MORE INFO www.visitkznsouthcoast.co.za

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Shop 14, The Quarter Shopping Centre, Ballito; Phone/WhatsApp: 079 475 6318; ballito@phuzawater.co.za; phuza-water-ballito.business.site/; @phuzawaterballito; W @phuzawaterballito


advertorial*

Online

EDUCATION WITH COMPREHEND AFRICA, A PEDAGOGY HAS BEEN DEVELOPED BASED ON RESEARCH AND PROVEN TO WORK IN THE DIGITAL ENVIRONMENT

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ducation has been disrupted. The good news is that the innovative way forward provides for systemic transformation, improved learning outcomes and an education that focuses on future readiness and individual potential. Using an internationally supported learner management platform and technology, Comprehend Africa offers CAPS aligned curriculum, learning materials and fully functional automated support that enables schools to continue with uninterrupted learning no matter where the learners are situated. This means that learners at school and at home can engage with the same material and lessons simultaneously. It just makes sense that schools integrate an online solution! Online learning requires materials and a pedagogy that have been developed based on research and proven to work in the digital environment.

Comprehend Africa can be used in the school and homeschool environment, and offers a seamless transition to a media-rich environment where learners are engaged, monitored and in contact with their teachers. Automated marking for quizzes and functional administration frees teachers to focus on individuals and ensure that each child is receiving the attention they need to master content and progress through the learning journey. FOR MORE INFO Schools seeking an innovative solution are encouraged to contact Comprehend Africa for a live or online demonstration – 087 820 4858; comprehendafrica@aeegroup.co.za

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oral health*

Look after your pearly

WHITES

GOOD ORAL HYGIENE STARTED AT A YOUNG AGE WILL RESULT IN HAVING LOTS TO SMILE ABOUT IN LATER YEARS, WRITES SARAH MACKINTOSH

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ith September being National Oral Health Month, there’s no better time to pay extra attention to your dental routine, particularly as two of the world’s most common health problems affect the mouth – cavities and gum disease. Two Durban dentists offer their advice on oral health for the whole family. According to Hanno Enslin, who has dental practices in Pinetown and Hillcrest, you should ideally start taking your child to the dentist at around two years of age. A good idea is to take your child with you to your regular check-ups to familiarise them with the environment. “Your child needs to have regular oral health checks, as it facilitates in early detection of caries (cavities), tongue ties which affect feeding and speech, as well as orthodontic problems that may arise,” advises Hanno.

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There are many factors that contribute to poor dental health, but according to Tilesh Bhoola of The Tooth Doctor in Durban North, the main causes are unhealthy diets high in sugar, the use of tobacco and excessive alcohol consumption. To keep your teeth in top condition, Tilesh recommends these tips: • Maintain a balanced diet. • Drink more water. • Limit your intake of sugary foods and drinks. • Ensure you brush twice a day.

5 bad habits you need to kick to ensure healthy teeth • Both adults and children

should limit sugary and acidic drinks. • Adults should try to reduce smoking and alcohol consumption. • For toddlers avoid the prolonged use of baby bottles and pacifiers. • Discourage children from eating too many sticky sweets and drinking undiluted juice. • Don’t skip using a mouth guard and other parafunctional appliances as prescribed by your dentist.

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ABOVE: Hanno Enslin, who has dental practices in Pinetown and Hillcrest. ABOVE RIGHT: Tilesh Bhoola of The Tooth Doctor in Durban North.


UPHOLSTERY

Benze is a family enterprise steeped in tradition and old fashioned values since 1970.

• Add flossing to your daily routine. • Ensure you visit your dentist at least twice a year, allowing them to spot any issues and provide treatment solutions. “Common dental problems that present in the children we treat include tooth decay (from too much sugar and prolonged use of a baby bottle), orthodontic problems resulting from thumb sucking or the use of a pacifier, early extraction of deciduous teeth, and dental anxiety and phobias (due to a bad first experience or none at all),” says Tilesh. To avoid these dental health issues in your child, Tilesh and Hanno suggest these tips: • Start good oral habits from a young age – like brushing, flossing and using mouth wash. • Ensure children brush their teeth twice a day using a fluoride toothpaste. • Follow a healthy diet as much as possible. • Rinse the mouth with water after meals to reduce the amount of acidity in the mouth, which causes caries to develop. • Ensure regular visits to the dentist for check-ups and

prevention of tooth decay. Flossing is as important as brushing says Tilesh. “Flossing once a day is not only good for removing food in between the teeth that the brush is unable to reach, but it also stimulates the gums, helps to reduce plaque and lowers inflammation in the area.” In addition, adds Hanno, “Flossing can be introduced as soon as the child allows you to floss for them, and then when they are able to floss on their own.” Should you be supervising your child’s tooth brushing, and until what age? According to Hanno, depending on the child’s personality and natural hygiene regime, it can vary a lot, but supervision is probably necessary until they are tweens. Last word? “It’s important for adults and children to have regular dental checkups every six months. In fact, it’s even more important for adults, as periodontal or gingival disease can be detected early to prevent tooth loss – as well as maintaining your tooth health! Sometimes people forget that one has to regularly maintain their teeth just as you would service your expensive car – otherwise you lose your warranty! Sadly, teeth are often neglected,” concludes Hanno.

WE DEAL WITH ALL FABRIC HOUSES

SERVICES WE OFFER

RE-UPHOLSTERY * RESTORATION * REPAIRS * SCOTCHGARDING * CUSTOM FURNITURE DEEP CLEANING SERVICES: LOUNGE SETS, DINING CHAIRS, CARPETS, PERSIAN RUGS AND MATTRESSES 55 Buro Crescent, Unit 19 Buro Centre, Mayville, Durban upholstery@benze.co.za | www.benze.co.za | 031 208 7131 | 082 635 0165 (WhatsApp)

With ads ranging in price from R2 000 to R33 500, let us put together an advertising package to suit your budget and needs.

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FOR MORE INFO Tilesh Bhoola: 031 5631420; www.facebook.com/ ToothDoctorDurbanNorth Hanno Enslin: 031 701 6291/3; www.painfreedentistry.co.za

VIEW OUR DIGITAL VERSION OF THE RIDGE ONLINE ON ISSUU

Contact Lynda Kapsimalis on 082 379 9912 or email lynda@famouspublishing.co.za


rock the kitchen*

PUDS

to please WINTER IS JUST NOT WINTER WITHOUT A COUPLE OF FAVOURITE PUDS TO FINISH OFF A HEARTWARMING MEAL, WRITES ANT ELLIS

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Philippa's Self-saucing Chocolate Pud KINDA LIKE THOSE TINY CHOCOLATE LAVA THINGS BUT WAY EASIER. Cake: • 1 cup plain flour • 2 tsps baking powder • ½ tsp salt • ¾ cup castor sugar • 2 tsps instant coffee powder • 5 tbsps cocoa powder • 30ml butter, melted • ½ cup milk • 1 tsp vanilla essence • ½ cup chopped nuts (optional) Mix together dry ingredients. Add butter,

t’s been decidedly fresher weather in my neck o’ the woods of late. Well, to be more honest, it’s been a bit less hot than usual – but I have seen a few co-workers, friends and family break out something long-sleeved and even have a little whine about it. For those readers up the hill, I know you’re a good few degrees cooler, and the fireplaces are set to nuclear – yup, that’s a Durban winter for ya. Speaking of, we live in a sub-tropical climate so let’s be super clear about one thing – it’s always balmy enough to eat ice-cream. But before we get there, let’s set the scene. Consciously or not, when it’s cooler we tend to change the way we eat. For many of us it’s out with the light and bright salads and in with the buttery mashed potatoes. Seasonal eating means hearty, rich and comforting stews, pies, curries and roasts, with carb-heavy sides that fill and satisfy. And it’s the same with dessert – you’ll be wanting something denser, richer and warming, but that still has a sweet bite. Instead of resorting to nasty microwaveable desserts that require 10 litres of custard per square inch to swallow, find 20 minutes to whip up something rocking. Then set it in the middle of the table and let the fisticuffs ensue. I’ve got a couple of goodies that are really easy, and really worth it. They’ll also make you look learned and experienced. Let’s go for it.

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Red Wine Poached Pears IF YOU THINK THIS SOUNDS A BIT OLD-FASHIONED AND SNOOTY, THINK AGAIN. SO AROMATIC, SO EASY AND A JOY TO EAT WITH AN ESPRESSO AFTER A WINTER’S DAY LUNCH. • 1 large, firm pear per person, peeled but with stalk remaining (any variety will work) • 750ml red wine (I’ve made this with shiraz and with cabernet sauvignon, both top notch, but avoid the boxed plonk if you can) • 1 cup water • 1 tsp vanilla extract • 2 cups sugar • 6 cloves • 1 cinnamon stick • twist of orange peel • 1 star anise (optional) Mix together wine, water, vanilla extract, sugar, cloves, cinnamon, orange peel and star anise in a pot on the stove top.

For dessert you’ll be wanting something denser, richer and warming, but that still has a sweet bite milk and vanilla essence, mix well. Add nuts if desired. Pour into a greased ovenproof tray or individual ovenproof serving ramekins or bowls. The mixture should be quite stiff – so don’t flap, this is correct. Sauce: • ¾ cup brown sugar • 300ml hot water • 2 tsps instant coffee powder • 2 tsps cocoa powder Mix together all ingredients, adding hot water last. Carefully pour over uncooked cake mixture. Bake at 180ºC for 30-40 minutes (slightly less if individual servings). The pudding/s should be soft and gooey with a slight crust. Cool slightly and dust with icing sugar. Serve warm with chocolate ice-cream, an extra sprinkling of nuts and fresh berries if desired.

Bring to boil to dissolve sugar. Add pears, making sure the liquid covers the pears. Cover pot, lower heat and simmer until pears are soft and cooked through – about 2 hours – turning pears regularly to ensure even absorption of liquor. Serve as you like, warm with vanilla ice-cream, sweetened crème fraiche or mascarpone, and milk chocolate shavings. Until next time, nurture that winter sweet tooth. If you don’t think you need dessert every night (your kids might disagree), that’s cool – but when it’s time, make it count with something to remember. And if all else fails, remember that on the East Coast, ice-cream will do just fine.

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ABOVE: Durban lover of good food, wine and company, Ant Ellis.

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FOR MORE INFO Talk to me at ant@rockthekitchen.co.za

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fashion*

2

Easy

LIVING

TIME FOR SOME LUXURIOUS ME-TIME – INVEST IN SLEEPWEAR FROM SAINT VIEVE AND ENJOY THE GOOD LIFE

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S

ome people collect books, some collect wine, some invest in plants. Genevieve Buttery collects luxury sleepwear. After not being able to find locally produced, good quality, luxurious sleepwear, Genevieve took the leap and started Saint Vieve in

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Be A Winner

Exclusive to Ridge readers, Saint Vieve is offering a free pair of their gorgeous pyjamas from their winter 2021 range. Enter today by going to www.famouspublishing.co.za. Closing date: August 13, 2021.

2020. In no time this authentic entrepreneur has taken the art of easy living and sewn it into every sleepwear garment she designs. From gorgeous gowns and shrugs to chic pyjama sets, this range of feminine sleepwear is so stylish it’s not just for sleeping in. It is what has been missing from your downtime, your me-time, your self-care routine. And made with love from natural, breathable fabrics with the utmost attention to detail by a team of Durban ladies, it’s perfect for our climate.

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FOR MORE INFO www.saintvieve.co.za; info@saintvieve.co.za; @saintvieve

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4  Sophie Long Set in a fuscia linen tencil, R1 050.  Alexandra Nightie, R750, and Alexandra Long Set, R950. Both available in grey and milk. Anna Shrug in crisp white linen tencil, R650, over Neve Short Set, R850. Rose Long Set, R950, available in midnight navy and crisp white. Victoria Nightshirt in a sky blue linen tencil, R750.

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decor*

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1 2

 Corinne de Haas Ceramic Pouring Vases, R295 to R410.  Luxury Comfyzak, R8 625.  Birds of a Feather, R520.  The Sculptural River Lamp, R6 325.  Slow Life three-seater Couch, R54 050  Relax Chair, R9 100.  Corinne de Haas Ceramics. RIGHT: Cara-Ann Potgieter, Palmy Living founder.

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Legacy

LIVING

PALMY LIVING – DECOR AND FURNITURE FOR INTENTIONAL LIFESTYLES

O

nline decor and furniture boutique, Palmy Living, boasts a carefully curated range of South African designed and manufactured furniture pieces to help you create a space worth escaping to. The name Palmy denotes

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flourishing – and it is exactly this idea of creating a glorious, intentional lifestyle that is central to the brand and its collections. Each product is designed to make a statement and to add a unique element to your home experience. Palmy products are durable and made from quality materials to ensure the pieces become legacy items to be passed down to generations to come. For their latest collections – Slow Life and Day in Africa – Palmy Living partnered with interior designer Ernani Conradi, illustrator Maria Magdalena Atelier and ceramic artist Corinne de Haas, to create a complete ensemble of memorable pieces. The Slow Life collection includes Palmy’s debut couch and lounger, and a low coffee table – all inspired by Scandinavian design; while the Day in Africa collection features two

Each product is designed to make a statement and to add a unique element to your home experience striking AfriScandi-inspired sculptural lamps, woven light shades and a statement server. The new pieces are all designed to make an understated statement on their own, while creating a beautifully curated home when put together. Each piece is designed with at-home moments in mind, with a design style that features neutral colours and shapes without artifice, making the pieces perfect complements to other designs and well-suited to any style of home. Palmy Living was founded in 2018 by Cape Town husband-and-wife duo, Johann and CaraAnn Potgieter. Cara-Ann says, “We believe that homemaking is a journey, not an outcome. We encourage you to be mindful and intentional about curating your space, and to take the time to enjoy the process of homemaking and finding the timeless pieces that will evolve with you.”

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FOR MORE INFO Shop online at palmyliving.com; 072 600 3444; cara-ann@palmyliving.com

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advertorial*

B

lending exclusivity and bespoke architectural design, Izinga Hills unlocks a private domain where you can discover a likeminded community, a secure environment for your family, and experience high-end living. Izinga is a sought-after node with professionals and young families demanding freehold homes. Presently, over 40% of recent buyers within Izinga are between the ages of 18 and 35 years. Izinga Hills presents spacious freehold stands starting from R3,195-million within a secure estate, allowing you and your family to build a legacy home and experience open spaces unlike any other place in the neighbourhood. Since 2016, Izinga Estate has seen great capital appreciation on freehold homes with an average year-onyear growth of 24%. Located on the beautiful North Coast of KwaZulu-Natal, Izinga Hills boasts expansive north facing views of the Indian Ocean and is perched above the bustling hub of uMhlanga,

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Invest in your

FUTURE OFFERING STATE-OF-THE-ART SECURITY, STUNNING VIEWS AND PREMIUM FACILITIES, NOW IS THE TIME TO INVEST IN IZINGA HILLS

offering quick access to worldclass amenities. This premium area conveniently accesses Durban or the North Coast and is a mere 10-minute drive from King Shaka International Airport. Whether you need to

get to the office, drop the kids off at school or grab a bite to eat, access to top-notch retail, medical, recreational, and educational facilities are all on your doorstep. “Not only will you have access

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to leading businesses and retail sectors within uMhlanga, Izinga Hills residents will be able to conveniently access the holistic premium estate facilities – a clubhouse, pool area and outdoor spaces that promote family-friendly time within this secure estate. Outside the estate you have access to a plethora of outdoor activities. The secure precinct boasts open spaces with jogging and cycling trails, a play area for kids, and revitalised wetlands. You couldn’t ask for more around you,” says Trishen Maharaj, codeveloper of Izinga Hills. Izinga Ridge is a controlled, securely managed precinct, with the Izinga Estate Management Association at the helm of the safe environment. In creating the ultimate family neighbourhood, the association focuses on the upkeep of security and of the entire environment within the estate to ensure a consistent and delightful experience for you and your family. Moms and tots can go for sunset walks, or active individuals can enjoy peaceful morning runs in the private park and recreational areas maintained by the association. Additionally, Izinga Hills also offers state-of-the-art security for the holistic estate. Embrace family living and take comfort in knowing you have a 24-hour security presence at the gatehouse and exclusive biometric access. FOR MORE INFO 087 095 2748; info@izingahills.co.za


ON AUCTION: 28 JULY 2021

Modern Warehouse with Good Access and Internal Height Section 14 Mount Edgecombe Industrial Estate, 65 Marshall Drive, Mount Edgecombe

2 x Industrial Properties 6 & 8 Sneezewood Lane, Glen Anil

Extent: ± 1 602 m² | Brilliantly located in a secure park | Fantastic internal height | Large roller shutter door | Vacant occupation | Large warehouse floor, offices, large staff changerooms and a mezzanine level

6 Sneezewood: Site Extent: ± 4 416 m² | ± 2 700 m² Industrial Warehouse/ Factory | 8 Gantry Cranes 8 Sneezewood: Site Extent: ± 3 609 m² | ± 2 600 m² Industrial Warehouse/ Factory | 5 Gantry Cranes

AUCT-001502

LUKE | 071 351 8138

AUCT-001489 | AUCT-001490 VIREND | 071 383 1735

Auction Date & Time: 28 July 2021 | 11h00 | To Bid Visit: auctions.in2assets.co.za | Auction Terms: R50 000 refundable registration deposit. Strictly by EFT. FICA Documents are required | Auctioneer: Andrew Miller

ON AUCTION: 19 AUGUST 2021

One Of The Last Remaining Exclusive Suburban Development Sites 2 Idwala Circle, Izinga Park Estate

2 x Upmarket Homes on One Property 9 Moreland Drive, La Lucia

Extent: ± 12 158 m² | The Silver Ridge Development enjoys a brilliant position along the Umhlanga Ridge | Located in one of South Africa’s fastest growing urban nodes | Permissible bulk ± 12 159 m² | 60 Unit opportunity | Medium density development | Located within the ultra-secure Izinga Park Estate

Extent: ± 1 727 m² | Brilliantly located | 2 Separated upmarket homes | 1 x 3 Bedroom and 1 x 5 bedroom home | Swimming pool | Large manicured garden areas | Either an investment property or end user with extended family

AUCT-001503

LUKE | 071 351 8138

AUCT-001506

LUKE | 071 351 8138

Auction Date & Time: 19 August 2021 | 11h00 | To Bid Visit: auctions.in2assets.co.za | Auction Terms: R50 000 refundable registration deposit. Strictly by EFT. FICA Documents are required | Auctioneer: Andrew Miller

CONTACT US FOR MORE INFO: 0861 444 769 info@in2assets.com www.in2assets.com 063 500 1652

The Rules of Auction & CPA Regulations can be viewed at www.in2assets.com or at Unit 505, 5th Floor, Strauss Daly Place, 41 Richefond Circle, Ridgeside Office Park, Umhlanga Ridge. Bidders must register to bid and provide original proof of identity and residence on registration. The Rules of Auction contain the registration requirements if you intend to bid on behalf of another person or an entity. The above properties are subject to a reserve price and the sale by auction is subject to a right to bid by or on behalf of the owner or auctioneer. In terms of the POPI Act, our contact details have been stated in this document. By responding to such, you hereby opt in for future marketing communication via email, mobile and WhatsApp. Email optout@in2assets.com to be removed from all future communication.


trending*

Celebrate

WOMEN

WOMEN’S MONTH IS A TIME WHEN WE CELEBRATE WOMEN, THEIR UNIQUENESS, THEIR CREATIVITY, THEIR STRENGTH, THEIR ACHIEVEMENTS – EVERYTHING THEY ARE

by Emma, “This isn’t just, ‘girls are better than boys, boys are better than girls’. This is just, ‘everyone deserves a fair chance’.” It’s not just a women issue, it’s a human rights issue. HeForShe is an invitation to men and people of all genders to stand in solidarity with women to create a bold, visible and united force for gender equality. The men of HeForShe aren’t on the sidelines, they are working with women and with each other to build businesses, raise families and give back to their communities. Commit to HeForShe and inspire millions of others to do the same. www.heforshe.org

*Edith Eger

A

ugust is a month when we acknowledge, honour, and commend significant women who, on a daily basis, inspire and strengthen women in our community. We are not simply referring to feminists who are shaping a more gender equal future, but to powerful women who have powerful messages to share. Here are some women worth mentioning.

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HeForShe

Launched by Emma Watson, HeForShe is the United Nations global solidarity movement for gender equality. As quoted

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Edith is a daughter, a sister, a wife, a mother, a grandmother, a greatgrandmother. She is a psychologist, an author and an Auschwitz survivor. She is an incredibly insightful woman who is testament to the resilience of the human spirit and the power of choice in our lives. She has combined her formal education in psychology and her own life challenges to help countless people heal and live full lives. Edith shares her story and strategies to heal in her books The Choice and The Gift, and can be found on social media platforms and podcasts. You’ll be inspired by her capacity to heal, to be positive, to build a beautiful life, despite trauma. As she says, “To celebrate the gift of life is to find the gift in everything that happens, even the parts that are difficult, that we’re not sure we can survive.”

dreditheger.com; The Gift, R239, The Choice, R165, www.takealot.com

Chimamanda Ngozi Adichie

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Nigerian Chimamanda is an awardwinning author, a creative writing coach

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Handbook and her latest book, Evolution Of Goddess – a fun and inspirational exploration of female divinity throughout history that will help you understand and celebrate your inner goddess. www.emmamildon.com; Evolution Of Goddess, R239, www.loot.co.za

200 Women: *Who Will Change

The Way You See The World

and mentor, and an activist for gender equality. In addition to her highly successful novels, Americanah and Purple Hibiscus, she can be found on TED Talks presenting We Should All Be Feminists which unearths the need to transform social beliefs and gender ideas that promote the inequality between men and women. www.ted.com/talks/chimamanda_ngozi_adichie_ we_should_all_be_feminists; www.chimamanda. com; We Should All Be Feminists, R119, www.takealot.com

*Emma Mildon

Crowned by the Huffington Post as a true millennial mystic leader, Emma is a spiritual activist, scribe and a spiritual

philanthropist. She is a voice for the next generation of new thought spiritual thinkers. She educates and inspires people who are committed to taking balanced, conscious action towards global healing.  Emma is an international bestselling author with her first book The Soul Searcher’s

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In 200 Women, 200 women from a variety of backgrounds are asked the same five questions. Their answers are inspiring human stories of success and courage, love and pain, redemption and generosity. From well-known activists, artists, and innovators to everyday women whose lives are no less exceptional for that, each woman shares her unique replies to questions like, “What really matters to you?” and “What would you change in the world if you could?” The interviewees include US Supreme Court Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg, actor and human rights activist Alfre Woodard, and Nobel laureate Jodi Williams, along with those who are making a difference behind the scenes around the world, such as Marian Wright Edelman, head of the Children’s Defence Fund. With responses ranging from uplifting to heart-breaking, these women offer gifts of empowerment and strength inviting us to bring positive change at a time when so many are fighting for basic freedom and equality. Local interviewees include Graca Machel, Caster Semenya, Zelda la Grange, Mpho Tutu van Furth, Hlubi Mboya, Sahm Venter, Joanne Fedler, Ingrid le Roux, Gillian Slovo and Zoleka Mandela, among others. A portion of the project’s revenue will be distributed to organisations devoted to protecting and advancing the rights of women. 200 Women, R206, Exclusive Books

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advertorial*

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Down at the

J

ust three hours drive from Durban, Hluhluwe River Lodge is an intimate forest lodge with sweeping views of Lake St Lucia that is the perfect spot for kicking back, chilling out and reconnecting with nature. Offering fantastic walking and mountain bike trails, as well as an abundance of bird life, the lodge is ideal for those wanting to explore Hluhluwe’s game reserves and wildlife attractions. Comfort and hospitality is number one at this owner managed lodge which offers 12 chalets (two are for families) with break-taking views of the forest or lake as well as Mkhulu’s House – a self-catering option for those wanting more privacy. The thatched roof chalets are tastefully decorated and tick the boxes regarding essential luxury, but also have a subtle “bush” feel that is fitting when one considers the surrounding area. Commanding a fantastic view of False Bay (southern reach of Lake St Lucia), the main lodge incorporates a dining room, bar and a lounge area, while outside an expansive terrace and grassed courtyard offer a 180° view of Lake St Lucia and the river floodplain – the perfect setting for enjoying the amazing home-cooked meals on offer. There are several attractions closeby to suit those wanting to explore. Hluhluwe River Lodge borders the world heritage site

RIVER

NEED TO RECONNECT WITH NATURE? HLUHLUWE RIVER LODGE – WHERE PEACE AND TRANQUILLITY ARE THE ORDER OF THE DAY – AWAITS YOU

iSimangaliso False Bay Park, or if you prefer, safari’s to Hluhluwe can be arranged to view the Big 5. The lodge can prepare a picnic lunch to enjoy on the safari. Anyone with an interest in indigenous trees will feel truly at home at Hluhluwe River Lodge, which is literally surrounded by some of the country’s most remarkable

Hluhluwe River Lodge – no better place to escape to when Covid blues is getting you down tree species. The “sand forest” is an extremely rare forest type containing many trees that are specific to the area. For those keen on walking, there is a wonderful walking trail that meanders through the 80-hectare conservancy, passing through the beautiful sand forest and palid sand veld. There are nyala, red duiker and impala to be seen at close range, and the shy suni – Africa’s second

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smallest antelope – also frequents the forest. A glimpse of this elusive and rare species is a highly soughtafter sighting. For the birdwatcher, the forest is an excellent place to spot the beautiful Narina Trogon, African Broadbill and in the high canopy Neergards Sunbird. Following a walk in the forest, a drive down and along the shoreline of the lake is a must to take in the awesome view across Lake St Lucia through Hell’s Gate and the eastern shore dune forests in the distance. The area offers excellent mountain biking trails literally from the doorstep of your chalet to suit the novice to experienced rider. These wonderfully scenic rides pass through beautiful lakeshore forests with fantastic scenery. Why not book a picnic lunch to end off your morning cycle or some refreshing sundowners before heading back for a gourmet dinner. Hluhluwe River Lodge – no better place to escape to when Covid blues is getting you down. FOR MORE INFO 035 562 0246; info@hluhluwe.co.za; www.hluhluwe.co.za

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property*

D

espite the initial shock to the housing market from the severe lockdown and further uncertainties surrounding the pandemic, the market for residential property – across all price bands – has proven to be one of the country’s more resilient sectors. The aggressive interest rate cuts to near 50-year lows and resultant improved affordability – particularly for first-time buyers and renters – and the change in priorities as a result of the lockdown, catalysed a wave of demand in the market which surprised on the upside. While we cannot know what the long-term effects of the pandemic and associated lockdown will ultimately have on the property market, with the impact of the pandemic far from over, continued changes in the way we live and work can be expected to continue to evolve – with important consequences for the residential property market. The most fundamental change has undoubtedly been the shift to universal remote working. As time passes and, in places, a growing percentage of the population is vaccinated, there is an increasing focus on trying to figure out how we will work in future. Many employers are looking to influence how and where their employees work while reassessing their office space requirements. With the business environment remaining uncertain, this process is

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Adapting to

CHANGE GARETH BAILEY LOOKS AT THE HOUSING MARKET WHICH CONTINUES TO BE IMPACTED BY THE NEW WAY WE LIVE AND WORK likely to play out over the long term – with major structural consequences for the very fabric of our business hubs. What we know at the very least is that demand for office space is likely to be reduced and that perhaps some of that space will be repurposed to residential accommodation. This means there is likely to be an increase in new residential stock in some hubs. In the case

ABOVE: Gareth Bailey, Pam Golding Properties.

Continued changes in the way we live and work can be expected to continue to evolve

of South Africa, a significant portion of housing demand comes from first-time buyers, as a substantial proportion of the population are younger and not yet in the formal housing market. This suggests a possible proliferation of more affordable, mixed-use developments close to public transport and business hubs may well be a key growth sector in the future. In South Africa, the semigration trend of homeowners to the socalled Zoom towns is well documented, with small, often coastal towns, and peripheral suburbs with amenities and healthy municipalities, experiencing a net influx of new residents attracted by the appealing lifestyle and relative affordability of homes in these areas. However, in the US – which is seemingly approaching a level of herd immunity – some of those who had relocated to the country are starting to show the first signs of returning to the cities. It is possible that while some will find they miss their networks of family and friends and the previous lifestyles, they may well opt to return home

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once they have learnt to live within the new parameters created by the pandemic. It is also possible that this may not occur to the same degree in South Africa as the transactional costs of buying and selling are relatively high. Given that the pandemic may well remain with us for some time, it appears likely that we will adopt a more flexible approach to living. For property developers this would suggest a stronger focus on mixed-use developments, which allow a property to be used in many different ways and provide a range of amenities and functions to residents and tenants in these uncertain times. In addition to the pandemic, there is also a growing acceptance of the importance of climate change and the need to move to a net zero carbon environment. Given that South


NORTH DURBAN Durban North office · 031 573 6000 Umhlanga office · 031 561 5300 Umdloti office · 031 568 1299

Durban North / R4.995 million

Ref# 1ND1530065

Bedrooms 4 / Bathrooms 3 / Garages 3 / Feast your eyes on this home that marries the traditional with modern, top of the range amenities. Immaculate, with landscaped garden, sparking pool and spectacular sea views. Belinda du Plessis 082 851 2579

Somerset Park / R3.39 million

Ref# 1ND153770

Bedrooms 3 / Bathrooms 2 / Garages 2 / This serene, tranquil, stepless, pet friendly, secure little haven ticks every box. Open plan living area. Caeserstone kitchen and separate scullery. Double garage has direct access to kitchen. Africa has such a young population, the awareness and willingness to embrace a sustainable lifestyle – and the extent to which cost considerations make selfsufficiency and reduced dependency on governmentsupplied electricity and water – all suggest that the shift to sustainable, green building and lifestyles is likely to rapidly gather momentum. While there is often a focus on different generations and their varying values and needs, it is also important to remember there are still lifecycle similarities. Young adults or first-time buyers are likely to favour a small lock-up-and-go in a business hub, while a young family may consider moving to a Zoom town. Homeowners who are downscaling could go the route of a well-located

sectional title or a small freehold in an estate – such as the retirement component of an estate, or in a small town. These life stages will dictate different housing requirements regardless of the pandemic because if you can live and work anywhere, it makes sense to live somewhere that suits your particular needs, Covid-19 notwithstanding. That said, South Africa’s property market is currently underpinned by first-time buyers wanting security, convenience, affordability and buzz, suggesting that microapartments in business hubs will retain their appeal. While it remains to be seen how the country’s economic recovery gains traction, we believe that solid fundamentals remain in place for ongoing investment in the residential property market.

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Terri Greeff 082 455 6833

La Lucia / R7.995 million

Ref# 1ND1533662

Bedrooms 5 / Bathrooms 6 / Garages 4 / This home has spectacular presence with the wow factor. Spread over 3 levels it has all you require for comfortable living. Easy access to main roads and excellent schools. Joy Chiang 083 256 5993

Umhlanga Rocks / R8.2 million

Ref# 1ND1534390

Bedrooms 3 / Bathrooms 2 / Parkings 2 / Sought after seaside destination in a prime position. Spacious apartment with large balcony and enclosed entertainment room. Lovely sea views and very secure. Delmarie Holing 084 727 2144


last word*

Exposed! Shopping

SECRETS

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THERE’S DEFINITELY AN UPSIDE TO SHOPPING ONLINE WRITES DARREL BRISTOW-BOVEY, EVEN THOUGH YOU CAN’T SQUEEZE THE FRUIT

was explaining to my partner why I don’t like online shopping. “It’s too impersonal,” I said. “I like to squeeze the fruit to see if it’s fresh. I don’t want my peaches to arrive all mushy.” “They wouldn’t be mushy if people like you didn’t go around squeezing them,” said my partner. “Anyway, don’t buy fruit online, if you don’t want. Buy the other stuff.” “No,” I said, stubborn as an old man in a checkout queue querying the price of a can of tuna. “I like to see what I’m buying.” “Do you honestly think it makes a difference to shake the washing powder? What do you think? Some boxes are lighter than others?” “You never know,” I said evasively. I don’t like it when she uses logic against me. “Anyway, living online is inhuman. One of

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the joys of shopping is interacting with other people.” She stared incredulously. “Since when do you interact with other people?” she demanded. “Swearing doesn’t count as interaction.” “If people don’t want to be sworn at, they shouldn’t just stop in the middle of the aisle,” I muttered under my breath. I’ll show her, I thought that afternoon, as I pushed my trolley into my local store. She doesn’t know me as well as she thinks she does. I breezed down the aisles, smiling like a preacher and dispensing “Good afternoons” in every direction. It turns out this is an excellent way to clear space in a crowded store. People edged away; mothers pulled their children closer to their sides. This is

great, I thought. This is the best shopping experience I’ve ever had. I was in the aisle with the toilet rolls, reaching out my hand towards the merchandise, when I heard a hearty “Hello!” I froze. Of all people to bump into, casual acquaintances are the worst. You can ignore good friends and strangers, but casuals demand small-talk. As she jabbered, I felt her eyes lightly scan my trolley for clues to my personality. I brazened it out. There’s nothing you can know about me from three bars of chocolate and a packet of spaghetti. But then … “Don’t let me hold you up from your shopping,” she said. I looked at my hand, still frozen in mid-stretch for the toilet rolls. She waited expectantly. This was a dilemma. If I were to reach for the luxury quilted three-ply she’d think, What a princess! Who does he think he is? Is he stocking the bathrooms at Nkandla? Also, I don’t like three-ply. I think it’s over-rated and ineffective, and lacking in traction. In some situations it’s possible to have too much luxury. But I couldn’t reach for the one-ply either. One-ply isn’t toilet paper, it’s a cry for help. She would look at me with pity and contempt and think, Why doesn’t he love himself? If he doesn’t love himself, how can he expect anyone else to love him? But two-ply? How pedestrian! How middle of the road! I don’t want her to sit at her book clubs or dinner parties saying, “Oh, you know Darrel? I thought he was quite interesting but then I discovered he’s just a two-ply kind of guy.” I don’t want anyone to know I’m a twoply kind of guy. In fact, I don’t want anyone to know I use toilet paper at all! These are private matters! I arrived home and my partner looked in puzzlement at the packet containing three bars of chocolate and a packet of spaghetti. “Where’s all the rest of the shopping?” she said. “I’ll get it now,” I said, turning on the computer.

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Custom Solutions To Any Entrance GATE & DOOR CONTROL BELIEVES THAT EXCELLENCE IS AN ATTITUDE - AND HAVE LIVED UP TO THIS SLOGAN FOR THE PAST 30 YEARS

 Garage door installers, automation, repairs and services We supply and install a range of 100% Aluminium, Meranti wooden garage doors, fiberglass and steel/Aluzinc garage doors. We also carry the quality range of roll up WISPECO garage doors.  Gates manufactured to create beautiful entrances Driveway gates for all types of properties are manufactured from both Balau wood and wrought iron.  Specialising in entrance solutions for

gated estates and business parks Manual or automatic booms with a GSM intercom system for hassle free communication or an automated, commercial gate, manufactured from wood, galvanised steel or clear-view panels.  We offer after-sales service and maintenance on all installations Service level agreements available for optimal functioning.

Visit the only Gate & Garage Door Showroom in Durban at 632 Chris Hani Road Durban North!

www.gateanddoor.co.za | 031 563 3481 | vanessa@gateanddoor.co.za


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